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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00123
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 14, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00123
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST


Monticello


138TH YEAR NO.30,50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 2006


Hispanic Presence




IS Growing Locally


EASTER BUNNY had a trial run before the Sunday holi-
day, when he visited Brynwood Center last week and
helped prepare for the egg hunt. With the Bunny is
Makenzie Holmes. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Although no demonstration
took place locally in support of
immigration law reforms -- as
happened in countless cities
across the state and the country
Monday -- a Hispanic presence
is viable and growinghere.
The evidence is mainly anec-
dotal (the statistical data is not
readily available). Even so, it
supports the perception that
the Hispanic population is
growing.
"It's far more than a percep-
tion,"'says Larry Halsey, direc-
tor of the Extension Office.
"It's real."
Some of the anecdotal evi-
dence:
A growing visibility of His-
panics in the community:"' .-
Go to the bank on a Friday
afternoon or go to the field be-
hind the old high school any
Friday evening and you will
see 30 to 40 Hispanics playing
soccer, Halsey says.


More and more too, he says,
-he is having to do 'pesticide
safety training classes in Span-
ish, because of the growing
number of Hispanics in the ag-
riculture sector.
SLastly, he points to the ex-
panding ethnic food section in
the local Winn Dixie, a result
of greater public demand for
these products.
Kim Barnhill, director of the
Health Department, also has
noted a growing Hispanic
presence in her sector.
"We have a translator and we
recently had to increase the
number of her hours," Barnhill
says. "We have definitely seen
S.'in irci:,:e .cin the number of
Hispanics (we serve)."
Phil Barker, superintendent
of schools, agrees..
He says the school system
has seen a small influx of His-
panics students in the current
year, particularly mt the ele-


mentary level.,
"It's my recollection that back
in the early 90s, they would
come and leave," Barker says.
"They were children of mi-
grant workers. But now, some
are staying."
He puts the number of His-
panic children who entered the
school system in the neighbor-
hood of between "23 and 28".
It's true that Hispanics have
always been part of the social
fabric, if oftentimes they chose
to keep a low profile because
of their legal status. The differ-
ence now is their more visible
and permanent presence.
That greater visibility is due
to their greater number in the
communityy' 'points out rted
Beshears, almost sublimely.
And the reason for the
greater number, he adds, is that
the economy is good.
"There's more opportunities
in agriculture and they're fill-


ing the demand," says
Beshears, owner of Simpson's
Nurseries, which employees a
great many Hispanics in its op-
eration.
Indeed, about 50 percent of
Simpson's workforce, which
consists of about 130 employ-
ees, is comprised of Hispanics,
according to Beshears.
"They're very willing, capa-
ble and enthusiastic workers,"
he says.. "They have a good
work ethic.""
, Hispanics' good work ethic
is a quality commonly cited by
employers.
Beshears expounds on the
theme.
"Their work, ethic is some-
thing that you haven't seen for
a while in the American work-
force," he says.
Beshears sees a need for the
United States to gain control of
its border. At the same time,
he understands the important
contribution that immigrants
provide to the agricultural
economy.
(See Hispanic Page 9)


Quality Development


Slated For Monticello


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Any doubts about develop-
ment coming to Monticello
can be put to rest.
Following the lead of devel-
oper Riley Palmer and his
Crooked Creek Subdivision
just west of town, a Tampa-
based group is seeking to an-
nex 273 acres into the city,
which would bring their total
holdings to 420 acres.
The idea is to develop the
property, which extends from
Coopers Pond on the south to
Willow Road on the north, into
a high-end development.
Dick Corbett and Bob Sierra,
nationally known developers
are the individuals behind the
proposal, which the Local


iAl


Planning Agency (LPA) heard ity that we had at the Interna-
Tuesday night. _. tional Plaza in Tampa'," Cor-


City Will Be
Annexing
273 Acres

"Our goal is to bring a
quality development," Corbett
told planners,. adding that he
has a long association with the
community and with the Gerry
family, founder of the Gerry
Medical Clinic.
Corbett, in conjunction with
Sierra, developed the Interna-
tional Plaza in Tampa, a shop-
ping center reportedly rated
the 13th best in the country -
and the best on the west coast
of Florida.
"I got Bob (Sierra) and said,
'You can bring the same qual-


'hb.r


EMILY ANDERSON, city clerk, and members Patricia
Erwin and Steve Rissman of the Local Planning Agency
review a developer's plans. (News Photo)


bett told planners. "Bob looked
at the property and said, 'If we
can do something of quality, it
will be exciting."
Corbett said the name of the
company he and Sierra
formed, which will develop the
property, is Monticello Planta-
tions, LLC.
Clay Thompson, a Tampa-
based engineer who works on
projects with Sierra, further as-
sured planners that the devel-
opment would be an asset to
the city.
"We are very experienced in
the development of master
plan communities," Thompson
said. "We are focused on high
quality projects. We are not
going to come in and get out.
We're here for the long term."
Besides the 273 acres that
Monticello Plantation LLC
wants to annex into the city,
the partnership owns an ad-
joining parcel that's already in
the city.
The latter property, which
takes in the former stockyard
off Cherokee Street and runs
behind the old high school,
will be part of the
development.
The LPA recommended ap-
proval of the annexation, sub-
ject to the terms of the
agreement worked out and ap-
proved by the City Council.
* Last week, the council -- in a
separate action -- approved a
request from Monticello Plan-
tations for an extension of the
deadline for submission of a
large-scale Comprehensive
Plan amendment to May 31.
The original deadline was
March 31.


C`V "-~ws s


NEW PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY signs going up in the
downtown district remind motorist that people on foot
have the right-of-way, by state law. (News Photo)


Enterprise Zone,


Bed Tax Coming


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Two of the more exciting
projects that the Economic De-
velopment Council (EDC) is
pursuing is establishment of an
enterprise zone and adoption
of a tourism development tax.
That's the word from EDC
Director Julie Conley, who re-
ported the group's latest doings
to the County Commission last
week.
Conley defined an enterprise
zone as a geographic area spe-
cifically designated for eco-
nomic development or revitali-
zation.


She said parcels comprising
enterprise zones do not have to
be contiguous, but the total
area can not exceed 20 acres.
Businesses and other com-
mercial operations within en-
terprise zones are eligible for
tax breaks, tax rebates and cor-
porate credits, among other
benefits.
"At the same time, a lot of
responsibilities go with it,"
Conley said.
As examples of the latter,
she mentioned the require-
ments to hire an administrator
and to educate the public on
the desirability of such zones.
The EDC has scheduled a
(See Bed Tax' Page 7)


New Signs

Alert Cars

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

'An eye-catching pedestrian
crosswalk sign was erected at
the crosswalk located at North
Jefferson and Dogwood
Streets Tuesday.
The sign was approved by
the City Council and DOT.
City Clerk Emily Anderson
said the signs seem to be
working well and the need to
place one on the north side of
town was far greater than on
any other side.
"Since Dogwood Street now
has a greater amount of park-
ing, the pedestrian traffic in
that area is much more con-
gested, especially at lunch
time," said Anderson.
"And the traffic coming
through town from the north,
has a tendency to go faster be-
cause there are no lights to
slow them down.
Anderson added that shortly
after the sign was erected, she
noticed that most if not all ve-
hicles approaching the area,
stopped when no one was in
the crosswalk.
"We'd much rather have
them stop than to have them
barreling through," said An-
derson. "People will get used
to the sign soon."
She added that those driving
trucks sometimes don't seem
to understand the dilemma of
someone in the crosswalk
looking both ways and being
unable to cross.
"We'll see what the reaction
to the sign is before we have
to order six more," said An-
derson.
"It's a state law that traffic
has to stop for pedestrians on
(See Signs Page 9)


Evidence Anecdotal

But Pretty Reliable


.~.. ~.. .-. I I


1. .. .. I







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006

ACA Wins 2nd Place

In NFCC Art Show


Aucilla Christian Academy
won the second place trophy
for overall school performance
at the 29th annual NFCC Art
Show, recently.
More than 150 high school
students in grades 9-12 dis-
played their works in the Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium, and vied
for prizes.
Students competed within
their own grade levels and
schools competed for overall
team trophies.
Two Aucilla students, Re-
bekah Falk, and Suzanne
Walker, received Merit
Awards for outstanding two
dimensional artworks.
These works will be dis-
played in the NFCC Art Gal-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Plans continue to solidify for-
the Caribbean Home Town
Get Down, slated for 5-9
p.m., Friday, May 26.
Spokesperson Ericka Im-
brunone said the upcoming
Home Town Get Down "is
during Memorial Day week-
end, and will help to kick off
the holiday weekend early."
She added that the mer-
chant's attire for the event will
include Caribbean, Hawaiian
shirts, grass skirts, shorts,
beach wear, flip-flops and the
like.
Usually during the event,
Dogwood Street is lined with
vendors of every description.
During the Caribbean Home
Town Get Down, both Dog-
wood and Cherry Streets will
be lined with vendors.
"We are open to all new
vendors," said Imbrunone.
She added that the booth fee
is $10 for the event.
"Business owners will be,
dressed in grass skirts and
leis, and businesses along with
the area, will be decorated with
a Caribbean theme," said Im-
brunone.
"We're still trying to con-
firm a band to play Caribbean
music," she added.
Besides the 50/50 cash raf-
fle, activities and music, Im-


lery during May, 2006.
Ribbons were awarded
based on grade level and me-
dium.
ACA winners include:
Courtney Connel; first in
painting; Jana Connel, first in
fiber, second in mixed medea;
Alfa Hunt, first in fiber, Holly
Jones, first in painting.
Melissa Martin, first in
black and white drawing, Ka-
lyn Ownes, first in mixed me-
dia and second in black and
white drawing, Michaela Roc
canti, second in fiber, first in
painting; and Miranda Wider,
second in sculpture.
Linda Rose is the art instruc-
tor at Aucilla Christian.


AUCILLA students won second place school trophy at Standing, L-R: Corie Smith, Serena Harvin, Jennifer
NFCC Art Show. Pictured are L-R: kneeling Angie Stein- Pitts, Chris Tuten, Casey Gunnels, instructor Linda
berg, Suzanne Walker, Keri Brasington, Alex Searcy. Rose, Melissa Martin, Holly Jones, Taylor Rykard.
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Book Sale

Planned

At Library


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Friends of the Library met
in March at the Library to dis-
cuss the revision of the By-
laws and the upcoming Book
Sale planned for Saturday,
April 29, at the library.

Book donations are now be-
ing accepted, and may be
brought to the Library.

Contact Book Sale Chairman
Eleanor Hawkins at 997-2863
for books that need to be
picked up.


Happy astr fom avi, enandth tafat-l.~


SEaster Sunday Brunch 'Buffet





10am -4pm t I

Baked Honey Ham Roast Beef, Au Jus Carving Station
Peel & Eat Shrimp Assorted Chicken Dishes


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Julie's Rice Pilaf Baked Macaroni & Cheese
Assorted Veggies Assorted Dinner Rolls
Fresh Salad Bar Assorted Pies & Cakes
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A Tallahassee Tradition. fior (hOver S26 VRanr i tf 1Qo7


+ *****.*******-


brunone said a "Dress Your
Pet" contest will be
conducted, a limbo contest,
as well as many other family
oriented activities.
"The limbo contest will go
on throughout the evening,"
said Imbrunone. "And will be
done by the process of elimi-
nation by how low can you
go."
Another contest on tap will
be the pre-carved watermelon
contest. The melons will be
judged on originality.
All contest times have yet to
be determined.
Also, Monticello Caribbean
Home Town Get Down T-
shirts will be available for
purchase, along with a pleth-
ora of vendor items.
She added that the winners
of all contests will receive
fresh flower leis, and that com-
plimentary plastic leis would
be given to the children who
attend the event, and will also
be available for sale to adults.

Imbrunone said the wheels
are continuing to turn and co-
ordinators still have some
time to come up with even
more creative ideas to make
this the best family oriented
time in town.
Anyone with ideas, or wish-
ing to volunteer for the event
can call Imbrunone at 997-
2015.
Interested vendors can con-
tact Jena at 997-5080.


Cox Soul Food To

Offer Easter Dinners


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Easter Dinner for the elderly
and needy will be held 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Sunday at Cox's
Soul Food located at 490
South Railroad Street.
Cox, in collaboration with
Greater Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church, and Harvest
Center Church will offer a
meal complete with baked
chicken, turkey, or ham, col-


lard greens, cornbread
dressing, candied yams, green
bean casserole, macaroni and
cheese, sweet potato pie, a va-
riety of cakes.
Contact Gloria Cox-Jones,
coordinator at 997-2359 for
pick-up information.

Churches, groups, organiza-
tions, and individuals are al-
ways needed to pick up and
deliver dinners to the persons
in need and to help with the
preparations of the meals.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006 PAGE 3


JCHS Brittany Harvey Earns

Governor's All Star Award


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Biittany Harvey, 16, a Jef--
ferson County High School
student, was one of 67 high
school juniors receiving the


2005-2006 Governor's High
School All-Star Award last
week, during a luncheon at
the.Governor's Mansion.
Governor Jeb Bush and Lt.
Governor Toni Jennings pre-
sented the awards.
STo be selected for the a\\ jrd,


a committee from each of the
67 county schools, including
at least one teacher, one ad-
ministrator, one parent one
community member and two
high school seniors, narrow
the field of candidates to the
final nominee.


Sgt. Roger Murphy TO Leave

MPD TO Accept ABT Position
He graduated in 1987.
FRAN HUNT .. Murph .has undergone
Staff Writer much law enforcement spe-
cialty training. during his ca-
SCity Police Criminal Inves-_ reer, including drug
"igaions Sgt. Roger Murphy investigations, iinterview-s and
has resigned, to accept'a posi- interrogations, homicide
tion as Lt. for Alcoholic Bev- school, sex crime school,
erages and Tobacco (ABT), crime scene investigation
crime, scene in\estgations.
working accreditation and in- and more. "Much too many to.
temal affairs. list," said Murphy.,
Murphy worked with City In his years,with MPD, Iur-.
Police in many. capacities for : phy has worked patrol. in\es-
19 years and five months. i nations, seed as a patrol
He w b i h n litigation, served as a patrol
He willbegin his new posi- Sgt.. v.as an in estigator for
tion April 28.' the drug task force, ser ed as
MPD hired Murphyin 1986 a '.%atch commander. a patrol
and, he immediately began division commander, and as
law enforcement. training at criminal ini estigati' e Sgt.
the former Pat Thomas Law l Murph, has also been serv-
Enforcement Academ, in- ing as a criminal justice in-.
Tallahassee, presently, TCC. MURPHY structorfor police, corrections
and probation ,and parole at
NFCC since 2000. He will
Consu er Handbooks continue to serve as an in-
structor in his new career \. ith
NOw Available Online Ts ears s local law
preventing identity theft, un- enforcement officer. Murphy
.FRAN HUNT derstanding credit, resol\ina has been involved in hun-
Staff Writer problems after a purchase, dreds of arrests and investiga-
and much more. tions, ever, thing from traffic
Family and Consumer sci---- New information is in- nations to murder.
ences Ageht Heidi Copelancd e, i t s "It's been almost 2:i ears of ,
reports that the new 2006 clouded about Medicare pre- unforgenable experiences in
reports that the new 2006 scription drug ,plans, free ,home to% n
Consumer Action Handbook c t rpor, my. home to" n. said
is now available. rph. "I .as a working with
Sign-ups to receive the free There is also an updated list ,a ery good group of people
handbook are now being of addresses, phone numbers here, working wi:h people
taken. online at: and web sites for corporate I've known all my life.
Shnp: \\v\\w conrsumineraction.g consumer affairs offices. "I felt like i"was really serv-
o-v/caw_orderhandbook.shtml BBB's, state and local govern- ing my people; I enjoyed the
The handbook is an everyday ment listings, national con-: work here and I will miss it,"
guide to being a smart shop- summer organizations, Federal said Murphy. "But Monti-
per and is full of helpful tips Agencies and others who can cello is my home town and it
about buying a car or home,__ help. always will be."


Sausage Dog Fundraiser


Cited to meet the Governor
and Lt. Governor and have
her picture taken with them.
Harvey is the daughter of
Jacquelyn and James Harvey
of Monticello.


In addition to the luncheon,
All-Stars visited the Capitol,
participated in a mock senate
session and received an award
certificate and a signed photo
of the Governor.


The criteria for selecting the
winners includes: academic
performance, earning at least
a 3.0 GPA. (Harvey main-
tains a 3.4); maintaining good
'conduct both inside and out-
.side of the classroom, leader-
ship, and participating'in ex-
tracurricular events such as
athletics, enrichment pro-
grams and school clubs.
Harvey is in her first year of',
the JCHS Key Club, has been
a member of 4-H since she
was in the fourth grade, has
served on the JCHS \arsit.
softball team as a right-fielder
for.two years, and she is ac-.
ti\.e in her church southh group
at New Bethel AME.
She volunteerss at the Tal-
.lahassee memorial Hospital
'Child Care Center.
'She was prompted to volun-
teer at TMH when her cousin
began volunteering there.
"I wanted to do it and see
what it was like to work in :a
Shealth-related field," said Har-
vey ."I want to major in the
health care field and become
a pediatrician because I like
kids."
She added that \\hen she
was ad\ sed that she \',as cho-
sen to receive the holior, she
was shocked. "I couldn't be-
Ihe e that I was nominated to
represent Jefferson Courint
High School," said Har e).
"I was able to bring one per-
son \.ith me to. the luncheon
and I brought my miom. She
said that the e\ent was one
she \,. would ne\ er forget." -
She added that she was ex-


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DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Morgan's Garage Relay
For Life team will hold a Sau-
sage Dog lunch 1 la.m. 2p.m.
Friday.
The lunch will include "chips,
a cold drink, and dessert for a
donation of $4.
The fundraiser will be held
at CarQuest Auto Parts on
South Jefferson Street..
The County Relay For Life
over night event will be held
Friday and Saturday, April 21
and 22 on the track of the for-
mer JCHS on Water Street.


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Hwy9So
Thmsil


The Republican Executive Committee
ofJefferson County
Cordially invites you to meet

Senator Tom Lee
President of the Senate
andl
Representative Joe Negron
Chalirm;ui f the House Appropriations
Committee

Monday, Apiil 17
g on

6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
S. at/
Willow Pond Farm
West Lake Rc;uad
'MOlnucell,, FIorida

Rc ireshmeits & Hors d'oeaures to be served

.Please RS\VP
S' 850 228-l4-10o
chair mna 'Jieffersofii gop.co ilii

Dri\ine Directions .
R. irn it .ie l'ir .ri, '..*iur CL''unr-.-'u'e i imler;ec -.nr, o io US.90 and US 19.)
Take US 1'. ..riM ir..nm ihe .ir unh>..rue i.,r I I "' rt .i nule turn left on Lake
R, .Jd ji. ,. 1 2.' nile iun lie .:.ii e;il Lake Road jnJ g-* I and 1/10j miles;
i, 'T. rih i -,r..ii T I Rc'.i. R .id p. ,,cr,: ,ri ,Mi.i .tlbr ci-. J -nl r V'/ill.-,
i-,rid .i ilie n im iniersection. F-,II.: i. pIrkiii, ji e k \ ll:.\ '.rJnd
SGeneral Store, .1 \~ 'll,..i, i'.mriJ R '

Pjid F:.r b', i' lie cpiblic.i Pin, .:1 Jleler .n County,
N ., n il '. '.'.', ll h el r:,.ri r .p c ifm








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14,2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior. Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello. Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Plan Supports


Military in Iraq


From Our Photo File

u^ ~_.***-sit '


AT A WORKSHOP in Sept., 1990,
state's department of fish biology
how "electroshock" can stun fish
(News File Photo)


at Bentley's Lake House, Charles Cichra of the
explained to Extension Office's Larry Thompson
for capture and study, without harming them.


Many Americans have found
a new way to show American
troops serving in Iraq since
2003 that they still care and
that these ser\ icemen and serv-
icewomen haven't gotten lost
in the shuffle.
"When I toured Iraq in 2005,
I realized that e\en doing,
something little to express our
latitude can go a long wa\."
said cotunir\ music artist Aaron
Tippin. national spokesperson
for the Armed Services 'iMCA
(ASY'I CA. ) :
"These people are fighting
for our freedom the least we
can do is show our apprecia-
[lin," he said.
ASYMCA the nation's
leading nonprofit organization
providing support services toI
miliar,, personnel and families .
- encourages Americans to
show .'upport for ihc troops. ....
Americans can.show their
support through the Send a CD
to a Soldier program. By visit-
ing
www.sendacdtoasoldier.com,
you can donate a copy of Patri-
otic Country 2,. to :be included
in care packages and distrib-
uted to the troops by-
ASYMCA.
The compilation CD includes.
country music hits by famed
musicians, including Hank
Williams Jr., Willie Nelson,
Lonestar, Aaron Tippin, Ala-'
bama, Johnny Cash and Elvis
Presley.
ASYMCA programs help


families, of service members
cope with the realities of mili-
tary life by offering support
services such as child care, vo-
cational training and health
and wellness assistance
"COne of the hardest things a
ser\ ice member will ever do is
leave his or her family," ex-
plained retired General Nor-
man Schwarzkopf. ho
commanded the troops in De-
sert Shield and Desert Storm.
Gen SchWarzkopf said hie
held his subordinate com-
manders personally responsi-
ble for both the service
members under their command
and those service members'
families.
"I found that knowledge of
their families' health back
.,home contributed significantly
to the military readiness and
prepaieedjies.i of The..sold irs.".
Sch\alizkopf added. "It was
the soldiers who were most
preoccupied with their fami-
lie;' well-being who were least
able to focus on the job at
hand.'
ASYMCA, he'said,, provides
the kind of support our mili-
tary personnel and their fami-
lies deserve.
;Tax-deductible, donations to
ASYMCA can be made by
phone at (800) 597-1260, on-
line at www.ASYMCA.org or
by mail: Armed Services
YMCA; 6359 Walker Lane,
Suite 200; Alexandria, VA
'223.10.


Fraud Doesn't


Respect Borders


Canada and the United States
share similar cultures, enthusi-
asm for sports and a common
border .
Unfortunately, the border is
proving to be 'no barrier to,
fraud schemes that targei \Ic--
tims in both countries.
Armed with the Internet arid
cell phones, con artists target
victims many of them older
Americans in- these cross-
border schemes. Using false
names and electronic tricks,
they hide who and where they
real ly: are.
The good news is that the
U.S. Postal Inspection Service
is working with Canadian law
enforcement to stop these
crimes. Prevention, however,
is still the best medicine. Chief
Postal Inspector L.R. Heath
encourages consumers to pro-
tect themselves by following
these tips: '
Be wary of anything that
promises large sums of money,
such as sweepstakes or lottery
winnings in exchange for your
advance payment, donation or
investment.
Don't be pressured into mak-
ing a decision about an offer.
Check it out first.
Be cautions about businesses
that try to conceal their mail-


ing :ddres-es and phone.num-
bers, and evade questions
about their operations.
Be aware that if you respond
to even one'of these "offers,"
your name will be added to a.
"mooch"' list by these crimi-
nals
These are contact lists. simi--
lar to those used by legitimate
businesses, that track people
who have fallen for scams in.
the past.
They are boughtand sold by
these criminal enterprises and
you can count on being tar-
geted again.
The Postal Service's Con-
sumer Advocate Delores J.
Killette said. "Older Ameri-
cans need to be educated to
avoid becoming victims of
consumer fraud and convinced
that it's okay to say 'no' to so-
licitations. But their children,
many of whom are baby
boomers, also need to play a
role, They need to keep an eye
on parents and grandparents to
protect them from scammers.
Fighting fraud truly is a family
matter."
Educated families are the
best defense against these
fraudsters if they recognize the
warning signs. (NAPS)


* Short Takes & Other Notions


BY'MERRY ANN FRISBY

Sylvester the Cat, "T%\eet,
Bird's7' nemesis. who Tweety:
calls 'Puddy Tat' is one:of my
.favorite cartoon characters.
Each' year I recall S\lhester's
lament "Spring is sprung, the
grass is riz I wonder x here da
birdies is?"
Well this year I know. The
male Goldfinches at the feed-
ers are-.bright-neon yellow..
They are in full breeding color,
strutting and singing: "I'm too
sexy for my feathers, too sexy
for my feathers..." The. grace-
ful Swallowtail kites have re-
turned, swooping looping arcs
about our fair town. Today I
saw an Indigo Bunting, blue as
all get out. Some birds are al-
ways here depending on the,
season. This year they are here
in force.


In hurricane-ra aged Nlissis-
sippi, there was a noticeable
lack of birds. I guess they have
no place to .live, because so
many trees were destroyed. To
an old bird lover like me, it
was a sad silence in the morn-
ings Tree lined streets are
home to many birds in down-
ltown Monticello I see migra-
tor, birds often and I only live
three blocks from the Court-
house.
Keeping our tree scapes and
other things we love about our
town was the subject of an im-
portant recent meeting at the
Opera House. I attended "De-
signing Healthy Communities"
sponsored by our local Health
SDepartment. It was well done,
many thanks Kim Barnhill.
S One of the speakers named
Dan Burden said, "Cities exist
to maximize exchanges." It
struck me that is exactly what


we do downtown. Exchange
money, goods, ideas and greet-,
ings. It looks like we have that
part covered.
I suggest one small item of
improvement, We need at least
some bicycle racks., Increas-
ingly I see people riding bic\-
cles downtown The sidewalks
are already in poor condition.
and thel aie narrow. I presuine
that re-doing the sidewalks
might be in some future for us-
Y few bike racks in the nor-
.parking spaces might solve
part of the problem. .
At this same meeting, I met a
fairly new resident named
Winston Lee. He and his farm-
ily have located here and boy
should, we be glad. He has
wonderful credentials, and he
has designed a plan for im-
proving the .downtown
streetscape.
This plan does not involve


removing an\ parking spaces.
or anything drastic. It just util-
izes some space that we do not
use now anyway. Lee is pursu-
ing grant money to make this
happen. I hope this idea does
not fade away. Stop by City
Hall and ask to see the plan it's
a beaut!
Presenter Dan Burden com-
mented that children today
onl\ go one-nintl as far as \%e
did \when %te ere g',row ing up.
Parents'apparentl\ do not see"'
the streets as safe an, more
Could this possibly 'have a
connection to obesity in.kids?
Like some throwback to Oz-
zie and Harriett days, our
streets are safe. Our kids can
and do ride bikes and skate-
boards and roam all over town.
Burden commented that \we
seem to have more concern for
our free-range chickens than
(See Short Takes Page 5)


New Drugs To Treat Cancer


There may, be new hope for
many cancer patients, iheir
caregivers and loVed ones.
That's because America's
research-based pharmaceutical
companies are today develop-
ing nearly 400 new medicines
to treat cancer, according to a
survey of ongoing research
conducted by the Pharmaceuti-
cal Research and Manufactur-
ers of America (PhRMA).
Many of the medicines now
in development represent po-
tential breakthrough cancer
treatments, while others in-
volve possible new uses for
existing medicines.,
The medicines in develop-
ment are all either in clinical
trials or under review by the
Food and Drug


:' Administration. They include:
S62 for lung cancer, the lead-
ing cause of cancer death in
the United States;
49 for breast cancer, which is
expected to strike more than
20Q,0.00 American women this
year;
50 for prostate cancer, which
is expected to kill more than
30,000 American men this
year; and

35 for colorectal cancer, the
third most common, cancer in
Both, men and women in the
U.S,
Other potential medicines
target kidney Cancer, pancre-
atic cancer, brain cancer, skin
Cancer, ovarian cancer and oth-
ers. In addition, companies are


working on new treatments to
improve the quality of life for
people undergoing cancer
treatment.
"Anyone fighting cancer or
anyone who has beaten it
knows the importance of these
medicines and this research,"
said Billy Tauzin, PhRMA
president and CEO who is also
a cancer survivor.-
"Sometimes, the hope that one
of these new medicines will
work for you is what keeps
you fighting the disease."
Recent cancer research ef-
forts have resulted in several
new treatments. Forexample,
a medicine to treat metastatic
colorectal cancer is the first
treatment approved that pre-


vents the ,formation of new
blood vessels that provide tu-
mors with oxygen and nutri-
ents.
There's also a medicine for
the treatment of nonsmall-cell
lung cancer that inhibits the
formation and growth of tumor
cells.
Research into possible new
cancer cures and treatments is
today being conducted by as
many as 178 biopharmaceiti-
cal companies as well as by the
National Cancer Institutes.
The Pharmaceutical Re-
search and Manufacturers of
America represents the coun-
try's leading pharmaceutical
research and biotechnology
companies.


Western States Beckon


As summer approaches,
there's only one way to beat
the heat lakeside!
According to a 2005 sum-
mers survey conducted by the
Travel Industry Association of
America (TIA), over 70 per-.
cent of Americans will spend
their summer splashing in
lakes or heading to the beach
for their vacation..
Whether you're planning a
weekend away or spontane-
ously hitting the road, some of
the best lakeside vacation des-
tinations reside within our own
National Park system.
"The U.S. National Park sys-


tem offers a wide variety of
destination and accommoda-
tion options at some of the
most magnificent lakes in the
country," said Sheri Smack, a
spokesperson for ARAMARK
Parks & Resorts, an authorized
.concessionaire of the National
Park Service. "We strongly
suggest planning your next va-
cation at one of our national
treasures."
Several of the National Parks
located in the Western states
provide unique lakeside vaca-
tion options.
Often referred to as Amer-
ica's favorite house boating


destination, Lake Powell, lo-
cated on the border of Arizona
and Utah in the Glen Canyon
National Recreation Area, of-
fers a wide array of houseboats
for rental, including the new
luxury-class, 75-foot Excur-
sion, featuring a fireplace, an
eight-person hot tub, home
theater system, six staterooms,
gas BBQs, waterslide and GPS
auto -tracking satellite system.
Additional houseboat rentals
include the Discovery- and
Adventurer-class houseboats
that sleep up to 12 individuals
and include all the comforts of
home.


With thousands of miles of
shoreline to explore and rising
lake levels, Lake Powell's
most popular water-based ac-
tivities include powerboating,
fishing, wakeboarding, jet ski-
ing, water skiing, tubing kay-
aking and water trampolines.
All equipment is available for
rent at Lake Powell. Resorts &
Marinas, and personalized
water-based instruction is also
available.
Lake Powell is also home to
Rainbow Bridge Nlational
Monument, offering visitors

(See Western States Page 5)


. Opinion & Comment


I II








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Writer Cites DCA Report


On Rezoning Of 450 Acres


Dear Editor:
The Department of Commu-
nity Affairs (DCA) has issued
its objections, recommenda-
tions, and conclusions in its re-
port about the Comprehensive
Plan Amendments approved
by the County Commission,
which plan to rezone 450 acres
of agricultural land to residen-
tial in Waukeenah, and on US
19.


Concerns listed in the DCA
report include:
Portions of the site(s) are se-
verely limited for the use of
septic systems and are vulner-
able to surface acquifer con-
tamination.
One parcel contains 77 acres
of forested wetlands, which are
classified as priority one for
conservation.
The proposed amendment


was not supported with ade-
quate data to demonstrate the
ability of transportation facili-
ties to support the proposed
land use.
The County has not provided
data to support the need for al-
most 400 more residential
units.
No data was submitted to
support that the additional
units would not have an ad-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Many no-bum warning flags-
have been posted in the
county, and the Division of
Forestry warns residents of
the extreme danger and possi-
ble expense that can result, if
residents insist on burning.
Forestry Operations Admin-
istrator for the Tallahassee
Center Brian Johnson, said
that currently, the Division of
Forestry is denying all burn-
ing permits except those
which are dealing with heavy
equipment for site prepara-
tions, piles only.
"We urge residents to wait
to bur their yard debris, we
are not authorizing any acre-
age bums, and we don't rec-
ommend barrel burns at this
time," said Johnson.
He added that though the
fire may be contained in a
barrel, with the recent gusts of
wind all it would take would
be one ember to start a wild


fire.
"With the frequent winds
and low humidity, it's a per-
fect combination for wild
fires," said Johnson. He ex-
plained that currently on the
Keetch-Byrum Drought
Index, which ranges from 0
(under water) to 800 (desert-
like conditions), this area is at
500.
"We are currently parched"


said Johnson. "We're advis-
ing residents to wait on yard
and debris bums until after
we start getting a lot of rain:

"It's drier now than I re-
member seeing it in a long
time," he added. "And the rain
that we got over the weekend
was just enough to hold the
dust down and it gives people
a false sense of security."


verse impact on existing public
school facilities.
:The amendment sites contain
archaeological and/or historic
resources.
The Jefferson County Com-
mission will conduct a public
hearing on April 20, 2006, at
their evening meeting, to de-
termine whether they will
adopt, adopt with changes, or
will not adopt the proposed
amendments.
It appears that there are still
many issues and concerns to
be addressed on these two
amendments, which were pre-
viously approved by "the
County Commission vote of 4-
1.
The entire DCA report may
be viewed at:
www.dca.State.Fl. us.
Sincerely,
Wayne Searcy

Short Takes
(Continued From Page 4)
our free-range kids.
Let us Monticellans jealously
guard the beauty and peace of
this town. We welcome new-
comers and look forward to the
commerce and liveliness they
bring. Newcomers also bring
new and exciting ideas. Let us
all be vigilant and engaged.
We need to reject the un-
workable and promote im-
provement. Lee's plan looks
like icing on our downtown
cake.


Western States


(Continued From Page 4)
the opportunity to explore one
of the Southwest's natural
wonders. Full-day and half-
day boat tours operate daily
from Wahweap Marina.
For those planning a getaway
in the Pacific Northwest, Lake,
Quinault is nestled among the
lush Olympic National Forest,
offering myriad of activities
from fishing to canoeing.
Built in 1926 within the heart
of one of only three temperate
rain forests in the world, Lake
Quinault Lodge is a rustic, his-
toric retreat offering lakeside
lodging, and spanning views of
the forests.
Visitors can explore the lake
by renting canoes, kayaks,
rowboats, or by scenic boat
tours, which are available
through the summer and offer
breathtaking views of the lake
and surrounding Olympic


Mountains. Lake Quinault is
also a great place for fishing,
with an abundance of trout,
salmon and steelhead, and
guided and non guided fishing
excursions can be arranged.
Located on the south shore
of Lake Tahoe just four miles
from Stateline, Nevada,
Zephyr Cove Resort & Marina
is an historic recreational desti-
nation offering everything
from camping and lakeside
cabins to boating and water-
craft rentals and cruises to Em-
erald Bay.
The Zephyr Cove Marina
serves as the departure point
for the authentic paddle-
wheeler M.S. Dixie II, voted
"Best of Tahoe" for the past 11
years.
The M.S. Offers daily
cruises, including the Glen-
Brook Historic Breakfast Buf-
fet and champagne brunch


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I I


k I














PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14,2006


Lifestyle


ChurcNe Community Coalition Awaits

Annrnv l Of Twn Crants


New Bethel AME Church
will hold a Sunrise Service
6:30 a.m. Sunday. Breakfast
will be served Church school
is at 9 a.m. with an Easter Pro-
gram and egg hunt for the
youths.
S***
Mt. Ararat AME Church will
hold its Easter Program 9:30
a.m. with an Easter Egg'Hunit
to follow.
A Men's Day Program is set
11 a.m., May 21. Guest
speaker is 4-H Agent John
Lilly.
***.
Olive Baptist Church pre-
sents a musical/drama 11 a.m.
Sunday, with a lunch to follow



Homes Of
Lether Mae Johnson
Lether Mae Jackson Johnson
age 56 a homemaker died Sun-
day, April 9 in Monticello.
The service will be at 3 p.m.
on Saturday, April 15, 2006
with burial at Boland Commu-
nity Cemetery in Monticello.
Family will receive friends
(viewing) from' 2:00 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 14,
2006 at Tillman Funeral
Home.
Mrs. Johnson leaves her hus-
band C.J. Johnson to cherish
her memories. Other survivors
include her children Clarence
White, Jr. and Bessie Feacher.
Brother Willie James
(Carolyn) Carr, Eddie (Beatrie)
Jackson, Johnny (Rby Dell)
Jackson, Arthur (Tennie) Ol-
iver, Sammy (Vanessa) Brin-
son and Dan Oliver; sisters Ev-
elyn Moore, Rosa (Lewis) An-
derson, Irene Jackson, and
Angie Oliver, along with nu-
merous nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends.
Robert Johnson
Robert Johnson age 60 a
Handyman died Thursday,
April 6, 2006 in Tallahassee.
The service will be at 11:00
on Saturday, April 15, 2006 at
Shady Grove Primitive Baptist
Church in Miccosukee with
burial at the Church Cemetery.
Family will receive friends
(viewing) from 2:00 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 14,
2006 at Tillman Funeral Home
in Monticello.
Survivors include a sister
Elizabeth Darity of Havana
and four brothers, Julius Darity
and wife Angela, Thomasville,
GA. Daniel Darity, Johnny
Darity and Archie Darity, all
of Miccosukee, along with nu-
merous relatives and friends.
Arthur "Boy" Jordan
Arthur Jordan age 66 a re-
tired City of Tallahassee Em-
ployee died Wednesday, April
5, 2006 in Tallahassee.
The service will be at 11:00
on Saturday, April 15, 2006 at


R-1 p W' WE 1 U IU% W% A % -NIwU%- %


and an Easter egg hunt for
children.
***
Casa Bianca MB Church will
hold an Easter 'Egg Hunt and
Program, 7 p.m. Friday, at the
church..
*** ..
Youth Outreach Ministry of
Monticello will celebrate their
'annual April Praise-a-brateion,
7:30 p.m. nightly, April 21 and
22 at St. Tabernacle Church of
God in Unity.
Friday speaker is Rev. Sims
Alexander of Mt. Nebo MB
Church in Greenville.
Saturday speaker is Minister
Katabia Henry, asst. youth
minister at St. Tabernacle.



Mourning
Beth Page Missionary Baptist
Church in Wacissa with burial
at Beth Page Cemetery. Family
will receive friends (viewing)
2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, April '14 at Tillman Fu-
neral Home.
A native of Wacissa, he was
retired from the City of Talla-
hassee's Sewage Dept. Survi-
vors include his daughter Pau-
lette Gilley, sons Dennis Jor-
dan, Cecil Williams (Marilyn)
and Tony Williams (Marvia);
brother. Roosevelt Jordan; sis-
ters Mae Lizie Smith and Lou--
ise Willis, along with six
grandchildren, one great
grandchild and his longtime
devoted companion Ethelean
Brown and a host of other rela-
tives arid friends.
Henry Livingston, Jr.
Henry "Pop" Livingston, Jr.
age 78 a retired Logger died '
Friday, April 7, 2006 in Talla-
hassee.
The service will be at 1:00
p.m. on Saturday April 15,
S2006 with burial at St. Mat-
.thews Cemetery in Greenville.
Family will receive friends
(viewing) from 2:00 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 14
at Tillman Funeral Home..
Mr. Livingston was a native
and lifelong resident of Green-
ville where he had served as a
councilman for the City of-
(See Homes Page 7)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Community Coalition is
awaiting approval of two
grants, Healthy Start Director
George Hinchliffe reported at
a recent meeting.
Reducing/Eliminating Racial
Disparities in Health Care,
closing the gap; and the Blue
Foundation re-application, will
add the focus on teaching life
skills -to parents in addition to
the prenatal curriculum.
Shena McFadden was recog-
nized by Hinchliffe for being
named the Student Social
Worker of the Year by the Na-
tional Association of Social
Workers, (NASW.)
Free childbirth and newborn
classes are being offered at the
Health Department, and a car
seat clinic will also be held on
the third Thursday of each
month. Cost is $10 per seat.
Jana Grubbs reminded mem-
bers that the Parent-Child
Home Program, a new family
literacy resource for Jefferson
County, is registering students
at this time.
Dessie Harvey with Refuge
House announced that the
month of April is Sexual Vio-
lence Awareness month, and a
meeting will be held to discuss
sexual predators and Jefferson
County on Thursday, April 27.
Dorothy Inman-Johnson, ex-


Fire Rescue Boot Drive Set

On Circle Friday, Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Fire Rescue Re-
lay For Life team will be con-
ducting a boot drive on
Courthouse Circle Friday and
Saturday.
The boot drive Friday will
be conducted 4:30-6 p.m., and
Saturday, 8-10 a.m.
Firefighter/EMT/Fire Res-
cue Relay For Life Team Co-
ordinator Carla Piggott said
that this is the fourth year that


THE MONTICELLO

CHURCH OF CHRIST

WILL HOLD A GOSPEL MEETING 16-21
APRIL, 2006. SUNDAY SERVICES WILL BEGIN
AT 9:30 A.M., 10:30 A.M. AND 5:00 P.M.

WEEKDAY SERVICES WILL BE EACH
EVENING AT 7:30 PM.
ALLAE WECOE
ALL ARE WELCOME


;Fire Rescue has conducted the
'boot drive for the Relay.
Each boot drive raises
$1,200 to $1,800 "We advise
residents to have their change
ready," said Piggott.
She concluded that the other
fundraiser for Fire Rescues
Relay team will be the sale of,
Bradley sausage and drinks, 6
p.m., Friday, April 21, during
the Relay For Life


Bamhart, Healthy Start Com-
munity Health Educator.
She will discuss criteria and
availability of free doula' serv-
ices as well as the Group Pre-
natal Care Program, operating
in Jefferson and Madison
counties.




sI"rsr 6rl


ecutive director of Capital
Area Community Action
Agency, Inc. announced regis-
tration for Heard. Start starting
_in April and held at the Jeffer-
son Elementary School.
There will also be an afford-
able housing conference June
S7-8, the cost is $75.
Real Estate agencies, plan-
ners, developers, concerned
citizens, and government offi-
cials are expected to attend.
Kim Barnhill, administrator
of the County Health Depart-
ment announced the Smart
Growth Summit held April 3,
was designed to help the
county become more health
conscious as it grows.
Terry Sherrard, from the De-
partment of Children and
Families encouraged agencies
to become partners with DFC
by putting a computer in their
office so clients can apply for
public assistance.
S April Lewis from Employ-
ment Connections announced
that a.class will be available to
help teach job readiness skills
to those ages 14-21.
Jerry Durbin, Employment
Connections gave a presenta-
tion to the members on the
services available at the
agency formerly known as the
One Stop.
The next meeting of the
JCCC is 9:30 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday, April 25 at the
County Public Library.
Guest speaker will be Cetta


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is'
one. Love the
JLordyour God
with all your.
heart and with all
your.sold and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5


Christ Episcopal

Church
425 N. Cherry Street Monticellp, Florida 32344 (850) 997-4116






u9-








Good Friday 7 p.m.
Sunday Sunrise Service ~ 6 a.m.
Sunday Easter Service ~ 10:30 a.m.


First United Methodist Church Of Monticello
325 W. Walnut St. 997-5545


April Worship Opportunities:


April 13th
Pancake supper at 6:00; Maundy Thursday worship service at 6:45 p.m. in the
sanctuary.

April 16th
Easter SonShine service at 8:30 outside the Family Ministry Center; brunch is
at 10:00 Traditional %worship service is at 11:00 in the sanctuary.

April 23rd
Regular worship services at 8:30 and at 11:00

April 30th
PICNIC-AT-THE-CHURCH will begin at 10:30 with a gospel sing that features
".Dow n Home" and the Praise and Worship team. After the worship time, there
will be games for the kids and the picnic. Come out and enjoy worshipping in
God's great outdoors!
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w Io w.. -


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REVIVAL

Reapers of the Harvest Church

April 9-14 at 7:00 p.m.

2.5 miiles West of Greenville on Hwy. 90

"He Is In The House"





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Join Us For

E R S T S SS E SE R U IC E

April 16th at daybreak

Glorybound Singers from Tallahassee
will perform at 10:30 a.m.


~ ..


to matcb evey lUmtyle
Sofa & Laiwot Sham $10"9.95



Llaw

150 CAITL CRCL W








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006 PAGE 7


Homes Of
(Continued From Page 6)
Greenville, Past Commander
of American Legion, Past
Worshipful Master of Masonic
Lodge 152, PHA deacon at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church at the Joshua in the
Heroines of Jericho. Mr. Liv-
ingston served his country
with dignity and pride in the
U.S. Army during the Korean
Conflict.
He leaves his devoted wife
of 56 years Ellawese Pride
Livingston. In addition to his
wife Deacon Livingston's leg-
acy and love will be forever
treasured by his sons, Odell
Livingston, Charles
Livingston, Lonnie Livingston
and Marvin Livingston, all of
Greenville, Herbert Livingston
(Gloria) and Theothelis Liv-
ingston (Vister), both of Fayet-
teville, NC: his daughter,
Ruthie Cross (Rollace), Miami,
Henrietta Reddick (Vernon),
Adana, Turkey, Bridgett Ed-
wards (Jerry), Ashville, Debra
Collins Brown, Madison,
Cindy Copeland (Clyde), Wa-
cissa, and Tonya Howard
(Wayne) of Tallahassee, a
brother, Lonnie James Living-
ston of Gainesville and three
sisters Annie Maude Plair,
Monticello, Rosa Lee Windom
and Bertha Lee Livingston
both of Orlando, 25 grandchil-
dren, 41 great grandchildren
and a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends.

Betty Ruth Connel
Martin
Betty Ruth Connell Martin
age 71, a retired accountant,
died Tuesday April 11, 2006,
in Waukeenah, FL.
A memorial service will be
at 2:00 p.m. Friday April 14,
-2006 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel. In lieu of
flowers take a friends out to
lunch, and tell them how much
you value them. Family will
receive friends after the
'service ...-,. : ...
Mrs. Martin was a native of
Waukeenah. In her youth she
attended the First Methodist
Church in Waukeenah. She.
also held numerous member-
ships along with her husband,
in the Southern Baptist
Churches where her husband
was stationed, including a
Southern Baptist missionary


Mourning
church in the Philippine Is-
lands. She was a member of
the LLL Club at the First Bap-
tist Church in Monticello.
Betty along with her husband
were Alumni of the Woodville
School, a group that attended
from the 1930s.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 47 years Clayton Mar-
tin, son Terry James Martin,
(Doriann) step granddaughter
Shawn Narhi of Monticello,
one sister Annie Lou White
(Bill) Tallahassee, three broth-
ers J.T. Connell (Frances),
Bobby Connell (Pat) of Talla-
hassee, Kenneth Connell
(Mary) of Waukeenah, and a
sister-in-law Bobbie Connell
of Tallahassee, several nieces,
nephews and many wonderful
friends.


Circle

Changes

April Date

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Camellia Garden Circle
has changed its meeting date
this month because of the
Easter holiday.
The Circle will meet at 2
p.m. Sunday, April 30.
Members and guests will
visit the home and garden of
Donna Gamiski and her hus-
band Charles Davis.
The tour of the gardens will
present suggestions to help
members create more original
gardens.
RSVP to Jean Brenner at
997-3109 so as to have an idea
of people attending.
Help with refreshments is al-
ways welcome.
SMONTICELLO
NEWS
IO.I C. N T BE vITHOIIT IT"


4-H Share The Fun Talent

Show Winners Announced


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

4-H Share-The-Fun was held
in March at the old JCHS high
school, in the auditorium.
Eight talent acts were pre-'
sented at the show.
Participants in the Talent
Show included: Alana Cham-
bers, Keiona Scott, Alyssa Ste-
phens, Stephanie Stephens,
David Wirgau, Leah Wirgau,
Lydia Wirgau, and Chevarra


Ulee.
The Clover Bud winner was
Leah Wirgau.
In the Junior Division win-
ners were Lydia Wirgua, first
pJlace; and David Wirgau, sec-
ond place.
In the Senior Division win-
ners were Stephanie Stephens,
first place; Alana Chambers,
second place; and Chevarra
Ulee, third place.
The 4-H staff wishes to
thank judges Shaquanta.Ed-
wards and Sissy Kilpatrick.


Norton Retirement Party Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The School Board will hold
a retirement party will 2-4
p.m., Wednesday, April 19 at
the School Board Office to
honor longitme employee



Bed Tax
(Continued From Page 1)
4:30 p.m. workshop on Thurs-
day, May 18, to further ex-
plore the benefits and respon-
sibilities of enterprise zones.
The workshop will be held in
the second floor of the court-
house.
The other exciting project,
Conley said, was the tourism
development tax, which is
scheduled to be on the ballot in
November.
Conley said the latest state
figures show that the county
would be collecting $30,000 if
the tax were now in place.
And that, she said, is without
any advertising of the county
in any tourism promotional
venues.
Conley emphasized that local
residents would not be subject
(See Bed Tax Page 10)


Jim Norton.
Norton has been a teacher
and administrator in the Dis-
trict for more than 40 years..
The public is invited to at-
tend the event.


The Jefferson County Recvclina Proaram


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



'Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojeffersonfl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


yftA 'Ai' JMtv., and Jt,.

jCaaotaee faqeaut ^
Saturday, May 6th at 3:00pm
Opet toa (i6 aud an en, owef age6
d iap aged 5 and uutded
Allgirls ages 8 around er wi llreceive agenuine
rhinestone tara andallboys wil receive a toy
Call 906-9650 or email MissNFFpageant@aol.com
for contestant information.














PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14,2006


S rts


JV Warriors Win


Three Straight


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

JV Warriors won their last
Three games and stand 7-6-1
on the season.
The Warriors squeaked by
Maclay 9-8.
Casey Anderson pitched the
game, striking out four and
giving up 12 walks, and eight
runs on five hits.
At the plate, he had one sin-
gle and three runs.
Brandon Dunbar, one sin-
gle, one run; Ryan Pritcher,
went two for three with one
run; Buddy Vollertsen, one
single, one run; Casey
Wheeler, one single; Lane
Fraleigh, one single; and Mar-
cus Roberts, Mason Shiver,
and Jacob Newberry each
scored one run.
In a double-header against
Brookwood, the Warriors
won both games, 8-3 and 15-
t -


SAnderson pitched, striking
out six, and giving up one hit
and three walks.
At the plate, he went one for
two with one run; Wheeler.
two for three with one run:
Dunbar, two for t o; John
Stephens, one for one with
one run; Shiver, two for two
With two runs; and Luke
Whitmer,' Vollertsen and
Newberry each scored one
run.,
Roberts pitched the second
game, striking out three and
giving up five hits ard four
walks.
Anderson went two for two,
four runs; Wheeler, two for
three, four runs; Whitmer, one
for three, one run; Roberts,
two for three, one run; Kent
Jones, one for two, one run;
Shiver, one for one; Pritcher,
one for ihree: Dunbar, two
runs; and Joe Mizell, one run.


;1:`:;- :-
0".


"J~ ~pl0~ .
U*~. 0 -. ~~


CASEY ANDERSON read- Waddail
ies for the pitch in a re- over the
cent Warriors practice count fo
session. (News Photo) Bishop,


,,',' **L -


S. '


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Despite the heavy winds,
many tornado- watches and
periodic heavy rains, the first
bass tournament at the head
of the Wacissa River saw a
good turnout with nine teams
participating.
The team of Rick Andrews
and son Ricky, won $80 in
the Big Bass Contest for a
fish weighing in at six
pounds, eight ounces.
The team also won first
place in the overall contest for
catching a total of 18.8
pounds of fish.
Winning second place was
the team of Lee Flowers and
Kevin Boland, both of Wa-
cissa, who received $80 for
catching a total of 18.2
pounds offish.
Spokesman Kurt Walker-
said the turnout was down


slightly from last year, bit he
attributed that to the threaten-
ing weather and this being the
first tournament of the year.
"The weather was pretty
bad," said Walker. ."We had
tornado watches all day, one
bad down pour and the wind
was bad all day. But regard-
less, everyone had some real
good fishing."
The next tournament is slated
for May ,20 and will begin at
dj. light
Weigh in is at 1 p.m. The
'entry fee is $20 per person,
$10 per boat for the Big Bass__
Jackpot, which will award
100 percent of the jackpot.

Walker said that the more
people there are, the bigger
the jackpot will be.
"We expect a much better
turnout the next time," said
Walker.
Walker added that these
.tournaments will be hosted
once per month.


Warriors Win 2, Lose 1;


Stand 15-4 On The Season


BILL BROWN

Aucilla took the field three
times last week, winning two
and bringing the record to 15
wins and four losses.
On Tuesday, Apalachicola
was the victim in a five-
Sinning 15-2 win for Aucilla.
Casey Gunnels pitched,the
first four innings, gave up two
runs on two hits and struck
out five., The win brings his
record to 3-2.
Josh Carswell wheeled the
big bat, getting three hits, one
a double, and two RBI; Chris
Tuten's bat delivered a
double, single and two RBI in
four trips to the plate; Colby


lofted a .home run
left-field fence, to, ac-
r two RBI; and Matt
Gunnels, Will Harts-
a.IlM


t,' .
i-> a "


RICK ANDREWS shows off two of the biggest bass
caught. The winner is at left, with the fish weighing six
pounds, eight ounces.



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field and Elliott Lewis each
had one hit, with Gunnels get-
ting two stolen bases and
Lewis, one.
After returning from Apala-
chicola,, the Warriors hosted
Munroe Thursday and
notched their seventh district
win with a12-4 score.
Tuten started and worked the
first six innings, for his sev-
enth win of the year against
one loss. He gave up four
runs on six hits and struck out
four.
Stephen Dollar worked the
seventh inning, striking out
one and' gi\ ing up no hits or
runs.
At the plate, Gunnels was
four for four; Carswell, three
for three, two RBI; Tuten,
two for four; Glen Bishi,,.
two for two, three RBI; Dus-
tin Roberts, one for three, one
home run and three RBI; and
Dollar and A. J. Connell each
went one for three.
On Thursday it was "Katie
bar the door", as Class 3A
East Gadsden inl added Finlay-
son Field on Friday and ex-
ited with a 16-8 win on 17
hits, including three home
runs.
East Gadsden jumped out to
an early lead, but the Warriors
battled back and- tied the
game at seven in the fifth.
East Gadsden replied with
five in the sixth and four in


the seventh, to seal the win as
the Warriors could manage
only one run in the seventh.
Roberts was charged with
the loss, his first of the
season. He was tagged for 11
runs, 11 hits and struck out
four in five and two-thirds in-
nings.
The Warriors offense which
only collected five hits,.was
led by Glen Bishop and Dus-
tin Roberts with one home
run each. Bishop had two RBI
and Roberts, one.
Tuten accounted for two
RBI on a triple; Hartsfield
and Waddail accounted for
the other two Warrior hits,
with Hartsfield -also. getting
one RBI.
The final regular season
home game is against
FAMU, 4 p.m., April 21,
here.
The District Tournament
will be hosted in Carrabelle
afterward, April 24-27.





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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006 PAGE 9


ACA JV Girls Lose

TO Madison 13-9


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JVs lost to -
Madison 13-9, last week.
"We got off to a slow start
and were down 4-12 after two
innings," said Coach Frank
Brown. But we rallied back
to within four runs when the
game was called due to a
mandatory time limit.
'This was one of those
games that we felt we could
have won, if we had been al-
lowed to play a full game of
seven innings," said Brown.
Taryn Copeland pitched the
entire five-inning game, strik-
ing out two and giving up ten


walks and 13 hits.
At the plate, Olivia
Sorensen, one run, three sin-
gles, one put-out; Skylar
Hanna, two tuns, two singles,
one double; Savannah Wil-
liams, one strikeout, three
put-outs; and Katelyn Levine,
two runs, one single, one
walk, one strikeout.

Erin Kelly, one run, one
Single, one double, one put-
out; Miranda Wider, one run,
one single, two put-outs; Mi-
chaela Roccanti, one run, one
single, one strikeout, one put-
out; Copeland, one run, two
walks, one strikeout; and
Nikki Kisamore, two walks,
one strikeout.


Lady Tigers Inch'

By John Paul II


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity softball team
squeaked by John Paul II for
a 10-9 win in an eight-inning
overtime game, now standing
6-5 on the season.
Coach Earlene Knight said
the Lady Tigers pulled out the
win after se\ en and four-
sixths innings, though ,he)
committed ten errors during
the game.
"John Paul got three outs.
We scored the run and it was
all over," said Knight.
Jemaria Cuyler pitched. the
game. "She did an outstand-
ing job," said Knight. Cuyler
struck out five, gave up seven
hits and no walks.
At the plate, she went two for
two, one RBI, one run and
two steals; Nakidra Thomp-
son, one for one, one RBI, the
winning run; Keandra Seab-
cpk t ,ne,~-,f=or, -hre. and
Chandra 'Tucker, tv.o for four
two RBI, three runs, one of
which was the winning run
knocked in by Thompson.


Chandra Brooks, two run;
and Majetta Jefferson, Kiarra
Powell, Miller and Ireshia
Denson, each scored one run.

Become an American Red
Cross Disaster Services
Volunteer

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
trainDisasterServices Volunteers
in your community) Contact u at,
850/878-6080 or visit our website
at www.tallytown.com/redcross.


El.


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La%.t Cast

Charters


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ROBINSON


Elizabeth Robinson

Hospice Counselor


Elizabeth Robinson, MSW
is a Covenant Hospice Be-
reavement Counselor, and so-
cial worker, who is dedicated
to helping individuals and
families in the community who
are experiencing the loss of a
loved one.
She knows that the feelings
of loss, following the death of
a'lloved one, can be over-
whelming. Grief is a normal,
natural response that is indi-
vidual and personal.


Through bereavement serv-
ices, Robinsion offers:
*Support groups and work-
shops to any social service or-
ganizations, schools, churches,
individuals, and health profes-
sionals
*Educational programs
*Remembrance celebrations.
*Individual counseling.
Robinson resides in Jeffer-
son County, having moved
from Stewart, in Jan. 2005.
"I love Monticello,'.' Robin-


Hispanic Presence Growing Here
(Continued From Page 1) industry and agriculture would iglesias (churches) cropl
Agriculture, he points out, is fall on their faces in Florida across Florida and Geor
an entry level job into the and the rest of the nation with-
workforce. He cites several, ut Hispanic workers," Halsey "The Southeast and th
now prominent local individu- says. South are being transfc
als who started their work ca- "It's not a perception," he re- Halsey says. "It's been
reers at Simpson's, a business iterates, citing the increasing on for years. But it'
that traces its origin back more number of bodegas (grocery reached the point of
than 100 years.' stores), .tiendas stores) and. mass."
But the fact is that in today's
world, it's very difficult to find
many Americans willing to do SJn Pedestrian Frie ndl
*hard manual labor outdoors., ns5 es iend
"The\ want air conditioning," (Continued From Page 1) lot more of them."
SBeshears says.. a marked crosswalk." .
Halsey agrees with the as- Anderson said that in the "We want to enc(
essment. beginning, Main Street and ,Aalkabilii\," said And
Go to the kitchen of any res- the Chamber had asked for "And put more empha
taurants take nour e the gns and owner Great pedestrian safe,,."
workers \tio make \our beds
Adventure Outfitters Marga-
and clean your room when you ret Levings found the design
stay in a hotel; or observe of the signs s hd ig nal-
,of the signs she had originall, 1
workers on construction crews sn in S h C a
,seen in South Carolina. ]
and you will see Hispanics I'e also seen them in West
everywhere, he says.
She find HispPalm Beach," she added.- "So m i
Indeed, he finds Hispanics far, several hundred of the
form a significant part of the signs have been ordered i the
underpinnings of several Flor- state, in places like Fort Wal- A Na
ida industries.
ida industries. .. ton and Panama City, so peo-
"Construction, the hospitality -1, ..


e p are going~ tu eL se
Car abele toOchlckone aa


Carrabelle to Ochlockonee Bay
Bay and Flats Fishing
Winter Grouper Trips
Sc.tnic W tlei Touts


1 N ht St
1 Night St(


ping up
gia.

he rural
irmed,"
going
s now
critical


ly


oura
terso
sis




t11
"1


ge
n.
on


son said., "the people here are
so nice."
She is a member of Christ
Episcopal Church and active in
the community, always willing
-to help with a positive attitude.
Bereavement services are
available free of charge at
Covenant Hospice for any one
who is experiencing a loss in-
cluding the loss of a pet, a di-
vorce, or a loved one.
For additional information
about services available, call
Covenant Hospice 850-575-
4998.

amlrr1ey *10 I*Iol;li]:


SxA/-venger





* Amphibious All Season All Terrain
!* All Wheel Drive Up to 6 Passengers
!* 674 cc Liquid Cooled
Kohler Engine
25" Goodyear 'R
Rawhide III Tires
1-877-ARGOATV
* New Steering,System www.ARGOatv.con
I I,


Knap. awareae
111 Remington A e.- Thomasville, GA
229-226-1686


dwodidi
iture-Based Lod:'ge

9 :Special: .-'
ay :18 Holes jAf"


.;' $175 Special:
2 Night Sta- -y 36 Holes qf golf

3896 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327
www.thelnnatwildwood.com
850.926.4455
Fax 850926.6955

Outdoor d enters re Our Specialty


-- ----- --- ----------------------------


RealEsate


SVIRGINIA G. BLOW,
Broker Associate Kellya ndKelly
850.509.1844 Prperties
QOuio W 4 reL'wumZei.. .Tb- ehAuE/
kai 1md#Bct uiyeryo#jeUle*
COMMERCIAL- RESIDENTIAL LAND
TOP ASSOCIATE PRODUCER PAST FOUR YEARS
$$$$MULTI-MILLIO VOLLAA PRODUCER $$$
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


&


SABOR REALESTATE


MIS


MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor


SALES- ASSOCIATE
850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE YOU DESERVE / PEOPLE YOU TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT "LOTS ~ ACREAGE


'JOE. oBETp

Realor -Assoial


Got Land?
Thinking about buying or selling -land? Contact the land
specialists at SouthVest Land Group, Inc. We can assist you with professional
service and a friendly, no-pressure atmosphere.
Sellers All we do is land. Your rope, doesn't take a
backseat to houses or anything else. We'll take photos and
use maps and exhibits to highlight your property for buyers.

Buyers Whether it's a single lot or large acreage, a
recreationhil retreat or timber tract, we can help you find that
perfect property.
Contact us today for a confidential discussion regarding your real estate needs.
Simply call or send us an e-mail message at southvest99@aol.com. We
look forward to hearing from you.


850-9(
SOf


John A. "Al" Russell, Broker
36-0017 So th es 850-50
office Land Ceoup, Inc-

, ,^~i;ha;i~;i3^S(^^lt^^^~a!hs~e:d~rs;~ 9 ;' '


3-4242
e11


EL,~E


EQUAL KOUSINU


Top 10 Things To Do When Selling Your Home:,
#1. Call Lynette C. Sirmon
*She'll take care of the other 9!)
"We didn't expect it to be that easy!" That's what you'll
typically hear from Lynette's long list of satisfied
clients. From her years of experience selling real estate,
Lynette knows exactly how to make sales come together
quickly and easily. When it's time to sell your home or
land for top dollar, all you need to do is make
one simply phone call...
850-933-6363 MB or 850-948-5000 After Hours
R. Winston Connell, Realtor
310 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL 32344


_,,,, -r---- -,.n -- -- --


~ad~,


IPlllbIIIIIIPsBIIIIbRIPI~OWIIIB~~I ~~.I+PIFI~BUL~&~B~R~.~ :~'*II1II~~*~b811 ~P~YrJ~IIPlrW~~~L~d~nB~lrT1PblllB(LY~s~ "


---------- --


A6.


I








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006


Bed Tax
(Continued From Page 7)
to the tax, which applies only
to tourists staying in the
county's several motels, bed &
Breakfast inns and RV park fa-
cilities.
Monies generated from the
tourist tax would be used to
promote the county's tourism
industry.
Conley shared with commis-
sioners some figures that un-
derscore the lucrative nature of
tourism, particularly eco-
tourism.
According to the figures,
85.8 million visitors came to
Florida in 2005. This ac-
counted for the employment of
944,500 people in the tourist
service related industries and
the generation of $57 billion in
revenues, Conley said,
Of the $57 billion, $13.7 was
for lodging, she said.
"Tourism is big business,"
Conley said. "And rural eco-
tourism is the fastest growing
segment of tourism."


:2


INVITATION TO BID: The Board
of County Commissioners of
Jefferson County will receive bids
on or before 5:00 p.m., Monday
April 24, 2006 on the following:
Commercial grade Z-Turn riding
lawn mower, 52" to 54" cut, 25 to 27
horsepower engine, include all
warranty information, include



TOindW tom







Monticello

News


delivery price to the Jefferson
County Recreation Park, Mamie
Scott Drive in Monticello, Florida.
All bids must be submitted in sealed
envelopes plainly marked "BID-
Z-Turn Mower" and be mailed or
delivered to the Board of County
Commissioners, Courthouse, Room
10, Monticello, Fla. 32344. The
Board reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids and.to
accept the bid which they feel is in
the best interest of Jefferson
County.
4/14, 19, c
NOTICE OF GENERAL
ELECTION: I Sue M. Cobb,
Secretary of State of the State of
Florida, do hereby give notice that a
GENERAL ELECTION will be
held in JEFFERSON County, State
of Florida, on the SEVENTH day of
NOVEMBER, A.D., 2006 to fill or
retain the following offices: I.inied
States Senator, Representative In
Congress: Districts 2 and 4,
Governor and Lieutenant
Governor, Attorney General, Chief
Financial Officer, Commissioner of
Agriculture, State Senator: District
6, State Representative: Districts 9
and 10, Supreme Court, Retention
of Three Justices, First District
Court of Appeal, Retention of Four


Judges, Circuit Judge, Second
Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 11 and
12, Clerk of the Circuit Court,
County Court Judge Group 1,
School Board: Districts 2, 3 and 5
County Commissioner: District 2
and 4. Jefferson Soil and Water
Conservation District: Groups 1, 2,
and 4 IN Testimony Whereof, I
Hereunto set my hand arid affixed
the Great Seal of the State of
'Florida, at Tallahassee, The Capitalr
this Second day of April A.D., 2006,
.Sue M. Cobb, Secretary of State.)!
4/14, 4/28, c


Monticello Trading Company
located in the heart of
downtown Monticello. Tired of
all that clutter and need money?
Come see us with your used
furniture, collectibles and
antiques. Booths for rent at
reasonable prices. 509-3517.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, c


Need weekend respite care for
elderly women with Alzheimer's
disease. References and


background check required.
(850) 322-9667 (Iv message).
4/14, pd
MONTICELLO: 'Part time
janitorial position available
immediately. Please call
681-3148 for more information.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 5/3, 5, 10, 12, c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Criminal
Investigative Sergeant. This
position requires a minimum of
a high school diploma and
Florida Police Standards. The
candidate must have broad
experience as an Investigator
and also live within 25 miles of
Monticello Police Station. The
ideal candidate should have
some advance education and
some experience in training. The
position requires a background
check. Salary and benefit
information available upon
request. Submit application and
resume to: City of Monticello
Police Dept. .195 S. Mulberry
Street, Monticello, FL 32344 by
April 24, 2006 EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.



BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN R
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's Mii-Storage

850-509-1465 cell h Trimming 0 Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. La .n &Landapin
850-997-0877 home Mowing. Aerial Device ---------
Clean Portables for construction sites, o Removal 0 Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) i Mention This Ad & receive
4 family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance I A 10% Discount
997 35 ---- ----------
Events and Types 997-0039 Lic.&Insured 997-2535 l02 East Mahan
11025 East Mahan 877-4550.

B & M Tractor Service K_ __ CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hoing, HLEL ,NC. LA HI TA Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing -
R/ C"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
Bd MRichbourg Nursery, Inc. *o --- Lloyd, FL 32337
"" hbor N, n c. *L'imerock -
99 Richbourg Road -
Brad McLeod a ". ...,- a -. :
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeodT ,
c:8 09-2 H^':^l:^ k Monticello, FL 32344 "Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. Sand': .....J 997-6788
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346 L-
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 'Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on arroll Hill) 229-226-0717 -': .p Soil
Fax 850-997-8388
Wo o t 77mn~ ntiro lii lm


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676








Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


vrre ccepC aLu mUnujfcturer coupLos.

I-10 Chevron

Black & Mild Cigars (original) +tax
$1.79 (5 ct. pk) $32,99 (20pk 5ct Ct)
Copen Hagen (Silver Top Only) +tax
$4.39 can $39.99 Roll
Grissly (All Flavors) + tax
$1.79 can $8.22 Rollc (% can)
Longhorn (All Flavors) + tax
$1.29 can $6.09 Roll (5 can)
Kayak (All Flavors) + tax
$1.11 $5.19 Roll (5 can)
Free Crystal Lighter with Carton
Marlboro $3.04pk $8.80/3pk $26.99 carton
305's $1.57pk 3pk $4.47 & 1400 ct $13.30 2ct
DTC's $1.70pk 3pk $4.80 $15.20 cart. &
$14.40 2 cart.


Residential & Commercial Lic.# eg #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES



PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383
PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN YouNEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY &NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis* Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS ijyioiuriHo
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Call for quality work
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTEDor quty
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711 45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
SResidential Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior

THURMAN TRACTOR SERVICE D N TR
I } MOWING HARROWING,'
FOOD PLOTS
Since 1977
LIC. & INS *Licensed *Bonded *Insured

James Thurman, LLC Residential & Commercial
850-997-5 11 FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100

850-545-0139
I ~~ .. .i 11


I W li I he Decorator's MR. MERCHANT
5 __gWarehouse, LLC THIS SPACE


i COULD BE
Wash ing 260 N.YOULDE
Cherry.Street YOURS FOR
64S.Jfes S Furnishing & Accessories ONLY $10.00


MONTICELLO S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, V Keaton Tire Repair
Sales Service ~ Installation Change Outs CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,erce s ur Business on and off Ihe Road
Residential Commercial LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
54 Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


Tyrone Davib
Sales Manager


IUltimate

UIage Auto

877-7222
Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold
g 00D (RDIT, BAD (RDiT,

T iT DOZEN 'T MATTER


4 II
Eal YRNle' akngi


4/12, 14, 19, c
History Instructor: North
Florida Community College in
Madison Florida. Full time
faculty appointment beginning
August, 2006. The successful
candidate will teach History
courses through the
sophomore-level. These include
American History, History of
Western Civilization, Race and
Ethnicity, African American
History and World History.
Qualifications: A master's
degree t (from accredited
institution) with a minimum of
18 graduate semester hours in
History. Community college
teaching experience is preferred.
In addition to teaching duties,
position will include: established
office hours; serving on College
committees; professional
development; participating in
Department and College
activities. Some classes taught
may be night and/or dual
enrollment courses on NFCC
campus and/or' at satellite
campuses. Send applications to:
Director HR, North Florida


Ii


I











oP-rtiateeYour Ad .-
.. .:;. :.c. _-.-. :
-, ,. _I


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006 PAGE 11

:-f. .IASSIEID ADVERTISING RATES
b' iines; editions 'ednesday and Fridav...$7.00
-. .' .' ,,.-Each Additional Line....S1.00 .
E -.E-DINEFS Mvonday Noon for Wednesday
" -'' wednesday Noon for Fridan
SCall Our Clasgiied Department at:
; 9_97-3568
.. .. -.- :..- 7- .:_ .-o : L -


HELP DWAgT1

Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison,
Florida 32340. Only complete
application packets will be
considered. Complete
application on website at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions: Call
Mrs. Enid Kozlowski
(850-973-1636) or email to
kozlowskie@nfcc.edu.
Application packet must be
received by April 18, 2006. EOE
4/7, 12, 14,19, c
Free room, board, and small
monthly stipend in exchange for
light housekeeping and cooking
for elderly male in his home.
References and background
check required. (850) 322-9667
(Iv message)
4/14, pd


Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners is
seeking applicants for a
Part-time Gate Attendant at the'
County Solid Waste
Department. Job description;
and applications may be
obtained at the Solid Waste
Department located at 1591
Waukeenah Street, Monticello,,
Florida. Hours and days of this
position are: Friday and
Saturday 6:30am 4:00pm and
then Sunday and Monday
6:30am 10:30am then 3:00pm -
7:00 pm. Essential Job
Functions are: Loads and
unloads heavy material from
trucks. Move equipment and
large bulky objects. Performs
custodial duties. Maintains
ground. Rakes grass and water
plants. Weeds flower beds.
Shapes hedges and trims trees.
Cut grass. Plants and fertilizes
flowers. May operate
tractor-mower in mowing grass
on 'right-of-way Picks up boxes
and other materials left by
residents. Needs to get along
well with people and be able to


HELp W4
direct and explain where the
different types of materials are
to be disposed of. Minimum
qualifications are: Knowledge of
operation, maintenance,
capabilities, limitations and
safety aspects of equipment.
Ability to understand and
comply with oral instructions.
Ability to read street and traffic
signs. Ability to perform manual
labor. Skill in using hand tools
Education and experience
needed: One (1) year experience
in performing manual labor.
Licenses, Certifications or
registrations: Posses of valid
Florida Drivers License and a
valid Social Security Card.
Applications will be accepted
until 4:00 p.m., April 26, 2006 at
the Solid Waste Department
located at 1591 Waukeenah
Street Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer.
Drug Free Workplace. Drug
Testing is a required part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applications with a disability
should contact the above office
for accommodations. For
additional information please,
call 342-0184.
4/7. 12. 14. 19. c


GARAGE SALE -."
ROYAL MINI STORAGE:
Saturday, April 15, 8am 1pm.
2084 So.Jefferson St.
4/12, 14, c
Estate Sale: Sat. April 15, 2006
at 8:00 a.m. Liquidation of
Robert and Katherine Williams
Estate Monticello Fl: 70 years
accumulation of living,, Sofa,
Chairs, Willett Cherry Wood
Dining Set, Curio, 3 Bedrooms
of Furniture, Pearl G.F. Clock,
Books, Sheet Music, Dishes,
Corning Ware, Pots, Pans,
Table Linens, Bells, Garage
Contents, Clothes Men sz 46 &
shoes sz 12, Ladies sz 14 & shoes
sz 7, Hobnail, Wedgewood,
Fenton, Fostoria, RS Prussia,
'Lamps, Mink Stole, Jewelry,
Hats, Franklin Mini-items. Old
Photos, Yamaha Piano,
Flatware, Stemware,
Knick-Knacks. bric-a-brac,
Entire Household Everything
Must'GO, Rain or Shine, 6 miles
N. of Monticello, follow signs.
No early sales. Lynette C.
Sirmon 850-933-6363.
4/12, 14, c


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities






Registered Nurses Incentive

Care Units Cath Lab
$500 Recruitment Incentive (With one year of experi-
ence) Archbold Hospital, in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or email rtaylor@archbold.org EOE










Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates


Seeking highly motivated, experienced and
enthusiastic professionals for the Greenville
area. Convenience Store experience desired.
All shifts available. Excellent opportunity for
advancement. Competitive Salary, Bonus,
Benefits and opportunity to join a progressive
and fast growing company. Fax resume to:'


Fast Track Foods #411
ATTN: Bertie

Fax: (850) 948-2678
Phone (352)494-7550


1993 Ford F250- New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced
$1,000 to $3,500..
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book. 997-6806
tfn, c
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4 Door Model
As Low As. $750 down,
850-536-9111-
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal


Metal roofing save $$$ Buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all
accessories.,Quick turn around!
Delivery available toll free
(888)393-0335.
4/14-fcan
Wolf Tanning beds buy direct
and save! Full body units.from'
$22 a month! Free color catalog.
Call today! (800) 842-1305
www.np.etstan.com
4/14-fcan
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000
Call Mike 519-6506.'
4/14,pd
Appaloosa Horse nice riding!
horse. Best Offer. Call 997-3368
4/14, 19, 21,c
Crepe M rtle staring at $1, red.
and white, 342-3246, ask for
Ricky.
4/12, 14. 19, 21, 26, 28, pd

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,r
997-1980.
11/30 tfn, c
Office for Rent 238 W
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F 9-5 available May 1st
tin

REAL ESTATE
4/1 wood frame house on 3"
' acres. Located in Wacissal,
Moving must SALE NOW!'
Asking $135,000 OBO. Tim
342-3586 or 528-4484.
4/7, 12, 14, pd


WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles
850-545-3677


Drivers & Owner Operators:
Excellent Home-Time! 99% Pre-
Loaded! 80% Drop & Hook!
Great Pay & Benefits! CDL-A
3yrs. exp. browntrucking.com
770-344-2028



p -


U





I,


Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: ..washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. / 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding..
'509-8530, quick responses.
Peters Satellite -- Your Dish:
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service., We
also offer Go-Karts,, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.,
tfn, 1/25
Private Dut. Elder Care 24
hours/ 7 days a week. Home
850-997-0162 mobile
850-544-7052
4/7, 12, 14, 19, 21,26, 28, pd
SHealthy Weight Loss available
only at" Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
" increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiaco.l consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil 'with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a' drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug. Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

House For Sale!!
1430 Florida Ave
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Large Screened back
porch Beautiful Lot
Work in Process To reno-
vate home buy early at
$94,500 before price
goes to $110Kto 115K
997-6806


U.


VIRGINIA G BLOW
Broker Associate
850.509.1844
LISTINGS NEEDED !!! !!
$115,000 3/2 Modular / 3 AC, extras, Lloyd Acres
$109,000 3/2 HOME /lot, in town, like new, Martin
$129,900 2/2 HOME /2. SACwood floors & walls
$129,900 3/2 HOME / lot, hardwood floors, York
$163,000 3/2 HOME / 1 AC, historic fixer upper
$295,000 Profitable 7 apartments, Hagan
$500,000 10,000 SF Bldg., 16 AC'S, Hwy. 90 E.
$650,000 9,470 SF COMMERCIAL BLDG
WILL LEASE/BUILD TO SUIT
S50,000, City lot with view of Courthouse
$125,000 7+/- AC's pasture with woods
$247,500 16.5 +/- AC'S Lake Miccosukee Frontage
$350,000 20+1- AC's with pond and creek, Lloyd
COLDWELL BANKER KELLY AND KELLYPROPERTIES
'EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


U


OI


6690 SW Sundown Creek Road, Greenville, FL
FRIDAY -:- APRIL 28 -:- 10:00 A.M.
Beautiful Plantation With Large Majestic Oaks


* Great Cattle and Horse Farm
*1 1/4 Miles 1-10 Frontage
* Great Development Potential
* Quail Hunting Operation
* Large Food Plots Contain Both
Natural & Planted Habitats For
Quail & Other Wildlife
* Abundant Game Quail,
Deer & Turkey


* (2) Large Barns.
* Aircraft Hhngar
* 3200' Approved Pratt Ranch
Grass Landing Strip (# 20 FD)
* Fenced & Crossfenced
* Well Stocked Duck Pond
*4"Well .
* Planted Longleaf Pines


Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.
800-323-8388
10% Buyer's Premium AU479 AB 296


LARGE GUEST LODGE
* 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths,
4000 Sq. Ft., Kitchen
with Built-Ins
PLUS A LARGE SELECTION OF
WELL MAINTAINED EQUIPMENT


Broker
Participation
Welcome!


KELLY &rKELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jrfferon SL
Monticrllo, FIl 3344
(850) 997 5516
www.rbkk.com
Perry Location:
(850) 223-2370


- We all needsomeone or something to
inspire us to bring out our bet -
Happy Easter
4Br/3.5Ba TWMH on 5.8 acres.
Abore ground poo, storage she4
workshop, & much more! $220,000
2Br/2Ba on 2.5Acres. Hardwood
floors, knoty pine walls,encedyard
great starer home! $ 129,90Q
S IBr/IBa great oplionsfor expansion
for 2 more bedrooms. Hardwood
floors, gasfreplace. S 129,900
SReduced' 3Br/IBa. Coopers Pond
Brick hom e, 2shde, close to town,
Great price! S 139,900


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com




Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $ ;,5 6
Now $76,500

Priced to Sell Under Contract 1993
Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2 bath home on 2.5
acres in Li'lyd Acres paved road frontage
$76,500,

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote,
oaks, pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Freeman Road 13.29 acres of pasture land
with easy access' to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only
3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property us 19
South near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres under
contract 5 available on the east side of town
high and dry in quiet locAtion with lots of
game, 9 year old planted pines, profit from
both appreciating land and growing pine Now
$9,500 per

Near Lake Hall Under Contract 2
wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres Under Contract -3
bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres with
a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!


For CopleteInfomaio
wwwrowlluctonsco


IB


I


m






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 14, 2006


" We'll Do Whatever it takes!!


12-


I


8-12
AWAL iAV


800-771-1144 ThomasvilleHonda.com
: i


_____iow Mil -, low Prices Used Cars/Iv s Ts-

Low Miles Low Prices Used Cars/Used Trucks


2005 Honda Accord LK






4 Cy., 18,428 Miles, Automatic.,
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2004 Lincoln Navigator






31,811 Miles, Sunroof/LifIgate,6 Disc,
4 Capt Chairs, Third Row Power-* #4712A

2005M nsler Town m Cotrv


2003 Honda Element El


21.300 Miles, Automatic. Keyless Entry,
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7,833 Miles. PW/PL.
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2005 Nissan Altima


2006 Honda CRV IX


4WD. PWIPL Keyless Entry.
CD, Tilt. Cruise #4769A

2004 Ford Mustang






40th Anniversary. 18,302 Miles. CD,
PWIPL, VS, Chrome Wheels .44.47M

2002 Mini Cooper S


2004 Tovota Corolla CE


2005 Toyota Camry LE


S -%


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31,585 Miles. Cruise,
CD, Automatic #P2076

2005 Toyota Rav 4


Limited 9.385 Miles, Leather, Sunroof. 29,839 Miles, PW/PL,
CD, Navigcatlon Chrome Wheels #-44681A CD,* #P2085


2001 Ford Ranger Edge


Aulorratic, PW/PL. 45.671 Miles,
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Clolh interior*. P4670B


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21,631 Miles, One of a Kind!'!

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Loaded, Nice Car* #4018A


S" ,, *



Cruise, CD.Cassette
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2005 Chevy TrailBlazer


16,846 Miles, PWiPL, CD,
TiltlCruise. Cloth Seats #P2076


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New Hondas I, Stock & Inboundm




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I t I T i TM MW'", am

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VT


1610


E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA 1-800-771-1144
www.ThomasvilleHonda.com


Monday Friday 9A-7P Saturday 9A-6P Sunday 12P-5P
Service Department open Saturday 8A-2P
Photos for Illustrative purposes only
*Savings may reflect dealer incentives Plus tax, title and license. Subject to prior sale. Financing on select models for limited terms with qualified credit.
** H n


JI: f 51


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