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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00119
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 31, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00119
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Sports
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
Full Text



404
UNI\
GAII

Attention
Needed To
Power Safety

Editorial, Page 4


n A Op F-ORIDA I S y
LIBRARY WEST
IERSITY OF FLORIDA
NES2jILLLk, L.-32611


Forum Identifies
Available

ServiceO Here

Story, Page 6


1st :IUMC
Golf Tourney
Raises $1,500

Story, Page 11


TCC President
Speaker At
Chamber Meeting

story, Photo, Page 14
I I I I


Friday Morning
" -


Monticello


I IRTJ VVFAD R C NO -f50CENTS


Published Wedhesdays & Fridays


ws

FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 2006


City Eyes Special Fees For New


users Of Water


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city's water committee
agreed Tuesday night to rec-
ommend to the council that it
adopt an ordinance establish-
ing a systems charge for new
developments coming into the
city.

New Houses
Will Have To
Pay $982

The, charge, as,determined
by a study conducted by
George & Hutcheson Engi-
neering Inc., will be $982 per
residential unit, based on a 3/4
inch meter.
The charge for commercial
and other nonresidential users
will be calculated based on the
size of the meter required.
A commercial user with a
one-inch meter, for example,
will pay $2,455, or 2.5 times
as much as a residential unit.
And an industrial user with a
three-inch meter requirement
could pay as much as 15 times


Sewer Service


more, or $14,730. ..
The charge is intended to .
compensate the city for the ad- .
ditional demands placed on its
water system by new users. As B
structured in. the ordinance-to- '" .
be, the monies raised from the .
charge will be kept in a sepa-'
rate account and will be used ..
for capital improvement pro-
jects only.
George and Hutcheson Engi-
neering Inc. calculated the
charge based on the city's pro-
jected growth during the next
five years. That growth is ex- '
pected to add 699 dwelling
units to the city, not counting --
new developments that may .
come in the interim. --
The calculations also take .
into account five of seven pri-
ority projects that city officials
have identified for pursuit in
the coming years.
These projects include the
extension of the water system
north on US 19 to the Jeffer-
son County Club and beyond,
at an estimated cost of
$905,952; and the connection ...
of the inter-loop in the Pecan
Grove and Holly Hill subdivi- CITY OFFICIALS expect an additional 699 dwelling
sions, at an estimated cost of units will come into the city in the next five years, plac-
$347,890. __ing more demand on its water system. (News Photo)


The engineers assured city
officials that the charge was le-
gall. defensible, should, it be
challenged. They said the
charge was based on a combi-
iinaion of the buy-in and incre-
mental methods, as set forth in
the American Water Works
Association's manual, titled
"Principles of Water Rates,
Fees and&Charges."
The engineers pointed out
thai whilel e the monies raised
\ia the systems charge would
not fully fund the cost of ex-
panding the system, they
%% would go a long ways to mini-
nizing the amount the city
v.ould have to borrow to pur-
sule such projects.
The committee is expected
to take up next the establish-
mient of policies and proce-
dires for the reimbursement of
funds to developers who un-
dertake the expansion of the-
ci.y's infrastructure to their de-
velopments at their cost.
An example is the Crooked
Creek subdivision west of
town. Developer Riley Palmer
is undertaking the extension of
water to his proposed subdivi-
sion at his cost. But the agree-
ment calls for the city to reim-


burse Palmer part of the cost
from the tap-in fees it collects
when home buyers begin con-
necting to the system.
City officials want to estab-
lish standard rules and proce-
dures for the reimbursements,
rather than dealing with the is-
sue on a case-per-case basis.
In the second half of the
meeting, the sewer committee
discussed the idea of imposing
a like charge on the sewer sys-
tem. In the end, the committee
decided to recommend to the
council that it instruct George
& Hutcheson Engineering Inc.
to commence the necessary
study.
The study for the sewer sys-
tem charge is not expected to
take as long as the water sys-
tem analysis, given the former
is a less complicated process.
The committee also briefly
-discussed the wastewater recy-
cling project, which is esti-
mated will cost about $2
million. The city has a com-
mitment for $1.5 million from
the Suwannee River Water
Management District.
The committee will recom-
mend that the city begin solic-
iting bids for the project.


Clerk Of Court Office Will Be On


Ballot For November's Election


DALE BOATWRIGHT, right, talks with Extension Office
Director Larry Halsey during a commission meeting.
Boatwright's job encompasses a multitude of responsi-
bilities. (News Photo)


Private Group Wanting

TO Partner With County
school is built at the site of the
LAZARO ALEMAN current high school. Duhart
Senior Staff Writer and Carpenter are among sev-
eral groups vying for the lease
Two women who recently of the old middle school once
approached the County Cor- it's vacated.
mission seeking county partici- When Carpenter first ap-
pation in a multipurpose center preached legislators with the
they are trying to establish idea several months ago, it ba-
here got a pass from commis- sically entailed establishing a
sioners. place where welfare mothers
Commissioners told Wanda could go to earn a GED and
Duhart and Jacqueline Carpen- get job training.
ter to resubmit their request In the interim, however, the
once the two get a definitive idea appears to have expanded,
answer from the School Board with it now encompassing the'
on the availability of the How- alleged participation of numer-
ard Middle School (HMS) ous other organizations and
buildings, with Carpenter and Duhart
HMS is scheduled to be va- ,amassing letters of support
cated as soon as a new middle (See Private Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Although unexpected, Clerk
of Court Dale Boatwright's an-
nouncement Monday that he
will depart office at the end of
the year does not present a
problem for the elections of-
fice.
The fact that Boatwright an-
nounced his decision so early
in the process assures that the
matter will be handled rou-
tinely, according to Elections
Supervisor Marty Bishop.
Had Boatwright waited until
after the election or until the
beginning of next year to make
his announcement, Bishop said
the governor would have ap-
pointed someone to complete
the term, as happened in the
case of Commissioner Clifford
Brown, who died in office.
As it is, Bishop said, candi-
dates will be able to qualify for
the position during the regular
qualification period, which is
scheduled for the week of July
17 through 21. Or they can
pre-qualify at any time before
then.
In fact, Brenda Sorensen,
who sought the office in 1996,
pre-qualified Wednesday.
Bishop said whoever is
elected to the office will serve
a two-year term and will then
be required to run again in
2008.
He said names of other po-
tential candidates are being
bantered about, but he declined
to disclose any names.
Bishop said he learned of
Boatwright's decision last


Thursday, following Boat-
wright's announcement of his
decision to his staff the day be-
fore.
He said it was his under-
standing that although Boat-
wright had submitted his
resignation to the governor on
March 1, he had waited until
the governor's acceptance of
the resignation before making
the matter public.
Boatwright's announcement
is sure to add spice to the com-
ing election, as is usually the


case when an incumbent is not
running. All told, eight offices
are up for reelection this year.
The offices and incumbents:
County Commission, seats
2 and 4, held by Commission-
ers Eugene Hall and Skeet Joy-
ner, respectively;
City Council, seats 1 and 2.
held by council members Ger-
rold Austin and Tom Vogelge-
sang, respectively;
School Board, seats 2, 3
and 5, held by Beverly Sloan,
Fred Shofner and Ed Vollert-


sen, respectively.
County judge, held by
Bobby Plaines, who has al-
ready pre-qualified.
Another candidate who pre-
qualified is Shirley Washing-
ton, who is seeking the School
Board, District 3 seat, a posi-
tion she held previously.
Pre-qualifying early allows
candidates to open campaign
accounts, begin spending on
their political advertisements,
and start collecting the neces-
(See Clerk Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A south Florida man who
caused a traffic fatality here in
early. 2004 plead no contest to
vehicular homicide and other
charges March 13 and was
sentenced.
Sean C. Neal, of Clearwater,
FL, received a year of commu-
nity control, to be followed by
10 years of probation.
Neal also will be subject to
random urinalysis tests, pay
restitution in the amount of
$2,930.60, and have his
driver's license suspended for
three years.
The other charges against
Neal were making false state-
ments on his application for a
Florida driver's license and
driving a vehicle while his li-
cense was suspended or re-


voked.
The judge withheld adjudica-
...... -* ,


tion on the vehicular homicide
(See Man Pleads Page 2)


THE COUNTY'S emergency services are often called to
respond to accidents on the interstate. (News Photo)


Clearwater Man Pleads No Contest

TO Charge Of Vehicular Homicide


IMI YE "kJ/ODU 1 -I 0








PArEl MONTICELO,. (FL). NEWS. FRI.. MARCH 31.


Man Pleads No Contest
(Continued From Page 1)


THE ELECTION'S OFFICE already is gearing up for the coming election. Here Deputy
Elections Supervisor Lee Davis and Elections Supervisor Marty Bishop review voters'
lists. (News Photo)


Clerk Of Court Office On Ballot


(Continued From Page 1)
sary signatures to get on the
ballot.
The alternative to getting
signatures is to pay the regis-
tration fee, which is equal to
one percent of the salary paid
by the particular office the


candidate is seeking.
Bishop said he expects four
or five candidates will come
forward next week.
"By coming next week, they
don't have to do the campaign
report," Bishop explained.
The campaign report details


how much money in contribu-
tions a candidate has taken in
and how the money was ex-
pended. The report is due
quarterly now and must be
submitted every two weeks
once the election nears.


Private Group Wants Partnership


(Continued From Page 1)

from various entities and
elected officials, including
State Senator Al Lawson and
Congressman Allen Boyd.
Indeed, as Duhart presented
the proposal to commissioners
on March 16, the center would
bring together vocational train-
ing, childcare, affordable hous-
ing, and 4-H and music pro-
grams, among other services.
"Our proposal to you guys is
that you partner with us and
bring in a recreational center to
Jefferson County, because
there isn't one," Duhart said.
In return, the county could
have the use of the gym and
the locker area in the middle.
school, Duhart said.
Commissioner Gene Hall
saw potential with the proposal
and expressed being impressed
with the portfolio that Carpen-
ter and Duhart had managed to
assemble.
"When we look at the rec-
reation element of the Com-
prehensive Plan, it says we
will provide places for recrea-
tion," Hall said. "And right
now, we don't have one com-
munity center operated by the
county. This is something that
by Florida statute we are sup-
posed to provide."
Indeed, compared with the
wide range of recreational ac-
tivities available to inmates at
Jefferson Correctional Institu-
tion, it was his opinion that the
county was "woefully inade-
quate" in this area, Hall said.
The other commissioners ap-
plauded the two women's drive
and ambitions, but they stop
short of making any commit-
ment.
"It's fantastic what you're
trying to do," Commissioner
Jerry Sutphin said. "But HMS
is the property of the School
Board and we have no jurisdic-
tion over there ... To me, you
need to partner with the
YMCA and groups like that. I
don't think it's appropriate for
this board to partner with you."
Moreover, he didn't see the
School Board donating the
building to the two women,
given the hurdles the county
had been made to jump to get
only a portion of the old high
school, Sutphin said.
"I admire your spunk," he
said. "But I don't think the
School Board that I know right
now is going to give you the
buildings."
Commissioner J. N. Tuten
also thought the request was
better addressed to the School
Board.
"With the GED and college
courses, you need to be part-
nering with the. school
system," Tuten said.
Besides, he added, even if
the legislators were to offer
funding for the project -- as
some of their letters appeared
to indicate -- such funding
would not be recurring. Mean-


ing that the county ultimately
would have to bear the finan-
cial burden of supporting the
institution.
Commissioner Skeet Joy-
ner's questions were more to
the point. What was Duhart's
definition of a partnership, he
wanted to know. More specifi-
cally, what exactly was being
asked of the county?
"Is this group going to be
self-sustaining?" Joyner asked.
"Otherwise, the county needs
to know how much n'oney we
have to put in the budget. I
commend what you're trying to
do, but as far as making an obh-
Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
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American Red Cross at 878-6080
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ligation, we need to know
what that 'obligation is
upfront."
The board suggested that
next time, the two women sub-,
mit a written request, complete
with a projected budget and
their sources of funding.


and false statement charges.
He adjudicated Neal guilty on
the charge of driving with a
suspended or revoked license.
According to the police re-
port, the accident occurred
2:45 p.m. on March 13, 2004,
on I-10.
Neal was traveling west on
the inside lane of the interstate
when he started to pass a semi-
truck traveling ahead of him in
the same lane.
Accelerating into the outside
lane to pass the semi, Neal
failed to see a pickup truck
that was also traveling west on
the outside lane.
The police report states that
Neal slammed his brakes in an
attempt to avoid hitting the
pickup truck but was unsuc-
cessful. The front of Neal's ve-
hicle struck the rear of the
pickup truck, causing the latter
to overturn several times and
eject the driver, 72-year-old
Donald Veenstra.
The report states that Neal
then lost control of his vehicle,
which careened off the road
and ran over Veenstra, who


Opening

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had been thrown into the me-
dian when his pickup flipped
over.
Using a crash reconstruction
formula, investigators calcu-
lated that Neal's vehicle was
traveling at 93 miles per hour
when it struck the pickup
truck.
The report states that at the
time of the accident, Neal ad-
mitted to drinking a beer three
hours before the crash and to
traveling at least 10 miles
above the posted speed limit of
70 mph.
Investigators learned subse-
quently that Neal had obtained
his Florida driver's license in a
fraudulent manner by stating
on the license application form
that he had no suspension in
another state.
Investigators found that
Neal's driving privilege had


been suspended in North Caro-
lina "for failure to appear in
court" and that his driver's li-
cense had been suspended in
Virginia.


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will meet at 9:00
a.m. April 12,
2006, at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street.


North Florida
Abstract & Title Co. Inc


850) 997-2670


220 S. Cherry St.-Monticello
E-mail: john@northflQridaabstract.com
"Serving the area for over 25 years"


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A
WORKSHOP TO WHICH THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED'

DATE: April 4, 2006
TIME: 6:00 p.m.
PLACE: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

SUBJECT: This workshop is to determine the
disposition (sale) or utilization (lease) of Howard
Middle School facilities once vacated by the
school district. Interested parties are invited and
asked to be prepared to make a presentation as
appropriate.

mllr=U..


Be Prepared For Storm & Hurricane Season
Sales And Installation Of Manual & Automatic Generator Systems


We Now Have A Digger & Bucket Truck

Please Call Us For Setting Poles For Barns,

Overhead Light Poles, Or Any Other

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The Monticello Opera House Presents


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For Information call 997-4242

















FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Coordinators of the Home -
Town Get Down activities are
planning their next event, 5-9
p.m., May 26, which will fea-
ture a Caribbean theme.


NEW Lamont Food Store owners are, from left: Sherry Hanif, Destiny Kishore, Raiaz
Kishore, and Mark Kishore, of New York City. (News Photo)

Lamont Food Store Sold;


Renamed Lamont Grocery


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Because of a change in own-
ership, the Lament Food
Store will soon be renamed as
Lament Grocery.
The New York family of
Mark Kishore, Sherry Hanif,
and children, Destiny and
Raiaz Kishore, recently pur-
chased the store from long-
time owners, Kusum and
Ishawar Jewan, who have de-
cided to retire and move to
California to be near their
children.
Mark Kishore said that he
had seen the ad for the sale of
the store in the newspaper in
New York. "We had been
talking about buying a busi-
ness, particularly a store, but
not in Florida," said Kishore.
"I came down to look at the
store, and the residents here
sold me on it.
"Everyone is so nice and
friendly here. In New York,
people don't* treat you with
that kind of hospitality, are
not friendly, and .respectful,
like they are here," he said.
"So I decided that this is the
best place to raise our chil-
dren. It's like everyone here is
family."
He added Wednesday after-
noon, that he had been in the
Lament area for the past four
days, and enjoys the area, the
business and especially the
residents and customers.
Kishore's experience in the
business had an early begin-
ning.
"I began in my country
(Guyana) and worked in a
family owned store from age
8-11," he said. "After coming
here, I helped my brother run
his liquor store in New York
for two years, and I really en-
joyed the work."
Kishore plans a few
changes at the store.
"I'm thinking about adding
hot food, like a deli,"-he said.


"And the little laundromat we
have, I'm thinking about shut-
ting it down and opening a
beauty salon. My wife has 24
years experience, and as soon
as she gets her license
changed over to here, we're


going to shut down the laun-
dromat."
The hours at the store will
remain the same; Monday
through Saturday, 6 a.m. until
9 p.m., and Sunday, 8 a.m.
until 8 p.m.


Conservation Reserve

Program Signup Set


The Farm Service Agency
(FSA) reports that the USDA
announces a general Conserva-
tion Reserve Program (CPR)
sign-up to be held this spring.
Farmers and ranchers will be
able to make offers for CPR's
'competitive general sign-up
from March 27, 2006, through
April 14, 2006, at the local
FSA office, which can be con-
tacted at 997-2072.
Offers for general sign-up


will be evaluated based on five
environmental factors of wild-
life, water, soil, air, and endur-
ing benefits, and cost.
CPR is a voluntary program
that helps farmers, ranchers
and other agriculture producers
protect their environmentally
sensitive land.
Producers enrolling in CRP
plant long term, resource con-
serving covers, with Commod-
ity Credit Corporation


'Wendy' Named Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Wendy has been named the
Humane Soceity's canine Pet
of the Week.
She is a female Monticello
Mutt, approximately eight


months old.
She has been spayed and all
vaccinations are up to date.
Shelter..Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista said that the person
who adopts Wendy must be
patient with her because she
is very shy at first, somewhat
skittish.


WENDY


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Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax:850-671-5900


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

UPN Network will be in -
Monticello over the weekend,
to film a 30 minute segment
of haunted historical places.
Founder of the Big Bend
Ghost Trackers (BBGT) Betty
Davis said James Coates of
James Coates Magical World,
will tale a private tour Satur-
day night with members of
BBGT.
"We have been working
hard to prepare for him," said
Davis. "We're putting to-
gether a CD of county and


To Meet Apri
The County Transportation
Disadvantaged Coordinating
Board meets 10 a.m.,
Thursday, April 13, at the
County Emergency Manage-
ment Office.
The agenda includes opera-
tional reports, funding applica-
tions and a staff report.
A public hearing will also be
held to afford the'opportunity
to discuss with the Board un-
met transportation needs, or
any other areas that relates to
local transportation services.
Also, a meeting of the Shut-
tie Sustainment Committee
will be held at 9 a.m. at the
same location.
For more information, or for
special accommodations at the
meeting, because of a disabil-


Spokesperson Ericka Im-
brunone said the upcoming
Home Town Get Down
would be much bigger and
- better than ever.
Usually during the event,
Dogwood Street is lined with
venders of every description.


city hauntings, pictures and
the stories of each, and a
DVD containing different
clips from investigations done
by BBGT in Monticello, in-
cluding Dancing With
Ghosts", the film made by
BBGT members during the
latest investigation of the Op-
era House.
"James also said he would
like to do something in the
Palmer House Saturday
night," said Davis.
She added that Sunday,
Coates and his crew would be
doing the actual filming.
No date has yet been set for
the airing of the film..


il 13
ity or ph
contact Va
Apalachee
Council at


physical impairment,
nita Anderson at the
Regional Planning
850 674-4571.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS,
Coordinators Plan

Caribbean Home

Town Get Down


LEE DAY

Saturday, April 1, 2006
Live Entertainment, Delicious Food,
Arts & Crafts, Children's
Games and Rides.

GREAT FAMILY FUN

1/4 MILES NORTH OF US 90 ON CR255,

LEE, FL -
PAID IN PARTY THE MADISON COUNTY
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
...... ...


Southeast Regional Cancer Center and the North Florida Cancer Network
were established to promote the finest principles of medical care. Can-
cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.
The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-
ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community, not just a
patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We
are in this together.


FRI., MARCH 31, 2006 PAGE 3
During the Caribbean
Home Town Get Down, both
Dogwood and Cherry Streets
will be lined with vendors.
"Business owners will be
dressed in grass skirts and
leighs, and businesses will be
decorated with a Caribbean
theme," said Imbrunone.
"We're even going to try to
get a band to play Caribbean
music," she added.
Besides the many raffles, ac-
tivities and music, Imbrunone
said they will conduct an-
another "Dress Your Pet For
The Occasion" contest, a
limbo contest, as well as a
variety of family oriented ac-
tivities..
Imbrunone said the wheels
are starting to turn and coor-
dinators still have some time
to come up with even more
creative ideas to make this the
best family oriented time in
town.
Anyone with ideas, wishing
to be a vendor or volunteering
for the event can call Imbru-
none at 997-2015.


I Choose
a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU

in Mind
3all 850-997-9981 ".

Steve McClelland
1- 1 E. -,

A Contracted General Agency for
BlucCouss BlucShieh
or Forida
U ...-.. -,:.. 64 7 u09


UPN To Film Local


Haunted Places


Transportation Board


SO UTHEST REGiONAL

CANCER CENTER R
A MEMBER OF NORTH FLORI DA CANCER CARE NETWORK








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

SLAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Attention Needed


To Power Safety


You can help avoid electri-
cal shock, burns and fires by
beginning your year-round
electrical safety awareness ef-
forts now. This is the word
being put out by the Electrical
Safety Foundation Interna-
tional (ESFI).
"Despite the fact that im-
proved product safety engi-
neering, standards and
electrical codes have reduced
electrical hazards, thousands
suffer from electrical shock
and fires each year," said ESFI
President Brett Brenner.
To increase electrical safety
awareness and protect those at
home and in the workplace,
ESFI has developed an electri-
cal safety tool kit that includes
statistics on electrical hazards
and recommendations to avoid
electrical shock, burns and
fires.
An average of 400 people
are electrocuted each year and
thousands more are injured be-
cause of electrical hazards.
To curb the leading cause of
electrocutions each year, note
locations of power lines at


home and on the job.
Power line contact with con-
struction equipment and items
such as ladders and gardening
tools are among the leading
causes of electrocutions.
Greater use of ground fault
circuit interrupters (GCFIs),
which protect both those. in
your home and workplace
against lethal electrical cur-
rents, can further reduce the
number of electrocutions.
Estimates indicate electricity
causes 140,000 fires each year,
which kill hundreds of people,
injure thousands more, and
cause $1.6 billion in property
damage.
Aging electrical systems,
combined with the growing
power demands, contribute to
electrical fire hazards.
Overloaded circuits, flicker-
ing lights, and discolored elec-
trical outlets and light switch
faceplates point to the need for
electrical upgrades.
Addressing these hazards
can save lives, reduce injuries
and cut economic losses
caused by electrical fires.


Heart Disease Takes


Toll On Americans


According to the American
Heart Association, heart dis-
ease is the number-one killer
of Americans in the U.S.
Most Americans are unaware
that taking precautionary
measures such as consuming a
healthy diet, managing stress
levels and getting adequate
physical activity can go a long
way in reducing the risks of
heart-related diseases.
Here are five simple steps
that you can take to maintain a
healthy heart:
Eat a Diet Rich in
Fruits and Vegetables: The
United States Department of
Agriculture's (USDA) new
Dietary Guidelines say adults
should consume the recom-
mended amounts of fruits and
vegetables each day to lower
their risk of heart disease.,
Exercise: Physical
activity helps improve heart
function, lower blood pressure
and cholesterol, and boost en-
ergy.
The American Heart Associa-
tion reports that 38.6 percent
of United States adults say
they do not engage in leisure-
time physical activity.
Adults should have at least 30
to 60 minutes of moderate-
intensity physical activity most


days of the week.
Add Fiber to Your
Diet: Fiber offers many heart-
health benefits, including low-
ering the risk of coronary heart
disease and blood cholesterol.
Try to get the recommended
amount of fiber (25 to 30
grams) in your daily diet.
Consume Omega-3s:
Omega-3 polyunsaturated
fatty acids (EPA and DHA)
help maintain a healthy cardio-
vascular system by maintain-
ing cholesterol and triglyceride
levels in the body. Good
sources of omega-3 fatty acids
are seafood, such as salmon,
tuna, crab and shrimp.
Supplement Your
Diet: A good supplement can
function as your nutritional
seat belt. Health professionals,
including doctors, nutritionists,
and even the Food and Drug
Association (FDA), agree that
many diets in the U.S. lack op-
timum levels of many key nu-
trients such as antioxidants,
omega-3s and plant sterols re-
quired to maintain a healthy
heart and that adding a daily
multivitamin or dietary supple-
ment can help fill the nutri-
tional gaps.
For more information, visit
www.herbalife.com.


Letters to the Editor Welcomed

5,00 Words or Less

Letters must be signed

and include

phone number of writer


-- Opinion & Comment



Everything Is Health


I'm beginning to think living
is hazardous to your health
(mine too).
There are warnings every-
where about the food we eat,
and the air we breathe. Sun-
shine is a no-no too.
Goodness, life is compli-
cated!
Of course there are
reversals, which confuse us
even more. Take eggs, for ex-
ample. A few years ago we
were told eggs were filled with
cholesterol and we were eating
-them at the risk of clogging
our arteries.
Fairly recently the word was
eggs weren't so bad after all!
Go' figure.
The other day I followed a
truck belching black smoke
down a busy city street.
I'm still wondering what that
experience did to my lungs.
Do I have black lung now?
Time was a steak was a good
thing. Now we're told to stay
away from red meat.
Eat more fruits and vegeta-
bles, we're told.
My cholesterol was elevated


Publisher's

Notebook I
:.-
mii.--,%s lees,---sv* ::


Ran Cichion


so I ate fruits and vegetables
for 18 months. I mean I was
disciplined.
For that year and a half I ate
no red meat, no fried foods, no
pizza, or any other stuff the
health gurus tell us to avoid.
With confidence I went to
see my doctor for my annual
physical just knowing my cho-
lesterol level dropped.
You can imagine my shock
when the lab reports came
back and my cholesterol had
jumped two points!
"Must be in the genes," my


doctor said.
Now I take a little pill every
morning to' keep my choles-
terol under control.
There's a.steady barrage of
advertising for herbal remedies
for every kind of ailment.
Gingkoba is one that amuses
me. I guess this stuff is sup-
posed to fertilize our brains be-
cause the actors pitching the
product say they are really
thinking clearer now with
Gingkoba.
I've known some people
who really need this stuff.


Danger
Like the young woman who
came to work one day to an-
nounce big-eyed that "you
can't get off 1-10 until you
come to an exit."
Will Gingkoba really help
her condition? Maybe there is
an extra strength variety!
Then there's the larger issue
and that is the Gingkoba com-
mercials suggest all of our
brains have turned to mush
and we need help.
Already, we're in trouble
for eating and breathing. Are
our brains shrinking too?
I haven't even mentioned
the occasional scary reports
about our surgeons making
major league mistakes and tak-
ing the wrong organ.
That's a real confidence
builder if you are a candidate
for any kind of surgery.
See what I mean about living
being hazardous to your
health?
We may be doing damage
without even knowing it.
All it takes is eating and
breathing. Not to mention
spending time in the sun.


'Chicken Littles' See Gloom


DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Well, I think it is about that
time of year for the "Chicken
Little" group to appear once
again. I believe there must be
a big hole somewhere out in
the American wilderness that
opens up and lets out all the
"doomsdayers" to spread their
"woe is me" nonsense.
Every year for at least the
past 15 years,,someone wants
to tell us how absolutely lousy
our school systems are becom-
ing and how hopelessly our
children are falling behind the
Japanese and Germans, espe-
cially in technology!
To quote Colonel Sherman
Potter, "Horse hockey!" Amer-
ica is the most technically ad-
vanced society that the world
has ever known. Japan and


Germany are so far behind us
in this respect that we can't
even see them in our rearview
mirror.
Granted, many students and
schools of today (not to men-
tion our own Jefferson County
schools) have dropped well be-
low the acceptable minimum
level of educational perform-
ance. This situation is due in
part to lack of parental in-
volvement that once was
deemed so self critical to aver-
age Americans.
Today's children usually
grow up in a two working par-
ent lfouselhold where personal
free time is at a premium. This
situation is compounded by the
attitude advanced by social
dogooders that people have the
right to abandon all responsi-
bility to insure they put them-
selves first, lest they lose out
on deserved "social rewards."


In other words, "do your own
thing" first and put everything
else second.
Fortunately, many thousands
of highly intelligent students
rise to the surface in this coun-
try. There are more than
enough to fill the halls and
classrooms of our most pres-
tigious technical universities
such as Cal. Tech and M.I.T.
There they become the next
generation of technical
wizards, astounding us with
their imaginations, unique
skills and remarkable inven-
tions.
I will grant you that the
United States doesn't possess
all of the world's great techno-
logical thinkers. Indeed, the
likes of Germany, Great Brit-
ain and Japan can boast of
technological advancements
and extraordinary break-
throughs by their scientists, but


the prize ultimately goes to
America where the diversifica-
tion of our technological enter-
prises and associated research
leaves every other country in
the dust.
It is also getting to be about
the time for the political
"doom and gloom" bunch to
raise its ugly head as well.
November elections are com-
ing and if you want to get in
office or stay in office, it's
time to start compiling your
list of "the sky is falling" talk-
ing points.
Neither political party is ex-
empt, but it is always the na-
ture of things to attack the sit-
ting representative or majority
party in power.
In this case, the Democrats
would have you believe that
Bush and the Republicans

(See Chicken Page 5)


Asthma Action Plan Needed


Parents and caregivers of
asthmatic children know how
difficult breathing can be for
children heavy coughing,
wheezing chest tightness and
shortness of breath. But un-
derstanding the effects of trig-
gers in the environment and
forming an asthma action plan
to counter those triggers is a
step in managing asthma.
The first step to keeping
your child healthy is knowing
what your child's triggers are.
Because you are with your
child daily, you can best notice
the patterns that set off your
child's breathing problems. Be
sure you report your findings


back to the doctor.
The most common triggers
are colds and allergens. An al-
lergen (e.g. animal dander,
pollen, mold spores) is a sub-
stance that can irritate the
lungs of people who have al-
lergies and asthma. According
to the American Academy of
Allergy, Asthma and Immu-
nology, most children who
have asthma or similar breath-
ing problems have allergies.
Some common allergies or
allergy sources that can trigger
asthma-like symptoms include
molds, fungi, pollen, dust,
furry or feathered pets and
even cockroaches. Other


sources include exercise like
running, cigarette smoke and
foods like nuts or others con-
taining-sulhites.
Knowing your child's trig-
gers will help you steer clear
or them. You can follow some
tips to help your child feel his
or her best.
Clean and dust
weekly, using a vacuum with a
filters and/or microfiltration
bags.
Wash bedding weekly in hot
water, avoid feather pillows,
and put a dust mite cover on
your child's mattress and pil-
lows.
To reduce pet dander, keep


pets out of your child's room,
out of the car, and wash your
pets often.
When inside, replace heat
and air conditioning filters
monthly, use air conditioning
in the summer, and use an ex-
haust fan when cooking.
After you have identified your
child's triggers, your doctor
will work with you do develop
your child action plan.

Every child's asthma action
plan should be personalized
lor his or her unique situation.
It's easier to control your
child's breathing problems ef-
(See Asthma Page 5)


From Our Photo File
















-. ---:. -- -








JOHN PELHAM Florida Power Corporation's Security Specialist spoke to the Ameri-
can Legion in Sept. 1990, about how to contribute to the community's fight against
the invasion of drugs. (News File Photo)


--p- -sc~ -~- ----


a z ~---cllC -- -- -- ~~pI~IS









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006 PAGE 5

Joyner's Travel Center


In Business 30 Years


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


GREETING customer Jimmy Lee Davis, at Joyner's Travel Center, celebrating its 30th
year in business, are from left, Jarad Joyner, Jessie Joyner and their Dad Skeet Joy-.
ner. (News Photo)


(Continued From Page 4)
have completely ruined our
country and the only hope to
save the Union is to elect some
member of their party. Don't
be surprised to hear someone
say that Bush actually caused
Hurricane Katrina.
Yes, every administration-


Asthma Ac
(Continued From Page 4)
fectively when you have spe-
cific directions on which ac-
tion to take.
Your action plan is a.
great guideline to help you
manage your child's breathing
problems. But it can also be
helpful to other caregivers in-
volved with your child, includ-
ing family, school staff, and
daycare workers. Here are
some tips to make sure you get
the most out of your child's
action plan:
Make a copy of the
plan and give it to each of the
people who are involved with
caring for your child. (Be sure
you give them new copies any
time that you update the plan).
Keep an updated ver-


has its downfalls and the Bush
administration is no exception.
A war is a terrible thing, no
matter how justified the cause.
Who wants high gas prices or
political appointees being in-
dicted?
Yet, the fact that our econ-
omy is booming despite the


:ion Plan

sion of the plan with you at all
times. You never know when
your child's breathing prob-
lems may crop up. It can hap-
pen even when you are away
from home.
Be sure to review the
action plan with your child's
doctor at least once or twice a
year.


initial effects of 9/11, employ-
ment is at a near all time- high
and unemployment near an all
time low or that home owner-
ship among Americans is,
higher than it has ever been,
especially among minorities,
will somehow always get lost '
in the rhetoric.
No need to have any plans
of your own to put forward be-,
cause "doom and gloom" has'
nearly always proven to be a
useful tool in the hands of a
skillful politician, and Ainer-
ican's voting record can prove
that out.


You Can Count
On The

Monticello

News


Tuesday & Thursday nights 4 pm 'til close

ALL YOU CAN EAT
D--.CC, ., I WITH VEGGIES "ik


JM&, p,*E
r 0


Joyner's Travel Center,_
S.which opened March 15,
I976, celebrates 30 years in
business.
Owner Skeet Joyner said
that his parents had been in
the retail business for ap-
Sproximately 50-60 years, and
'when they opened the store, it
began as a "mom and pop"
operation.
He said that after purchas-
ing the property, it took all of
Sthe family's cash, so there was
:. no money to operate the busi-
ness
"So we took on two partners,
Thmnias Joyner and Jack Rob-
inson."
The corporate name of the
business was Big Bend Petro-
leum Inc., and the store was
called Quality Market.
Approximately two to three
,years later, they were able to
fully buy their partners out.
"I recall that when we first
.opened, gas was about 50-60
cents per gallon," said Joyner.
"In those days, if gas prices
,rose, it was a half a cent. to
three quarters of a cent. To-
dja:, it's no surprise to see it
raise 40 cents at a time."
SHe added that when the
business first began operating,
if a customer purchased 100
gallons of gasoline, they were
given 5.0 gallons of diesel
free.
The cost of the diesel at that
time was approximately 18-
20 cents per gallon.
Joyner was a full time
farmer in 1986 when his fa-
ther passed away.
"I had to make a decision,"
said Joyner. "I had to decide
whether to choose the busi-
ness or farming. I thank God
that I made the right
decision."
Joyner said that he cut back
on the farming responsibili-
ties to run the store full time.
"I could see that things were
starting to change and I


needed to change the business
in order to continue to
prosper," he added. "I started
to change it from a mom and
pop operation to an Interstate
located fuel stop.
When his mother passed
away in 2003, Joyner pur-
chased the store from the
family.
Joyner serves as the presi-
dent of the business, his son,
Jarad, the vice-president, who
will one day take over the
business.
Joyner's daughter, Jessie,
serves as the secretary.
S"My parents started me as
an independent business per-
son, and I feel obligated to
help my children get a start in
business," said Joyner.
He said that over the course
of the past 30 years, he has
seen things-change dramati-
.cally.
"Jarad, who obtained his
business degree from FSU in
.2004, had added and im-


proved the computer technol-
ogy tremendously," said
Joyner. "When we first
opened, we had one cash reg-
ister and a cigar box, now it
takes five computers o oper-
ate the business. It takes a dif-
ferent generation to add
something new. He brought
us up to the 21st century.
"It's just amazing how much
things can change over 30
years," he said.
On March 15, he celebrated
the store's anniversary with a
big birthday cake, a birthday
party and free food and drinks
for the customers.
"I've had some very good
employees over the years and
I wish to thank Jefferson
County residents for their
support in the business," he
concluded.
If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


NOTICE OF INTENT TO TRANSMIT PROPOSED
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT

The Jefferson County Planning Commission will hear a proposal by the Jefferson
County Utility Development Committee to establish an Urban Services Boundary.
The area within this Urban Services Boundary will constitute an overlay zone and
may affect future development plans within its boundaries. The Planning and
Zoning Committee has previously met in workshop mode on this issue on February
23rd and March 23rd. The Planning Commission will forward its recommendations
to the County Commission for their approval.




| '"' "^ ,7.
.. ... ... ...--







-;
















kropos ban Service Area Boundary





The Jefferson County Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed
r---- -r !V -



















Comprehensive plan map amendment on April 13th1 2006, at 7:00pm at the Courtroom of
the County Courthouse located at the intersection of S Highways 90 and 19. The hearing








may be continued as necessary. Information concerning the proposal may be reviewed at
the county planning office. The planning office is now located at the old high school
building at 445 West Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344.
From the "Government in the Sunshine Manual". Page 36, paragraph c: "Each board, commission or agency of
this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice that if a
71

S'"











person decides to appeal any decision made by the boarommission will hold a public hearing on the proposed
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record o the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose County Courthouse located at ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedingighways 90 and 19. The hearincludes
may be stimony anued evidencessary. upon which the appeal is to be based."e proposal may be reviewed at
the county planning office. The planning office is now located at the old high school
building at 445 West Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344.
From the "Government in the Sunshine Manual". Page 36, paragraph c:"'Each board, commission or agency of
this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice that if a
person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based."


Lietc Shwad Sale5


'Chicken Littles'















PAGE ~r MONTCELT O. (Fl,. NEWS. FRI.. MARCH 31, 2006


Lifestyle


Forum Identifies


Available Services


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Adult
School, in collaboration with
other agencies throughout the


', .


;CAMELLIA GARDEN CIRCLE made lamps from wine bottles at a recent meeting. From
,Left, Jane Davis, Bobbie Golden and Isabelle de Sercey. (News Photo)


iCamellia Circle Leans

,TO Make Bottle Lamps
Golden hosted the meeting
SDEBBIE SNAPP and provided the wine anc
Staff Writer beer bottles, and electrified


The Camellia Garden Circle
met for their March meeting at
the home of Bobbie Golden
and learned to make .lamps
From old bottles.


Jessie Alexander
Cooper
SJessie Alexander Cooper, 89
died on Friday, March 17,
2006. Services were held
March 24. at Bethel AME,
1'allahassee, Florida. She was a
native of Jefferson County
where she began her life's en-
joyment as an elementary
school teacher at the Old How-
ard Academy. Her profession
in the field of education
spanned over 35 years. She
\Nas the wife of the late Samuel
J. Cooper, the first Principal of
the Old Howard Academy
School.
She leaves to lament her gra-
cious existence, her daughter,
Sandra C. Moore (Jerry) her
son. Dr. Gerald Alexander
Cooper, two grandsons, Jerry
Lambert Moore Jr. of Talla-
hassee. Florida and Vincent A.
Cooper, of Ft. Lauderdale, two
nieces. Cheryl A. Hood and
Linda A. Jordan of Washing-
ton D.C. and two nephews,
Willard B. Barnhart, Sr. of
Monticello and Lucious Alex-
ander Jr. of Washington DC
and a host of other loving fanm-
ily members and friends.
Joe Henry Drew
Joe Henry Drew 55, died on
Wednesday, March 22, 2006.
Services will be held on Satur-
day, April 1, 2006, at Junious
Ilill Missionary Baptist Church
in Monticello, Florida. The
burial will follow at Mt. Olive
Cemetery in Monticello.
Viewing will be from 2:00p.m.
To 7:30p.m., Friday, March
31. 2006 at Tillman Funeral
Home.
Mr. Drew was a native of
Monticello where be graduated
High school in 1968 from
Howard Academy. For more
than thirty years, he worked in
the shoe repair business at
various shops in Tallahassee.
He was regarded as a master of
his craft. Joe was also em-
ployed as a custodian with the
Department of Highway
Safety.
Joe was a talented singer and
an accomplished fisherman.
SHe could catch fish when oth-
ers couldn't get a bite. He also
loved cooking wild game.
Saluting Joe's life and his
memory are his sisters, Evelyn
Drew Sikes and Mary Drew
Rollins: nieces, Valerie
(Byron) Williams, Lisa (Clin-
ton) Monroe, Elandria Rollins
Sand a nephew, Justin Reed;
grandnieces, Kalyn Baker and


candlestiCK and botte auapters
to make the lamps.
She shared her display of
fancy lamp shades with the
group and displayed some
lamps she had made previ-


Kendrea Bellamy, all are of
Tallahassee.
Joe was preceded in death by
his parents, Ned and Rosetta
Drew, maternal grandmother
who raised him and his sib-
lings, Martha Bradley, and a
brother Edward Drew.

Herman Howard
Herman Howard, -81,, a,la-
borer of Monticello, died Sat-
urday. March 25, 2006.
Survivors include a brother,
Henry Howard, Perry, Fl; a
niece, Patsy C. Wooten and a
nephew Archie Cuyler, both of
Monticello.
Deacon Dan Williams
Deacon Dan Williams, 91,
died Saturday, March 25, 2006
in Monticello. Services will be
at 2:00p.m. On Saturday, April
1, 2006 at Pleasant Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in
Monticello With the burial at
the church cemetery. Viewing
will be from 2:00p.m. to
7:30p.m. on Friday, March 31,
2006 at Tillman Funeral
Home.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Jefferson County, Mr.
Williams was a retired self-
employed farmer. He had also
worked in road construction
for White Construction Com-
pany.
An ordained deacon at Pleas-
ant Grove, he also was a mem-
ber of Pleasant Grove, New
Bethel, Hickory Hill, and New
Zion Pallbearer Lodges.
Among those honoring his
legacy and treasuring his love
and guidance are his sons; Ly-
nell(Deloris) Williams and
Ozell (Carmen) Williams, both
of Miami, Fl.; his daughter,
Alfredia W. Thompson and
Eloney W. Parker both of
Monticello, Terry Jean Wil-
liams, Apopka, and
Marjorie(Dozier) Harrell of
St. Petersburg, Fl.; his brother
Lewis Williams, Rochester, N.
Y.; sisters, Lenora Williams,
Vero Beach, Fl., and Francis
Roman of Rochester, N.Y.; his
daughter-in-law, Mary Wil-
liams of Miami, Fl., numerous
grandchildren, great-
grandchildren, nieces, neph-
ews, and other relatives and
friends.
He was preceded in death by
his wife Virginia Smith Wil-
liams, his sons, Donial
"Danny" Smith and Joe Lee
Williams.


ously, which were in use in her
home.
Members learned to use a
special drill for making the
hole in the bottle, for the wire
to come through.
Water was poured to keep the
sponges wet during the drilling
to keep the drill bits moist dur-
ing the cutting process.
The result is an easier,
smoother cut, and a better
looking finished product.
The end result is a personal-
ized vineyard candle lamp,
made from a bottle which may
have special meaning to the
owner.
Members also learned the
workings of the glass grinder,
brought in by Jane Davis. The
grinder is used to cut bottles to
make vases.
Flower arrangements were
collected by Jeanne Brenner to
take to the Mini Flower Show
held at the Chamber of Com-
merce the next day.
Brenner brought a variety
of rose bushes for members to
select and take home to plant.

Rummage

Sale Set At
St. Margaret's
St. Margaret Church on US
90 East will hold a rummage
sale, 8 a.m. to noon, Saturday,
April 8.
Items can be dropped off at
the parish hall behind the
church 11 a.m. to 1 p.m, Sun-
day.
A good selection of items is
expected and residents are en-
couraged to check out the sale.


Church News
Harvest Center will present
Glorious Praise International
Praise and Worship Leaders,
Ron and Pat Inkinbrant of
Cape Geraud, MO, 10:30 a.m.,
Sunday. Location is at the cor-
ner of Waukeenah Hwy 259
and Springhollow Road.


DREAMS COME

TRUE


With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
"My kids" have big dreams, too.




air purifier
It's simple. Look fbor the
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To learn more, go to
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county, have formed a com-
munity forum.
The purpose of the forum is
to establish awareness
throughout the county of avail-
able services.
The first community forum


Owner Of Snapdragon

Speaks To Sorority


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Xi Lambda Upsilon Chapter-
of Beta Sigma Phi met at the
home of Katrina Guerry with a
local business woman as
speaker.
Hostesses for this evening
meeting were Cindy Chancy
and Guerry.
Chancy introduced Hayley
Winchester, owner of the
Snapdragon, to speak to the
group about her business lo-
cated on Dogwood Street.
Snapdragon offers all types
of gift items, wedding invita-
tions, and free gift wrapping.
Reports were heard from the
Service, Social, Ways and


Register Now

For Summer

4-H Camp

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Registration is now being ac-
cepted for rho 5- 7 Year Old
Day Camp to be held at the
County Extension Office 8
a.m. 12 p.m. June 19 22 for
the cost of$15.
The Day Camp will include
such fun events as: a farm
visit; make your own hula
hoop; Fresh 2 U; Hairy Willie;
a visit to Quincy Research
Center; fishing; a balloon race;
a visit to Maclay Gardens;
swimming; Sno-Cones;
awards; and Power Point pres-
entations.
This Camp is filling fast so
reservations need to be made
now.


Means, Membership, and Sun-
shine committees.
Betty Messer won this meet-
ing's raffle, a gift from the
Snapdragon Shop.
All proceeds from this raffle
will be given to Hospice.
Winchester was presented
with a potted plant from the
chapter members.
In attendance at this meeting
were: Connie Boland, Judy
Carney, Cindy Chancy, Caro-
lyn Cheshire, Peggy Day,
Linda Demott, Mary Frances
Gramling, Katrina Querry,
Carolyn Hayse, Kathy Joyner,
Betty Messer, Alice Sander,
Mary Ann Van Kleunen,
Emily Walker, and Velinda
Williams.


'1-NCF- ,

HAIR
S\ it i 99

Si^w1 .& up


" i( \


fluc



The First Step'

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


J 'East

Thursday, April 6 8 p.m.

at the Monticello Opera House

Monticello, Florida


Zeaturinhorat
om intd oral
cEnsem1les I


FLOKAL DESIGNS
., SINCE 1934

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was held in December 2005 at
the Memorial MB Church.
The forums are held at vari-
ous churches to help reach
those who might not otherwise
receive the information.
Partners in the forum
include: the County Health
Department, Adult School,
Opportunity School, Family
Literacy, Employment Con-
nections, and Jefferson A.R.C.
The Health Department is
represented by the Healthy
Start Program Manager Shena
McFadden.
McFadden recently pre-
sented the community with the:
goals of Healthy Start which
include reducing infant mortal-
ity, reducing the number of
low birth weight babies and
improving health and develop-
ment outcomes.
An Abstinence Grant was
submitted in November for
$30,000 to teach abstinence in
the middle and high schools to
youths ages 10 -19.
The information was well
taken by participants and all
were encouraged to refer preg-
nant women to the health de-
partment for assistance.
For more information con-
tact McFadden at the County
Health Department at 342-
0170 ext. 106.


d*-

S. i


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
Lord your God
with all your
heart and with all
your soul and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5


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Fundraiser

Nets $1017
The State Farm Relay For
Life team held a Chicken Din-
ner fundraiser recently netting
$1017.
"Reports are that the chicken
and all the sides were
delicious, including the Irish
Green pound cake," claims
Lisa Reasoner, publicity chair-
man for the County Relay For
Life.
All proceeds from this fund-
raiser will benefit the County
Relay for Life to help fight
Cancer.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006 PAGE 7


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tie Hopkins, Bill Hopkins, Betty Hobbs, Tommy Surles
and Tami Seago. (News Photo)


4-H County Events

Take Place Saturday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

4-H County Events take
place 9 a.m. Saturday, April 1
at the Extension Office.
The new age divisions are:
Cloverbuds, 5 7 years of age;
Juniors, 8 10 years of age;
Intermediate 11 13 years of
age; and Seniors, 14 18 years
of age.
All County Events winners
will receive a ribbon the same
day and a trophy at the Annual
Awards Banquet.
County Event winners will
also go on to compete at Dis-
trict Events.
Senior 4-H members that
have won at District will have
an opportunity to go on to 4-H
State Congress, which will be
held at the University of Flor-
ida Campus in July.


Time allowance for County
Events categories are: Demon-
strations: Juniors, 3 12 min-
utes; Intermediate, 3 12
minutes; and Seniors, 5 12
minutes.
Public Speaking: Juniors, 3 -
7 minutes; Intermediate, 3 7
minutes; and Seniors, 5 7
minutes.
Horse Public Speaking: Jun-
iors, 3 7 minutes; Intermedi-
ate 3 7 minutes; and Seniors,
5 7 minutes.
Share-The-Fun: Juniors, 3 -
5 minutes; Intermediate, 3 5
minutes; and Seniors, 3 5
minutes.
If you would like to come to
the 4-H Office to work on your
demonstration or speeches,
feel free to use any equipment
or markers.
If you need help with your
project contact John Lilly, Gla-
dys Neely, or Heidi Copeland
to set up an appointment.


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Real Estate Courses:
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006



scene s FM01Tour ofHs
^^d~ ~ ~~~Ao' i^Ili*uu mlJHilBb,^


,... ... ,










CHRISTI BESHEARS visits with Martha Naughton on a tour of the Beshears' home,
the most modern home on the tour. It was built in 1975, and remodeled in 2005
(News Photos)


TAYLER McNEILL and Karma Jones, in ante bellum gowns, greet visitors to the
Girardeau-Dunn Home on the Avenue of the Oaks.


....... .- m A
PALMER PLACE Bed and Breakfast owns this antique SAMANTHA COOKSEY takes visitors on a tour of the
car and carnival museum on its property. Visitors were Opera House and collects for ticket sales.
treated to freshly popped pop corn.


TROY AVERA, background, and Mary Ann Clarke talk to
Jimand Theresa Heyde from Ohio, about the history of
the house. She holds the 1893-1900 Diaries of Honor-
able T.L. Clarke.


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MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. FRI.. MARCH 31. 2006 PAGE 9


- -V- -.- V.- -~ *~ -V- *~ ~ -V: ~ ~ V -V -.- -~ -~..
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The Leaders



Of Car



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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006


14
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Sports


MONTTCELLO. (FL), NEWS. FRI.. MARCH 31. 2006 PAGE 1:


ACA Girls Win 6 Straight;


Stand 12-3 On The


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After winning the last six
games, Lady Warriors now
stand 12-3 on the season, 5-0
in.district play.
The game slated against
Apalachicola was chalked up
as a win by forfeit, when
Apalachicola canceled be-
cause of too few player to
field the team.
In the district game against
R. F. Munroe, ACA won, 7-4.
The Lady Warriors col-


elected nine hits and commit-
ted one error.
Brittany Hobbs pitched all
seven innings, striking out
five, walking four and giving
up five hits.
At the plate, she went two
for three.
Nicole Mathis went three for
four.
In district play against John
Paul II, the Lady Warriors de-
feated John Paul for a 14-3
win.
The game was chalked in
five innings because of the
ten-run rule.


Season
The Lady Warriors col-
lected 16 hits and co.jmined '
one error.
Paige Thurman pitched the
entire game, striking out
three, walking none and gi\-
ing up six hits.
Bethany Saunders v.ent three
for three, three RBI, Chelse:
Kinsey, two for two, one RBI;
and Joanna Cobb two for tv. o,
one RBI.
ACA blanked the Hjnulton
County team for a 7-)0 ;vin
The Lady Warriors col-
lected eight hits and comint-
ted one error.
Hobbs pitched. sien in-
nings, striking out fi' e. v. a ..-
ing none and giving utp ;eve .
hits. At the plate, -he v .it
two for four with one KB I.
Kinsey went two for three,
two RBI; and Saunders went
one for three, two RBI.
In the district game against
Carrabelle, the Lady Warriors
downed them for a 22-1. vic-
tory.
The game was called in five
innings due to the ten-run
rule.
The Lady Warriors racked
up 22 hits and committed two
errors.
Hobbs pitched, striking out
three, walking two and giving
up three hits. At the plate,
she went three for four with
two RBI; Lindsey Day, five
for five, four RBI; Kinsey,
three for five, two RBI; and
Keri Brasington, three for
four, one RBI.
In the game against John
Paul II, ACA won 12-2.
The game was called in six
innings due to the ten-run
rule.
ACA collected 17 hits and
Colmmiined three errors.
Thurman pitched, striking
out three, walking one and
giving up three hits.
Hannah Sorensen went two
for four, three RBI, one triple;
Melissa Martin, three for f9ur,
two RBI; and Tristen
Sorensen, three for three.
"In these past few games,
we have been getting so far
ahead, we've been able to play
the younger girls some more,"
said Coach Roslyn Bass.
"We've really been jelling as a
team, and have been hitting
well."
She concluded that it is
three weeks until the district
tournament, which will be
hosted at ACA, April 17-20.
"There's nothing like that
home-field advantage."


NOW AVAILABLE!
New PoolTables
Balls: Cues '-
Other Supplies
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850-668-7665
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metmea


LADY WARRIOR Bethany
Saunders pauses for a
photo at a recent ACA
practice session. (News
Photo)


Wacissa Fire
Department
Trail Ride Set


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Wacissa Volunteer Fire
Rescue Inc. will hold its An-
nual Trail Ride fundraiser Sat-
urday, April 8 beginning with
Round-um up at 9 a.m. at the
corner of Pinhook and 59.
The riders will head out at 10


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Preparing for the upcoming
season, the Monticello De-
mons.and the Lady Diamonds
played a coed game Sunday,
in which the team of Coach
Roosevelt Jones beat the team
of Assistant Coach Willie
Cuyler, 17-8.
On Jones' team, Kelvin
Jones, Wilbo Ellis, Jr., and
Joe Anderson all went three
for three, Jones and Andrews
both with a home run. '
Deandre Howard went two
for two with two home runs;
Valerie Robertson two for
three; Lisa Fead and Kidra


Thompson both two for three;
and Shericka Parrish, K. Jay
and Nick Russell, all one for
two.
Cuyler's team was lead by
Nikki Cooks who went three
for three; Letita Fead, James
Edward and Johnny Rivers all
two for three; Eldred Jennings
and Tasha Smiley both two
for two; Johnny Gilley, Mi-
chael Meeks and Fannie Mae
Fead all one for three.
Coaching the Lady 'Dia-
monds is Jones assisted by
Michael Meeks and coaching
the Monticello Demons is
Jones assisted by Cuyler.
Jones reported that the colors
for both teams this year
would be blue and orange.


1st UMC Golf Tourney,

Dinner Raises $1,500


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The First United Methodist
Church Relay For Life Golf
Tournament and fish fry din-
ner was a huge success, rais-
ing approximately $1,500.
The winners of the tourna-
ment was the three-man team
of Charlie Jackson, Danny
Phelps, and Kevin Langston.
They were each awarded
"bragging rights" and a $75
gift certificate to the C & D
Pro Shop at the Country Club.
Spokesperson Heather Col-
lins said there were a total of
25 golfers in the tournament,
and 100 fish dinners were


sold.
"It was a beautiful day and a
perfect afternoon for a game
of golf," said Collins.

She added that there were
several contributors to the
event that were to be thanked,
including:: Green South
Equipment Co. of Thomas-
ville (previously Jones Trac-
tor Co.), General Sheet Metal
of Tallahassee, and the Thig-
pen family of Monticello,
who underwrote the expenses
for the event, Chuck Cham-
bers, whose assistance was
helpful in coordinating teams,
and Margaret Calhoun, the
First UMC Relay For Life
Coordinator.


Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the, Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
wwwtal lytown.com/redcross.



American
Red Cross


Something Different at Dairy Queen

"Dine In Only'


Family Night Senior Night
Eve Monday Night 5pm-9pm Every Tuesday Night
Come Join Us
hoose one of the following Meals for only $3.49
#1 1/4# Classic Grillburger w/ Cheese

#2- Ft. Long Chili Dog

#3 -Double Cheese Burger

#4 Breaded or Grilled Chicken Sandwich

#5- BBQ Sandwich

#6 Fish Sandwich

#7 4pc. Chicken Strip Basket

All the above Meals include a 16 oz. drink,
your choice of fries, onion rings or sub salad

#8 Crispy or Grilled Chicken Salad
w/ 16 oz drink (no fries)
All meals come With a 5 oz. Sundae also. No discounts can be used.


H 1 iu- 2 4
Th m sile2431


JCKC Golf Tourney

Set Over Weekend


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Ken--
nel Club Annual Four-Ball
April Fool's Day Golf Tour-
nament takes place Saturday
at the Country Club.
The event will officially
kick off 4 p.m., Friday with
the Shoot-out of Past Champi-
ons.
Spokesman Chuck Cham-
bers said there will be 100
golfers, making up 50 two-
man teams.
"There will be golfers from


Georgia, Tallahassee, Madi-
son, Perry, Jacksonville, from
all over," said Chambers.
Saturday tee-offs will be
shotgun starts, slated for 8
a.m. and 1 p.m. and teams
will be playing "Best Ball".
Sunday, shotgun starts, are
scheduled for 9 a.m. and 2
p.m. and teams will; play
"Select A Shot".

Winners will be provided
with a gift certificate from the
Pro Shop at the Country Club,
along with having their names
placed on the plaque of cham-
pions that hangs in, the Coun-
try Club trophy room.


Bass Tournament Set At

Head Of Wacissa River


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

For the second consecutive
year, bass tournaments will be
hosted at the head of the Wa-
cissa River.
The first tournament this
year will be begin at daylight,


Saturday April 8.
Weigh in is at 1 p.m. The
entry fee is $20 per person,
$10 per boat for the Big Bass
Jackpot, which will award
100 percent of the jackpot.
Spokesman Kurt Walker
said that the more people
there are, the bigger the jack-
pot.


Demons, Diamonds


Play Coed Game


Ij
I


I


.i









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006


LEGAL NOTICE
The Jefferson Community Water
System Board will meet 7 p.m.,
Thursday April 6, 2006 at 395 Wa-
ter Mill Road (Tank Site).
3/31, c

Call for Bids Project: Air
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Handler
at Christ Episcopal Church
Monticello Florida. Scope of project
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air
conditioning systems in the existing
church and removal and disposal of
-four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,


LEGAJS -, ,:ii;

Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
form successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
date and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL- 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office, 425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive' any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29,31, 4/5/06, c
Notice of Auction to the Highest
Bidder: Under the authority of the
Self Storage Facility Act, Section
83:805, the described below has
been seized for non-payment of rent
and incurred Expenses: UNIT #27
Darrell Broxie Household goods;
UNIT #45 Henry Mays Household


goods; UNIT #46 Sandra McKown -
Household goods Auction Date:,
April 15, 2006 Time: 10:00 a.m.
Place: Monticello Mini Storage,
corner of York & Railroad Streets,
Monticello, FL.
3/31, 4/7/06,
Legal Notice Request for
Information (RFI) The Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc. is
seeking sources interested .ip,
achieving Lead Agency designation-
under the Community Care for the
Elderly Act (s. 430.202, F.S.). Lead
Agencies are designated to provide,
case management and to coordinate
various community-based services
to eligible individuals within a
specified Community Care Services,
Area (CSA). For the purpose of this:
Request for Information .(RFI), 'a
CSA in defined as a county.
Counties include: Bay Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty,y
Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and
Washington Counties. Prospeclihe
sources must demonstrate the:
ability to work with individuals age i
60 and- older. If a ,contract is,
awarded for:this effort, the Area;
Agency on Aging for North Florida,
Inc. anticipates duration of not.
more than one year with two,


one-year renewal options, pending
: continued funding availability.
Responsibilities include, but are not
limited to: Provision of case
management; Provision or
coordination of core service;
Coordination with Home Care for
the Elderly, Alzheimer Disease
Initiative, and Medicaid Waiver
Home and Community-Based
Services and Assisted Living Waiver
for the Elderly programs;
Responding to Adult Protective
Services referrals classified as high
risk and in need of services to
prevent further harm; Responding
to CARES Nursing Home
Pre-Admission Screening Team
referrals for persons at imminent
risk of staff; Recruitment,
maintenance, and utilization of
volunteers; Development of a
disaster preparedness/response plan;
Management and development' of
elder resources; Quality assurance
and evaluation of client satisfaction;
Maintenance of client records; and
Input of client data in local and
statewide databases. All services
must be provided in accordance
with established guidelines set forth
by the State of Florida Department
of Elder Affairs Home and
Community-Based "Services Draft


lNOTICEE

Handbook, dated January 2003, and
contracts between the Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
and State of Florida Department of
Elder Affairs. This RFI is a
preliminary step to the release of
Request for Proposal (RFP)
package on or around April 28,
2006. Failure to respond by the
deadline specified in this notice shall
constitute a "not interested"
response. The response to this RFI
will be used to identify those
organizations interested in
designation as the Lead Agency for
the Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. in Bay, Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf Holmes,.
Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty,
Madison, Taylor, Wakulla or
Washington Counties. A response is
due for each CSA of interest. In
.addition, individual RFP responses
will be required to be submitted for
each CSA. The Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida, Inc. does
not intend to award a contract on
the basis of this request for
information or to, otherwise pay for
information solicited. The Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida,
Inc. is also seeking sources
interested in providing services to
older adults under the Federal


Older Americans Act Title II-B:
supportive services, and III-C1 and
III-C2: nutritional services in
Franklin, Gadsden and Taylor
Counties as indicated in the
accompanying Legal Notice.
Organizations interested in
providing services in a county under
both the'Community Care for the
Elderly Act and Federal Older
Americans Act should provide a
single response to the Area Agency
on Aging indicating their dual
interest. .-Deadline: Written
responses to this RFI are due to the
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. no later than 3:00 p.m.,
EST on April 14, 2006. Responses
should include the organization
name, contact person, address, and
phone number. Only written
responses will be accepted. Contact:
Area Agency on Aging in for North
Florida, Inc. Attention Lisa Bretz,
2414 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee,
Florida 32308
3/31, pd
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN RE: Estate of
ROBERT LEWIS WILLIAMS,
Deceased. Probate Division Case


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN

Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's Mini-Storage.
850-509-1465 cell o Trimming o Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home o Mowing AerialDevie -- - - --
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties o Maintenance A 10% Discount
99a235 5--- -- -- -- --- ----
Events and Types 997-0039 Lc.& Insured 997-2535 11025 East Mahan 877-4550


B & M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC. LA CHIUTA
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, C- raig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing Sr cI"UTA
,," "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service Larichiuta
^..^ Richbourg Nursery, Inc. O- Loyd,FL32337
SP-* imnerock-
99 Richbourg Road
Brad McLeod *y.
Celli (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod m FL 3 7 d'11 Albany
: (850)545-2 325 Ce.00346 Monticello, FL 32344 Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. -Sand .. 997-6788
ii 0. (850)997-1451 Home: 997- 3091R R a....
10534 South Salt Rd, Laron,, FL. 32336 Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on CarrollHill) 229-226-0717 ,T p Soil
Fax 850-997-8388


Your Local Professional Painters

Interior ~ Exterior
Lic.& Ins. #4676









Septic Tank & Land Clearing

Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H Lic #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


We accept all manufacturer coupons.


1-10 Chevron


Swisher Sweet Sale
Flavor Cigar Tubes .59 each
(Reg.. grape, peach, strawberry)
Honey Kings Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pkg.) $2.49

Flavor Blunts 5pk $1.89
Little Cigars Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. or $8.89 Carton
Cigarillos Buy One Get One Free


The Decorator's

Warehouse, LLC



260 N. .
Cherry Street

Furnishing & Accessories


Residential & Commercial Lic.#cgc 11507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.

CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings


PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


j WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS Pi
1468 S. WALUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Call for quality work
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED 45 Yar In The Trade
CALL 850-997-6964 TfY-711 45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
<*0 850-997-7467 850-544-2917
i Residential Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior
1E^^? 1___; 09 7-4'3 -$0-4si2


S Three Sister s

: Certified
Angus Beef

Guest Chef

Mary Frances
Ferd Naughton
"9 Brenda Carl
0 Jan Wadsworth
Mike Humphrey
Lindsey Davis



AreYuSure u'reNotA

--Chef???


MONTICELLO S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience Keaton Tire Repair

Sales ~ Service Installation Change Outs CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL, "Service Is Our Business on and off the Road
Residential Commercial LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
Residential Commercial
342-9922 HOMIE EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Family Owned a Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100

www~kdanburchlus


2"-'- \'
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.Ultimate



Au877-7222
877-7222


Iyrone Davis A Very large selection to choose from
sales Manager 4 All trade-ins are welcome

4 Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
Trade rag
Pl P111,or60 (RP N T p (R' A IW
ft ft
A VeiiThicle T O1T AT f
S appve ThVCL lO-e


















9,-. .-3 .1
-. ."

9 7-3 8:-_ .", :.--


LEGALS

No. 06-36-PR NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of
ROBERT LEWIS WILLIAMS,
deceased, File Number 06-36-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, FL 32344. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are'
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this Notice is
March 24, 2006. Attorney for
Personal Representative: FELIX A.
JOHNSTON, JR., ESQUIRE, 195
Felix Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
Florida Bar No. 0094695, (850)
997-3131. DONALD F.
WILLIAMS, 8166 Eagle Point
Drive, Beulah, Michigan
49617-9604.
3/24,31-06
mammumma----......... I1
NOTICE
St. Jude, may the sacred heart
of Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved, and presented
throughout the world now and
forever. St. Jude, sacred heart
of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude,
worker of miracles pray for us.
St. Jude, help of the hopeless
pray for us. Thank you for
prayers answered. LS
2 '.3l 45. D. __
HELP WANTED
Servers/Cook must be 18
References Required. Call
Brian at 284-7899.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Wood Worker Wanted: Basic
experience with wood working.
Tools required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
3/29, 31. 4/5, 7, c
Need weekend respite care for
elderly women with Alzheimer's
disease. References and
background check required.
(850) 322-9667 (Iv message).
3/29, 31, 4/5, pd
Free room, board, and small
monthly stipend in exchange for
light housekeeping and cooking
for elderly male in his home.
References and background
check required. (850) 322-9667
(Iv message)
3/29, 31, 4/5, pd
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol Officer.
This position requires a
minimum of a high school
diploma and Florida Police
Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of Monticello Police
Station. Applicants must
complete a Department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request.
Submit application and resume
to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St., Monticello, FL
32344 by April 3, 2006
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.


3/24,31-c
Huddle House now hiring
experience waitress and cooks.
We offer above average wages
and health insurance with
2-weeks paid vacation per year.


HELP WANTED
Please come in and file an
application or call 342-3284 and
ask for Jack.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is currently
accepting applications for the
following positions.: 1. A
lineman at the entry-level
position. The position would be
based out of the Madison office.
However, the individual will be
required to live in the
Monticello area. Position will
require outage standby during
the week and the weekends as
required. All applicants must
possess a valid Florida CDL
Class A license. 2. A lineman at
the entry-level position. The
position would be based out of
the Perry Office. The individual
will be required to live in the
Perry, Florida area. The
position will require outage
stand-by during the week and
the weekends as required. All
applicants must posses a valid
Florida CDL Class A license 3.
An automotive mechanic at the
advance level position. The
position will be based out of the
Madison Office. The applicant
must have working knowledge
of diesel and gasoline engines
and hydraulic systems in
addition to basic automotive
repair and maintenance. The
salary will be based upon
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. offers a
benefit and retirement package.
The closing date of the accepting
applications is March 31, 2006.
Applications may be obtained
from Tri-County Electric
Cooperative's Offices.
Applicants should be returned
to the attention of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative's
Engineering and Operations
Department. Tri-County
Electric Cooperative reserves
the right to reject any and all
applicants. 850-973-2285.
3/8-3/31, c
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn

FOUND
Black puppy, 20 lbs.,
green/brown collar, well cared
for, found on Lloyd Rd. at
Indian Hills Rd., 3/29. Call
Frank Ward at 997-0144.
3/31 4/5, nc
ab _-!, --
SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Need a Clean or Organized
house? Call Traci 850-997-3176
3/8-31, pd


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


SERVICES FOR SALE


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite--Your Dish Sat-
elllite dealer. We offer equip-
ment, installation, repair, parts,
and prompt service. We also of-
fer Go-Karts, utility trailers and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150
Old Lloyd Road, Monticello, Fl.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Handyman Home repairs,
pressure washing, int/ext
painting, drywall, trim, wood
.working, siding. House
cleaning, housekeeping, call
251-4575 or 997-3587.
3/17,22,24,29, 31-pd

GARAGE SALE
Huge Plant Sale! Cheap, cheap
prices Hibiscus, Lantana, Salvia
& Mums galore!! Some bedding
plants Saturday, April 1st, 8am
% mile from 158A (Old Lloyd
Rd) on 158B (Rabon Rd) Look
for signs. 997-2232
3i31,pd
Yard Sale Royal Mini Storage
Sat. April 1, 8-1
3/29, 31, pd
Relay For Life Yard Sale. 7am -
3pm, Saturday April 1, 2006 at
1020 West Washington Street.
Look for signs.
3/29, 31, c
Estate/Yard Sale. Antique
furniture, Marble top bedroom
set w/2 complete twin beds,
couch, 2 rockers, coffee table,
microwave, jackets, knic knacs,
collectibles, etc. 997-2474 or
545-6353. Sat. 8 to 2. Rain or
shine. 280 Dixie in Nobles
Subdivision, off US 19 North.
3/31, pd

RF NL ESTATE
By Owner in Christmas Acres
:.2 Acres, '97 Fleetwood, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace,
asking $82K 877-3723.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, pd
Steinhatchee/Dixie County side.
Gulf fishing/Scalloping. TRADE
older 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
% acre private heavily wooded
lot, Hwy frontage, structurally
sound, blocks from boat ramps,
road to no where, pine log creek
landing. Approx. value
175-200K will trade for house
with acreage outside Monticello,
(352) 498-2832
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, 7, 12, pd


Mattress/Box bed Set: pillow
plush double sided pillow top
matress/box set, 4 inch pillow
top. List $989.00, sell for $248.
850-528-1422.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd
Metal roofing save $$$ Buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all
accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery available toll free
(888)393-0335.
3/31-fcan
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred. Philly $2000
Call Mike 519-6506.
3/31pd

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn, c
Secure Gravel Lot 100 x 100, 12
x 16 Office Bldg. 2685 S.
Jefferson St. 850-997-8727, $300
month.
3/22,24,2),31-c
Office for Rent 238 W
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F 9-5 available May 1st
tfn

AUTOMOTIVE
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced
$1,000 to $3,500..
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tire, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book. 997-6806
tfr., c
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4. Door Model
As Low As $750 down
850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal
11/2-tfn


WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles

850-545-3677



House For Sale!!
1430 Florida Ave
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Large Screened back
porch Beautiful Lot
Work in Process To reno-
vate home buy early at
$94,500 before price
goes to $11K to 115K
997-6806


Housing Vouchers

m We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep."

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571





















Registered Nurse Home Health

$1500-$3000 Recruitment Incentive -
FT Positions
Per Visit Positions $35 per visit premium pay for
admissions Archbold Home Health Services is cur-
rently seeking qualified applicants for the above posi-
tions to serve Leon, Madison, and Jefferson Counties.
One year of home health experience preferred. We of-
fer competitive compensation and an excellent benefit
package.

Contact: Nurse Recruiter. Archbold

Medical Center 229-228 -2713, Fax:

229-551-8733. rtaylor@archbold.org

Visit our website: www.archbold.org
tEOE


We're
5
215
1 I-fi


KELLY & KELLY Ag
PROPERTIES
Quick Sales Needed -


YourReal Estate
;peciaists
N. Jefferson St.
ticello, Fl 32344
50) 997-5516


* 2 3Br/2Ba adjacent homes on Marvin St. on city lots.
Completely renovated S 109,000 each or.make package offer

Seller Motivated -
* N. Forest Dr. 2Br/2Ba. Hardwood floors, knotty pine
walls in living room & kitchen. S 129,900
* York St. IBr/1 Ba could be 3Br. Seller will put up walls
and closets for buyer. $129.900


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, family room ot,00 Now
$76,500

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Freeman Road 13.29 acres of pasture land
with easy access to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only
3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59. 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool. detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90.and SR 59
only $1,200.000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morns
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres Under Contract -= 3 bed-
room 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres with a
big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000



Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Pei-ary Se/lls Real Estate!


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 31, 2006


TCC President Speaks

At Chamber Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Dr. Bill Law, president of
the Tallahassee Community
College (TCC) was the guest
speaker at the March meeting
of the Chamber of Commerce t
His topic was economic de-
S velopment and he shared su-
cess stories of how TCC has
reached out to communities
to provide unprecedented aca
demic opportunities.
-... d Law stressed the impor-
tance of sharing information.
Many times members of the
community don't know what i
S available to them, he said.,
Ss Lt Without sharing inform-
tion, opportunities are lost in
Community that might other
wise thrive
Frequently there is no cost
S. involved to link programs and
Da, i" w: 'e opportunities with people. It is
just a matter of making the
DR. BILL LAW, president of TCC was the guest speaker connection., Law continued.
Sat the Chamber of Commerce meeting and stressed the. He also spoke about how
importance of sharing information in the community, important it is for children to
S(News Photo) be mentored.



:ACA Students Hold Variety

Of Relay For Life Fundraisers
Sdle and high school students Roccanti said there is a
FRAN HUNT wished to also, become in- booth set up in the front hall-
Staff Writer evolved, so this year, they are way of the school where
collecting change also, white or pink hearts are sold
ACA students continue to Last year's collection raised for $1 each.
plan Relay for Life fundrais-. some $1,500 and Roccanti ex- "The students write the name
. ers to fight cancer. pects that this year, much of someone on one of the,
One fundraiser had already more.would be raised due to hearts and it is hung in the.
been held, and two more are the effort of the high -school hallway," said Roccanti. "The
presently ongoing throughout students. white hearts are for victims
the week. "They are really gung-ho and the pink is for survivors."
The first fundraiser was about this," said Roccanti. She added that this year, the
conducted' on Valentine's The class raising the most
Day, in which valentines were rhoney will receive an ice
sold to students. The effort cream party.
raised $450. Roccanti said the effort was Without Advertising,
Students are now collecting not to stress the students com- A Terrible
change in the penny drive. peting against each other, but
Faculty Coordinator Kim merely to raise funds for the Thing Happens...,
Roccanti said that in past Cancer Society.
years, the "Penny drive" was The third fundraiser, is set
only conducted among the up by the Remembrance
elementary students, but mid- Board.


TCC offers tutoring pro-
grams pairing adult students,
with children.
Some of these adults have
had previous successful ca-
reers such as military assign-
ments and are now returning to
college.
For a child who may be first
in his or her family to go to
college, this is a huge step in
envisioning the process of
what it looks like to be suc-
cessful and how to get there.
In other Chamber news, 12
county seniors graduated from
this year's Junior Leadership
Program.
They were each given Cer-
tificates of participation, $100
scholarships from the Kiwanis
and Rotary Clubs, and $50
contributions to each gradu-
ate's savings account.
Chamber members Diane
Freeman and Judson Freeman
coordinated the program.
The speaker for the noon
meeting, April 11, is Sherry
Heyen executive director of
School Improvement for Jef-
ferson County.


Remembrance hearts were
selling very well, much better
than last year.
Roccanti attributed the boost
in sales to the recent loss of
young classmate Haley Gran-
thain to cancer. "I think she's
the driving force this year,"
said Roccanti.

The ACA Relay For Life
team is lead by three different
school organizations, includ-
ing the Student Council, the
Anchor Club and the Fellow-
ship of Christian Athletes.





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Statistics Show People Remember
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Residential and Commercial


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CALL TODAY

228-4883

14538 US 19


A rewarding job with the nation's leading bottled
water company may be closer than you think.
Nestle Waters North America is hiring.
Nestle has several immediate opening at its Madison County bottling facility.
Employment opportunities are available for flexible and self-motivated individuals seeking
careers in production, maintenance, logistics and quality assurance.


Florida Department of Transportation has a vacancy in
Taylor County:


Position Number:
Broad Band Title:
Working Title:


Closing Date:


For more information concerning job description and requirements
and to apply online go t'):

https://pcoplcfirst.mvf!or da.com/logon.htm
or call 1-877-562-7287.

Contact person: Theresa Kuhn

The Department of Transportation is an Equal Employment Opportunity,
Affirmative Action and Drug Free Workplace employer.


Machine Operati
S11s per hour
Fork Lift Operate
$11-per hour
Blowmold Technic
$1350 per hour
Quality Assurance
513'" per hour
Line Mechanic
$175i per hour


or5

ors


Nestle Waters offers great starting pay, ranging from $1125 to $1750
an hour depending upon the position. Our outstanding benefits
package includes health and dental insurance along with a 401K
and profit-sharing plans.


Stop by and fill out an application (directions belovw), and take the
:ians first step toward a challenging and rewarding future
with Nestl6 Waters. Applications are also available
Techs at Employment Connection centers in Madison, Perry,
and Live Oak, Florida. For more information,
call Nestle Waters at (850) 971-2100
or visit our website
._ i at www.madisonblue.org.


c Otions..
\ From'l-10: Take exit 262 North
through the town of Lee to SR 6.
/Turn East (RIGHT) for approx.
3 miles to Hawthorn Road. Look for the
Deer Park sign. Turn RIGHT on Hawthorn
Road and follow the signs to the parking area.
From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West approx. 15 miles.
Entrance is on LEFT.
Equal opportunity employer
M/FN/D


NORTH AMERICA


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Highway Maintenance Workers Level 1
Highway Maintenance Technician -
Pe ading reclassification

April 4th. 200(i


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