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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00120
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 5, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00120
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Main continued
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
Full Text

771 V) ,


r.A T N r-'';i~


S A I pi'- '


Chamber Helps

Enrich Student

Experiences

Story, Page 6
I


Park Director

Reports Spring

Sports Scores

Story, Page 9
Now


:. 1 2 ,l1


Wednesday Morning







/ ontice0 lo


138TH YEAR NO.27 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5,2006


Sheriff ows His


Will Avoid


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The incident involving the
Jefferson County Sheriffs De-
partment that resulted in a
Leon County jury last week
awarding a total of $2 million
in punitive and compensatory
damages to three South Florida
plaintiffs occurred in 2001.
That was the first point that
Sheriff David Hobbs empha-


"For whatever reason, it
wasn't handled appropriately,"
Hobbs said. "But I don't want
to slam anyone real hard."
Handled appropriately how?
By law, the department is
required to provide public re-
cords when a request is made,
Hobbs said, referring to the re-
quest made by the plaintiffs
attorney in October, 2001. '
The attorney was seeking re-
lease of the records pertaining
to the July, 2001, traffic stop


,~'1 '"
'y- 4


,;!f ..


SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS believes the matter could have
been better handled in 2001. (News Photo)


sized Monday.
"I was not sheriff then," he
said, referring to his 2004 elec-
tion.
His second point: the inci-
dent should have been handled
in 2001. Handled appropriately
in 2001, it would never have
reached the level it did.


on Tram Road that the Leon
County jury last week found
violated the civil rights of a
Delray Beach family.
Had the records been pro-
vided upon request, the lawsuit
possibly could have been
avoided, Hobbs opined. As to
why the Sheriffs Department


Sheriff Dept insurance

Policy Should Pay $2M


didn't release the records at the
time, he couldn't say, he said.
"It's unfortunate," Hobbs
said. "Had it been dealt with in
the appropriate manner, we
wouldn't be dealing with it
now."
As for the $2 million the
jury awarded the plaintiffs, the
department's insurance policy
should cover the cost, he said.
"Historically, the insurance
company has covered all dam-
ages, whether punitive or com-
pensatory," Hobbs said.
If there is any cost to taxpay-
ers, he expects it will be in
higher insurance premiums.
But even here, he didn't expect
the amount to be outrageous,
H-obbs said.
"It will probably be a mini-
mum increase on the premium
end, if anything," he said.
Hobbs would not comment
on the racial slurs allegedly ut-
tered by one of the six officers
involved in the incident.
"I wasn't there," he said.
But based on all the infor-
mation that he had been privy
to, "there is absolutely no indi-
cation, to my knowledge, that
a strip search of any one was
ever ordered or carried out," he
said.
In the lawsuit, the plaintiffs
alleged that a Leon County fe-
male deputy was called to
scene and instructed to strip
search the mother and 15-year-
old daughter.
"Upon her arrival, the female
deputy searched Mrs. (Arnetta)
McCloud and allegedly groped


FORTUNE
...was sheriff at time of in-
cident
McCloud's genital area without
even using a sterile glove," the
suit accused. "The McCloud's
15-year-old daughter was then
ordered to remove her clothes
and bend over in full view of
passing cars and male
deputies. The female deputy
then performed an illegal and
unnecessary search on the mi-
nor."
Hobbs said the evidence in-
dicated that a Leon County fe-
male deputy was called to the
scene and instructed by the
ranking officer to conduct a
pat down of the two women.
But the female officers took
the women away from the
deputies to conduct the pat
down, Hobbs said.
"She never asked anyone to
take their clothes off," he said,
adding that the search took
place at midnight on a se-


Policies


eluded road.
As for the individuals in-
volved in the incident, three of
them -- Major Mike Joyner
and deputies George Stinson
and David Clark -- have since
left the department.
Hobbs stands by the two re-
maining deputies, Gerald
Knecht and Dwayne Hayes.
"1 have no problem standing
behind Dwayne and Gerald,"
Hobbs said. "They are compe-
tent, compassionate law-
enforcement officers. All they
did was follow direct orders
from a superior. If it was clear
to me that someone had vio-
lated the law or policy and
procedure, they wouldn't work
for me. But the evidence does
not support that."
Added, Major Bill Bullock:
"If there were criminal or ad-
ministrative violations, they
would have been dealt with. If
it's there, I will certainly deal
with it. I have no problem
dealing with things like that."
Hobbs made the further
point that no complaints have
ever been filed against either
deputy, before or after the
2001 incident.
"I won't sacrifice the position
that the people entrusted to me
to back someone who's
wrong," Hobbs said. "If I did-
n't know in my heart that these
boys were innocent, I wouldn't
back them."
Part of the reason that the
court found in favor of the
plaintiffs, Hobbs believes, is
that the subjects were detained
too long.
According to the.plaintiffs'
testimony, officers detained
the family for more than three


lncidents


hours while they searched the
vehicle for drugs, waited for
the K-9 unit to arrive, waited
for the female deputy to arrive,
and then escorted the family to







.' .
..- J







JOYNER
...was ranking officer at
the scene

a relative's house, which they
also proceeded to search for
drugs.- No drugs were ever
found.
Two hours would seem a
reasonable time to conduct a
vehicle search by the side of
the road, Hobbs said. And un-
der normal circumstances, two
hours would be more than suf-
ficient time, he said.
A reasonable time, of course,
is a matter of interpretation, he
added.
Officers in the middle of an
investigation don't check their
watches to ensure that they're
staying within reasonable time
limits, he said. They tend to
see the various activities -- in-
cluding the waiting for the ar-
-(See Sheriff Page 11)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Encouragement of conserva-
tion subdivisions: That is the
stated aim of the guidelines
that a committee of the Plan-
ning Commission is in the
process of formulating for re-
view by the full body.
So far, the committee --
composed of planners Brad
Mueller, Angela Gray and
Corwin Padgett -- has been
working on the fringes of the
project.
It's to say, the group has
more or less agreed on two
preliminary proposals that be-
gin to lay the foundation for
conservation subdivisions.
The first calls for wetland
acres to be counted at half the
value of upland acres, when it
comes to transferring housing
credits from wet to dry areas.
This would apply in cluster-
ing situations where a devel-
oper wants housing credits for
acreage that is under water.
Under the old model, wetland


acres counted the same as up-
land acres.
Under the committee's pro-
posal -- which applies to zon-
ing districts Ag-3 (one house
per three acres), Ag-5 (one
house per five acres), and Ag-
20 (one house per 20 acres) --
it will require twice as many
wetland acres as upland acres
to justify a dwelling unit.

Group Meets
Next April 17
in Chamber

The second proposal calls for
a minimum dry lot size of 1.5
acres. Meaning that every par-
cel in the three respective dis-
tricts must contain 1.5 acres of
dry land before a dwelling unit
will be permitted.
Last Wednesday, the com-
mittee briefly touched on the
desirability of encouraging
conservation subdivisions and
how best to go about establish-
ing guidelines that encourage
such developments.
Conservation subdivisions,


in effect, ensure the preserva-
tion of green spaces by con-
centrating or clustering the
housing units in smaller areas,
while dedicating a major por-
tion of the property to conser-
vation easement.
The intent, according to the
concept's proponents, is to re-
duce urban sprawl and pre-
serve the rural character of a
community.
Among the points briefly
discussed last Wednesday was
the idea of offering developers
incentives, variously called
"carrots", to encourage conser-
vation subdivisions.
The carrot, in effect, would
consist of an offer to allow a
higher density than the particu-
lar zoning designation permits,
provided the developer agrees
to clustering.
"Here's the carrot," Padgett
said at one point, pretending to
be talking to a developer. "You
can put 60 houses now. But if
you cluster, you can do 65
houses."
Hines Boyd, a citizen attend-
(See Planners Page 11)


;, y .:..? .-


CITIZENS have now begun attending the meetings of the Planning Commission's
committee. Attending last week's meeting were Hines Boyd and George Carswell.
(News Photo)
. le' Servk --"I -,,ir East
lrl i e S u,'@


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials were expected
to approve an agreement on
Tuesday that will guarantee
city water to an out-of city
developer.
The water committee, at
least, was scheduled to
recomminid to the City
Council Itha it enter anl


agreement with James
MacFarland to provide water
to his W\olf Creekl subdivision.
Located about two miles east
of Monticello on the north side
of UJS 90. the plan calls for a
subdivision consisting of 33
houses that will be clustered
on 43 acres.
The remaining 65 acres of
the 108-acre parcel will be
dedicated to a conservation
casement, a stipulationi


imposed by the County
Commission in its approval of
the development.
IThe draft agreement worked
out between MacFarland and
the citv's water committee on
March 28 calls bfr the
developer to pay the cost of
the water extension.
In return, the city promises
to reimburse MacFarland up to
$41.250 as and when the 33
(See City Page 11)


Help Teenager

With Road

Safety

Editorial, Page 4


Wacissa UMC

Raises $4,000

At Relay Event

Story, Page 14
I


gl~D""~OL~~ ~S~e"P~I-l~""s~9as~s~a~


I


WE


imew


I


PlannerS To Promote


Rurai Character Here








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006

Education Rally Draws


Most Participation Yet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The fifth annual Educational
Rally drew the largest num-
ber of participants date, Coor-
dinator Mary Madison
reports.
Presentations included
"Just Move Jefferson," by
Kim Barnhill, Health Depart-
ment director.
Other presenters included
Karen DeRosier of the Epi-
lepsy Association of the Big
Bend Area, who fitted and
supplied each child with a
safety helmet; Bonnie Mathis
of the Diabetes DOers, Shena
McFadden of Healthy Start,
and Dyana Prevatt for the En-
vironmental Health (clean
water) group.
Each group displayed and
distributed information and
fun items for the children,
such as safety key chain whis-
tles, pencils, T-shirts and
miniature footballs with
healthy and safety messages
and numbers for contacts.
The audience -was enter-
tained with presentations
from the Boys and Girls Club
groups, including the Smart
Girls, directed by Sharica Par-
rish. The girls danced to the
music, "I love You".
Other entertainers included:
Monticello African Drum-
mers, (MAD) Wilbur Davis,
director, and the Karate
group, Kiture Burke, director.
Participants were also given
a Kelly green and white print
"I am committed" T-shirt, the
logo, "I am committed, en-
lighten me encourage me, em-
brace me because... I am con-
fident, I am energetic, I am
fallible."
In the absence of Mayor Ju-
lie Conley, Vice-mayor Ger-
rold Austin presented former
Miami Dolphins All Pro Sam
Madison, with the key to the
cir, aand d read a proclanlion,
proclaiming '.larcl isi
Sam-Mvadison Dayp-in'-recog--
nition of Madison's dedicated
services and outstanding par-
ticipation in each educational
rally.
The rally events ended with
the give away of door prizes,
autographs and photos with
Sam Madison.


On behalf of Sam and wife
Saska, executive director of
Madison Avenue For Kids
Foundation, Inc., Mary Madi-
son added that she would like
to give a big, "God bless you"
to the following supporters
for their financial donations,
time, services and or prizes:
Steve Andris/JCKC, Willie
Sloan/Branch Street and Al
.Hall DBA Tillman Funeral
Homes, Tommy Surles Insur-
ance Agency, Inc., County
Judge Robert "Bobby"
Plaines, Steve Walker Realty,,
Inc., Dr. Rosa Thorne Foun-
dation, Inc., (Quitman, GA),
Lois Hunter/Tax Collector,
Law Offices of David Collins,
Farmers and Merchants Bank



Odum Earns

GED At

Adult School

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Kelvonte Odum was re-.
cently awarded his GED and
named the twenty-ninth
graduate at the Adult School
this year.
"GED testing was a quick,
yet challenging way for me to
earn my diploma," said
Odum. "I chose to take the
GED because I was ready to
pursue my career in cosmetol-
ogy.
He plans to attend Lively
Technical Institute.
"There are many opportuni-
ties in the world," said Odum.
"And this was my opportunity
to prove that if you believe,
you will achieve."

FHP Corrects
Report Error
FHP Trooper Williams T.
Grubbs reported Monday
morning,.that the-.eport .he,
prepared March 17, stating
Greenville resident Rose
Smith was fatally injured, was
inaccurate.
"It was an inadvertent typo-
graphical error and I truly
apologize, it was my
mistake," said Grubbs.


(Jefferson branches), Eugina.
Dunn/Dunn Furniture,
Cricket, Marvin and Jake Ed-
wards, Sheriff David Hobbs
Barbara Gamble/CVS, and
Willie Ann Dickey, Juliet
Jackson, principal HMS, Carl
Anderson/Battle One, and
Cynthia/Subway.
"The generosity of everyone
was wonderful," said Madi-
son. "Hopefully, everyone
went home a lot more in-
formed and happy with the
treats donated."
Refreshments served were
Subway sandwiches, cheese
balls, animal crackers,. treats
for the children and fruit
punch.


VICE MAYOR Gerrold Austin presents Sam Madison with the Key to the City and
reads the proclamation for the day at the Educational Partnership V. (News Photo)


Saturday SHARE


Registration Day


ADULT SCHOOL Principal Artis Johnson
vonte Odum with his GED Certificate.
29th student to graduate this school
Photo)


presents Kel-
Odum is the
year. (News


Vaccinate Horses For

Equine Encephalitis


Horse owners in the county
are urged to vaccinate their
horses against Eastern Equine
Encephalitis (EEE) and.West
Nile Virus, as mosquito season
gets underway.
Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson reports
that four cases of EEE have al-
ready been confirmed in Flor-
ida since January, even though
..the, first c4afs.a.e got usually
seen until May.
Bronson said the majority of
cases can be prevented through
proper vaccinations and
booster shots against mosquito
borne illnesses, and notes this
is the time to take action.
"Now that the mosquito sea-


son is upon us, it is critical
that horse owners take steps to
protect their animals.
"We have already seen some
EE cases because of the rela-
tively warm winter, and we
need to ensure that these cases
are kept to a minimum," Bron-
son states.
EEE is a viral disease that af-
fects the central nervous sys-
tem. and is transmitted to
horses by infected mosquitoes.
Signs of the virus include fe-
ver, listlessness, stumbling,
circling, coma, and usually
death.
The diseases is fatal to
horses in 90 percent of the
cases.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Registration for Aucilla-
SHARE is scheduled for 10
a.m. 12 p.m. Saturday, April
8 at Central Baptist Church on
Tindell Road in Aucilla and at
the public library on South
Water Street.
The Basic Package for April
is a guaranteed retail value of
$36 or more, for the price of
$1'8.
The package includes 1 lb.
Talapia, 1 lb. boneless pork
chops, 1.7 lbs. chicken drums,
1 lb. Salisbury patties, 1 Ilb.
lightly dusted chicken tender
loins, 12 oz. smoked sausage,
1 lb. frozen peas and carrots,
plus a selection of fruits and
vegetables.
There are also tliree April
Specials for an added cost.
They include a 3 lb. boneless
beef ribeye Delmonico roast
for $12;
A combo pack including 2
each 4 oz. boneless pork
chops, 4 each 4 oz. (80-20)
pure beef hamburger patties, 2
each 4 oz. boneless chicken
breasts, and 2 each 5 oz.
USDA choice boneless beef
sirloin filets for $11.50.
And 8 6 oz. lightly breaded
chicken breasts stuffed with


chives and parsley butter for
$11.
Pick-up and Distribution
Day for this month's SHARE
is set for Saturday, April 22.


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will meet at 9:00
a.m. April 12,
2006, at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street.


air purifier
It's simple Look ifr the
ENERGY STAR"' to reduce
your home energy use

To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

LAND USE CHANCE

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND
USE MAP; RE-DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 377 ACRES FROM MIXED USE SUBURBAN
RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL 3 TO RESIDENTIAL 1 WITH A
LIMIT OF 204 DWELLING UNITS ON THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT;
PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

Jefferson County Commission will have a public hearing.on adoption of proposed comprehensive plan land
use change in the Waukeenah area. The proposed change is from Mixed Use Suburban-Residential and
Agriculture 3 to the Residential 1 land use category. The subject property includes parcel numbers.08-1S-
4E-0000-0550-0000 and 17-1S-4E-0000-Q020-0000 and contains approximately 377 acres. The location of
the proposed land use map change is indicated on the map below.


A public hearing on adoption of the proposed land use change will be held on April 20, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as such matter may be heard, at the courtroom of the Jefferson County courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The meeting may be continued as necessary. The
application material may be reviewed at the County Planning Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill Road,
Monticello, FL. From the Florida "Government in the Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice
of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or
she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

AMENDMENT



JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

ORDINANCE NO. _

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF THE CURRENT
FUTURE LAND USE MAP; PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION OF A NEW
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
PROVIDING FOR NO SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT;
PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN;
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


The Jefferson County Commission will hold a public hearing on adoption of the proposed geographic information
system based future land use map change that will amend the area of the entire county wide area Jefferson County
Comprehensive Plan.


JEFFERSON COUNTY


The public hearing on the adoption of the proposed comprehensive plan amendment ordinance will be held on April
20, 2006 at 6:00 pm., or as soon thereafter as such matter may be heard, in the courtroom of the county courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be
necessary. Information concerning the amendment is available at the Jefferson County Planning Department, 445
W. Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223. From the Florida 'Government in the Sunshine
Manual' Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006 PAGE 3


- Students May Qualify


STo Win Computers
.... .n miot an, nig scnoo1i.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


PILOT ARMIS PENTON donatated two 30 minute flyovers of Jefferson County, during
a recent Home Town Get Down. At left is Dewey Johnson, who flew with Penton over
the county, recently. (News Photo)



Library Will Present Two

Sessions Of Computer Classes


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Computer classes begin at
the library, 10 a.m. April 11.
Class #1 Beginning Micro-
soft Excel 2003, will meet 10
a.m. 12 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Wednesdays during the
weeks of April 11 through
April 26.
Participants will learn the ba-
sics of Microsoft Excel, a
spreadsheet that will also per-
form database functions.
Students will also learn how
to develop single formulas and
make a chart using the chart
wizard.
Class #2 Internet Basics,
will meet 10 a.m. 12 p.m. on
Thursday and Fridays during
the weeks of April 13 through
April 28.
Internet Basics is an intro-
ductory class on navigating the
Internet.
Participants will learn how
the Internet works, learn to use
Internet Explorer 6.0, and get
an introduction to basic search
techniques.
In addition, participants will
learn how to open an e-mail ac-
count using Yahoo Mail, send
and save email, and set up an
address book.
Prerequisites for these


classes are that students should
have a basic understanding of
the Windows operating system
and must be able to use a
mouse.
For example, students should
know how to launch an appli-
cation, and create and save
miles.


These classes are for serious
applicants only.
Space is limited to nine par-
ticipants per class.

To register, contact Angela
at the Library 342-0205.
There will be a $10 fee for
supplies.


Sally Shovar To Exhibit

At Jefferson Arts, Inc.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson Arts will host a re-
ception for artist Sally
Shovar, 2-4 p.m. Sunday,
April 9, and daily, 10 a.m. un-
til 4 p.m.
Shovar lives in Moultrie,
GA, and received her BA in
Art History and Art from
Humboldt State University
Arcata, CA in 1978.
She exhibits at art centers
amd i 'l'.. throughout the
state of GA.
Shovar teaches and denion-
strates painting and drawing
at the art centers in Thomas-
ville and Moultric.
Hler studio work focuses on
portraits and still life and for a
creative balance, she creates


abstract paintings.
She is famous in southwest
Georgia, for her blue streaked
hair and portrait drawing
skills.
She jokes that she is leaving
a legacy to all the children in
local schools who will forever
think that one has to have
blue hair to qualify as a real
artist..
Special viewing can be
done by calling 997-3311 or
997-2975.


/ You CMan Find

/ News Without Favor...

Monticello

N ews


Area elementary, middle and
high school students now'
have the opportunity to win
one of six desk top
computers.
Speaking during the recent
fifth annual Educational
Rally, Saskia Madison, ex-
ecutive director for Madison
Avenue For Kids (MAFK),
emphasized that the mission
of MAFK was to motivate
youth and their families, and
to help them achieve through
educational empowerment.
In hopes of recruiting new
members for the Boys and
Girls Club, and encouraging
new and current members to
work harder to maintain and
improve grades in school, the
offer was forthcoming.
To be eligible, individuals
must be a member of the
Monticello/Jefferson Boys
and Girls Club, have attended
the most recent educational
rally, show most improve-
ment academically in the last
semester of school, or have
the highest grade point aver-
age at the end of the school
year.
Computers will be awarded
to two students at the elemen-
tary, middle and high schools.
Registration applications for
the computer give away can


be picked up at any Boys and
Girls Club site, and the dead-
line for submitting those ap-
plications is April 17.
Madison also gave high
praise to the VFW Post 251
and Ladies Auxiliary for their
efforts in educational empow-
erment in their Patriot's Pen
Essay and Voice of Democ-
racy audio competitions.
The youth scholarship pro-
grams are offered to students


in middle and high school.
The first place winners can
receive $15 up to $30,000,
among other incentives.
The deadline for entries is
Nov. 1, 2006 and the Voice of
Democracy theme is "Free-
dom's Challenge".
For further information on
all named competitions, call
Rally Coordinator/Foundation
Board Member Mary Madi-
son at 997-4504 or 210-7090.


Ghost Trackers Plan

Ghost Hunting Workshop


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Big Bend Ghost Trackers
have slated the Spring Ghost
Hunting 101 Workshop 10
a.m, April 29, at a location to
be announced..
The day-long event that
runs until approximately 10
p.m., includes segments con-
cerning the anatomy of a
ghost hunt, who can be a
ghost hunter, where to find
ghosts, spirit communication,
ghost photography, videos of
ghost hunts, how to capture
ghosts on film, how to record
voices from the dead, how to
conduct a ghost investigation,
the ghost hunters tool kit, the
where, what, why and when


of ghost hunting.
The special guest for the
workshop will be Psychic
Medium Sissy Taylor-Maloy,
who will teach spirit commu-
nication and will demonstrate
how to contact loved ones
who have crossed over, with a
gallery reading.
She will also offer personal
psychic readings for an addi-
tional charge.
Also included in the work-
shop is the haunted walking
tour where stories and histo-
ries are told of each of the lo-
cations, and their hauntings.
Concluding the workshop is
an actual ghost hunt in the old
1827 cemetery.
The fee for the workshop is
$25 per person.


THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY
ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED


DATE: April 10, 2006
TIME: 4:00 p.m.
PLACE: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, Fl. 32344


SUBJECT: Staffing Allocations




IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

TEXT AMENDMENTS


JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

ORDINANCE NO.

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL
AREAS OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT; AMENDING THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO REPEAL POLICY 1-2, BY ADOPTING A
NEW POLICY 1-2, CREATING NEW STANDARDS FOR FAMILY MEMBER
SUBDIVISIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

The Jefferson County Commission will hold a public hearing on adoption of the proposed text changes that
will amend the county wide Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan.




t,- on, icTollo. -.-

>, /
CD-











JEFFERSON COUNTY
The public hearing on adoption of the proposed comprehensive plan amendment ordinance will be held on
April 20, 2006 at 6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as such matter may be heard, in the courtroom of the
county courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing may be continued
from time to time as may be necessary. Information concerning the amendment is available at the Jefferson
County Planning Department, 455 West Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223.
From the Florida 'Government in the Sunshine Manual' Each board, commission, or agency of this state or
of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting
or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any
matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for
such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


NOTICE F COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND

USE CHANGE
AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND
USE MAP; RE-DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 73 ACRES FROM AGRICULTURAL 5 TO
AGRICULTURE 3 ON THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Jefferson County Board of County Commission will hold a public hearing on the adoption of a proposed
comprehensive plan land use change ordinance. The future land use map change proposed for adoption is
from Agriculture 5 to Agriculture 3 for parcel numbers 35-1N-4E-0000-0060-0000 and 02-1S-4E-0000-
0020-0000. The subject property is shown on the map below.


The public hearing on adoption of the proposed ordinance will be held on April 20, 2006 at 6:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as such matter may be heard, in the courtroom of the county courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing may be continued as necessary. Information
concerning the proposal may be reviewed at the county planning office, 455 West Palmer Mill Road,
Monticello, FL 32344. From the Florida "Government in the Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or
she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON

Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Help Teenager


With Road Safety- Opinion & Comment
.. -m mmm


BOBBY HAMILTION
Guest Opinion

According to the latest in-
formation from the Insurance
Institute for Highway Safety
(IIHS), teens have the highest
crash risk of any drivers, at
nearly four times that of driv-
ers over 20. In fact, the IIHS
says 39 percent of all deaths of
16- to 19- year-olds are caused
by car accidents, making it the
leading public health problem
for teenagers.
It's the parents' responsibil-
ity to teach kids how to be safe
in the driver's seat. My son
became a race car driver while
he was still in his teens, so I
really understand the fear of
putting your child behind the
wheel.
"It is more important than
ever to think "Safety First" be-
fore teens get behind the wheel
and onto the open road," said
Brad Eggleston vice president
of Auto Vantage, a leading car
care and travel assistance
group.
Here are a few tips for par-
ents: 1. Give the driver's seat
to your teen. Recent reports
suggest teens need between 25
and 50 hours of supervised
driving before getting a
license. Stay calm. If you


panic, so will your child.
Cover parking, multiple
lanes, various road types,
weather conditions and differ-
ent days and times. Draw at-
tention to safety hazards and
day-to-day conflicts. Simple,
straightforward instructions are
best.
2. Limit the number of friends
allowed in the car when your
child drives.
3. Wear your seat belt. Some
63 percent of fatally injured
teens are unrestrained. Lead
by example.
4. Continue to periodically
ride with your licensed teen.
The sudden freedom her or she
gains with a license can result
in risky behavior, such as
speeding. Teens are new to
the road and can be overconfi-
dent.
5. No cell phone. The IIHS
says drivers with cell phones
are four times more likely to
be involved in crashes that re-
sult in injuries.
6. Drinking and driving don't
mix. Make yourself available
should things get out of hand.
Blood alcohol concentrations
as low as 0.02 percent can hin-
der a driver's ability to track
moving targets.
Bobby Hamilton, is the 2004
NASCAR Craftsman Truck Se-
ries Champion.


__ m -


We re 0 Id Da y s Re ally Good ?


You hear a lot of talk these
days about the "good old
days."
The good old days really
mean enough time has passed
so we only remember the good
things and forget the bad
things. For example, as the
years pass, former servicemen
have a tendency to talk about
the good old days when they
were in the military. Forgotten
were the field drills, KP,
guard duty and other unpleas-
ant recollections but remem-
bered are the old girlfriends
and the nights on the town.
1 remember when the Satur-
day movie cost nine cents and
I went with a quarter in my
pocket. Nine cents for the
show and 16 cents for candy
and popcorn. Wow!
But I also remember mowing
hugh lawns with a push
mower after hours of work get-
ting the magnificent sum of 50
cents.
Two or three pennies could
buy enough candy to last a
good part of the afternoon and
if you had a nickel you were in
tall clover in the candy depart-
ment.


Publisher's

Notebook


I knew the candy counter
from both sides; as a customer
and as the vendor. Working in
my uncle's sundry store, one
of my jobs, one of my jobs
was to take care of the little
tykes who came in with their
pennies in hand.
Several candies sold two for
a penny so the little people
would say "Gimme two of
those and one of these." Then
they'd change their mind and
say "No, make it one of those
and two of these."
There was an empty box on
the third shelf of the candy
counter and I would put the
pennies or nickels there. At
the end of the day, the take at


Vi1P


the candy counter would be
somewhere: between 75 cents
and a dollar and a half. This
was real high finance.
Then there was the terrific
job I landed in a restaurant one
summer. I think I got the job
because when the restaurant
opened on a Sunday morning
the proprietor found me lean-
ing against the door. I was
afraid somebody else would
get there before me and get the
job.
What a job it was! The heat
in the kitchen a constant 97 de-
grees, I had to peel hundreds
and hundreds of pounds of po-
tatoes, not to mention carrying
boxes of supplies downstairs to


pots and pans for hours at a
" time and in general keep things
Stidy.
SFor 40.hours of this, I re-
Sceived a little over $20 a week
and all I wanted to eat so long
as I didn't stop working.
One hot afternoon (they were
all hot) fatigue had hit me and
I sat down at a small table in
the kitchen to eat my lunch.
The owner never came in at
W lunch so I felt perfectly safe
violating his instructions not to
stop working while eating.
Half way through my lunch,
who should be standing next to
the table but the owner. He
went into a rage reminding me
he did not want me to stop
working while I ate.
and bumped the plate which
smashed on the floor. If the
owner -was angry before, he
really was upset now; not only
did I sit down to eat but now I.
broke the plate He stormed
back and forth in the kitchen
with his hand on his brow say-
ing "My God, My God."
Ah, the good old days.
Seems to me the good old days
were a mixed bag, very much
-. like today.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
April 3, 1996
Traditional Good Friday
services are scheduled for
noon Friday at the First Pres-
byterian Church.
Mark L. Bellamy has an-
nounced his candidacy for the
congressional seat for the Sec-
ond Florida District.
The community group MAD
DADS recently received a
grant from the Department of
Juvenile Justice for the imple-
mentation of the program here
that would deter first and
second-time juvenile offenders
from moving deeper into the
criminal justice system.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
April 2, 1986
Bid requests for the new
public library have been pre-
pared, and advertising will be-
gin next week.
Sixty-five picture of local
youngsters were entered this
year in the "Jefferson Cuties
Contest" sponsored by the
Monticello News.
Farmers and Merchants Bank
has been included on this
weekend's Tour of Homes by
the historical association.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
April 1, 1976
Esther Connolly, president of
the Jefferson County Historical
Association, has been named
Bicentennial Patriot for her
work in historic preservation
by the Bicentennial Commis-
sion of Florida.


Larry Halsey, new county
agent, began duties here this
week.
Sailing aboard the luxurious
Emerald Seas sailing from Mi-
ami to Nassau and Freeport
were Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Nix.
The winners of the Miss
ACA Pageant are Marjorie
Hawkins, Jr. Miss, and Susan
Newman, Miss ACA.
Saturday's rainfall could not
dampen the enthusiasm for the
1976 version of Tour of
Homes as some 150 people
went on the tour despite the
weather.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 1, 1966,
Mrs. Jack Hamilton of Mon-
ticello has been named Jeffer-
son County chairman for the
1966 Easter Seal Fund Drive.
Some fifty business people
of Jefferson County were the
guests last Thursday of the
Florida Development Commis-
sion in Tallahassee as the
heads of the various depart-
ments outline the work they
are doing to promote Florida
and pointed to ways they could
be of assistance of Jefferson
County.
About 40 members and
friends of the Jefferson County
Historical Association met on
Monday night to hear the his-
tory of Aucilla. Mrs. Oliver
Scruggs was in charge of the
meeting.
(See From Our Page 5)


Bush Stu


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Like 70 percent of Ameri-
cans, I have a growing disap-
pointment in the second term
of the Bush Administration.
Surprisingly, it's not the rising
gas prices or even the war in
Iraq that has me discouraged,
but the lackadaisical and often
unbelievable responses and in-
activity coming out of the
White House.
1 don't blame Bush directly
because no one person could
run the country by themselves.
Rather, I question the credibil-
ity and actual intelligence of
those close political advisers
who surround every president.
Take the recent clambering
over the Dubai ports deal. If I
had been advising the presi-
dent, I would have told him to
go public with, "This was a


private b
going to
the Anme
not going
rity for
dealings.
Instea
convince
the gaun
deal to t
stupid do
were the'
Then
cane Ka
know thi
to go arc
the Mayo
the way
We we
footed" a
sive dev
should hE
What
pected, N
from all
The may
the bus


mbling
business deal, but I am evacuate
investigate it to assure leave, the
erican people we are have ac
g to sacrifice our secu- positioned
any outside business and equip
action a
d, his trusted advisors believe, t!
-d him to throw down have nati
ntlet and defend the operation
he death. Stupid is as available
oes. What in the world ment and f
y thinking? give imme
there was the hurri- mately to C
trina debacle. We all Instea
ere is plenty of blame pointing f
found in this one from accepted
or of New Orleans all glued to t
to the White House. ing daily
re all caught "flat destruction
and upset by the mas- ago! Whe
station, but no one help today
ave been "surprised". The area
was needed and ex- are still t
was' a rapid response with no
government agencies. Mayor is
ior should have used having M
es and Amtrak to revenue t


'Nanny Tips' For


DEBORAH CARROL
AND STELLA REID


If there's one thing we've
learned as nannies, it's that
parents need to be parents so
children can be children.
Following that basic rule will
help families get along in a
happy and healthy way.
Establishing consistency,
consequences and helping
children establish routines car.


all go a long way toward
nurturing their development.
To help parents get a handle
on these and other parental
tasks, we've come up with
what we call "nanny
commandments." HIere are
some tips:
Actions Ilave
Consequences. Good behavior
is rewarded. Bad behavior
comes with penalties.
Establish A Routine.
For example, at bedtime we


have the
bath, briu
bed.
Parents
routine lif
S
And MIea
you spleal
price.
P
Together
can't be
your child
know who


On issues
those willing to Governor has disappeared
e Governor should completely and the White
tivated and pre- House still isn't effectively do-
the National Guard ing anything!
ment to spring into Now for the outrageous gas
and ultimately, I prices. Please don't treat us as
he President should idiots! Big oil companies can't
onalized the entire have record breaking profits
and launched all and still charge high prices at
military units, equip- the pump. Even the elemen-
facilities necessary to tary math just doesn't work.
mediate relief and ulti- If the oil companies were
clean up the mess. maintaining "level profits" and
ad everyone started simply passing along the price
fingers. the President of higher oil costs, O.K. But
blae, and we sat our bone headed legislators
the television watch-
he television watch- want us to believe they are
live pictures of the "concerned" by calling all the
n. That was months oil big wigs to Washington for
re the heck is the "hearings".

a is still a mess, there At the end of the day, nothing
thousands of people changes and the big oil guys
place to live, the laugh all the way to the bank.
more interested in Where is the White House
larti Gras to raise leadership on this one?
o pay his salary, the (See Bush Page 5)




Results

four "B's" routine: they'll end up not listening to
sh teeth, book and anyone.
Don't Make Promises
can even make the You Can't Keep. If you tell the
Sby singing a song. kids you're going to
ay What You Mean Disneyland, better get ready to
n It. Think before pack your bags.
Sor you'll pay the Be Consistent. No
means no. Yes means yes.
parents Work Don't bend the rules for a
As A Team. If you short-term emotional gain.
on tle same page, Listen To Your Chil-
Iren are not going to dren. Acknowledge their feel-
om to listen to and (See Nanny Page 12)


From Our Photo File





A- -
I '"'i .





.-I


..."._.. ._. .......





S--







MEMBERS of the Humane Society met in Sept., 1990, to decide fall and spring ac-.
tivities and discuss the election of officers for the coming year. Present were: Rod-
ney Syphers, Jim Henrikson, Dick Sauer, Maryanne Sauer, Becky Pickle and Susan
Hagan. (News File Photo)


Cll~eaaraa~aee~Fsa~a~reWs~EL~~


I i -,-p ~g_-~ ILI L--L I411BICI~-A


,;qoll cli-floll











Letters...


Writer Describes Benefit Of


Forestry, Agriculture Here


Dear Editor:
Your recent article highlight-
ing Max Bilinski's opinion on
agriculture and development in
Jefferson County was interest-
ing, but contained several
flaws that I would like to point
out.
First of all, the article con-
tained the quote that: "The
price you're getting for trees is
half of what it was four years
ago."
Nothing could be further
from the truth. The most recent
price trends for Florida from
Timber Mart-South, as printed
in Spring, 2006 issue of "The
Florida Forest Steward," pub-
lished by the University of
Florida/IFAS, shows that state-
wide prices for pine pulpwood
and pine chip-n-saw are at, or
slightly above the early 2002
levels, and pine saw timber
prices are significantly higher.
On a more local level, our
firm's comparable sales re-
cords show that current prices
for Jefferson County are
roughly 50 percent higher for
pine pulpwood, about a third
higher for pine chip-n-saw,


and about 10 to 15 percent
higher for pine saw timber
than they were in 2002.
Our company markets mil-
lions of dollars worth of timber
each year for forest landown-
ers, so we make it our business
to know what timber prices are
doing.
The comments made by
"Coach Max" about the demise
of agriculture in the county are
also misguided. Certainly agri-
culture does not resemble what
we all knew 30 years ago, but
Jefferson County is blessed
with a thriving nursery indus-
try, two operating dairies, and
a variety of other agriculture
interests, such as beef cattle,
sod farming, peanuts, horses,
hay farming, and even goats.
In addition, the most recent
data collected by the state,
shows that the timber industry
alone contributes more that $2
million in payroll and more
than $18 million in forest
manufacturing output annually
to Jefferson County.
We also have a regional fer-
tilizer and farm supply, a feed
and seed store, two hardware
stores, and three oil distribu-


tors that service the agricul-
tural community.
Yes, the county's agriculture
has changed, but it is far from
dead.
Your newspaper coverage of
our local county Farm Bu-
reau's Farm/City Breakfast
should have driven home that
point.
Finally, although some de-
velopment for our county is in-
deed inevitable, it does not
have to signal the end of agri-
culture, and can be on our
terms if we so choose.
One thing is for sure: We
won't develop our way out of
our problems.
In the issue immediately pre-
ceding the aforementioned ar-
ticle, you newspaper cited a
joint study by 1000 Friends of
Florida and Tall Timbers that
was completed a few years
ago.
The study showed that rural
development actually costs
counties more in services they
must provide, than the tax
revenue they generate.
To think that more houses
and more people will solve the


problems with our schools, in-
frastructure, and county budg-
ets is simply delusional.
What our county really needs
is real industry that will pro-
vide real jobs for people.
Right now agriculture is one of
those industries.
In the future, I hope your ar-
ticles regarding agriculture and
;other topics will present a
more balanced view that con-
tains facutal information and a
variety of viewpoints, rather
than just one person's opinion.
David. S. Levis, RF, CF
Vice-President
Southern Forestry Consult-
ants, Inc,.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006 PAGE 5



THE JEFFERSON COUNTY

SCHOOL BOARD


Announces the regular school board meeting
which the public is invited. The meeting will
be held at the Desmond M. Bishop Adminis-
tration Building on Monday, April 10, 2005
at 6:00 p.m.


Agendas may be picked up at the district office
at 1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL.
Monday through Friday between the hours of
8.:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A copy of the school
board packet will be available for review at
the district office


"You Can't Be Without It"

Monticello News


Historical Association Thanks All


For Efforts
Dear Editor:
The Jefferson County His-
torical Association wishes to
publicly thank the homeown-
ers who graciously opened
their homes and the many vol-.
unteers who helped make the
2006 Tour of Homes a
success.
We will never know exactly
how many and who they are,
but the number of volunteers
would probably be about 200
community, members who
gave their time and talents to
put the event together.
Members of the Historical
Association, Chamber, Garden
Clubs, Altrusa, Kiwanis, Ro-


During Tour
tary, Beta Sigma Phi, and oth-
ers were working at the homes
and behind the scenes at the
many jobs necessary for a suc-
cessful tour.
Although we count this as
our major fundraiser, the main
purpose of the Tour is to bring
attention to the beautiful town
and county we have,.rich in
historic resources an scenic
countryside.
We would hope that in the
future, we will have more
"Tour guests," not just from
neighboring counties, but from
other areas as well.
As the county grows, there


Of Homes
are more and more new resi-
dents to introduce to the com-
munity.
Thank you, too, Mr. Cichon,
for your press coverage of the
Tour.
We hope that the advertising
was good for the businesses
who participated.
We appreciate the support
and encouragement from the
community and the Monticello
News for this, and other
events.
sincerely,
Beulah Brinson
Eleanor Hawkins
Tour Chairs


Bush Stumbling On issues


(Continued From Page 4)

Then there was this presiden-
tial promise by both candidates
to fix Social Security. Ya,
right. Absolutely everyone has
known for years' thai the sys-
tem is going broke fast, but
neither party is willing to do
the hard lifting to make any
significant changes.
Bush put his proposal before
Congress, but the political par-
tisanship and posturing got so
bloody the plan was finally
abandoned. Democrats some-
how applaud nothing being
done as a victory, but put for-
ward no credible plan of their
own to fix the problem! Once
again, stupid is as stupid does-
n't in this case.
Like President Clinton's
lame duck second term was


derailed by preoccupation and
knee jerk reactions to the
Lewinsky affair, Bush has the
Iraq war as the millstone hang-
ing around the neck of his sec-
ond term.
Unfortunately, those poor
Republicans in (or running for)
Congress this fall, are poised
to be the victims of George
Bush's stumbling and inept
second term.
By rights with the economy
being in great shape, unem-
ployment at an all time low,
interest rates still very reason-
able, the stock market well
above the 11,000 mark, and
personal home ownership at a
record levels, Republicans
should be flying high.
But, bad decisions out of the
White House on foreign poli-
cies and some domestic issues


is all that is needed in this par-
tisan political environment to
torpedo even the best of politi-
cians.


From Our
(Continued From Page 4)
FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 21, 1956
Olive Baptist Church was the
scene Saturday evening when
Miss Elizabeth Hamilton,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.B.
Hamilton became the bride of
William D. Powell, son of Mr.
and Mrs. T.L. Powell of Al-
bany.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M.
Cox of Monticello announced
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Shirley to Clyde H. Sauls
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde
H. Sauls of Monticello.


NORTH FLORIDA'S
LARGEST AC
HEATING & COOLING CONTRACTOR FOR THE
PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED
MO HOUSING
Florid .oNDUSTR Y

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Fla. Lie. #C050446, #RA0035243, Ga. Lic. #CN003927, L.P. Lic. #2406, ES-0000151


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts
the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.





The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://wwwcojeffersonfl,us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.














PAGE 6MONTICELLO(F 006


w -'A --


Leslie Williams Wil

Marry Anthony Sims


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Donna and Jeff Williams of
Monticello announce the en-
gagement and forthcoming
marriage of their daughter Les-
lie Marie Williams to Stephen
Anthony Sims son of Mallory
and Howard Sims of Day, FL.
Williams is the granddaugh-
ter of JC and Gloria Barnwell
of Monticello and Beatrice
Eakins of Greenville and the
late Lamar Eure of Havana.
The bride-to-be is graduating
from North Florida Commu-
nity College in May 2006 with
her Associates Degree.
Her plans are to pursue her
Bachelors Degree in Psychol-
ogy at Florida State University
in the fall.
She is currently employed at


Sunstate Title Service in Mon-
ticello.
Sims is the grandson of
Georgiana Sims and the late Al
Sims of Day, and Marjorie
Bell and the late Clarence Bell
of Live Oak.
He is a United States Naval
veteran, and is currently at-
tending North Florida Commu-
nity College where he is
pursuing his Associates De-
gree.
He is currently employed at
Jefferson Builders Mart in
Monticello.
An outside wedding is
planned at the Myrtlewxood
Plantation located in Thomas-
ville, GA. at 3:30 p.m. on Sat-
urday, May 20. 2006.
A Reception will follow at
the Myrllewood Clubhouse.
All family and friends are in-
vited to attend.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The First Baptist Church will
present an Easter Musical 'One
Holy Lamb', by Lari Goss,
Mike Speck, Danny Zaloudik,
and David Guthrie, 11 a.m.
Palm Sunday Service and 6
p.m. Saturday, April 15.
The musical came out in
2004 and includes slow, heart-
breaking songs and other num-


bers of praise and happiness
that are fast paced and
exciting.
"It is a varied musical which
should appeal to all," says Mu-
sic Director Sissy Kilpatrick.
She will be heard along with
a 45 voice choir.
Pastor Thermono Moore can
be reached at 997-2349 for
more information.
A nursery will be provided
for infants through 5 years of0
age.


Brynwood Sets Egg uLt'


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Brynwood Center will hold
an Easter Egg Hunt'10'a.m. -
12 p.m. Saturday on the
grounds of the Center.
This is an event for the com-



CARD OF THANKS
Thanks to all of our friends
who were so kind and thought-
ful to the Blackmon family
during the departure of our be-
loved "Lee."
No one knows pain except
one who has been afflicted.
No one knows sorrow unless
he has been called to grieve by
it, and there is no heart that
can bear with these burdens
without the love, thoughtful-
ness and care shown by
friends.
Your prayers, phone calls,
visits, flowers, gave us
strength to press on in the
Lord.
We thank you abundantly
and ask God's blessings on
each of you.
Annie P. Blackmon Family

CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Annie
B. Dean, beloved mother, sis-
ter, grandmother, friend and
cousin, wish to convey sincere
thanks for your kind expres-
sions of sympathy during our
recent sorrow.
We know that our pain will
decrease and what will remain
will always be.
Thank you for keeping us in
your thoughts and prayers.
The Dean & Blake Family

CARD OF THANKS
To our wonderful friends
and neighbors:
There are not enough words
to adequately express our
gratitude to this community for
the loving outreach of prayers,
food, cards, and support after
the loss of our beloved wife
and mother, Yvonne D. Bar-
field.
Our sincerest appreciation to
all those who stood by us in
our time of need.
Tim, Justin, and
Rebecca Barficld


munity to come out and mingle
xivth the cresid Cnt I:-a 'a -f
fun and games, ltood, cold
drinks. and lots of pries.
Two Easter BIunnies will be
on hand to provide photo op-
portunities.
Brenda Thompson, activities
director, promises a day of f'in
for all.
For more information con-
tact her at 997-1800.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The C (II, ..i.., of Commerce
continues to enrich the lives of
children. This time with a trip
to the Circus.
Member Gretchen Avera,
Avera-Clarke Bed and Break-
fast, organized a trip to the
Civic Center for eight students
from Jefferson Elementary
School
Avera found that with the
help of Gloria Yaun of Yaun
Advertising, she could con-
tinue to broaden horizons for
the youth in this community by
treating them to a trip to see
the (ircus when it came to
Tallahassee.
From her suggestion, 'WC'TV
Channel 6 donated the tickets
Ior the Ciricus advenlturc,
"The children had a great
time and enjoyed the
Circus,"says Avera.
"Once again we were able
to provide a wonderful, fun ex-
perience for our children in
this county," she adds.
"This was a great idea and a
great way to network within
the community," says Marga-


ret Levings, Chamber presi-
dent.
"Also this type of event ex-
poses county children to the
Arts/Theater and provides
them with the opportunity to
be mentored by an adult," she
adds.
On this March excursion Av-
cra was accompanied by then
JES counselor, Michelle
Brantly.
In January, Avera accompa-
nied a group of children to see
the Broadway Play "Peter Pan"
during "Kids Night at the
Civic Center."
Funds for the tickets was
raised from Chamber
members.
Avera is planning plane rides
with the Young Eagles for her
May excursion with county
youth.
Anyone wishing to donate
to future events for Children
and the Arts/Theater can con-
tact Avera at 321-6980.


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Progress Energy

Fundraisers Net $1,400


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Events hosted thus far by
Progress Energy for the
American Cancer Society re-
lay For Life, has raised more
than $1,400.
Spokesperson Gaye Hanna
said that number comes from
the yard sale held over the
weekend, and the two break-
fasts, hosted previously.
"And our kids that were col-
lecting from the community
around the courthouse, raised
close to $500," said Hanna.
"We were so proud of them."
She concluded that coordi-


nators thank all volunteers
and patrons of the events.



Business
Prayer
Breakfast

The Business Community
Prayer Breakfast will be held 7
a.m. Thursday, at the First
Baptist Church in Lloyd.
Guest Speaker is Don
Covan.

All are encouraged to attend
and.to bring a friend.


STEPHEN SIMS AND LESLIE WILLIAMS


Chamber Helps Enrich

Student's Experiences


Lifestyle


First Baptist To Perfrom

Easter Musical April 15


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006 PAGE 7


Altrusa Brings Back

Nun Bingo Fundraiser


Altrusa presents Nun Bingo
7 p.m. Saturday at the Opera
House.
The cost is S5 and includes
two Bingo cards, with addi-
tional cards available for S1
each.
A great evening of fun, food,
and prizes awaits those plan-
ning to attend.
Proceeds will support the
County Relay For Life event
April 21 and 22.
Contact Mary Frances Gram-
ling at 997-5552 for tickets
and more details.
Members of the Altrusa team


were walking the streets, last
week dressed in their habitF,
soliciting donations and com-
mitments for the Nun Bingo.
Though they claim not to be
street walkers, they collected
lots of fabulous prizes for the
Bingo.
Nun Bingo is back by popu-
lar demand for the third year.
The local nuns bring the Lit-
tle Sisters of Drifton back for a
fun filled evening of Bingo.
The nuns will be serving
snacks and beverages and
there will be Early Bird draw-
ings, raffles and a 50/50 draw-
ing as well.



First Birthday
Emma Jane Allen celebrated
her first birthday, March 30.
She is the daughter of Bon-
nie S. and Stevie J. Allen.
Maternal grandparents are
Christine Reynolds and Johnny
Cook.
Paternal grandparents are
Stevie Allen and Sherry
Allen.
Allen has a brother, Eugene.


G6T


IN TIlf



SWIM


These 'Nuns' Do Enjoy Refreshments!


LISA REASONER and Jan Rickey, aka the Sisters of Altrusa, will serve snacks during


the Nun Bingo Relay for Life fundraiser. (News Photo)

Pageant Deadline Friday


Spokesperson Christi Clark
reports that the deadline for
applications for the Water-
melon Festival Princess Pag-
eant has been extended to Fri-
day, April 7.
To qualify for the pageant,
contestants must not turn 15
years of age, before Aug. 1,


COUNTY 4-Hers help door prizes at the 4-H District III Jr. Congress. L-R: Sharka
Farmer, Shayne Broxie, Chevarra Ulee, Benjamin Hudson, Tierra Thompson, Jaz-
maun Hall and Angela Scurry.


DREAMS COME

TRUE


Gallon


& Sons Mechanical, Inc.


Heating A; Conditioning
& Refrigerators
Sales & Service All Major Brands
Free Estimates ~ Financing Plan Available


Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.



American
Red Cross


If you know
a child with
muscular dystrophy
who can benefit
from a special
getaway, tell him
or her about MDA
summer camps.
They're fun and free!



Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


2006.
Applications are closed for
the Little King and Queen Pag-
eant.


Health Dept.
Fundraiser
Planned
The County Health Depart-
ment will hold a Relay For
Life fundraiser Garage Sale
from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Satur-
day, April 8 at the Health De-
partment at 1255 West
Washington Street.
All proceeds from this event
benefit the County Relay For
Life to fight cancer, to be held
April 21 and 22 at on the
JCI IS track on Water Street.


Zip!
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COMMUNITY

HOLY WEEK SERVICES

Sponsored by Jefferson Ministerial Association


All Services Noon at First Presbyterian Church, E. Dogwood St.

Speakers For The Week

Monday: Rev Carl Hanks, liturgist
Father Joe Schwab, preacher

Tuesday: Rev. Art Beal, liturgist
Rev. John Dodson, preacher

Wednesday: Dr. Len Dodson, liturgist
Father Mal Joplin, preacher

Thursday: Rev James Urqhart, liturgist
Rev. Phillip Holbrook, preacher

Friday: Rev Ron Cichon, liturgist
Rev.Thurmon Moore, preacher


A light lunch will be available in the fellowship hall
following the Monday through Thursday services.


Offering will be used for the Ministerial Association Fund
which helps people in distress.


Something Different at Dairy Queen

"Dine In Only"


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&
Residential


With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
"My kids" have big dreams, too.


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In Honor of Doctors' Day

BIG BEND HOSPICE
Thanks Our Caring and
Compassionate Physicians


ig Bend
hospice


Nancy Chorba, M.D.
Associate Medical Director
Wakulla/Franklin Counties


Jessic Furlow, M.D.
Associate Medical Director
Gadsden/Liberty Corunties


1723 Mahan Center Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32308
(850) 878-5310
www. bigbertdhospice. org


Lianc I-Iaislcn, D.O.
Associate AIedical Dir;ector
Taylor Couinty


IBa


Family Night Senior Night
Every Monday Night m- Every Tuesday Night
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#2 Ft. Long Chili Dog

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All the above Meals include a 16 oz. drink,
your choice of fries, onion rings or sub salad

#8 Crispy or Grilled Chicken Salad
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All meals come with a 5 oz. Sundae also. No discounts can be used.

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r.AN

John T. MacKay, M.D. Julie Schindler, D.O. Richard Thacker, D.O.
Associate Medical Director Associate MVIedical Director Associate Medical Director
Jefferson County Madison County Lecn Counijt


__ I_ ~___






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006


The Leaders



Of Car



C are .........


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Commercial & Pats Open Lock Safes
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JV Warriors Fall


TO Carrabelle 5-4


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy-
JV boys lost to Carrabelle
5-4, last week, and stand 3-
6-1 on the season.
Coach Demott Anderson
said that factors contributing
to the loss, include: errors,
just having come back from
spring break and being a little
rusty, and starter Casey An-
derson being moved up tem-
porarily to pitch for the
varsity team.
"We had to do without Ca-
sey's bat, but we still did
pretty good," said Anderson.
Errors plagued the Warriors
from the first inning, when
ACA committed three, which


resulted in Carrabelle scoring
four runs for a 4-0 score.
The Warriors fought back in
the second to end the inning
with a 4-4 tie.
"Carrabelle scored the win-
ning run in the third and no
one could score after that,'
Anderson stated.
The Warriors had four hits
and committed four errors
during the game.
Marcus Roberts pitched,
striking out four, and giving
up seven hits and three walks.
Luke Whitmer went two for
three with a double and one
run; Brandon Dunbar, one
single; Casey Wheeler, one
for three with a double and
two runs; and Mason Shiver
scored one run.


Lady Tigers Place


2nd in Invitational


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County high
School girls track and field
team finished in second place
overall during the invitational
hosted here for JCHS, Lin-
coln, Perry and Madison.
The girls ran in several
heats during the invitational,
accounting for the winners in
each of the categories.
"They all did really good
and I hope they keep up the
good work," said Coach Nikki
Cooks.
. Alexia Huggins took second
place in the 100 meter with
13.3 seconds, and third in the
200 meters with 31.1 seconds.
Quaneshia Franklin took
second place in the 100 me-
ters with 13.5 seconds, third
in the 200 meters with 28.5


seconds, and last in the long
jump with 13'.
Shanice Brooks won third
in the 100 meters with 134
seconds, fourth in the 200
meters with 30.6 seconds, and
took third place in the 100
meter hurdles with 20.1 sec-
onds.
Keandra Seabrooks won
second in the 100 meter hur-
dles with 19.7 seconds, and
third in the 10 meters with
13.8 seconds.
In the 4 x 100, the Lady Ti-
gers, consisting of Huggins,
Seabrooks, Brooks and
Franklin, won first place with
54.1 seconds.
Jazmaun Hall won first
place in the shot put with 29'
and she took second in the
discus with 59'.
Ceata Crumity finished sec-
ond in the shot put with 25'
and first in. the discus with
78'.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

During the track and field
invitational hosted here last
week, the Jefferson County
High School boys faired well.
Coach Harry Jacobs said
while the meets were
unscored, if they were scored,
Live Oak would have taken
first, Madison second, and
Jefferson, third.
In the high hurdles, Jon
Dady finished first with 14.5
seconds; and Breon Parker
came in second with 15.2 sec-
onds.
In the 100 meter, Daryl
Young took first with 10.6
seconds, and in the 200 meter,
first place with 22.4 seconds.
Lucius Wade took third in
the 100 meter with 11.1 sec-
onds and second in the 200


meter with 23.0 seconds.
In the 4 x 100, Dady,
Parker, Wade and Young took
first place with 42.8 seconds.
In the long jump, Dady
came in first with 20' 6"; and
Crumity came in second with
20' 1".
In the discus, Cuyler won
first with 120'; and Blair took
second with 110'.
In the high jump, Dady
came in third with 5' 10"; and
Crumity came in fourth with
5' 8".


Without Advertising,
A Terrible
Thing Happens...


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006 PAGE 9



SC&F Fencers Win First


Two Games

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The C & F Fencing Coach--
Pitch team won the first two-
games of its season last week.
In the first game, the Fencers
defeated State Farm
Insurance, 10-5.
Coach Mike Holm said
teams were tied 1-1 after the
first inning, but the Fencers
came back in the top of the
second, and maintained a
positive lead, scoring four
runs in the third.
"There were some great de-
fensive plays made by both
teams, which kept the score
low," said Holm.
Sherquez Ivey, Ty Chancey,
Kelli Reams, and Brandon
Holm, led the Fencers, all go-
ing two for two, with Kelsi
Reams shitting two doubles.
In the second game, the
Fencers beat Hiram Masonic
Lodge, 17-7.


WARRIOR Casey Wheeler winds up for the pitch at an
ACA practice session. (News Photo)


Park Director Tells

Spring Sports Scores


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Director Kevin
Aman reports the week's
scores in spring sports.
In T-ball action, Capital
City Bank downed Bishop
Farms, 22-15, and Jefferson
Builders Mart, 13-8; and Ro-
tary beat .Bishop Farms,
20-16.
In Coach Pitch, Hilram Ma-
sonic Lodge squeaked by Ki-
wanis for a 15-14 win; State
Farm Insurance clobbered
Chicken Delite, 15-5; Ki-
wanis inched by Chicken Del-


ite, 15-14; and C & F Fencing
downed State Farm Insurance,
10-5, and Hiram Masonic
Lodge, 17-6.
In girls softball, games were
split with Joyner's Travel
Center winning 16-12, over
Jackson's Drug Store, and
Jackson's defeating Joyner's
8-4.
In Cal Ripkin Little League;
FMB blanked' Monticello
Milling, 5-0; Williams Tim-
ber downed Jefferson Farmers
Market, 7-4; Monticello Mill-
ing defeated Williams
Timber, 4-2; and FMB
squeaked by Jefferson Farm-
ers Market, 2-1.


Jefferson 'A's Win opener


The Jefferson A's baseball
team won their season opener
last week against the Camellia
All Stars, 17-11.
James Wesley pitched five
innings, struck out five, and
gave up four runs, six hits and
two walks.
At the plate, Wesley, Lamar
Hughes, and Ron Graham,
each. went two for four with
two runs;.
Telvin Norton went two for
three with two runs; Tommy
Johnson, two for three with


three runs; James Telton, two
runs; and Robbie Cambric
and Curtis Hightower each
scored one run.
Coach Jim Norton said he
began the local semipro
league in 1979, due to a lack
of baseball teams in the area,
such as the Babe Ruth
League.
The league is for players
ages 15 and up, and in order
to get the team started, resi-
dent Ferrell Hamrick donated
funds to purchase the team
uniforms.


Of Season
C & F scored six runs in the
first, with Douglas Gulledge
making a diving catch from
the shortstop position, to hold
Masonic to a few runs.
C & F Continued to score
during all innings, and held
Masonic scoreless for two in-
nings.
Holm added that it was due
to some good defensive plays
made by Brandon Holm,
Hunter Handley, Alex Camp-
bell and Casey Demott.
John Burns and Mason Col-
lins also made some good de-
fensive plays for Masonic.
The Fencers led offensively,
with Chancey, Emma Witmer
and Gulledge all going three
for three, Chancey and
Gulledge, each hitting dou-
bles.
Jake Edwards went two for
three; Campbell went two for
three with a double; Holm
went two for three with a dou-
ble; Demott, Sherquez Ivey,
Brian Bowman and Reams all
went one fopr three


Tigers Remain 1-6


The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team
remains at 1-6 on theseason,
after the game slated against
West Gadsden last week, was
canceled.
Assistant Coach Jim Norton
said the reason behind the
cancellation was because
West Gadsden had scheduled


two games for the same day.
"The other game was a dis-
trict game so West Gadsden
played that and kicked us out
of it," said Norton.
He added that as of Monday
afternoon, the game had not
been rescheduled.
The next home game for the
Tigers is slated against
Rickards, 4 p.m., Thursday.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006

Lady Bees Split Madison


Double Header Last Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
Lady Bees split games in a
double header last week
against Madison, for a 10-9
loss in the first game, and an
8-2 win in the second.
Coach Corinne Stephens
said that though the girls are
an extremely young team,
they continue to show much
improvement, some of them
even making spectacular
plays.
"They are a young team.
They're running the bases and
hitting well, though their
fielding can still use some
work," said Stephens.
In game one, the Lady Bees


scored two runs in the first,
Shanks, four; in the second,
both scored two; in the third,
Lady Bees five, Shanks, two;
and in the fourth, HMS scored
0, Shanks two, resulting in the
10-9 loss for the Lady Bees.
Stephens added that most of
the points for the Lady Bees
came from their capability to
run the bases well and steal a
good number of bases.
Stephens added that most of
the points for the Lady Bees
came from their capability to
run the bases well and steal a
good number of bases.
At the plate, Misty Watson
scored one in the first and one
in the third; Lenesiyah
Massey, one run in the third;
Winrich, one run in the third;
LaAshlie Norton, one run in


the first and one in the third;
Emily Howell, one run in the
third; Brionna Jones, and
Simone Williams, both scored
one run in the second.
In the second game, Ste-
phens said Massey pitched,
and though individual statis-
tics were not available, Mas-
sey did a phenomenal jog on
the mound.
HMS scored three in the
first, Shanks, one; HMS two
in the second, Shanks, one;
and Lady Bees, two in the
third and one in the fourth.
Scoring for the Lady Bees
were Watson; one in the first
and one in the fourth; Massey
and Winrich, each scored one
in the first; Norton and How-
ell each scored one in the
third; and Jones and Arnold,
each scored one in the second.


Warriors Win 1; Lose 2


In Spring Classic


,.J


g.2 ..,
.7 r~~iP~
LL:,
.0I 1- -. r


TIGER Breon Parker waits for the pitch at a recent
JCHS practice session. (News Photo)


Madison

Defeats

Tigers 11-2

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High--
School varsity baseball team
lost to Madison 11-2, last
week.
The Tigers now stand 1-6
on the season.

On the mound, Patrick
Cherry pitched the first two
innings, struck out three, gave
up three walks and six hits,
which allowed Madison to
-score three runs in the first
and five in the second.
Demario Rivers pitched the
remainder of the game, strik-
ing out one and giving up one
walk and four hits, allowing
Madison to score two in the
third and one in the sixth.
At the plate, Rivers went
two for four, scoring one run
in the first; Curtis Hightower
went two for four, scoring
one run in the third; and
Breon Parker went two for
three.


BILL BROWN

The Aucilla baseball team-
played three games in the
Spring Classic, and lost two.
In the game in Chatta-
hoochee, Cottondale was the
victim of a 14-5 loss.
Dustin Roberts pitched the
first five innings, recording
his fifth win of the season.
He gave up four runs on six
hits and struck out seven.
Only two of the four runs
were earned, as the Warriors
committed six errors.
Chris Tuten tossed one third
inning, with Casey Gunnels
working the last one and two
thirds innings.
Gunnels struck out four, giv-
ing up one unearned run.
The Warriors scored 14 runs
on nine hits and four errors.
Tuten led the Warrior bat-
ters at two for two and three
RBI; Others hitting safely
were; Gunnels, one for two
and a double; Glen Bishop,
one for four, one RBI; and
Matt Bishop, two for four,
two RBI.
Colby Waddail, one for
three a triple and two RBI;
Stephen Dollar, one for four,
two RBI; and A. J. Connell,
one for one, one RBI.
In Class 2-A, Port St. Joe
was the opponent on the
Sneads field.
Fielding again plagued Au-
cilla as seven errors led to a
9-5 loss, the record of the
year.
Only two of the nine runs
were earned.
Tuten pitched the complete
game, giving up nine runs on
five hits, and struck out three.
Glen Bishop had the hot
bat, getting two hits, two RBI,
with a two-bagger.
Other hitting safely, all with
one hit, were; Gunnels, Josh
Carswell, Roberts, Waddail
with a double, and Stephen
Dollar.


The Friday game against
Altha was a complete turn-
around, as the ACA fielding
improved with only one error.

Kirkpatrick, the opposing
pitcher, was sharp, tossing a
two-hitter to hand the Warri-
ors the third loss of the
season, charged to Gunnels.

The score, 8-3 was on the
solid pitching and 13 hits,
from the Altha batters, includ-
ing two home runs, the only
ones given up by the Aucilla
pitching this year.
Tuten and Glen Bishop got
two hits, in the first inning
when Aucilla scored it's three
runs.

After the first, it was three
up and three down for the rest
ofthe game.


PLEDGING OUR

ALLEGIANCE


Tuesday, the Warriors
travel to Apalachicola for an-
other district game, to be fol-
lowed by a five-game home
stand, starting with Munroe
on Thursday, East Gadsden
will be the opponent Friday,
followed by Branford on
Monday.
On Tuesday, April 11, Car-
rabelle will invade Finlayson
Filed in a game that will most
likely determine the regular
season district champ.
All the home games are at 4
p.m.


Great pio
MDA


"Come out and support the every
Warriors in their quest to be-
come district champions for
the fourth consecutive year," Muscula
said Assistant Coach Bill 1-8
Brown.


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Sheriff Pledges It Won't Happen


(Continued From Page 1)
rival of a K-9 unit or a female
deputy -- as part of the investi-
gation.
Under judicial scrutiny, how-
ever, reasonable time takes on
a different interpretation,
Hobbs said. And the court ap-
parently saw two hours as be-
ing more than sufficient time.
"Anything after that point be-
came unconstitutional and un-
lawful," Hobbs explained.
By the court's interpretation
then, the search of the two fe-
males was unlawful, as was
the subsequent trip to the rela-
tive's house and the search of
that dwelling.
"You don't know you're-



Planners
(Continued From Page 1)
ing the meeting, agreed the
concept was a good one. He
shared with planners his ideas
for encouraging conservation
subdivisions.
The ideas included allowing
the units in the base density to
be increased by 50 percent, if
50 percent of the buildable
land was maintained as open
space (up to a maximum of 65
percent for 65 percent open
space; and allowing up to 30
percent additional units as den-
sity credits provided "afford-
able housing" was part of the
equation.
"We need to step back and
say, what do we want Jeffer-
son County to look 10 or 15
years from now," Boyd said.


wrong," Hobbs said. "And it's
not wrong unless you're sitting
in front of a federal court."
What's to prevent a similar
incident from occurring in the
future?

The answer, Hobbs said, is
that he has been implementing
new policies and procedures
since day one of his admini-
stration.
"These policy changes I am
incorporating have nothing to
do with this case," Hobbs said.
"The changes were forthcom-
ing anyway. The policies
needed to be changed."
The incorporated changes ap-


ply not only to law enforce-
ment officers, but to the jail
personnel and to every aspect
of the operation, he said. They
are rules and regulations that
govern the everyday activities
of the department, he said.
"I feel confident with the
chief deputy I have," Hobbs
said. "We have employed dif-
ferent levels of supervision
since I've been here."
A typical traffic stop would
not warrant supervisory over-
sight, he said. But in a case
such as the Tram Road stop,
which involves special circum-
stances, a corporal or a patrol
sergeant would monitor the


situation, depending on the
complexity of the problem,
Hobbs said.
Ultimately, the two supervi--
sors would answer to Bullock
and Hobbs.
"I want the citizens to know
that we have a good depart-
ment," Hobbs said. "I want
them to know that we're striv-
ing to do better and to do
what's best for the county.
We're going to deal with this
and we're going to move for-
ward."
Fortune and Joyner could not
be reached for comment by
Monday's deadline.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006 PAGE 11



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To Promote Conservation


"We need to look at the big
picture. Let's not get bogged
down on the details. I still
want this county to look rural.
And I think conservation sub-
division has the potential to do
that."
Padgett agreed.
"If we do this right, we can
do all," he said. "We can ac--
commodate the farmers and
have conservation
subdivision."
Mueller likewise agreed on
the desirability of conservation
subdivisions. But he saw po-
tential problems with the con-
cept.
The first, he said, was selling
the idea of greater density to
citizens already upset about


the accelerating rate of devel-
opment in the county.
It would take education and
political salesmanship
statesmanship, Boyd called it
-- to sell the idea to a poten-
tially hostile public, he said.
Meaning that people would
have to be convinced that al-
lowing the higher densities in-
certain areas would ultimately
translate into more open
spaces overall and a more rural
character to the county.
The second caveat he added
was that conservation subdivi-
sions, by their very nature,
were intended for high-end
money earners.
"The key is to have very
flexible language," Mueller


said. "We won't be overrun
with conservation subdivision.
There is only one in the pan-
handle so far. But I think we
need the language to encour-
age these subdivisions. I don't
think we have to give up the
farm to do it either. The one's
that have been done have
proven profitable. I think it's
all doable."
The planners agreed to meet
again 7 p.m. Monday, April
17, in the chamber.
Next time, they want to in-
volve Planning Official Bob
Arredondo in the proceedings.
They want also to involve both
proponents and opponents of
development, to ensure the
best and most fair product pos-
sible.


City Water Service To Extend East On US 90


(Continued From Page 1)
new home buyers connect to
the water system.
The $40,425 is calculated on
the connection fee of $1,250
per house, including the
installation of the meter.
It's expected that the
reimbursements will be made
over time, given the developer
is selling only lots and it will
be up to the property buyers to
construct the houses.
Per the city engineer's rec-
ommendation, the developer
agreed to install an eight-inch
mainline. The engineer deter-
mined that an eight-inch main-


line will provide sufficient
pressure to serve the subdivi-
sion, as well as provide capac-
ity for other customers that lie
between the city and the subdi-
vision and that may decide to
connect to the system.

A recently adopted city ordi-
nance requires that residences
that received city utilities must
annex into the city if the prop-
erties become contiguous with
the city.
It's the hope of city officials
that the availability of water
service via the eight-inch
mainline will encourage in-fill


m lm


development in the area be-
tween the city and the Wolf
Creek subdivision.


It's the further hope that as
this development occurs and as
new residences are annexed
into the city, the Wolf Creek
subdivision will eventually be-
come contiguous to the city.

The agreement worked out
by the water committee does
not exempt the Wolf Creek
subdivision from the new sys-
tem's charge that the commit-
tee approved for


recommendation during the
same meeting.
The system's charge, a form
of an impact fee, will assess
$982 on every new residential
house that connects to the
city's water system. (The
charge is higher for commer-
cial and other nonresidential
units.)
The system's charge is in-
tended to compensate the city
for the additional demands that
growth will place on its water
capacity. By law, the monies
generated by the system's
charge can only be used for
capital improvement projects.


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006

Summer School 2006 at
` -Atlantis Academy

STallahassee
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pr l


Nanny Tips
(Continued From Page 4)
ings. Say "I understand" and "I
am listening" take the time to
understand what they are go-
ing through.
Respect Is A Two-
Way Street. If you don't re-
spect your children, they are
not going to respect you.
Positive Reinforce-
ment Works Much Better Than
Negative Reinforcement.
Praise, pleasure and pride ac-
complish far more than nag-


going, negatives and
nay-saying.
Define Your Roles As
Parents. It's not your job to
keep your children attached to
you. It's your job to prepare
them for the outside world -
and then let them go.
Deborah Carroll and Stella
Reid Nanny Deb and Nanny
Stella are the stars of the hit
television show "Nanny 911"
on the Fox television network.


In the Circuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for Leon
County, Florida. Case No. 2006 DR
707 Division: Family Court Lisa
Ann Esmond (Petitioner) and
Richard Ross Esmond (Respondent)
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR


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DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
Richard Ross Esmond 931 Hickory
Knob Circle, Cedar Hill, Tx. 75104
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
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a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to on (name of Petitioner)
Lisa Ann Esmond whose address
is 259A Villas Court North,
Tallahassee, Fl 32303 on or before
(date) April 6, 2006, and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court at (clerk' address) 301 South
Monroe Street, Tallahassee., FI
32301 before service on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter., If you
fail to do so, a default may be


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LEGALS

entered against you for tie relief
demanded in the petition. Copies
of all court documents in this case
including orders, are available at
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request. You must
keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your
current address. (You may file
Notice of current t Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915 .) Future papers
in this law suit will be mailed to the
. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure
requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and
information. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including
dismissal or striking of pleadings.
3/29, 4/5, 4/12. 4/19//06, c
The Jefferson County Utility
Development Committee will meet
Friday, April 7, 2006, at 9:00 AM
the Capitol City Travel Center,
Gamble Road, Lloyd, Florida. The
meetingng is open to the public.
4/5/06,
:N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File Number
06-37-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY CARR WHITE, Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO
ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby
notified that an Order of Summary
Administration will be entered in
the estate of MARY CARR WHITE,
deceased, File Number 06-37-PR, by
the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division
the address of which is c/o Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello.
Florida: that he total cash value of
the estate is approximately S6,700
and that the names and addresses of
those to whom it will be assigned by
such order are: Sid J. White
Monticello, Fl, Jack F. White,
Monticello, FL., A.C. White
Orlando, FL., Jesse P. Lee
Cumming, GA., Mary Lee Raleigh,
NC. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT : All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on w homn a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of tihe
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER TIE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF1
THIS NOTICE OR THIRT\ DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF TIIE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF TIlls
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED The date
of the first publication of this Notice
is April 5, 2006. Attorney for Person
Giving Notice: Brain T. Hayes, P.A.
P.O. Box 1273 Florida Bar No.
0034687; 247 North Jefferson St.,
Monticello, FL 32344, (850)
997-2364; Person Giving Notice:
SID .. WHITE, CERTIFICATE OF
SERVICES: I IIEREBY CERTIFY
that a copy of the forgoing has been
furnished this 31st Day of March,
2006, to: Agency for Health Care
Administration Medicaid Third
Party Liability; Post Office Box
12900, Tallahassee, Florida
32317-2900; BRIAN T. IIAYES:
P.O. Box 1275; Monticello, ilorioa
32345 Ph: (850) 997-2065; Flla. Bar
ID No. 0034687 Attorney for Sid J.
White, Petitioner Estate of MARY
C., RR WIHITE, Deceased
4/5. 4/12/06, c

Call for Bids Project: Air
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Iandler
at Christ Episcopal Church
Monticello Florida. Scope of project
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air
conditioning systems in the existing
church and removal and disposal of
four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 arch 20(106 for
LICENSE) CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available 'for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BONI
REQITIREMI'ENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
from successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID


MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday


LEGAS1J
i >-, i' -

16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
date anl location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office, 425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/08-3/3 1, c
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31. 4/5/06, c

NOTICE
St. Jude, may the scared heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified, loved,
and preserved throughout the world
now and forever. St. Jude, sacred
heart of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude,
worker of miracles pray for us. St.
Jude. help of the helpless pray for
us. Thank you for prayers
answered. LS
3/29, 31.4/5, d

HELP WANE "
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
Vendor Needed for local antique
shop. Work one day per week in
exchange for booth rental.
"';;'ne 997-6056.
4/5, 4/7, pd
DRILLERS HELPER Great
pay and benefits! Must be able
to Travel, Clean FL License,
CDL is a Plus, EOE & Drug
Free Workplace Call
1-800-487-9665
t/5, -/7, c
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services fic!i and two years of
profession al. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Some
local travel required. License
required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift:
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
OPS-FEMA Team Leader
(#2264) Masters degree with
from an accredited university or
college with a major in the field
of counseling, social work,
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services field with one
(1) year of full time or
equivalent related professional
experience or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited
university or college with a
major in the field of counseling,
social wo-'k, psychology,
nursing, rehab. special
education, hei!lh education, or
a related human services field
and three (3) Years of full-time
or equivalent related
professional experience. Clinical
supervision experience
preferred. Shift variable.
OPS-FEMA CRISIS
COUNSELOR (#2262) A
Bachelor's Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in counseling,
social work, psychology,
criminal justice, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services field; or other
Bachelor's degree from an
accredited university or college
with one (1) year of full time or
equivalent work or volunteer
experience in a social service,
health care, or related field.
Shift Variable.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workpii.ce.
4/5, c
Wood Worker Wanted: Basic
experience with wood working.
Tools Required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
3/29, 31, 4/5, 7, c
Need weekend respite care for


elderly women with Alzheimer's
disease. References and
background check required.
(850) 322-9667
4'5, pd
Free room, board, and small
monthly stipend in exchange for


light housekeeping and cooking
for elderly male in his home.
References and background
check required. (850) 322-9667
(lv message)



Yard Sale At Health
Department, 1255 West
Washington Street. 8 a.m. 12
p.m. for Relay for Life.
342-0170 x 206.
4/5, 4/7, pd
Yard Sale Saturday April 8,
2006 at Monticello Mini Storage
next door to Monticello Milling
from 8-12, Many, Many
Goodies, Jewelry, small
appliance, curtains, small pieces
of furniture, clothes imuc1 more
Come Check Us Out

FO1.ND ... '
Black puppy, 20 Ibs.,
green/brown collar, well cared
for, found on Lloyd Rd., at
Indian Hills Rd., 03/29. Call
Frank Ward at 997-0144.

SERVICES

Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn

Peters Satellite -- Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-097-31 77.
tfn, 1/25
We do not give simple answers
to complex questions. Instead,'
we offer tools that help people
develop a sustaining faith.
Christ Episcopal Church, three
blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday services at 10:30 AM.
997-4116.
4/5, c
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d. tfn


Registered o year ola DarK Btay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
4/5, pd
Small Breed Canine Black/Tan
male, % Chihuahan /4 mind
Dachshund. $100 Call 997-3568
Ask For Fran



Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Office for RENT 238 W.
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F, 9-5 available May 1st
3/31 tfn


REA ESTAT :
Steinhatchee/Dixie County, side.
Gulf fishing/scalloping.. Trade
older 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
% acre, private heavily wooded
lot, Hwy frontage, structurally
sound. Blocks from boat ramps,
road to nowhere, Pinelog Creek
landing. Approx. value
175-200K will trade for house
with acreage outside Monticello.
(352) 498-2832
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31.4/5, 7, 12, pd
Buy Owner in Christmas Acres,
2.2 Acres, '97 Fleetwood, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace,
asking $82K 877-3123
3/17,22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, pd
HILLTOP 2.5 ac., 12 miles, E.,
$10,000 per ac., secluded, dirt
rd., MH ok. wooded
BRING THE BAIT 6.4 acres, 8
miles E., $14,900 per ac., pond,
home site, well, septic, scenic
SHADY PARADISE, 4.2, ac., 6
miles E., 3/2 DW, firpl., grt. rm.,
porches, garden area. $139,500
JUST RIGHT, 1973 farm house,
new tin roof, 5.69 ac., 2
Bedroom, 2 Bath, porch,
carport, pole barn, silo barn,
$155,900 R Winston Connell,
:Realtor Lynette C. Sirmon,
Realtor Associate 850-933-6363
MB or 850-948-5000 HM
4/5. 7, c

AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced

$1,000 to $3,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500 below NADA
Book. 997-6806
tnll, c



WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles

850-545-3677




House For Sale!!
1430 Florida Ave
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Large Screened back
porch Beautiful Lot
Work in Process To reno-
vate home buy early at
$94,500 before price
goes to $110K to 115K
997-6806


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

+ 575-6571





Registered Nurses Incentive

Care Units Cath Lab
$500 Recruitment Incentive (With one year of experi-
ence) Archbold Hospital, in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or e-mail rtaylor@Aarchbold.org EOE


We're Y awReal Estate
Specialsts....
215 N; Jefferson St
Monticello, Fl 32344
(850) 997-5516


Significantly Reduced -
* 3Br/2Ba home tucked away on 10 Acres. New Bldg
could be great mother-in-law suite. Being sold "as-is"
$31,000 below appraised value. S 309,000
Tallahassee Listings
- Great Investment or starter home! DWMH with new
roof. Positive cashflow for investors. S 52,900
, 3Br/2Ba close to FSU and TCC would be a great college
home! $138,000


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, family room $87,500 Now
$76,500

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Freeman Road 13.29 acres of pasture land
with easy access to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only
3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres Under Contract -= 3 bed-
room 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres with a
big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000



Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estatc!
..\


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


S~n]le

IPIa~l








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 5, 2006

Luther Davis Dean Of

50 Years Selling Cars


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson native Luther
Davis. owner of Davis Motors
of Monticello, Inc. has been
associated with the automobile
business for 50 years.
After graduating trom Mon-
ticello High School, Davis at-
tended the University of
Georgia to play football, and
while there, was chosen to
play football for Georgia
Military College.
While pursuing his educa-
tion, he joined the National
Guard school.
Davis began his career in the
automobile business in 1956
when he began working at L.
G. Morris Motors, Inc., where
he spent the next 15 years.

"Morris Motors was a
Chrysler/Plymouth dealership
for new cars," said Davis. "I
worked as a salesman, book-
keeper and accountant. I
guess you could say that I was
part .owner in the business.
Every year, L. G. Morris
would give me some stock in
the company."
After 15 years, *. G. Mo-
tors went out of business.
That is when Davis decided
to open his own used car lot.
"I've been strictly a used car
dealer since then, 35 years,"
said Davis. "I know that I can
offer people a service here."
When Davis purchases a ve-
hicle, be it car, truck or SUV,
he and his mechanics go over
them with a fine-tooth comb,
repairing anything that may
be wrong with the vehicle be-


fore it is sold.
"I would never intentionally
sell someone a bad car," said
Davis. "But every now and
again, something goes wrong
with a used car, and I get with
the customer and work with
them to either replace the ve-
hicle or repair the problem."
He usually carries 20-25
different cars on his lot and
inventory is constantly chang-
ing.
Davis offers financing at his
lot. "I sell mainly the older
vehicles, all the way up to the
90's and early 2000's," said
Davis. "But it's much more
affordable for me to finance
an older vehicle than a new
one. 1 can't afford to finance
those. But there are some
people who would rather have
a vehicle financed by the
bank.

"I'm not one to repo," said
Davis, who understands that
financial problems do arise in
families from time to time.
He is always more than will-
ing to work with his custom-
ers.
His friendly ways and un-
derstanding have earned him
high praise from former cus-
tomers.
Davis, who is now to work-
ing some full time days at the
business following a "run of
bad health", wished to extend
some special thanks to friends
and residents in the area.
"God has been good to me
and I really appreciate the
people who helped to keep
me in business and take care
of me and the business when I
was sick."


'Cinnamon' Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has
named Cinnamon as its feline
Pet of the Week.
Cinnamon is a female short
hair Calico, born in July
2005.
She has been spayed and all
vaccinations are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista describes her as be-
ing cuddly, lovable and ex-
tremely shy with people at
first.
"Once she gets to know you,
she's very affectionate," said
Bautista.

Cinnamon is so much a
snuggler, she likes to sleep
under blankets or towels.


To adopt Cinnamon or any
of the other many animals at
the shelter call 342-0244.


LUTHER DAVIS greets a prospective customer at his car lot. Davis has sold automo-
biles for 50 years. (News Photo)


SEE TfE fUTURE









With your help, "my kids"
can look forward to
a future without
neuromuscular diseases.
Please volunteer
today.



Muscular
Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


Wacissa UMC Event Nets

$4,000 in Cancer Relay


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Wacissa United Meth--
odist Church Relay For Life
event, was a huge success
which saw some several hun-
dred in attendance and raised
$4,000 for the American Can-
cer Society.
The car show, had 47
participants and presented 35
awards.
Receiving awards were the
top 25 cars, the top two in en-
gines, paint, interiors, and
work in progress,
"Young Gun", awards were
presented to the youngest par-

Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION
of the Big Bend
Serving Persons with Epilepsy
Community Education
Diagnosis and Treatment

Case Management

Support Groups



1108-B Eastspark Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777

F1IjOUDA DEPARTMENT f

HEALTH


ticipant in the show who
shows the greatest effort in
car show hobby and the dis-
tance award, given to the par-
ticipant which came the
greatest distance in order to
participate in the event.
Spokesperson Kathy Lam-
bert said she would rather not
list the manes of the individ-
ual winners.
The winner of the quilt raffle
was Kathy Walker.
Attractions held during the
event to raise the $4,000 in-
cluded the car show, turkey
shoot, quilt raffle, garage sale,
bake sale, and youth group
sponsored breakfast and
lunches.
If It Happens In
Jefl'rrson C'ouinlt.
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


North Florida Community College


Artist Series Angels

North Fi, rid.i C ,,m n iity Col,.'.e i ihi:nks its
Artist Serie" Angel -.poniors for supl'..riing and
enhancing the .? A )-06 NFCC Artikt Scric ,,,on t


Clemnons, &uth6'rrord A&ssociates, Inc.
Madison Cour:t Cmmnrunity Bank
Norris' Lady Bug Cafe h r Sr asons Gift Shop


Ameriprise


G o~ Sposors
Finantciaul Se~rvices, fvrl.c E. Branham, CFP-
Beggs Funeri Ho mre
Elbert R. Hartivick, SFC(RET)
Madison lVetetivrly Clilic4
Morrri & Judy Ste en
The Rosery Ftorist
Thornas.iP. Moffs!s, J r.


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


AFLAQ CCE Rill" fussell
Drs. Arna-c~ & &schecta 13.urkart
Aim & ,Oia Cartru
Mr. & Mrs. 1Wflizijrn 8. Cr
P~cf'erl;r $Ann Imncst

SuC~ Rl .3uSe
tBirzi & L'in~ia'F; P'. rr'ic~: at Law
Johf& B& funny allftdt:b

G I & 1 h-;wa

TIP-Varl llC~l~j59r

Bronrze Spnsurmi WC. U Frances 7.. ml. t, ; .:=. & riU'~ ;rt'r"
PaHr00% WIi". .,Ii ., Dr. Harq G.,i:rvi Sir ~ Myra
Jklewin.c, Dr. Jessica 'Aol, :.1.irj' I ,ii r: c'; & 5iu~1uo i t'y.;'~.


~~ 1''r


'l~!':' I~i;~~ l'~'' I I nI;:~
C A *' ;i


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


' ; ;'p-
,., % ".I
-/ ; .- '. '
i -' r .
i I
.................


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


I'0 -...~ a -I 'V;...

~ ~..f1


r


Y. ~.: ~*


-LeM()Ylle




ARTFE"STIVAL



Tdfdms,ce


APRIL 22-23,2006

SAT. 10-5 SUN. 11-5


1.00 Artists

Live Entertainment
GreatFood Great Fun

A Free Community Event!

2-22-8800
Lewis and Bloxhain Parks Downtown


IL : I-- $ I

PREVENT 3~:E~~]


S) D


I
C
i


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