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The Monticello news
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00117
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 24, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00117
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Sports
        page 10
    Main continued
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
    Main: Classified
        page 17
    Main continued
        page 18
Full Text








Jamestown

Events Note

Anniversary


Editorial, Page 4


ACA Parents,

Students Learn:

Internet Safety

Story, Page 7
I-


First Methodist

Golf Tourney

Monday

Story, Page 10
I I


School

improvement

Changes In Effect

Story, Page


Friday Morning


138TH YEAR NO.24, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 2006


HOME of Donna and Moe Skelton on North Jefferson Street is among the stops on the
Tour of Homes scheduled Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $25 for adults and $5 for
Children and covers admission on both days.


A -t


THE DUNN HOME, on the Avenue of the Oaks, was built in 1890, and is considered
an excellent example of the Queen Anne Style. (News Photos)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Community supported agri-
culture.
That's what Susan Anderson
calls her type of farming,
which involves chemical-free
practices and consumers in-
vesting time and labor into the
process.
"As a consumer of the farm
products, you become invested
in the farm family," Anderson
explains. "You know the
farmer and you know the prod-
uct intimately. You volunteer
to work on the farm. You have
parties on the farm. People
participate in every aspect of
the process, from planting to
weeding to harvesting to shar-
ing the food.
"Our philosophy," she.con-
tinues, "is that the way farms
will be preserved for the future
is to get people involved with
farming. The only food secu-
rity we have is local farms.
When you export farms to for-
eign countries, your life source
become dependent on the va-
garies of the political
situation."
A county native and former
planning analyst with the De-
partment of Community Af-
fairs, Anderson began actively
farming about 12 years ago.
Or better yet, she and her
husband, Roy Stanley, began
building up the topsoil then,
eventually taking it from a
depth of three to 18 inches.
"An aspect of the way we
farm is that when you do a leaf
analysis of the products that
come from deep, rich topsoil,
you have a different spectrum
of minerals available," Ander-
son says. "You have a more
dense nutritional product then
from conventionally grown


products.
"It's good for the earth, it's
good for the environment, it's
good for people and it's also
economically beneficial to the
farmer. People are long-term
purchasers from the farmer be-
cause they are invested in the
farm."




Farming
Organically
Helps Citizens
TO Eat More
Healthy


Anderson says she and her
husband started farming or-
ganically because they wanted
to eat more healthily. Next
thing they knew, they were
producing more than they
could consume and were giv-
ing away large quantities of
the produce.
People insisted on paying


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jurors in US District Court
were expected to view a July,
2001 video tape Wednesday of
a midnight traffic stop near
Tram Road, in a civil rights
lawsuit against former Jeffer-
son County Sheriff Ken For-
tune and several deputies.
A statement released by Ru-
bin and Rubin, attorneys for
the Freddy McCloud Family of


sustainable






AgricultOutre
wave Of Futur e


for the offerings and suggest-
ing that they sell the excess
produce, Anderson says.
"We started selling to New
Leaf Market wholesale and it
evolved from there," she says.
"It next escalated to everything
going to the Farmers' Market."
All told, Anderson says she,
an intern -- and Roy, on a part-
time basis -- are able to grow
three acres of organic row
crops, fruits and berries each
season.
"We try to grow as diverse
an offering as we can," she
says, adding that the type of
vegetables and fruits grown
depends on the season.
Generally, they are able to
extend the season a little at
each end for certain crops,
thanks to the use of their
greenhouse, Anderson says.
But ultimately, the season de-
termines the type and quantity
of produce harvested.
SBesides the organic produce,
Anderson raises chickens co-
operatively.
"If people want us to raise
(See Agriculture, Page 2)


Palm Beach, in Nov, 2004,
claimed that deputies terror-
ized the family with a roadside
strip search, racial profiling,
and slurs.
The McClouds are charging
that deputies unlawfully de-
tained and searched them,
falsely imprisoned them, in
violation of their constitutional
rights.
At press time, no further in-
formation was available about
the case.


Ciy yards Conrat Fr Frst Sep


Of Sewereabilitation Project


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city has awarded the
contract for the first phase of
the sewer rehabilitation project
to SBP Inc., out of Pensacola,
FL.
SBP's bid of $351,602.20
was the lowest of five bidders.
The company's work will en-
tail cleaning, televising, and
doing some smoke tests in all
the sanitary sewer mains
within the city and possibly
some outside the city.
"Once they get through tele-
vising the lines and doing the
smoke test, they'll write up
each problem," City Superin-
tendent Don Anderson said
last week. "We'll have all the
information on VCRs and
DVDs. Then we'll be doing the


bids for the repairs."
Robert George, the engineer
overseeing the project, earlier
told the council that a total of
125,000 linear feet of sewer
pipes will be tested.
"It's a long process," George
said of the overall project,
which has been in the planning
for several years and which is
estimated to cost between 53
and $4 million when com-
pleted. "From here on, things
will move faster."
He added that following the
completion of the first phase,
the Department of Environ-
mental Protection .(DEP),
which is partly funding the
project, will want the remain-
ing phases bid out in one pack-
age.
"The DEP will want the city
to undertake a loan to finance
the project," George said.


$351,602.2 ,
LOwest Bid

The way he explained it, the
DEP will provide the city with
a low-interest loan that the city
will then pay back from the
revenues generated by the en-
hanced sewer system.
The DEP has provided the
city with $700,000 for the first
phase of the project. Given
that the contract to SBP was
only half that amount, George
recommended the city use the
remaninig $350,00-or-so to be-
gin the repairs of the system.
The city is expected to get
another $700,000 next year --
the second half of the $1.5 mil-
lion grant the DEP awarded
the city last year to address the


inflow and infiltration prob-
lems at the wastewater treat-
ment plant.
Indeed, the funding was
specifically earmarked for the
identification and correction of
the inllow and infiltration
problems.
The problem of excess
stormwater entering the city's
sewer system and treatment
plant is particularly notable
during heavy rains.
Ultimately, the water surges
created by the storms flow or
infiltrate into the city's waste-
water treatment plant, which is
then forced to work harder and
longer to handle the increased
volume.
Notwithstanding these peri-
odic surges, it is George's as-
sessment that the treatment
plant has never really operated
over capacity. That's because,


GEORGE


although designed for a mil-
lion gallon capacity, the plant
averages about half a million
gallons a day, according to
George.
iHe offers that a redundancy
factor built into the plant tem-
Sporarily diverts the extra water
into a lined holding pond.
Why then the urgency to cor-
S rect the inflow and infiltration
problem?
"The urgency is that you're
S introducing an additional flow
into the system that doesn't
Need to be there," George ex-
plained. "So the system is
working longer and harder
than you want it to. The water
is also having to be re-
s0 circulated and re-circulated.
It's not ellicient. It's using
more energy. And the long-
term effect is that you're wear-
ing out the equipment."


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JUrorss To VoeleW Tape in

Trial Of DeputoleS Here










PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006


Agriculture


PULITZER PRIZE WINNING Author Robert Olen Butler, and Elizabeth Dewberry, dis-
tinguished author, accompanied by Michael Purvis, local musician, presented Hors
d'oeuvres for the Brain and Soul, at the Opera House Saturday, which drew more than
200 attendees.



Animal Abuse, Domestic


Violence Share Similarities


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Refuge House employee -
Dessie Harvey informed Hu-
mane Society members on the
links between animal abuse
and domestic violence.
She gave some staggering
statistics concerning those
links;
"Why be concerned about
domestic violence in animals
abuse cases?" she asked.
Nearly 3/4 of families with
school age children have at
least one companion animal.
A companion animal is con-
sidered a family member. If
the family is experiencing
violence, then the animals
may become targets of the
violence as well
"The person who abuses the
fanily,pet,,may also be abus-
ing-other members- of the
family. Sometimes, animal
abuse imay be the only visible
sign of abuse occurring in the


home, and many women who
are abused often stay in vio-
lent situations due to threats
against or concern for their
pets," said Harvey.
Citing statistics, Harvey
added, "In a recent sample of
large domestic violence shel-
ters around the country, 91
percent of advocates reported
that individuals talk about in-
cidents of pet abuse when
they enter the shelter.
Harvey listed motivations
for animal cruelty;
*To exert power over an-
other.
*To intimidate another per-
son into subservience.
*To silence a human victim
from revealing an abusive
situation.
*To replicate abuses a per-
son, particularly a child, has
witnessed/suffered.
*To iranipulate the'action" ,,
of another person. .. .. ..............
*To 'isolate the human vic-
tim.


*To prevent the human vic-
tim from leaving.
*To express aggression
through an animal.
*To enhance one's own ag-
gressiveness.
*To shock people for amuse-
ment.
*Retaliation/revenge.
Harvey told of the similari-
ties between animal and hu-
mans in abusive situations.
"Both are victimized as bat-
ters struggle to obtain power
and control, both can suffer
extreme physical and psycho-
logical abuse, both will ex-
hibit physical signs of abuse
that the batterer will neglect or
refuse to explain.
"Both can exhibit regression
or relapses in training, both
can fail to thrive, or remain
small, shy and sickly, and
both can become aggressive
as a defensive response to
abuse," 'said Harvey. ..r'


(Continued From Page 1)
chickens for them, we'll do it,"
Anderson says. "But they have
to sign up and pay in advance.
We will then raise the chicken
for them and help process
them if they want."
Anderson calls their type of
chicken raising "pasture poul-
try". Meaning that the birds are
kept in mobile cages and
moved to fresh grass once a
day so that they never inhabit
the same pasture twice.
"Thirty to forty percent of
their diet is grass and bugs,"
Anderson explains. "It changes
the Omega 3 in the eggs. They
are more like salmon than con-
ventionally produced eggs.
The eggs are higher in folic
acid."
The meat too is generally
leaner and healthier, Anderson
says.
If demand is an indication of
the viability of a product, or-
ganic farmers are doing well.
Across the country, demand
for organic products exceeds
supply, a situation is. that is
also true at the local level.
"We have more demand than
we can satisfy," Anderson
says. "Our problem is labor
and the fact that food is still
too cheap. Part of the message
we want to convey is that you
need to pay labor.more money.
It's a social issue."
Organic farming, Anderson
says, requires an intelligent

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and skilled labor force, not un-
like white collar workers.
These individuals, Anderson
says, must possess a knowl-
edge of weather, soil, pests,
microbiology, plant diseases,
and the importance of wood-
lands in the overall picture,
among other things.
"Chemical applications are
dumbing down farming," An-
derson says: "Smarting up
farms is moving to organic
farming.
"Nutrition begins in the soil.
When you have fungi and mi-
croorganisms and worms in
the soil, they create an envi-
ronment that allows nutrients
to get into the roots. Then your
plants are healthy.
"When you use chemicals,
you destroy the soil and the
zone around the roots, which
take up the chemicals.' What
you're consuming is a different
product. It may sustain .you


with calories, but it's more a
source of health problems
down the road."
Anderson, along with other
organic farmers and gardeners,
regularly sells her products at
the Lake Ella Growers Market,
opened 3 p.m. to dusk every
Wednesday at Lake Ella off
Monroe Street in Tallahassee.


WING

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UNIT


MLK Center Committee

Plans Meeting Monday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The regular monthly meeting
of the Martin Luther King
Center Committee is scheduled
for 7 p.m. Monday, at the Me-
morial MB Church at the cor-
ner of Rhodes and 2nd Streets.
On the agenda is the prepa-
ration for the Emancipation
Day Parade. The date for the
parade this year is Monday,
May 15.
Emancipation Day celebrates
the liberation of slaves.
A Proclamation was issued
by President Abraham Lincoln
on Jan. 1, 1863, declaring all


slaves in the United States then
in rebellion to be "then,
thenceforward, and forever
free." A preliminary proclama-
tion had been issued on Sept.
22, 1862.
As there will be no school on
this day, be aware of children
playing and enjoying their
time off.
For additional information,
contact Charles Parrish, at
997-3760.
U.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 3


Health Dept. To Sponsor


Smart Growth Workshop


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Smart Growth -- a new ap-
proach to development that
calls for the creation of distinc-
tive, cohesive and attractive
communities with a sense of
place -- appears to be gaining
traction locally.
A little more than a week
ago, Jefferson Citizens For A
Sustainable Future -- a group
formed in response to the ac-
celerated rate of development
here -- sponsored a workshop
on the issue at the Woman's
Club.
Now the Health Department
is scheduled to hold a similar
workshop on the topic next
month.
Titled "Smart Growth Con-
ference" and scheduled to co-
incide with National Public


Health Week, the event will be
held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday,
April 3, at the Opera House.
Kim Barnhill, director of the
Jefferson and Madison Health
Departments, is the spark plug
behind the idea.
You might ask: What does
health and housing develop-
ment have in common?
The answer, Barnhill will tell
you, is that health is very much
tied to lifestyle, and the pre-
sent housing development
models don't promote healthy
lifestyles.
Meaning that sprawl and
the current building patterns
encourage passivity and vehi-
cle dependence. And sedentary
lifestyle, it is now the conven-
tional wisdom, promotes
weight gain.
Consider the statistics: two
out of every three Americans


today are overweight and one
out of every three is obese.
Jefferson County, mean-
while, is ranked one of the
seven highest counties in the
state, in terms of the percent-
age of overweigh and obese
people.
According to the research,
more than 60 percent of
Americans are not getting the
recommended 30 minutes of
daily physical activity, and 25
percent are not active at all.
The research further shows
that obesity is linked to poor
health, increasing the likeli-
hood of heart disease, diabetes,
cancer, asthma and premature
death in adults and children.
A healthy lifestyle, the re-
search indicates, is one that in-
cludes daily physical activity
such as jogging, walking, or
bicycling. Which Smart
Growth does.
How? By building commu-
nities that include sidewalks,
bicycle trails and other means
of transportation other then
roads for vehicles.
The details of how to plan
for smart growth and why its
so desirable will be answered
at the conference, which will
have several nationally recog-
nized experts speaking on the
issue.
Believing that accelerated
growth affects not only this
county but the region, Barnhill
has invited elected officials
and planning commissioners





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public also is welcomed.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Speaking to the Humane
Society, Oureach Counselor
Dessie Harvey asked for help
in detecting signs of abuse.
"I'm asking that when you
are called to investigate ani-
mal abuse allegations keep
your eyes open and watch for
signs of human abuse."
In cases of animal abuse,
95 percent of the time, the
wife or girlfriend, or children
were also being abused.
"We want the Humane So-
ciety to be able to pick up on
this," said Harvey. "See if the
woman lets the man do all the
talking.
"Like an abused animal will
try'to please their master, so
will a woman," she said. "I
would also like to ask for
your help with the animals of


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The County Community
Coalition meets 9:30 to 11:00
a.m., Tuesday, at the library .
Guest Speaker will be Dor-
cas Washington with Employ-
ment Connections.
Washington will explain her
agency's efforts to provide
services to individuals and
businesses in order to build the
capacity of the County work-.
force.
Healthy Start Coalition
spokesperson Donna Hagan
states of the role of the Coali-
tion is to provide advocacy for
services for the citizens in the


people being abused.
President Caroline Carswell
suggested that when cases of
domestic violence or sexual
abuse arise, the Refuge House
can call the Humane Society
if pets are also present.
"If I were in an abusive re-
lationship, and had to leave
my animals behind, it would
serve as a deterrent," said
Carswell.
"We need to make a com-
mitment, be it large or small,
and we need to come up with
a practical plan for these
situations."
Members agreed to attempt
setting up a foster program
specifically for animals of
abusive family' situations,
with the intent that if an
abused person requires a stay
in the Refuge House shelter,
the animals would be taken
care of until the person is
ready to leave the shelter.


three county area.
She related that the efforts of
the coalition recently, were
"outside" the usual meeting fo-
rum; and aimed at promoting
advocacy for the lack of re-
sources for Jefferson's citizens
and promoting awareness of
the cultural norms that affect
the population served.


Among the issues to be dis--
cussed are the principles of
smart growth. These include:
taking advantage of compact
building designs; creating a
range of housing opportunities
and choices; creating walk-
able neighborhoods; preserv-
ing open spaces, farmland,
natural beauty and critical en-
vironmental areas; and


strengthening and directing de-
velopment towards existing
communities.
"If we don't do it right the
first time, we won't get a sec-
ond opportunity," Bamhill
says. "I heard it well described
at a recent meeting. Someone
said, 'Once you let the tooth-
paste out of the tube, there's no
putting it back in."


Wacissa United Methodist Church
RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER

March 25, 2006


CAR SHOW, TURKEY SHOOT,

YARD SALE & BAKE SALE
PLUS
A QUILT SHOW



Event: Yard Sale, Bake Sale and Quilt Show
Where: Wacissa United Methodist Church


Time:


8 am


Event: Car Show Antique, Muscle, Classic Cars
Where: Wacissa United Methodist Church
Registration: 9 am-11 am
Registration fee: $15 day of show
Judging: Noon
Awards: 2 pm


Event: Turkey Shoot $5.00 per shot
Where: On the corner of State Road 59 and State Road 59
(1 mile north of the Wacissa River-look for signs on the
fence)


Time:


High Noon


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Quality Assurance Techs
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Line Mechanics
$1750 per hour


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with Nestle Waters. Applications are also available
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or visit our website
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Human Abuse Related

TO Animal Abuse


Employment Specialist

To Speak At Coalition


,,ctions.-
I From 1-10: Take exit 262 North
Through the town of Lee to SR 6.
Turn East (RIGHT) for approx.
3 miles to Hawthorn Road. Look for the
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From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West approx. 15 miles.
Entrance is on LEFT.
Equal opportunity employer
M/F/V/D


NORTH AMERICA








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
S. ..'%:.:.


Jamestown


Events Note


Anniversary


It was nearly four centuries
ago that three small ships, bat-
tling the roaring waves and
turbulence of the Atlantic
Ocean, carried 104 intrepid ad-
venturers from Blackwell,
England, to the shores of Vir-
ginia and what the Europeans
called the "New World."
On the banks of the James
River, they established Jame-
stown as the first permanent
English settlement in the
Americas in 1607. America's
400th Anniversary commemo-
rates their historic journey -
the journey that changed the
world and the legacies on
which our nation was founded.
From local festivals to inter-
national summits, 2006 and
2007 will be filled with activi-
ties commemorating this piv-
otal moment in world history.
Despite disease, famine, and
on-and-off conflicts with the
native Algonquians, the colony
grew steadily and prospered,
with three major developments
in the Jamestown settlement
that remain its enduring lega-
cies:
Representative government -
the first democratically elected
assembly in the New World
convened in the Jamestown
church on July 30, 1619. The
democratic institutions govern-
ing us today have their roots in
this first assembly.
Cultural diversity Jame-
stown brought together three
cultures from three continents
- Virginia Indians, Europeans
and Africans creating a tradi-
tion of multicultural society
that continues to shape our
lives today.
Free enterprise The Vir-
ginia Company was first and
foremost an economic enter-
prise, chartered by King James
I to settle Virginia and create
wealth. By contrast, the Pil-
grims who settled Massachu-
setts 13 years later came
primarily for religious
freedom.
As America commemorates


the 400th Anniversary of its
birthplace, you too can par-
ticipate in commemorating that
first journey across the Atlan-
tic the journey that changed
the world. There are several
ways to do this:
Visit. Jamestown Settlement
is a living history museum op-
erated by the State of Virginia,
and Historic Jamestowne, site
of the original fort, is operated
by APVA Preservation Vir-
ginia and the National Park
Service. Together, these sites
provided complementary expe-
riences that transport you to a
time when the seeds of our na-
tion were being planted.
Along with Yorktown and Co-
lonial Williamsburg, Jame-
stown is part of America's
Historic Triangle, a 23-mile-
long area encompassing three
of the most important sites in
early American history.
The venues will play starring
roles throughout the com-
memoration as the events and
programs that encompass
America's 400th Anniversary
unfold.

Plant. No matter where you
live, you and your family can
plant an Anniversary Garden,
creating a living, growing
commemoration in your own
yard and community. As you
do this, you will continue the
legacies of Jamestown, plant-
ing the seeds of promise and
hope for the next generation.
Plant lists and suggested gar-
den layouts are available on-
line.
Learn. Tune in to "Jame-
stown Live" on November 9,
when an "electronic
classroom" will be created for
students to experience the
story of America's birth.
"Jamestown Live" will be
broadcast live from Jamestown
Settlement museum and His-
toric Jamestowne.
Reflect. The legacies of
Jamestown impact modern
American society every day.


Foul Language Grows


In Everyday Usage


REX ROGERS
Columnist

I've noticed that lazy lan-
guage is one of the "acceptable
sins" in the Church.
Christian people can be
heard using the "B-word," the
"S-word," the "A-word," along
with a host of substitute crudi-
ties all while masking our be-
havior with silly statement
like, "Pardon my French."
I've heard this kind of lan-
guage on the golf course, at
fancy dinners, and on campus.
I've even heard it in profes-
sional settings. It's another sign
that the Christian community


has adopted many of the traits
of what preachers used to call
"worldliness."
Meanwhile, I'd suggest to
you that, in a culture given to
coarseness, not swearing or not
using crude language is one of
the most powerful testimonies
of faith available to us. Our
speech literally fills the air
around us. If we speak differ-
ently, people will recognize it
quickly.
A while ago, I joined one of
four foursomes playing the
famed Pebble Beach golf
course in California. Thinking
it would please us and result in
(See Foul Language Page 5)


SOpinion & Comment


" 'Short Takes & Other Notions
1


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

If quitting smoking has be-
come a habit, you're not alone.
A recent study found that more
than 51 percent of surveyed
smokers say they will or may
try to quit this year and nearly
all of them have tried to quit
before.
Recent survey showed 55
percent of workers eat lunch in
30 minutes or less, with a third
of them eating at their desks.
Haven't seen "Brokeback
Mountain" and don't intend
to...What happened to cus-
tomer service? In far too
many places, clerks treat cus-
tomers as some kind of incon-
venience.
Didja know the Dallas Cow-
boys have been in more Super
Bowls than any other team?
They played in eight and won
five.
In a 1915 poster quoting


David Starr Jordan, noted sci-
entist and president of Stan-
ford University warned, "The
boy who smokes cigarettes
need not be anxious about his
future. He has none."
We need cell phone cour-
tesy. Too many people loudly
chat away on their cell phones
in restaurants, standing in line
or in doctors' offices. Seems
like common courtesy would
suggest this annoys other peo-
ple, but I guess some folks
don't get it.
The real art of conversation
is not only to say the right
thing in the right place, but to
leave unsaid the wrong thing at
the tempting moment.
Youngsters on love: "I'm
not rushing into being in love,
I'm trying to finish the fourth
grade."

I understand there is a pat-
ent pending for video-
enhanced grave markers that


will play prerecorded mes-
sages from the deceased for
visitors to their graves. Cost
will be $8,000 to $10,000.
Law of Dirty Carpets: The
chance of an open-faced jelly
sandwich :landing face down
on a carpet are directly corre-
lated to the newness and cost
of the carpeting.
Quotable quote: "Educa-
tion is when you read the fine
print. Experience is what you
get if you don't." Pete Seeger.
Thanks to Sandi Reid for
sending me some interesting
tidbits garnered over the years.
You are a compulsive shop-
per if you get a high from buy-
ing things, you buy items you
don't need, you lie about what
you buy or how much you
spend, you hide packages and
receipts, you use money set
aside for bills even as debt
mounts.
Didja know everywhere is
within walking distance if you-


have time?
Maybe the recent port fi-
asco will result in more inspec-
tions of containers arriving
here. Presently, we're inspect-
ing some five percent of the
containers. This, five years af-
ter the 9/11 attack! What ex-
actly is the Homeland Security
Department doing?
Cuts projected in the VA
budget in 2008 amaze me es-
pecially when we are at war
and more and more GIs are in-
jured and maimed and in need
of medicare care and rehabili-
tation.
Voices in Washington are
conflicted over whether or not
Iraq is slipping into Civil War.
Whatever you'd call what's go-
ing on there whatwith death
squads, wholesale slaughter,
attacks on mosques, torture
and increasing sectarian vio-
lence doesn't bode well for the
success of our mission in that
country.


Peer Pressure Difficult


For most young people, the
teenage years are a fun and ex-
citing time, filled with first-
time experiences: a new
school, a part-time job; getting
a driver's license, maybe a first
romance. In general, it is a pe-
riod marked by greater respon-
sibility and freedom.
However, teens can also ex-
perience feelings of doubt and
may lack self-esteem. For
these reasons, they are particu-
larly susceptible to peer pres-
sure: an overwhelming desire
to fit in and do "what everv-
one else is doing," even if it
means participating in such
high-risk activities as drinking,
smoking and sex.
It's all part of a teenager's ef-
forts to try to separate from his
or her parents and establish a
personal identity.


To help teens and their fami-
lies cope with peer pressure.
The Health Alliance on Alco-
hol (HAA), a national educa-
tion initiative established to
address the issues of underage
consumption of alcohol that
includes members Heineken
USA, New York Presbyterian
Healthcare System and White
Plains Hospital Center, has de-
veloped a booklet entitled
"Facts & Conversations: Peer
Pressure."
Written by adolescent health
experts at Columbia University
Medical Center and The Mor-
gan Stanley Children's Hospi-
tal of New York-Presbyterian,
"Facts & Conversations: Peer
Pressure" answers some com-
mon questions:
1. What exactly is peer
pressure?


"Peer pressure" is a term
used to describe how an ado-
lescent's behavior is influenced
by other adolescents.
While most parents think of
peer pressure as negative, not
all peer pressure is bad. Teens
may be influenced by their
peers to study, to compete in
athletics or to attend a relig-
ious function. However, when
fellow teens are drinking or
engaging in other risky activi-
ties, peer pressure can lead to
problems.
2. Are there different types
of peer pressure?
Peer pressure can be divided
into active and passive peer
pressure, and studies have
shown that both strongly influ-
ence teen drinking.
Active pressure may be in
the form of an explicit offer to


drink alcohol or a verbal criti-
cism for refusing to drink.
Other forms of direct pressure
include invitations to partici-
pate in drinking games or or-
dering of rounds of drinks
while at a bar.
Passive pressure is based on
a teen's desire to fit in and
adopt the values and practices
of fellow teens. Passive social
pressures can be further di-
vided into social modeling of
alcohol use ("everyone's doing
it") and perceptions regarding
peers' alcohol use. Although
many teens do drink alcohol to
an alarming degree, teens in-
variably overestimate the rates
at which their friends drink.
The false sense that all teens
drink can lead teens to feel that
they have to drink to fit in. By
(See Pressure, Page 5)


Food Disease Causing Harm


A century ago, food borne
diseases such as typhoid fever
and cholera were common.
Even though improvements in
food safety have conquered
these illnesses, many food-
borne diseases are still causing
harm today.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion, approximately 76 million
cases of food-borne disease
occur each year in the U.S.


The most commonly recog-
nized food-borne diseases are
those caused by salmonella
and campylobacter.
Together, these bacteria
cause 80 percent of the ill-
nesses and 75 percent of the
deaths associated with meat
and poultry products. Seafood
is a leading cause of food-
borne illness.
"With properly treated sea-
food and poultry, and a little


food safety know-how, con-
sumers can greatly decrease
their chances of dangerous
food contamination," said
Aaron Ormond, a microbiolo-
gist and director of research at
Global Food Technologies, a
company that produces tech-
nology instrumental to food
safety.
Ormond offers the following
tips to keep your family safe
from potentially fatal food-


borne illnesses:
Check color, odor and tex-
ture. When purchasing
chicken, its color should be
pink, not gray or yellow. Fish
meat should be shiny and firm,
not easily separated from the
bone and have a fresh, mid
smell.
Inspect the package. Pur-
chase meat and seafood that
has received an anti-pathoeen
(See Food Disease, Page 5)


From Our Photo File






I AA
-- -




'--J. ... -- ,ari :-.^ | *
.- ... ., ,.















ASHVILLE Fire Chief Jack Shelley, stands next to his department's new fire pumper,
in Sept., 1990. The pumper was reported to increase fire fighting capability within a
five mile radius of the fire tower. (News File Photo)


--

































SEN. ROD SMITH, Gubernatorial Candidate, was the guest speaker at a St. Patrick's
Dinner and fundraiser, held Thursday at Christ Episcopal Fellowship Hall, and spon-
sored by the Jefferson Democratic Executive Committee. Facing camera at left,
Smith speaks to attendees.


Gubernatorial Candidate Smith

Speaks To Local Democrats


The Jefferson County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
hosted its second annual St.
Patrick's Day dinner and fund-
raiser, Thursday, at Christ
Episcopal Fellowship Hall.
Special guest for the evening
was gubernatorial candidate
Sen. Rod Smith, who outlined
his platform and strategy for
winning the Democratic nomi-
nation for governor.
On hand for the event in ad-
dition to numerous local
elected officials, were, Sen
Dave Aronberg, representing
the coalition of Florida Main-
stream Democrats, and repre-
sentatives of the Jim Davis
campaign.
The sold out event was at-
tended by more than 80 Demo-
cratic supporters, who together
donated more than $1,200, to
help sustain the Party's con-
tinuing outreach efforts to the -
cbrhmunity.


Food Dise
(Continued From Page 4)
treatment that doesn't alter the
food's color, smell, taste, or
appearance.
Be sure to avoid products
that have outlived their "sell-
by" dates or have dents or tears
in their package.
* Avoid cross-contamination.
Use separate cutting boards
one for raw meats and another
for fruits and vegetables to
diminish the likelihood of
cross-contamination. Also, was


Guests also donated dozens
of books which will be sold at
a book sale in front of the li-
brary, April 29. Proceeds of
the sale will be donated to the
library.
Dave Watkins reports that
Sen Smith, who was also the
keynote speaker at last year's
event, commented that the
audience had more than dou-
bled, and reflected the growing
success and strength of the
grassroots organization in the
County.
He outlined his priorities for
the state, should he win the
election as Governor.
Specifically, Sen. Smith
noted that the current budget
surplus should be used in part
to raise teachers' salaries to
levels at least commensurate
with Georgia.
The current lack of adequate
funding for education, which
continues to place Florida near
the very bottom in spending, is


Sase
your hands thoroughly with
antibacterial soap before and
after handling raw meat and
seafood.

Store at the right tempera-
ture. Fresh seafood and poultry
should be stored at 40 degrees
or below to ensure freshness.
When cooking poultry, breasts
should be cooked at 170 de-
grees, whole chicken or turkey
at 180 degrees and ground
poultry at 165 degrees.


one of the reasons good teach-
ers are now leaving the state to
teach in Georgia and else-
where.
He also noted that many
seniors and low income fami-
lies are not able to obtain af-
fordable health insurance and
prescription medications, and
that this problem should. also
be addressed before any sur-
plus funds are returned in the
form of tax rebates.
Watson continued: Candi-
date Smith also took issue with
Governor Bush's current edu-
cational approach which en-
courages "teaching to the test"
rather than teaching the funda-
mentals which are required for
success later in life.
The other Democratic candi-
date for Governor, US Repre-
sentative Jim Davis, will be the
featured speaker at a future
event to be held by the Demo-
cratic Executive Committee.
Further details on that event
will be provided and the public
will be invited, as always.


Pressure

(Continued From Page 4)
eighth grade, nearly half of all
adolescents report having had
at least one drink and one in
five report having been
"drunk."

3. Are all teens affected by
peer pressure the same way?
No. An adolescent with a
healthy self-esteem and strong
sense of self will be better able
to resist both active and pas-
sive pressures to drink. In con-
tract, teens who are depressed
or insecure are more likely to
succumb to peer pressure.
Fortunately, parents can help
their teenage children resist the
pressures to drink. By staying
involved, parents can lessen
the impact of peer pressure.

4. Does peer pressure
change as teens get older?
Yes. While rates of adoles-
cent emotional development
vary and transitions are not
necessarily smooth, the role of
peers and peer pressure
changes as teens progress
through early, middle and late
adolescence.

5. Is peer pressure the only
factor leading to underage
drinking?
No. Other important influ-
ences on teen drinking include
relationships with parents, pa-
rental drinking, sibling drink-
ing, participation in religious
activities and the media.
"Underage drinking is often
influenced by peer pressure,"
said Karen Soren, HAA
expert/M.D., Associate Clini-
cal Professor of Pediatrics and
Public Health at Columbia
University College of Physi-
cians and Surgeons. "By
knowing the facts, you can
better prepare yourself to ad-
dress peer pressure in conver-
sations with your teen.
Remember, these conversa-
tions need to be ongoing, and
topics will often need to be re-
visited as the teen matures
both physically and psycho-
logically."


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 5


k


SOUTrH EA T
C./ 4 R
PLid ...


How many times have you heard that
one? Or more importantly.... how
many times have you said it? Well,
there's no longer a reason for anyone
in Florida to ever say it again.
It used to be a very real trap. If there
were no Republicans running in a
County race, the entire election was
decided in the Democratic primary.
We never even got a chance to vote
for the Democrat we thought was the
best candidate. So a lot of good
Republicans registered as Democrats.
But a recent change in the election
-law allows Republicans to vote in'
the Democratic primary when only
Democrats are in the race. Problem
Solved.
So... for all you Republicans in
Democrat clothing, The Republican
Party of Jefferson County has a
message for you. In fact, our entire
two party system has a message for
you.
Come home...we've missed you!



Are you sure YOU're

m Hnot a Republican P
S Why not make it official?
Just call us at 228-4400 and...
S b : We'll do the rest!
Swvftck now ss-
It's Ea!s'
Pa I I,:.- L, i- J nc.'i a,-. i ..u.-. r frdi -. : r. I- ,1. T0
Ndjl a jri.; Cr c 6 d *:"* : i M 51. .:.:-,- -,- =- i.- J -. :,l- I,,





S Muscular Dystrophy Association People help
1- 5 721717 MDA.. because
1-0 0-57 21717 MDA helps people.


VDF'Q 19 QI'o4LL
~LJ !YJJA


A MEMBER OF NORTH FL.ORIDA CANCER CARE NETWORK


Foul Language


(Continued From Page 4)
greater tips, one of the caddies
for our foursome began telling
vulgar jokes half way down
the first fairway. He continued
until one of our foursome
pointed to me and said, "He's a
preacher."
Well, though I preach from
time to time, I am not a
preacher; I am a Christian uni-
versity president. But the des-
ignation stuck and for the
remaining 16 holes I was
called "Preacher" and the


caddy never told another off-
color joke.

We all learned in the fifth-
grade science 'class that water
seeks its own level. Later in
life we learned that people
seek their own level too. With
language, it can mean that we
all keep looking for the lowest
common denominator of com-
munication until we all end up
in the swamp.
If you want to speak French,
learn the real thing.


S...


More than 40 years ago, Grandma gave you Series E
Savings Bonds. And you forgot about them-until now. You
were cleaning out boxes of junk when you found a treasure...
those old Series E Savings Bonds. Even though there no longer
earning interest, they could still be worth more than 5 times
their face value. So why not redeem those old bonds
atyour local financial
institution? r Tc'AT7TT\' .


I


Creating a I '3A/lVt(x 3 ^
NewCentury ~'l RF-I'Tr
f Savings J.DUIBOND
Do you have old Savings Bonds? Check out the Savings Bond
Calculator at www.savingsbonds.gov to discover their value.
1-800-4US BOND
A public service of this newspaper


SOUTHEAST
R E GI ONAL C AN.C ER
CENTER A'E-MB ER
OF THE NORTH
FLORIDA CANCER
NETWORK HAS
BEEN PROVIDING
THE PEOPLE OF
NORTH FLORIDA
AND SOUTH.
GEORGIA THE
HIGHEST QUALITY
OF CANCER CARE
SINCE 1989
DEDICATED TO
BRINGING YOU THE
ADVANCES OF
TOMORROW TODAY

2003 Centre Pointe Blvd
Tallahassee FL, 32308






Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax: 850-671-5900


Southeast Regional Cancer Center and the North Florida Cancer Network
were established to promote the finest principles of medical care. Can-
cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.
The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-
ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community, not just a
patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We


are in this together.


"I usually vote

SRepublican but I'm

registered as a

Democrat so I can

vote in local elections"


1 om
Nf. 'uti 6

-reastr
in m














PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006


Lifestyle


Red Hats Celebrate

St. Patrick's Day
recognized with red rose fa-
DEBBIE SNAPP vors.
Staff Writer Shofner gave the Invocation,
an Irish Blessing, in honor of
The Red Hat Ladies cele- Saint Patrick's Day.
brated St. Patrick's Day at their A traditional Irish meal was
recent meeting held at the served, prepared by Mary
Chamber of Commerce. Frances Drawdy, Chamber di-
Queen Mum Thelma Bird- rector.
well introduced the newest The hostesses shared some
member to the group, Carolyn Irish Blessings and Poetry, and
Price, and welcomed guest, some Irish humor from the
Faye Creel. Internet.
Creel is the daughter of Colleen Weber won the door
member Dorris Uptain and sis- prize, a lovely Red Hat brace-
ter of Maggie Shofner. let.


Uptain, Shofner and Illean
Vorce were the hostesses for
this meeting. They decorated
the tables and coordinated the
Saint Patrick's Day program.
Attendees were dressed in
their Saint Patrick's Day
finery, with shamrocks every-
where.
March birthday members
were serenaded with song and


The April meeting of the
Red Hats will be held in Tho-
masville, GA. at the Toscoga
Market Place.
Members will meet at 11
a.m. in the Dunn's Furniture
parking lot on North Jefferson
Street and carpool.
The membership will be con-
tacted by hostesses Fran Black,
Colleen Weber, and Carmela
Naranjo.


Homes Of Mourning


H. Loomis Dean
H. Loomis Dean, 88, died
December 7, 2005, in Sonoma,
California. Graveside services
were held at Roseland Ceme-
tery, in Monticello, at 11:30
a.m., Saturday, March 11.
Born September 19, 1917, in
Monticello, he was a graduate
of the Eastman School of Pho-
tography, in Rochester, New
York. He traveled the country
as a press agent for Ringling
Brothers Circus for four years.
He served his country as a
member of the Army Air
*Corps during World War II,
where he covered the war in
the Pacific from both the air
and on the ground. In 1947, he
joined "Life Magazine," as a
staff photographer, and was
stationed in Life's Paris Bu-
reau. During 25 years with
"Life," he covered major
events all over the world.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Peggy; and a daugh-
ter, Susan.
Survivors include his son,
Christopher Dean; daughter
Deborah Gaughan; grandsons,
Ben Guevara and Wyatt Dean;
and former wife, Mary Sue
Dean.

Janetta D. Jones
Janetta Jones, 35, a childcare
provider, died Wednesday,
March 15, in Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Funeral services will be held
3 p.m. Saturday, March 25, at
Memorial Missionary Baptist
Church, with burial at
Bethpage Cemetery in
Wacissa, Florida. Family will
receive friends 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 24, at Tillman
Funeral Home. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to
Ethel Jones.
S She leaves to cherish her
love, legacy and memories, her
mother, Ethel Jones; her
fiance, Marvin Barrington, Sr.;
her four sons, Zachary, Zan-
ders "Maurice," Marvin Jr, and
Marion Barrington, her two
sisters, Jacqueline Pleas and
Annette Jones, and Sylvia
Merritt was reared as her
sister; her two brothers, Ricky
Pleas, Sr., and Alexander
"Jay" Jones and Detroit
Griffin, Carlos Merritt, Mi-
chael, Tony and Keith Pleas
were reared as her brothers,
and a host of sorrowing rela-
tives and friends.
Tillman Funeral Home is
handling arrangements.

You Can Count
On The
Monticello

News


Angela B. Walker
Angela B. Walker, a physical
therapist 85, died Wednesday
March 22, 2006, in Tallahas-
see at Big Bend Hospice
House.
Funeral Services will be
Monday March 27, 2006, at 11
a.m. at St. Margaret's Catholic
Parish, in Monticello, FL.
In lieu of Flowers, donations
may be made to: Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL, 32308-
5428, in her name.
Angela was born in Hillsbor-
ouch. New Mexico, the daugh-
ter pf Elijio Barreras and Car-
lota Tafoya.
She had lived in Lamont, FL,
since 1966. She was a member
of the Seminole Booster Club,
and also F.A.C.E. (Family &
Community Educators with
Jefferson County.)
Angela was a veteran of
WW II and Korean Conflict, a
First Lieutenant in the U. S.
Army where she received her
training in Physical Therapy.
She put her training to work
for the Easter Seals Founda-
tion and Archbold Memorial
Hospital. She was a member of
St. Margaret Catholic Parish,
Monticello.
She is survived by 3 sons:
Richard F. Walker, Jr., of Tal-
lahassee, Edward L. Walker,
of Crawfordville, and Louis
Russell Walker, of Monticello,
2 daughters: Marilyn Case of
Monticello, and Kelly Ann
Walker of Tallahassee. A
brother Abraham Barreras of
CA, and a sister Corrine Lu-
chini of LosCrusis, NM, and 7
grandchildren:
Edward L. Walker, Shaunna
Walker, Randy Walker, Rachel
Walker, Nicolette Case, John
Paul Case, Gabrielle Case and
Walker.
Also, two great grandchil-
dren: Eric Walker and Edward
Walker Jr., and 1 great-great
grandchild, Alexis Walker.


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RED HAT ladies recently held their St. Patrick's Day celebration. From left: Illean
Vorce, Maggie Shofner, Thelma Birdwell, Dorris Uptain, Minnie Stokley, Carmella
Naranjo, Fran Black. (News Photo)



Registration Accepted Now

For 4-H Summer Camp


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Registration for 4-H sum-
mer camps are being accepted
on a first come first served ba- -
sis.
Jubilee Wildlife and Outdoor
Recreation 4-H Day Camp at
Jubilee Plantation will be held
June 5 9 for students ages 10
- 15 at a cost of $15.00.
To register for camp come
by the Extension Office at 275


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North Mulberry Street between
the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday and
fill out the forms or contact
-4-H Coordinator John Lilly at
,342-0187 to have the forms
-'mailed out to you.
Day Camp fees should be
paid at registration. Fees are
non refundable.
The Multi-County Camp is
hosted by Jefferson and Leon
Counties.
Jubilee Camp gives youths a
chance to be outside and enjoy



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wildlife and outdoor
recreation.
This Camp includes activi-
tie. in Forestry, Conservation,
Wildlife, Archery, Air Rifles,
and Sporting Clays, on Mon-
day through Wednesday.
On Thursday there is. a
change in the routine and the
campers travel to Piney Z
Plantation for Fishing, Aquatic
Science, and Canoeing classes.
Friday is a day of fun and
enjoyment with contests in
Archery, Air Rifles, Shot Gun,
and Casting.
Participants will enjoy a
cookout for lunch. Afterwards,
there is a fun Eco-Challenge
competition to demonstrate the
skills learned in Forestry, Con-
servation, and Wildlife classes.
Camp concludes with Sno-
SCones, a PowerPoint presdnta :
ti6n 'of the"week's activities,
awards, -and goodie bags for
everyone.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local 4-Hers attended the
District III Junior Congress at
the North Florida Research
Center in Quincy, FL.
These include: Janelle
Bassa, Tevin Bellamy, Jacorey
Dixon, Cydney Hasting, Emily
Howard, Ya'Tyra Howard,
Deion Siplin, Brandon Whit-
field, Simone Williams, and
Shanice Young.
Classes taught by county
residents include:
Public Speaking: Arsenio
Bright, Alana Chamber, and


Alex Farmer.
Team Building: Shayne
Broxie, Shanka Farmer, Benja-
min Hudson, II, Tierra Thomp-
son, and Chevarra Ulee..
Recreation: Jazmaun Hall
and Angela Scurry.
The youth participated in
four rotational sessions and
were offered the opportunity to
participate in the following ac-
tivities: Polished Public Speak-
ing, designed to fine tune
public speaking skills; Team
Building and problem solving
initiative activities.
Youth took part in recrea-
tional activities and Arts and
Crafts, and made coasters and
learned other crafting skills.


DEADLY
NEUROMUSCULAR
DISEASES

Please help us put
the brakes
-:on *40/'-
neuromuscular
diseases.


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I "Su7-(no Ue4tcmwe ,^|
/

- I Doyou know whatyou want to do when you
- / graduate? Are you interested in changing
SI careers? Is a career in healthcarefor you?

S, 7-ave our questions anwered

|- _, at d Arckhbow's Annual

-ea/rcare Career NfLt!

S--Tuesday, April 4

6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.
-=- -
--- (drop in)
---- ---- --- ---- ---- --------------- 7--------- ----
Tour hospital departments... and speak with our staff
-- 'Speak with area college and university representatives
E- Obtain Archbold Scholarship information
E Register for great prizes d&enjoy refreshments

SJohn D. Archbold Memorial Hospital
Auditoriums A & B
E r .... .. .. >....... 311 k' ?7 (7


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday: _
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
Lord your God
with allyour
heart and with all
your soul and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5


ARSENIO BRIGHT, left, Alana Chambers, and Alex
Farmer taught a public speaking session at 4-H District
III Junior Cohgress.


Local Youth Attend

4-H Junior Congress


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GOSPEL SING

featuring |


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 7


ACA Students, Parents Learn


About Safety On Internet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Sheriffs Department Inves-.
tigator Sally Cole, conducted
presentations at Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy last week, one
for students, and one for par-
ents concerning Internet
safety.
"Children of all ages are
flocking to the Internet," said
Cole.
She advised that it is impor-
tant to note the types of dan-
gers that children may be
susceptible to on the Internet.
She explained that MySpace


is a chat room very popular
with teens, and urged studnets
to consider the consequences.
"Imagine yourself is a dark
room wth 500 people you
cannot see, with voices gar-
bled so you can't tell if they
are male or female.
"Would you walk around
and give out your picture,
home phone, and address?
"Of course not, but that's
what happens when you are
not careful about using a cha-
troom," she explained.
Cole told parents there is
much information on the
Internet not suitable for chil-


dren.
"This content can include
nudity or other sexually ex-
plicit material; hate group or
racists web sites; promotional
material about tobacco, alco-
hol, or drugs, graphic vio-
lence; information on satanic
or cult groups; or even recipes
for making bombs and other
explosives," said Cole.
"Unfortunately, child por-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Xi Lambda Upsilon
Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi met
at the home of Alice and
Mitchell Sander on Tuesday,
Mar. 14.
Hostesses for this meeting
were Sander and Kathy
Joyner.
The program was given by
Mitchell Sander on the Eco-
nomic and Social Impact of
Wild Life Hunting in foreign
countries.
The Sander's have traveled
extensively to Africa, British
Columbia, Canada, and to
North and South America for
wild game hunting.
The Sandlers have a large
game room with more than 50
mounts of wild game on dis-


play.
The meeting was called to
order by President Connie
Boland, and reports from the
Service, Social, and Sunshine
Committees were presented.
The winning raffle ticket
was drawn for a gift won by
Elinor Garner.
Money raised from this raffle
will help to fund Hospice.
Social Committee Chairman
Jean Folsom discussed the
plans for the upcoming Foun-
ders Day of Beta Sigma Phi in
April.
In attendance for this meet-
ing were: Boland, Judy
Carney, Cindy Chancy, Ann
Coxetter, Peggy Day, Folsom,
Mary Frances Gambling, Gar-
ner, Carolyn Hayse, Joyner,
Sander, Mary Ann Van Kle-
unen, Emily Walker, Velinda
Williams.


Church News Notes


Pleasant Grove MB Church
will celebrates its 23rd annual
"Pay-It Yourself Financial
Drive," 3 p.m., Sunday.

Rev. Dr. Edward Scott and
the Mt. Zion AME Lloyd
Church Family celebrates
Family and Friends Day, 11
a.m., Sunday.
*+*
New Bethel AME Church
will observe its 141st Anniver-
sary with services at 11 a.m.
and 4 p.m. Sunday. Morning
speaker is Rev. Mazie Wood-
son Rojas, of St. Petersburg.
Afternoon speaker is Rev. Rol-
ous Frazier, of Orlando. Guest
Choir is "Anointed Voices."

Elizabeth MB Church, Dills
Community, celebrates its
135th anniversary 11 a.m.
Sunday. Guest speaker is Elder
Thomas Cuyler, associate pas-
tor for Church of God .by
Faith, of Winter Haven, FL.
Guest choir is New Jerusalem


Church of God in Christ.

St. Rilla MB Church cele-
brates the fourth anniversary
of Pastor and Mother Mack, 2
p.m., Sunday. Rev. Abram
Marshall, Green Cove Springs,
is in charge of the service.

Casa Bianca MB Church will
celebrate their annual Family
and Friends Day, 11 a.m. Sun-
day. Pastor George Proctor
and Greater Elizabeth MB
.Church of Lloyd, are in charge
of services.

New Bethel AME Church, in
conjunction with Elizabeth
MB Church and the Second
Harvest Food Bank, will pro-
vide food to the needy via the
USDA Food Commodities
Program.
Distribution takes place 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at New
Bethel AME Church. The pro-
gram operates the fourth Satur-
day of each month.


nography is frequently ex-
changed via the Internet, and
sexual predators can use the
Internet to try to reach out to
children for sexual
purposes,": said Cole.
"Other Internet dangers to
children include sexual ex-
ploitation, or enticement,"
said Cole. "Sexual predators
may target children online
while maintaining relative
anonymity. The nature of on-
line interaction facilitates de-
ception abut the predator's
identity, age and intentions,"
said Cole.


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"Children of all ages have
a lack of emotional maturity
that can make them more sus-
ceptible to manipulation or in-
timidation," said Cole. "Also,
they have a strong desire for
attention, validation, and af-
fection along with a lack of
caution or self-preservation.
"Children are taught to obey
adult requests and demands
and may be less likely to
know when it isn't appropriate
to do so. In addition, children
are naturally curious about
sex and other 'forbidden' top-
ics.


Tallahassee's ONLY
full-service

home care company, offering:

Oxygen
Medical Equipment
Infusion

Nursing
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy

Home Health Aides
Companions/Sitters


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"It is important to note that
children may be hesitate to
tell a trusted adult they are ap-
proached in an inappropriate
way, because of a feeling of
embarrassment or the stigma
of being labeled tattletale."
Other crimes that children
may engage in include send-
ing viruses, hacking, gam-
bling, or illegal purchase or
distribution of narcotics and
weapons, fratd, and the ille-
gal copying of software or
other copyrighted material,
Cole stated.


Fundraiser Saturday

At Wacissa UMC


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Wacissa United Meth-
odist Church Relay for Life
Fundraiser begins 8 a.m. Sat-
urday, at the church.
Activities will be geared to
all tastes, including a turkey
shoot, raffle, quilt show, ga-
rage sale, bake sale, car show.
The turkey shoot will be
held at the corner of Gamble
Road and Highway 59, begin-
ning at noon.
The cost is $5 per shot and
turkeys and various other
prizes will be awarded.
All other activities will be
conducted at the church, lo-
cated on Highway 259 near
Walker's grocery.
The raffle will be for a
handmade lap quilt throw and
tickets are $5.
The garage sale will feature
furniture and many other
items.
A bake sale will feature
homemade cakes, pies, cook-
ies, brownies and the like.
Registration for the car
show will be conducted 9-11
a. m.


Judging begins at noon and
prizes will be awarded at 2
p.m.
Many trophies will be
awarded, along with specialty
awards, including Best Paint,
Best Engine, Best Interior,
Best Progress.
For further information per-
taining to the car show, con-
tact Gary Snipes at 997-2134.
The Youth Group will offer
a breakfast of donuts, coffee
and juice beginning at 8 a.m.,
Lunches of hamburgers or
hot dogs and drinks will be
served at noon.

brighter future
It's simple. Replace 5
lights with ones that '
have earned the
ENERGY STAR to
reduce your home
energy use.
To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


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SOUTIHEiI ST
REGIONAL CANCER
CENTER A MEMBER
OF THE NORTH
FLORIDA CANCER
NETWORK HAS
BEEN PROVIDING
THE PEOPLE OF
NORTH FLORIDA
AND SOUTH
GEORGIA THE
HIGHEST QUALITY
OF CANCER CARE
SINCE 1989
DEDICATED TO
BRINGING YOU THE
ADVANCES OF
TOMORROW TODAY

2003 Centre Pointe Blvd
Tallahassee FL, 32308


Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax: 850-671-5900


cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.
The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-
ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community, not just a
patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We
are in this together.
are in this together.


Sorority Hears Program

On Wild Game Hunting


-- --.-r Mr. W .-.. lW%- -f ---- 4- --


caring


N-i -;~'6;


For Our




seniors


AAT6 Il k


A MEMBER OF NORTH FLORIDA CANCER CARE NETWORK


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9991,172


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006


WELCOME


TO HISTORIC MONTICELLO

DURING


TOUR OF HOMES

MARCH 25-26

Adults $25 Children $5


Avera-Clarke House
Bed, Breakfast & Special Occasions


580 W. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5007


Joe L. Roberts
Owner

Badcock
HOME FURNITURE
& more


405 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Bus. 850-997-4323
Home: 850-997-2406
Fax: 850-997-3130


Farmers
&
Merchants Bank



Member F.D.I.C.
200 E. Washington St. Monticello




230 N. Jefferson St. ~ Monticello, FL
850-997-4342 800-513-6860
Fax 850-997-1404

www.myfsn. com/monticello
florist ru6453@aoC.com


CAP IT OFFrr GRAPHICS


ICREENPRINTING

345 Railroad St.
997-6023
Joe and Margaret Nicolosi


Robert R.

Plaines


County Judge


DUNNS FURNITURE




1242 N. JEFFERSON STREET
997-2013
60 YEARS 1946 2006


1290
S. JEFFERSON


MONTICELLO


342-1050


4 Caminez,
Brown
&
Hardee, P.A.
Attorneys at Law
997-8181


Tel: (850) 997-3348
Fax: (850) 997-6958


STATE FARM

INSURANCE


E-mail
soejeffersonco@aol.com


LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR,
STATE FARM IS THERE."
Call or visit me today.


Tommy Surles
State Farm Agent
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus: 850-997-8282
tommy.surles.bw9i@statefarm.com
Providing Insurance
and Financial Services


Morrow insurance
Agency

tuto-owners Insurance
Life Home Car Business

380 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL. 32344
997-3912


Freddie Pitts
Agency Manager
105 W. Andrew Street, Monticello, Florida
997-2213
Helping You Is What We Do Best


Bari's I




1277 S.
99


Store


Jefferson St.
)7-4410


SMarty Bishop
Jefferson County
Supervisor ofElections


380 West Dogwood Street
Monticello, Florida 32344


:T.ARM
PaTIRRA I I







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 9


TOUR OF HOMES

* Tour Dixie Plantation

Visit Gracious Monticello


Homes


* See Antique Auto and
Carnival Museum

SEnjoy Food, Music and
Local Crafts


North Florida
Abstract & Title Co. Inc
850) 997-2670


220 S. Cherry St.-Monticello
E-mail: nfabstract@cs.com
"Serving the area for over 25 years"


1317 Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL
342-3201


GREAT ADVENTURE
OUl- il ILRS


*Merril's, Chaco's, Crocs, Georgia Boot, *Columbia,
Woolrich, Royal Robbins, Life Is Good, Flyshacker,
*Crabtree and Evelyn, Burt's Bee's *Boker Knives, Coast
LED's *Pet Supplies *EMOTION KAYAKS
255 N. Jefferson Street Monticello, F1 32344
850-997-5900
www.greatadventureoutfitters.conz


SSteve C. Walker
Realty, LLC
850- 997-4061

250 S. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL
Residential Development ~
Commercial ~ Hunting Land
www.stevewalkerrealty.com

MONTICELLO'S ONLY FULL SERVICE HARDWARE
EDENFIELD (HARDWARE
"We Are Just Around The Corner."
155 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Florida 32344


Mark & Trisha Wirick
Owners/Managers


(850) 997-2144
(850) 997-4624 (fax)


VMS


INC.


1455 N. JEFFERSON ST.
997-5000


THOMAS GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Director
Kathi Sloan Hansberry
Licensed Funeral Director


997-2024
750 Branch St.
Monticello, Florida


Monticello
Christian
Academy
1590 North Jefferson St.
_: 997-6048
Now ACCEPTING ENROLLMENTS
FOR '06- '07 SCHOOL YEAR
The Staff & Students of
MCA.


Chicken Delite

635 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Fl 32344
997-4939


Philip Sheats
Contractor
545-8493

Custom Homies
Lie. & Ins.
LIC. #CR-CO33480


Danny's Collisons
&
Customs, LLC

765 E. Washington St.
997-1500


Sorensen


Tire


Center

1300 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344


997 4689


Register's

Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


' Tallahassee East
KOA

Campground
346 KOA Rd.
Monticello, FL 32344
Tallehokoa@aol.com
997-3890 1-800-KOA-3890


A Branch Street
FUNERAL HOME


~~ ___ ____ ~____


..


~---Li













PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006


Sports


JCHS Girls Track Team


Wins Recent Meet Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Tigers track and
field team won its recent
meet here and placed well in
the Disney Invitational.
In the 100 meter, Alexis
Huggins took first place in the
first heat with 13.8 seconds.


Deidra Arnold took second
place in the second heat with
15.0; and Quaneshia Franklin
took second place in the third
-heat with 14.6 seconds.
In the 200 meter, Huggins
took second place in the first
heat with 28.5 seconds; Ar-
nold took third place in the
second heat with 29.3
seconds.


Lady Diamonds Tell

Softball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Diamonds softball
team announces the season
schedule.
The team is coached by
Roosevelt Jones.
All games will be held at 4
p.m.
Action begins against Madi-
son, April 16, here; Perry,
April 23, here; Jasper, April
30, here; Greenville, May 7,
here; Quitman, May 14, here;
Thomasville, May 21, here;
Tallahassee, May 28, here;


Green Co Springs, June 4,
here; and Mayo, June 11,
here.
Madison, June 18, there;
Perry, June 25, there; Jasper,
July 2, there; Greenville, July
9, there; Quitman, July 16,
there; Thomasville, July 23
there; Tallahassee, July 30,
there; Green Co Springs, Aug.
6, there; and Mayo, Aug. 13,
there.
"I am also looking for a
scorekeeper and an assistant
coach," he said. Interested
persons can call 342-1209 or
322-1871.


Franklin took second place
in the third heat with 29.4
seconds.
In the shot put, Jazmaun
Hall took first place with 29
feet; and Ceanta Crumity took
second place with 27 1/2 feet.
In the discus throw, Crumity
took first place with 72 feet;
and Hall took second place
with 55 feet.
In the 4 x 100, the Lady Ti-
gers, consisting of Franklin,
Huggins, Arnold and Kene-
shia Coates, took first place
with 55.3 seconds.
Schools competing in the
meet included Jefferson,
Perry, Madison, and Maclay.
In the Disney Invitational,
the 100 meter and 200 meter
were run in heats.
In the 100 meter, Franklin
came in fourth with 14.3 sec-
onds; Huggins came in fourth
place with 14.0 seconds; and
Arnold came in last.
In the 200 meter, Franklin
came in fourth place with
29.3 seconds; Huggins came
in fourth place with 28.2 sec-
onds; and Arnold came in last
with 33.3 seconds.


In the shot-put, Crumity
threw for 27 feet; and Hall
threw for 29 feet. Neither
placed.
In the discus throw, Cru-
mity threw for 72 feet; and
Hall threw for 55 feet. nei-
ther girl placed.
"The girls did a really good
job," said Coach Nikki
Brooks. I hope they keep
up the good work."
The Lady Tigers will next
compete in the home invita-
tional, slated for 3:30 p.m.,
March 28.




C:SPENDINC(

A LOT Of TIME

LOOKINgJ IN

THE MIRROR

MAY NOT BE

A SINN Of

VANITY.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director
Kevin Aman reminds resi-
dents and parents, that the
Spring Sports Jamboree will
be hosted Saturday at the
park.
All games are limited to
three innings or 45 minutes,
whichever comes first.
The regular season will be-
gin Monday and pictures will
be taken at the assigned times
before the scheduled first
games.
Teams and their field as-
signments include: 10 a.m.,
field one, FMB and Jefferson
Farmers Market; Coach Pitch,
Chicken Delite and C & F
Fencing; T-ball, Bishop
Farms and Jefferson Builders
Mart.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Roosevelt Jones has
announced the schedule for
the Monticello Demons base-
ball team.
All games will be held at 4
p.m.
Action begins against Madi-
son, April 16, here; Perry,
April 23, here; Jasper, April
30, here; Greenville, May 7,
here; Quitman, May 14, here;

HMS Game

Schedule

Changes

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Due to a transportation prob-
lems, the schedule for the
Howard Middle School soft-
ball team has been changed.
The game that had previ-
ously been slated for March
14 against Wakulla, there,
was changed to a double-
header on March 17.
A game that was slated for
March 15 against Shanks,
here, has been combined with
the game scheduled for March
30, there, for the Lady Bee's
second double-header of the
season.

"Transportation is a prob-
lem for everyone," said Coach
Corinne Stephens.


10:45 a.m., field one, Mon-
ticello Milling and Williams
Timber; Coach Pitch, Kiwanis
and Hiram Masonic Lodge;
T-ball, Capital City Bank and
Rotary.
11:30 a.m., field one, FMB
and Williams Timber; Coach
Pitch, C & F Fencing and
State Farm Insurance; T-ball,
Rotary and Jefferson Builders
Mart.
Field two, Joyner's Travel
Center and Jackson's Drug
Store.
12:15 a.m., field one, Monti-
cello Milling and Jefferson
Farmers Market; Coach Pitch,
Kiwanis and Chicken Delite;
T-ball, Bishop Farms and
Capital City Bank.
1 p.m., Coach Pitch, Hiram
Masonic Temple and State
Farm Insurance.
For further information con-
tact Aman at 342-0240.


Thomasville, May 21, here;
Tallahassee, May 28, here;
Green Co Springs, June 4,
here; and Mayo, June 11,
here.

Madison, June 18, there;
Perry, June 25, there; Jasper,
July 2, there; Greenville, July
9, there; Quitman, July 16,
there; Thomasville, July 23
there; Tallahassee, July 30,
there; Green Co Springs, Aug.
6, there; and Mayo, Aug. 13,
there.


Advertise In

Your Local

Paper


First United Methodist Church

Sets Golf Tournament Monday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The First United Methodist
Church will conducting a
golf tournament and catfish
fry dinner to benefit the Relay
for Life, Monday, at the
Country Club.
The golf tournament begins
at 1 p.m., and is a three-man
scramble with a shotgun start.
The cost is $50 per player.
The catfish fry will begin at


6:30 p.m.
Meals are $10 each, are
available for either eat-in or
carry out, and include fried
cat fish, cheese grits,
coleslaw, baked beans, hush-
puppies, and a drink.
All proceeds benefit the
County's Relay For Life to
fight cancer.
For further information on
the golf tournament contact
Clee Collins at 342-3374 or
Chuck Collins at 997-5484.


REVIVAL 997-2165

CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
March 31 April 2st
Guest Preacher Dr. Vince Massa
Super Served Each Night At 5:45 P.M
SERVICES EGIN aT 7:00 P.M.(6:30 SUNDAY)
285 N. Magnolia, Monticello
Conner of Dogwood & Magnolia



Gallons & Sons Mechanical, Inc.
Heating Air Conditioning
& Refrigerators
Sales & Service All Major Brannds
Free Estimates-Financing Plan Availible

222-4329 s
Commercial
& Serving Area
Residential For 35 Years

905 Gamble St., Tallahassee, Fla


IT MAY BE

A SICJN Of

INTELLIgENCE.

If you're smart, you'll
examine yourself regularly for
melanoma/skin cancer. Look
for blemishes larger than a
pencil eraser, multi-colored or
asymmetrical in shape. If
you have any questions, see
your dermatologist.


As low as .
Package Deall
Diese l Tracto Pcktag7e
*Diesel Tractor
-Rotary Cutter 1
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i includes Warranty
*Other Pkgs Available
CHECKS CREDIT CARDS '1
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Exit 11 off 1-75 1/4 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484 .


$


DESRICK JONES throws the shot put at a recent Jeffer-
son County High School practice session. (News Photo)



Spring Jamboree Set

At Park Saturday


Demons Baseball Team

Posts Season Schedule


Next Event
March
0-54-79 or 80-31- 25th
2 Events
--. Left This


o Come Join
".,--- __ In The Fun!

For More Info, Call John Knight
850-584-7999 or 850-371-2525
6580 Hwy. 19 South e Perry, FL 32348


~






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 11

I The Mower Medic

Mobile Repair Shop

Service & Repair on any type of Power Equipment


Christian Academy, about the importance of agriculture
in our society.


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app Iicza bkI, to p o ff a II fI uid I vaIs a ndid
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to p oft faII flu Hi -L &Is and et tire ss u ra,
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DOROTHY LEWIS, a representative of the Farm Bureau
speaks to Ms. Love's second grade class at Aucilla


I


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006
*r- School Improvement Director

*Ii- ._.. Aims For Positive Change


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
When Sherry Heyen was
hired by the District Schools as
Director of School Improve-
ment, in Aug, 2005, she
brought with her 28 years of
experience.
Discussing her position,
Heyen said: "my focus is not
to attribute blame, but to con-
centrate on existing conditions
can be corrected to improve
our schools."
Among the improvements
Heyen has worked to accom-
plish are: curriculum changes
at Jefferson Elementary
School, including accelerated
classes, and emphasis on staff
development.
"We cannot afford to retain
teachers who are not up to
par," she said. "Teachers on


annual contract will be looked
at closely at regular intervals
to be sure they putting forth
their best possible effort."
Another major improvement
Heyen has orchestrated is en-
suring that every student's re-
cord is carefully examined to
be sure he/she is placed appro-
priately.
"This will require much ef-
fort, but is something that must
be done," she said.
Heyen said that for years
there have been personnel in
areas that have been unsuper-
vised, without anyone ensuring
the job is being done in the
best possible manner. Guid-
ance Counselors are but one
example she cited.
"To facilitate reports and
planning, plans call for every
teacher to receive a personal
laptop to be used as a technical
tool, with appropriate


software.
Heyen expects to continue to
work at school improvement
and correct whatever needs
correcting.
She asks the community to
support her efforts in changing
the perception of district
schools.
To this end she has spoken
to Rotarians, and plans to
speak to Kiwanians and Cham-
ber of Commerce members as
well.
"Without vision, schools per-
ish," she laments.
She works with the District
Strategic Plan, is responsible
for changes in curriculum and
instructional practice, in serv-
ice activities, and writes both
Federal and State grants for in-
structional programs.
Heyen is also responsible for
training, management, and de-
Svelopment for all principals.


She earned her Masters and
Bachelors Degrees in Child-
hood Development and Ele-
mentary Education from FSU,
and her degree in Administra-
tion and Supervision from the
University of South Florida.

I Choose
a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU
in Mind
Call 850-997-9981
to find out more.
Steve McClelland
FMB Insurance Services
108 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
A Contracted General Agency for
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fW ornoria
*^ -S--- 62478 -090

Help us cure
Neuromuscular diseases.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


Improvement
activities on-


SHERRY HEYEN is the Director of School
for District Schools and has a number of
going to reach this goal. (News Photo)


Now you don't need one
of these to get your
Federal payment.

Call 1-888-382-3311 to learn where __ __
you can open an ETA. Or visitor
Web site at www.eta-find.gov. Bectronic TransferAccount


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Ages 3 to Adult
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893-0771
For More Information
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Corner of Bradfordville Road.and Quail' Valley Road


Summer Fun!!




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Re-kindling the Joy of Learning

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We are offering English, Math, History and Science
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Dates: June 5-June 23 & June 26-July 24
Time: 8:30 am-12:30 pm & 1:00 pm-5:00 pm
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S|Call (850) 893-4692
s i ^ Or visit us at
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MARK VOLLERTSEN 0


1 -


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specialists at SouthVest Land Group, Inc. We can assist you with professional
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Sellers All we do is land. Your property doesn't take a
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Buyers Whether it's a single lot or large acreage, a
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perfect property.
Contact us today for a confidential discussion regarding your real estate needs.
Simply call or send us an e-mail message at southvest99@aol.com. We
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 13
-w 'ye --.- -- 'W We' W-' 'w' -we -.


The Leaders


Of Car


Care.........


N) iEiBER
-0.k


Curtis

Morgan's
GARAGE, INC
Complete Automobile
Repair Center
A/C Repairs
Suspension
Tune-Ups
Brakes
Electrical
Oil Changes
Computer Diagnosis
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

erl~sr *


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BCNDED & INSURED RESIDENTIAL
Locally Owned & Operated LOCKS
I: OPENED
For Over 20 Years INSTALLED
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HEPAIRED
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LOCAL PROFESSIONALS IN UN Y


VISA


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-- -~~--~~- --~~~~---~


z0424m683K.






PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006
- -r -. -r -


The Leaders



Of Car



Care.........


OUR TOP PRIORITY
IS GETTING CARS BACK
TO THEIR OWNERS
QUICKLY & EFFICIENTLY.


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Owner
Precision Color Matching
RS1


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Technicians


* Direct repair shop for most
major insurance companies


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LICENSED LOW RATES :QUICK RESPONSE-
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Service Entire Tallahassee Area Including Killearn & NX Downtown All Campuses Appalacee Pkwviy Airport
PERSONAL CHECKS iNSURANCE COMPANIES
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 15


FEkIT- HE-LP-WANTED


'SNICKERS' needs a good home. She is a stay at home
cat and a really good pet. (News Photo)


'Snickers'

Pet Of Week

The Humane Society has
named "Snickers" as its feline
Pet of the Week.
Snickers is a female tan
Tabby domestic short hair,
born Nov, 2004.
She is spayed and all vacci-
nations are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista said that Snickers
was an owner release, given
to the shelter because the
owner was moving and could-
n't take the cat with her.
"Snickers would be perfect
for an elderly person," said
Bautista. "She loves
cuddling."
She added that Snickers is
terrified of the outdoors, and
is strictly an indoor animal.
Also, Snickers does not like
other animals, cats, and espe-
cially dogs.
"She has to be an only ani-
mal in a household," said
Bautista.
To adopt Snickers or any of
the other many critters at the
shelter call 342-0244.



LEGAL NOTICE
Call for Bids Project: Air
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Handler
at Christ Episcopal Church
Monticello Florida. Scope of project
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air

conditioning systems in the existing
church and removal and disposal of
four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
form successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
date and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office,.425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24. 29, 31, 4/5/06, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular
monthly meeting on April 13, 2006
at 7:00 P.M. The meeting will be
held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of US
Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be
continued as necessary.
Information concerning the meeting
is available at the Jefferson County


LEGALS

Planning Department, 445 W.
Palmer Milf Road, Monticello, FL
32344, Telephone 850-342-0223.
From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency
-conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record -of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose he or she may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
3/24-06
The Jefferson Planning Commission
subcommittee will meet to discuss
subdivisions on March 29 and April
17, 2006 at 7:00 P.M. at the
Monticello Chamber of Commerce,
420 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344. The meeting
may be continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual," page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. For information contact
the Jefferson County Planning
Department at 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
telephone 850-342-0223.
3/24-06
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Jefferson County Commission
will review and make a decision
regarding a proposed cook shack
minor development and special
exception. The proposal is to be
located on parcel number
31-2S-3E-0000-0022-0000 southwest
of Fanlew. Interested parties may
present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Commission
meeting on April 20, 2006 at 6:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the
matter may be heard, in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 in Monticello,
Florida 32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual," page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, o r commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, lie or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony nd evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Prior to the meeting, interested
persons may contact the Jefferson
County Planning and Building
Department at 850-342-0223 or
write the Department at 445 Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344
and provide comments. The
development proposal may be
reviewed during business hours at


the Department office.
3/24-06
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN RE: Estate of
ROBERT LEWIS WILLIAMS,
Deceased. Probate Division Case
No. 06-36-PR NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of
ROBERT LEWIS WILLIAMS,
deceased, File Number 06-36-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, FL 32344. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE 'OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this Notice is
March 24, 2006. Attorney for
Personal Representative: FELIX A.
JOHNSTON, JR., ESQUIRE, 195
Felix Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
Florida Bar No. 0094695, (850)
997-3131. DONALD F.
WILLIAMS, 8166 Eagle Point
Drive, Beulah, Michigan
49617-9604.
3>24,31-06


NOTICE
The Jefferson (ountr Road
Dept. is asking for sealed bids
for an equipment trailer, 20 ton
capacity pintle with ramps,
wood deck, tongue jack. Lights
and brakes must meet D.O.T.
certifications.
Bids will be accepted through
March 31, 2006. All bids must
be sealed and delivered to the
road dept. office at 1484 South
Jefferson Street, Moriticello,
Fla. 32344. Bids will be opened
April 5, 2006. Our office phone
number is 850-997-2036.
3/22,24,c
Is stress ruining your
relationshships? Buy and Read
DIANETICS, 3102 N. Habana
Ave., Tampa, FL 33607.
3/24-fcan
We Buy Mortgages. Are you
collecting payments on a
mortgage? Why wait years for
payments? Call (800) 282-1251.
3/24-fcan
Absolute Auction. 96 Acres
mountain property within
Cherokee National Forest
Proclamation Boundary.
Saturday, April 1, 10:30 a.m.
Call 1-800-4FURROW or visit
www.furrow.com TN Lic. #62.
3/24-fcan
Estate Auction. 104+/- acres -
divided. Excellent home sites.
Saturday, April 1, 10 a.m.
Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)
323-8388
www.rowellauctions.com. 10
percent buyer's. premium GAL
AU-C002594.
3/24-fcan
Hunt Elk, Red Stag. White tail,
Buffalo, Wild Boar. Our season:
now 3/31/06. Guaranteed
license. $5.00 trophy in two
days. No-Game/No-Pay policy.
Days (314) 209-9800; evenings
(314) 293-0610.
3/24-fcan
Earn degree online from home.


*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job

placement. Computer provided.
Financial aid if qualify. (866)
858-2121
www.onlinetidewatertech.com
3/24-fcan
There will be a Local Mitigation
Strategy Meeting held on 27,
March 2006 at 1:00 p.m. in the
Emergency Management Bldg.
Conference Room.
3/22,24-c


Servers/Cook must be 18
References Required. Call Brian
at 284-7899.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol Officer.
This position requires a
minimum of a high school
diploma and Florida Police
Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of Monticello Police
Station. Applicants must
complete a Department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request.
Submit application and resume
to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St., Monticello, FL
32344 by April 3, 2006
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.
3/24,31-c
Huddle House now hiring
experienced waitresses and cooks.
We offer above average wages
and health insurance with
2-weeks paid vacation per year.
Please come in and file an
application or call 342-3284 and
ask for Jack.
3/1.7, 22. 24, 29, 31, c
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is currently


accepting applications for the
following positions.: 1. A
lineman at the entry-level
position. The position would be
based out of the Madison office.

However, the individual will be
required to live in the
Monticello area. Position will
require outage standby during
the week and the weekends as
required. All applicants must
possess a valid Florida CDL
Class A license. 2. A lineman at
the entry-level position. The
position would be based out of
the Perry Office. The individual
will be required to live in the
Perry, Florida area. The
position will require outage
stand-by during the week and
the weekends as required. All
applicants must posses a valid
Florida CDL Class A license 3.


An automotive mechanic at the
advance level position. The
position will be based out of the
Madison Office. The applicant
must have working knowledge
of diesel and gasoline engines
and hydraulic systems in
addition to basic automotive
repair and maintenance. The
salary will be based upon
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. offers a
benefit and retirement package.
The closing date of the accepting
applications is March 31, 2006.
Applications may be obtained
from Tri-County Electric
Cooperative's Offices.


Florida Department of Transportation has a vacancy in
:Taylor County:


Position Number:
Broad Band Title:
Working Title:



Closing Date:


04492
Highway Maintenance Workers Level 1
Highway Maintenance Technician -
Pe hiding reclassification


April 4th, 2006


For more information concerning job description and requirements
and to apply online go to:


Iulps://pcOlclirs. rivlornv itrJa.coi/lo/I;on.htm
or call 1-877-562-7287.


Contact person: Theresa Kuhn


The Department of Trainsportation is an Equal Employment Opportunity,
Affirmative actionn and Drug Free Workplace employer.

.


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
g q


h







PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006


TIEa


Applicants should be returned
to the attention of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative's
Engineering and Operations
Department. Tri-County
Electric Cooperative reserves
the right to reject any and all
applicants. 850-973-2285.
3/8-3/31, c
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc.. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
"Now Hiring 2006" Average
postal employee earns
$57,000/yr. Minimum starting
pay $18/hr. Benefits paid
training and vacations. No
experience needed (800)
584-1775 ref #P4901


3/24-fcan
Driver Now hiring qualified
drivers for Central Florida
Local & National OTR
positions. Food grade tanker, no
hazemat no pumps, great
benefits, competitive pay & new
equipment. Need 2 years
experience. Call Bynum
Transport for your opportunity
today. (800) 741-7950.
3/24-fcan
Drivers CDL A. Special
orientation pay for experienced
drivers! Home weekends! Great
pay & benefits! Paid training
for school grads! Cypress Truck
Lines, Inc.
www.cypressstruck.com (888)
808-5846.
3/24-fcan
America's Driving Academy.
Start your driving career!
Offering courses in CDL A & B.
One tuition fee! Many payment
options! No registration fee!
(888) 808-5947
info@americasdriving
academy.com
3/24-fcan


1


SERViCES "-.


FREE cat to a good home. Call
997-1277. Tiny long hair, gray,
spayed, about 7 years old.

SE R :--
4-1 7.,


painting, drywall, trim, wood
working, siding. House
cleaning, housekeeping, call
251-4275 or 997-3587.
3/17,22,24,29, 31-pd


1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced
$1,000 to $3,500.. .
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tire, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book. 997-6806
tfn, c
2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250,1700
mi. Nice $3,000 OBO must sell
850-508-3851
3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4 Door Model
As Low As $750 down
850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal
11/2-tfn
-. -
BU SINESS-;,^ ,
OPPOWIfihS
All cash candy route. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 machines.
Free candy. All for $9,995. (888)
629-9968 BO2000033. Call us.
We will not be undersold.
3/24-fcan


Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Arrested? All criminal defense
felonies....Misdemeanors, state
or federal charges,
parole...probation, DUI
...Traffic, tickets, bond
reduction. Private attorneys
statewide 24 hours A-A-A
Attorney Referral Service. (800)
733-5342. 3/24-fcan
Divorce $275-$350 covers
children, etc. Only one signature
required! Excludes gov't. fees!
Call weekdays (800) 462-2000,
ext. 600. (8 a.m. 7 p.m.) Alta
Divorce, LLC Established 1977.
3/24-fcan
Handyman Home repairs,
pressure washing, _int/ext


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN .Reister'sM -StoragI
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's MStoragelBR R2BOD
850-509-1465 cell o Trimming 0 StumpGrinding 315 WaukeenahHwy Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home o Mowing. Aerial Device - - - -
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal B Hog(1/4 Mile Off US 19 Sout Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties o Maintenance. I A 10% Discount
Events and Types 997-0039 Li. nsur 997-2535 11025 East Mahan -877-4550

B & M Tractor Service. _t r CARROLL HILL AUr ELECTRIC, INC. LA CHIUTA Craig
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,: .
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing ''
S"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta

B:J? Richbourg Nursery, Inc. .---- Loyd, FL32337
Brad MLeo99 Richbourg Road imerok
Brad M cLeod ,- ... ... i
Ce : (850) 10-2942 Mackd Monticello, FL 32344 Thomasville Road 115 Alba.-RJ- 9Sand 6788
Home: (850) 997-1451 -u.., *.) ')' t -. )--;-
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 850- 97 764 n Carroll il 9-226-0 7 Soil
Fax 850-997-8388


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior~ Exterior
Lie. & Ins. #4676








Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lament, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


We accept all manufacturer coupons.


1-10 Chevron


Swisher Sweet Sale
Flavor Cigar Tubes .59 each
(Reg., grape, peach, strawberry)
Honey Kings Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pkg.) $2.49

Flavor Blunts 5pk $1.89
Little Cigars Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. or $8.89 Carton
Cigarillos Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.89
Blunt Cigars Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.99
Kayak $1.11 can $5.19 tube (.5 cans)


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547
i *


YEAGER CONTRACTING Co.
CUSTOM HOMES


INC.


PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST-OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
1+ 2 BEDROOM / IHUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711


6


r MieC I es


SWE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
.997-6500
WHEN YouNEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials'*Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic. TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lie. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!





I IP



Cel 8045-97 wouls .o


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned O Office: (850) 342-3294
Lie. # RA0067121 1-9 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Three Sisters
Mystery Chief






Certified Angus Beef

The Decorator's


e, LLC


260 N. i
Cherry Street


Furnishing & Accessories


A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
*O Residential & Commercial

FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


Tyrone Davis
3ales Manager


7 Ultimate

Sage Auto

877-7222

Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold


or Drag

, Velticle
,aeonel


6000 (RIPIT WA (PIN

i7 HE% 7 S ATIPR


LFI
S 'I
Cal TRONs akigi


ukWX 9


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peter Satellite -- Your Satellite
dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and
prompt service. We also offer
Go-Kart, utility trailers and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150
Old Lloyd Road, Monticello,
Fla. 850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key


Need a Clean or Organized
hquse? Call Traci 850-997-3176
3/8-31, pd
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn


Ww rchous'


ova I


toi


I










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006 PAGE 17


Backyard sale Friday and
Saturday 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. -
Books, furninre, lots of misc.
junk and treasure. 310 E.
Dogwood.
3/24,p



Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.

11/30 tfn, c
Charming cottage. 1.5 bedroom,
1 bath. Very nice. Scenic,
private, safe, close to town.
$650. Horse option. Furnishings
available. 997-3271, 251-0760.
3/24,c
Secure Gravel Lot 100 x 100, 12
x 16 Office Bldg. 2685 S.
Jefferson St. 850-997-8727, $300
month.
3/22,24,29,31-c


The Ads That
Ran Here were
Killed Because
They Got Results.


imavressn/ox neu a3e: puluw
plush double sided pillow top
matress/box set, 4 inch pillow
top. List $989.00, sell for $248.
850-528-1422.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd
Metal roofing save $$$ Buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all
accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery available toll free
(888)393-0335.
3/24-fcan
Wolff Tanning beds buy direct
and save! Full body units from
$22 a month! Free color catalog.
Call today! (800) 842-1305
www.np.etstan.com

Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000
Call Mike 519-6506.
3/22,24-pd
22' CF Deep Freezer $45 or
trade for pressure treated wood.
6 Dresser Drawers Hickory
Wood $35 Knick Knack Shelf
$5. 510-0998, 342-1486.
3/22,24-pd


REAL ESTATE
Buy Owner in Christmas Acres
2.2 Acres, '97 Fleetwood, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace,,
asking $82K 877-3123. i.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, pd
Waterfront bargains! Lake
access from $202/month! Direct
lakefront starting at $99,000!
ONE DAY ONLY LAND
SALE1 Saturday, March 25.
Just 20 minutes from Augusta,
GA. Excellent financing
available. Call today for an
early appointment! (888)
LAKE-SALE x 1030. *Based on
purchase price of $39,900 with
10 percent down, fixed rate of
6.7 percent for five years,
15-year term w/balloon payment
due at the end of five years.
Terms and rates subject to
change without notice. Void
where prohibited by law.
3/24-fcan

Murphy, North Carolina AAH
cool summers, mild winters.
Affordable homes and mountain
cabins land. Call for free
brochure (877) 837-2288 Exit
Realty Mountain View
Properties
www.exitmurphy.com


3/24-fcan
Motivated investor wants to
liquidate two units in Jade
Beach, Sunny Isle, FL. 38th
floor unit "E" and 28th floor
unit "C" e-mail

RMW@ROCKLANDFINANCI
AL.COM or call Robert (818)
224-4555.
3/24-fcan
Real Estate Auction. Thursday,
3/30 two Gulf access lots Cape
Coral, FL Friday, 3/31 four new
builder houses. Gateway
Development, Ft. Myers, FL See
website www.scottauctions.com
(888) 283-7058, Bruce Scott.
3/24-fcan
North Carolina Mountain/Lake
lots. Deep water dockable lots
from $134,900. New properties
now available. N.


Clakefront.com Realty (800)
659-6017 or (828) 228-6199
www.nclakefront.com
3/24-fcan
Near Baxley, GA 6,200 sq. ft.
cypress house/lodge on 95 acres
with three acre pond. Excellent
location, beautiful home.
Hunting & Fishing Paradise.
$650,000. (912) 632-8916.
3/24-fcan
Looking to own land? Invest in
rural acreage throughout
America, coastal, mountain,
waterfront properties 20 to 200
acres. FREE monthly special
land reports.
www.land-wanted.com/sw
3/24-fcan
Final Closeout Lake Bargains!
April 8/9. Water access from
$34,900 with FREE boat slips.
Pay no closing costs! Huge
$5,000 savings on beautifully
wooded parcels on 34,000 acre
lake Tennessee. Enjoy unlimited
water recreation surrounded by
state forest. Excellent financing!
Call (800) 704-3154, ext. 722 TN
Land Partners, LLC.
3/24-fcan


Large mtn..land bargains. High
elevation. Adjoins pristine state
forest. 20+ AC to 350 AC.
Sweeping mountain views.
Streams. www.liveinwv.com
3/24-fcan
Lakefront and lake view
properties. Nestled in the hills of
Tennessee on the shores of
pristine Norris Lake. Call
Lakeside Realty at (423)
626-5820 or visit
www.lakesiderealty-tn.com.
3/24-fcan
North Carolina Cool mountain
air, view & streams, homes,
cabins & acreage. Free
brochure (800) 642-5333. Realty
of Murphy 317 Peachtree St.,
Murphy, NC 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com
3/24-fcan
Beautiful North Carolina.
Winter season is here! Must see
the beautiful peaceful
mountains of Western NC
Mountains. Homes, cabins,
acreage & investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate,

Murphywww.cherokeemountain
realty.com. Call for free
brochure (800) 841-5868.
3/24-fcan
We buy houses! Sell yours quick
and easy. Fast cash, fast closing.
Any situation OK
www.buymymansion.com
(877)239-9761.
3/24-fcan
North Carolina gated lakefront
community. 1.5 acres plus, 90
miles of shoreline. Never before
offered with. 20 percent
pre-development discounts, 90
percent financing. Call (800)
709-5253.
3/24-fcan
Coming soon. Historic home,
downtown. 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath.
Spacious,charming. Owner open


to rent, sale or lease
www.blueradish.big.
or 251-0760.
3/24,c


purchase.
997-2837


Steinhatchee/Dixie County side.
Gulf fishing/Scalloping. TRADE
older 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
'/ acre private heavily wooded
lot, Hwy frontage, structurally
sound, blocks from boat ramps,
road to no where, pine log creek
landing. Approx. value
175-200K will trade for house
with acreage outside Monticello,
(352) 498-2832
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, 7, 12, pd


WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles
850-545-3677


MDA
summer camps for
kids are fun and free!


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


VIRGINIA G BLOW

Q Broker Associate
850.509.1844

April 2,2006 SPRING FRENZY SEASON ...
GREAT TIME TO LIST YOUR IrK reiKI V
$115,000 3/2 Modular/3 AC, extras, Lloyd Acres
$129,900 3/2HOME/lot, in town, like new, Martin
$129,900 2/2 HOME/2. SAC,wood noors & walls
$129,900 3/2 HOME/lot, hardwood floors, York
$163,000 3/2 HOME/I AC, historic fixer upper
$295,000 Profitable 7 apartments, Hagan
$500,000 10,000 SF Bldg.,16 AC'S ,Hwy. 90 E.
$650,000 9,470 SF COMMERCIAL BLDG
WILL LEASE/BUILD TO SUIT
COLDWELL BANKER KELLY AND KELLY PROPERTIES
LECH OFFICE IS riDEPErIDEPT'.V Ol i.EDIND OPERATED



Registered Nurse Home Health
$1500-$3000 Recruitment Incentive -
FT Positions
Per Visit Positions $35 per visit premium pay for
admissions Archbold Home Health Services is cur-
rently seeking qualified applicants for the above posi-
lions to serve Leon, Madison, and Jefferson Counties.
One year of home health experience preferred. We of-
fer competitive compensation and an excellent benefit
package.
Contact: Nurse Recruiter, Archbold

Medical Center 229-228 -2713, Fax:

229-551-8733. rtaylor@archbold.org

Visit our website: www.archbold.org

EOE




Want to Work

in North Florida?

Due to growth we have new job
Opportunities in our modern poultry operations
In Live Oak, Florida all shifts

Apply Now!!
We want to interview people who can come to work regu-
larly, provide quality work, demonstrate good workplace
citizenship, work safely and be a dependable team play.
Must be able to perform the essential functions of the jobs
with or without accommodations, and be legally autho-
rized to work.

Weekly Perfect Attendance Bonus of $.95/hour or greater!
After 60 days + Perfect Attendance
Breast Deboner $8.31 $9.26
Packers $7.76 $8.71
Night Sanitation $8.11 $9.06
Live Hangers $10.00 $11.20
Maintenance $8.20-$13.20 + $.95 PA

Ability to work rapidly and with dexterity is important for
successful performance of these jobs. Medical insurance,
life insurance, dental, vision and prescription drug
programs, paid vacations, 9 paid holidays, credit union.


Gold Kist INC
19740 US Hwy 90 W
Live Oak, Florida 32060
386-208-0205 English 386-208-0190 Spanish
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER EOE-AA-M-F-V-D
APPLICATION ALSO ACCEPTED AT EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS LOCATIONS
1416 North Ohio 200 West Base St.
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL


I 95 ft "

The sky's the limit
for our growth and your opportunities.
Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH.
Digital Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
$33,000-$36,000
'or our TALLAHASSEE location We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT REQUIRED
WE OFFER PAID TRAINING! For more detailed Information, please visit www hrmcacclaim com/appiy/drscareers
***WE OFFER A FAST PATH FOR ADVANCEMENT AND
CAREER GROWTH!***
All of our field management staff were promoted from field technicians.
Most promotions occur after 6 continuous months with the company.
DRS Satellite Installation Techs are provided with
paid training a company owned truck
Stools a variety of shifts
Benefits (medical/dental insurance, life insurance, tuition reimbursement, 401K plan with matching funds, bonuses,
paid vacations, holidays, and sick time)
For more detailed information, please visit: www hrmcacclaim com/applv/drscareers TA
or call: 1-877-351-4473. RECEPTION
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE. SERVICES, INC.
--^ _>l\\ILC b, IINL.


Spring Into A New Home!

3Br/2Ba Cozy brick home on 5 acres. Great room with
fireplace, eat in kitchen & more! S 234,900

New Listing! Exceptionally built home with oak floors throughout. 9'
ceilings, Vermont wood stove, green house call for details! S 289,000

3Br/2Ba main house & 2Br/lBa cottage guest house both with huge
front porches overlooking Golden Pond. All on 12+ Ac. S 549,000


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


Call our office 997-5516 or visit our website
www.cbkk.com for all of our listings.
Serving Monticello and Perry areas!


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Just Listed! Won't Last Lonq! Indian Hills
Area 1568 sq. ft. looks stick built mobile-
home on 6 acres with creek, pond, pasture, a
real nice package $145,500

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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q -AN'R A'








PAGE 18, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 24, 2006

WANTED
MANAGER/ASST MGR -
FAST TRACK FOOD STORES
IS SEEKING HIGHLY MOTIVATED AND ENTHUSIASTIC
MANAGEMENT TEAM FOR THE MADISON AREA. COMPET-
TITIVE SALARY,
BONUS, PAID HOLIDAYS & VACATION.
FAX RESUME TO 850-973-2480: ATTN. KEITH
OR
APPLY AT OUR STORE LOCATED AT
6339 E. CAPPS HWY, MONTICELLO
OR
CALL JEANNIE AT 850-997-2651



IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY
DIAL 911


SEE THE fUTUR


RACES


With your help, "my kids"
can look forward to
a future without
neuromuscular diseases.
Please volunteer
today.

Muscular
Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717
Advertise In
Your Local
Paper


COMING APRILSSt'
RACING STARTS at the EXTREME rpm
S2 p.M. PRceway, next to Gator Motors
PRE. REGISTER MUST Pr
BEIN BY FRIDAY 1 19 N e
MARCH 31ST@ NOON 850-584-9544
.Entry Fee $1 5.00 Each Class- Each Enrant
Racers under age 18 must be accompanied by a guard
This is a family friendly event. No PETS No ALCOHOL


Keeping You Informed In Our Growing
Monticello News


Community


w4ri3i


rfife rson.oun Socia W k r


.- T:
4 : -:;
it, -. -
S_. t,- ._


It.takes a team to help toef
a life limritifig illness and theirjoved onsg-;
Big Bend Hospice salutes our Family Support Counselors .aid Oief & ;L6ss
Q-:C .t" nrl ICounselors and extends our heart-felt appreciatiorifto the social *rki rs
Case managers at our community's nursing homes, senior center, hospiit
health department and schools for being our part.s.:
j,^ ,^ .'Life's Journey. Help Starts Here. :
(7850) 997-2 827 or to: free 2-4 i.o s a :day (80) 772:562. 205N-.Mui t


KEi<,ISER
COLLEGE
C 0. L 1, E G E
TALLAHASSEE
1700 Halstead Blvd
Admissions Hours:
Monday-Thursday 9am-8pm, Friday 9am-5pm,
Saturday 9am-lpm


Medical Asstistant


Earn your Associate or
Bachelor's degree in:

us ness

SCoSputers

e Culinary






/ Flexible schedules for working students
/ Monthly class starts / Day, evening & online classes
/ Job placement assistance / Financial aid for those who qualify
Call Tol Free

2 888w" 4I5 2


www.keisercollege.edu


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