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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00116
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 22, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00116
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Sports
        page 10
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
    Main: Classified
        page 15
    Main continued
        page 16
Full Text



, ,; ,' i~ii ,. .-i L


Tools Help

Beat Internet

Fraud

Editorial, Page 4


Photos

Sought For

Relay Luminaria

Story, Page 6


Boys, Girls Club

Gets Grant For
Flag Football

Story, Page 11


'FOX & Feathers'

Features

Unusual Items

Story, Photo, Page 14
II


Wednesday Morning


138TH YEAR NO.23 ,50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


-. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 2006


_~L ..~_ZP(CYI~~J~ 1 9P ~ -C~llq~hI[UhiiiiILIa/~ju~L ... .


I *'. -.....,',-..'. .. .
i r..,...:


AVERA CLARK HOUSE was
rently a bed and breakfast.


built in 1890 in the "I" style of architecture, and is cur-


PALMER HOUSE is a one and half story wood framed residential Greek Revival built
by Martin Palmer for his son Dr. John Palmer. It is rumored to be one of the most
haunted houses in southeastern US.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 2006 biennial Tour of
Homes, sponsored by the His-
torical Association, takes place
Saturday and Sunday, featur-
ing 13 stops.
The tour will include: Avera-
Clarke Bed and Breakfast,
Beshears Home, Christ Epis-
copal Church, Dixie
Plantation, Dunn Home, Jef-
ferson Arts, John Denham
House Bed and Breakfast,
Monticello Opera House, Pal-
mer House, Palmer Place An-
tique Car and Carnival
Museum, Skelton Home, The
Cottage Bed and Breakfast,
Wideman Crew Home, and
Wirick Simmons House.
Tour hours are from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Tickets will be on sale
downtown at the Monticello
Opera House and the Wirick-
Simmons House.
They may also be purchased


at Dixie Plantation.
Ticket prices are $25.00 and
children $5.00 and include
both days.
Refreshments will be


served in several of the
on the tour.


stops


; Beshears
Home Most
Modern


Lunch can be purchased and
will be served at the Wirick-
Simmons House, headquarters
of the historical, for $7.00, and
is available at the many local
restaurants.
Most of the historic homes
are within i 11 ,,, distance.
A van ride to Dixie Planta-
tion is included in the price of
the ticket.
Also included in the ticket
price is an exhibit by local
sculptor Brad Cooley and a
Scottish concert by Arnold
Burkhart and Friends.


The concert is at 2:30 p.m.
on Sunday, at the Opera
House.
Showcased among blooming
camellias, azaleas, and dog-
wood, are a number of Greek
Revival, Classic Revival,
Queen Anne, Italianate, and
Victorian homes that have
made the tour a favorite with
visitors since its inception 40
years ago.
Among the historic
buildings, Dixie Plantation
was planned by John Russell
Pope who also designed the
Jefferson Memorial, the Na-
tional Archives, and the Na-
tional Gallery of Art in
Washington D.C.
The house is an excellent ex-
ample of neoclassical architec-
ture.
The Dunn house built in
1890 is an example of Queen
Anne style.
Very few changes have been
made to the original building.
Spectacular wood detailing
may be seen in the house.
(See Tour of Homes, Page 2)


, ,neriC l p IIImrn. ,, !!!nrrrnr ll II ll,;iit'iiltii I "

..... .- ...... .... ,..,. ...-.. ..





WIRICK SIMMONS HOUSE, built in Greek Revival architectural style, is one of the
--"~-



oldest homes in Monticello. It is the headquarters of the Historical Association.
(News Photos)


ninski Reflects On Past Rooms, Busts


MAX BILINSKI may live in the house his paternal grandfather built in 1921, but in no
way is he tied to the land. "My grandpa and papa farmed all their lives, but when
they died, their way of life died also," (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Max Bilinski lives in the
house that his paternal grand-
father built in 1921, on a cou-
ple of hundred acres that have
been in his family for 95 years
and that his grandfather and fa-
ther once farmed.
Bilinski, however, is not
tied to the land, the way his fa-
ther and grandfather were. Nor
is he interested in farming, if
farming were a viable occupa-
tion anymore. Which it isn't,
he will tell you emphatically.
"That's what my grandpa did
and that's what my papa did,"
Bilinski says. "M y ..i. ii, ...i
never changed. But when he
died, his way of life died."
Bilinski got enough of "the
smell and touch" of farming
when he was growing up, he
will tell you. And he didn't like
it. It was hard physical labor,
with mules the main source of
power and long hours in the


hot sun the norm.
That's why he went to the
University of Florida in 1959
when he got the chance on a
football scholarship and ma-
jored in agronomy. He re-
turned to the county in 1967,
following a tour of duty in
Vietnam, took up teaching at
the high school, and never left
the county again.
He moved into his grandfa-
ther's house -- across the road
from the house he was raised
- in 1975, following his
grandfather's death.
Bilinski can look out the
plate glass windows of his
kitchen and see relics of his
grandfather's day, including an
old barn and several antiquated
structures.
"I'm here for the duration,"
he says, adding that he doesn't
expect any of his three grown
children -- all of whom live far
away -- to return and live on
the land one day.
That is why he is not adverse
to development, or more spe-


Bfllnski
,.,'Im 1her6


ui[ration

cifically, to selling parts of his
200 acres for residential devel-
opment.
Bilinski has, in fact, sold
some small parcels recently,
realizing a bonanza that has al-
lowed him to remodel and
renovate the old farmhouse.
And why shouldn't he enjoy
the fruits of his good fortune?
he asks.
"What am I supposed to do,
live on my little teacher's re-
tirement salary and when I die,
my three children cut this up in
a liquidation sale?"
As Bilinski sees it, develop-
ment has been a long time
coming, and lie applauds the
recent growth trends.
(See Booms, Busts, Page 2)


i


co-


T o Openr


es









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006
1 -- r --.--


CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH was built in 1885 in Classic Revival style with ele-
ments of the Stick Style.


PALMER PLACE EXHIBIT HALL features
Sounds.

S... .. ..
,, .
-. -".-;,-


a display of antique cars and merry-go-


THE BESHEARS HOME, on Old Lloyd Road is the most modern house on the Tour of
Homes. The unusual style home was built in 1975. (New Photos)


Tour Of Homes


(Continued From Page 1)
Few changes have been
made to Christ Episcopal
Church built in 1885, and it
still functions a vibrant con-
gregation.
The John Denham house is
a Victorian frame house built
in 1888, by John Denham, a
pioneer settler from Scotland.
One of the homes distin-
guishing features is an octago-
nal cupola.
In contrast is the Beshears
modern and unusual home
built in 1975.
Tennessee flagstone is used
on the front porch, Italian ce-
ramic tile covers the interior
floors and a large fieldstone
fireplace is the focal point of
the family room.
The Beshears home boasts
one of the largest live oak trees
in the county.
In order to protect these his-
toric structures, tour visitors
are asked to refrain from wear-
ing high-heeled shoes that
might damage the wooden
floors.
While visiting Monticello, be


sure to check out the local
merchants, downtown shops
featuring antiques and treas-
ures.
All funds collected from the
tour are used to continue the


restoration projects of the Jef-
ferson County Historical Asso-
ciation in their effort to collect
and preserve the rich historic
heritage of Jefferson County.
For additional information
call 997-2465.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Jefferson County Utility
Development Committee will present for

discussion in a scheduled public
workshop a proposal for an
URBAN SERVICES AREA
The Discussion may include policies for
governing the urban services area, but is in-
tended to make recommendations to the
Board of County Commission on the limits.
The meeting will be held in the courtroom
of the Jefferson County Courthouse on
March 23rd, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. The public
is invited to attend and comment.


Booms, Busts


(Continued From Page 1)
A born raconteur, Bilinski
will expound at length on the
county's many booms and
busts.
"In the last 100 years, this
county has tried to develop at
least five times," Bilinski says.
SStart with the first one,
which he pegs as having oc-
curred around the 1920s, a
decade or so after his .Polish-
born grandfather first came
here from Wisconsin.,
Thirty years old at the time
he moved to Jefferson County
in 1911, the elder Bilinski pur-
chased the first 80 acres for
$18 an acre and kept adding to
Sit -- along with his son later --
until the family ultimately
owned 450 acres.
"My grandfather put his life
into the farm and he was suc-
cessful," Bilinski says. "A lot
of people had a one-tobacco
barn farm, but we had a two-
tobacco-barn and eight-mule
farm."
The Great Depression effec-
tively put an end to that first
development phase, Bilinski
says.
"The county started to de-
cline in population after that,"
he says. "Farmers, tenant farm-
ers and sharecroppers were re-
duced. Then we had a little
reprieve with World War II."
Bilinski points to the return
of the boys from the war as the
beginning of the second devel-
opment phase. This is when
the Nobels and Montivilla sub-
divisions were built.
That also was the time when
a few powerful man controlled
the county and made sure that
certain select industries didn't
get competition, Bilinski says.
"From 1946 to 1966, any in-
dustry that came into Monti-
cello and paid laborers more
than $5 a day wasn't encour-
aged," Bilinski says. "That's
because that was the going rate
at Mahan and Simpson nurser-
i'es; aridl they 'wdiuld block :iy-
thing that would come iin'here.
-'As" a' 'result,'" th'6"' Pdfftltibn
stayed the same."
Then came the 1970s and the
third development phase,
which produced Christmas
Acres and Lloyd Acres. Rising
oil prices reportedly put an end
to this phase.
"The price of gas started ris-
ing and when it got to $1.20 a
gallon, the development
stopped," Bilinski says.
The fourth phase was in the
80s. That's when Aucilla
Shores and such communities
surfaced. But like the other de-
velopment phases, this one too
was short-lived, a victim of
rising oil prices.
"This is the fifth one, and I
don't think anything can stop it
this time," Bilinski says.
"You've got people moving off
the coast, people crowded in
South Florida, and they know
where we are now.
"This fifth one has come on
us all of a sudden," he contin-
ues, "with land prices going
from $1,200 an acre in 1990 to
more than $15,000 an acre
now. You can't script what is
happening. Personally, I think
it's a good thing. This county
won't improve until we can get


development and the tax base
up. That's the way our schools
are going to improve."
Do the math, he says, and it
becomes clear that the county
has little other choice, he says.
Consider: the county is made
up of a little over 400,000
acres, and the bottom 33,000
are owned by corporations
such as St. Joe, he says.
Now sprinkle in some 15
plantations, each of which av-
erages about 5,000 acres.
"To make a long story short,
we had 225 farms in the 1950s
and early'1960s when farming
was good, compared with
1,500 in Thomas County at the
same time," Bilinski says.
Today, he says, the number
of viable farms has been re-
duced to less than 10. Meaning
farms where one or the other
partner don't have to engage in
outside work to help support


the operation.
"Farming is history around
here," Bilinski says. "There's
nothing I can grow. We had
some land planted in pines, but
that market's practically bust.
The price you're getting for
trees is half of what it was four
years ago."
That's why he carved 74
acres out of the 200 and is sell-
ing them as nine-acre parcels.
He figures he will have a few
more neighbors in the future,
but that's all right, he says.
Meantime, he's enjoying his
retirement from the Country
Club, where he worked the last
10 years, after retiring from
the school system. He's also
writing a book about his Viet-
nam experiences, for the sake
of his children and grandchil-
dren.
Other than that, he takes life
easy now, he says, visiting
with his children and grand-
children and "keeping a finger
on the pulse of the
community."


"Please take me home. I'm fun and lovable, and will be
a good pet. I don't eat much, and I won't munch on your
furniture," Sissy said. (News Photo)

'Sissy' Named Pet Of Week


?RAN HUNT
;taff Writer


The HLnIITIJ e iS- E '?P.t."ha-"'
named Sissy as the adoptable
canine of the week.
Sissy is a female German
Shephard mix and she is four
months old.
She has been spayed and all
vaccinations are current.
She is described as being,


educa

at tt


very sweet, playful, loving
and devoted.. SP lagfY
shadow when she really likes
someone. i...uc1 h she ,. is
h- tii/r, oif re, people at
first.
She enjoys being petted and
having good long belly rubs.
Sissy has thick hair and re-
quires frequent brushing.
To adopt Sissy or any of the
other many animals available
at the shelter call 342-0244.


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Applied Business Technology
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Radiologic Technology
ri- Respiratory Care Technology
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Technical Studies
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 3


City Rea(


Adopt Tr

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council is expected-
to adopt a tree ordinance next
month.
The Local Planning Agency
(LPA). recommended approval
of the ordinance last month.
The ordinance has been in the
making for more than a year.
In the convoluted language
of legal document, the ordi-
nance recognizes tree preser-
vation as an activity that is best
addressed "prior to the devel-
opment of engineering and/or
architectural plans and prior to
effecting alterations to trees
and/or their growing environ-
ment."
The provisions of the ordi-
nance apply to all public prop-
erty and property that is.within
10 feet of public
right-of-ways. The provisions
also apply to property that is










P,
' -; .

& I .

I:.,


.:;
a


ADAM McKINI


Adam McKir

Wins First P

Special Olyn

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

County resident Adam-
McKinney recently traveled
to Orlando to compete in the
Special Olympics basketball
state competition, and won
the first place medal.
His mother, Sharon, said
that Adam prior to the state
event, had gone to Daytona to
participate in the basketball_
competition, and took the first
place ribbon when he threw
the winning shot.



F:


official shade tree.
d ie s T It also sets protections for
certain trees -- the removal,
*ee Law impact or damage of which re-
ol e L a w quires a permit and compli-
ance with certain
planned for development, in- requirements.
cluding single-family dwell- Examples of trees that fall
ings that are constructed for into the protected category: .
sale. Trees within 10 feet of a
The ordinance makes it un- public right-of-way.
lawful to deface or mutilate Patriarch trees, with
trees on public property. Acts trunks diameters of 36 inches
that qualify under this provi- at breast height.
sion include affixing signs to, Trees in jurisdictional
driving nails into, or wetlands.
debarking, trees. .* Trees planted to meet re-
Absent a variance by the planting, reforestation or land-
City Council, the ordinance scaping requirements.
limits the trees that can be Recognizing that periodic
planted on city street to 13 inspections and maintenance
species of small trees and 13 of trees is necessary to pro-
spe.cies of large trees, mote their health, and appear-
Examples of the small trees'__ -ance, ihe ordinance charges the
are box elder, crape myrtle, City Council with developing
Japanese magnolia and redbud, a comprehensive community
with dogwoods cited as the tree care program.
city's tree of choice. The ordinance establishes
Examples of large trees are removal and replacement stan-
black gum, ginkgo, red maple dards for all new develop-
and sugarberry, with live oaks ments and redevelopment in
listed as the city's tree of the city and cites several ex-
choice. emptions.
The ordinance, in fact, desig- Among the exemptions:
S plants grown in nurseries; trees
That pose a safety hazard; dis-
eased or pest-infected trees;
': and noxious invasive trees,,
S. such as the Chinese tallow and
the mimosa.
.Applicants'for developments
will be required to give prior-
ity to the preservation of the
-: .... ; more enduring protected tree
i." species.
States the ordinance: "Pro-
tected trees may be removed
only in accordance with the
debit criteria set forth in this
section. However, even if an
applicant can demonstrate
B compliance with the debit cri-
teria, final determination of
whether a protected tree shall
be permitted for removal shall
be made by the city designee.
"The decision of the city des-
|EY ignee shall be based on balanc-
ing the preservation of the
more enduring tree species, in-
n ey elusive of current health, size
iney and form andsthe ability to de-
la s Si l .Yvpelpp: a:sjite, at the intensity or
lace in densi.ty- permitted by.the com-
prehensive plan and the imple-
npics meeting land development
regulations."
McKinney then traveled to Before'an applicant is per-
Ft. Walton, competing in the mitted to remove a protected
Special Olympics Adult Indi- tree, he or she must demon-
vidual Basketball Skills, also state that the removal is in
taking first place. keeping with good forestry
Sharon McKinney said that practices or is necessary for
Adam had been competing in the building of the structure,
Special Olympics for many among other criteria.
years. He had to give up tak- The ordinance further sets
ing part in the Special Olym- reforestation requirements for
pics following the Daytona subdivisions and sets standards
win, due to having surgeries for the.protection and preser-
on both feet. vation of the community's ex-
She concluded that for a listing native tree canopy and
couple of years now, Adam the vegetative understory.
has been back to competing For a more complete review
and playing in several differ- of the draft ordinance, contact
ent sports. City Hall at 342-1053.


MEMBERS of the Tree Ordinance Committee worked on the draft for more than a
year. From left, Emily Anderson, Pat Ervin, Steve Rissman, Riley Palmer. (News
Photo)


UNIQUE
MARBLE &
GRANITE, INC.


Fabncationi & hstallation if
Granite & arbik Ol
'Cummtertof's. I iMti,.s, Fr lhu':,..
Tablc Tops & Tiling







SAsk About
March Specials
Free Estimates
850-422-1890
Fax: 850-422-1891


Have Lunch With Us During

The Tour Of Homes


Hours 11 To 12, Homemade Gumbo
Or Black Bean Soup, Bread, Tea and
Desert.


$7 At The Wirick-Simmons House,
to Benefit the Jefferson County
Historical Association


And


Don't Miss Special Music and Litera-
ture Presentation 2:30 P.M. Sunday
March 26 at the Monticello Opera
House.



Included in Ticket Price Arnold Burkart and Friends


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

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They'll then send e-mail's di-
recting people to those sites in
an effort to "sell" merchandise
that doesn't really exist. In
'1.11.1- ji:ri,. consumers who
fell victims to such scams lost
an average of $895 each.
People can protect them-
selves by using services such
as GeoTrust's Trustwatch
service to verify the legitmacy
of Web sites and blogs and to
find out whether online mer-
chants, companies and chari-
ties are (or aren't) trust
worthy.
The service's free search en-
gine lets users run queries on
sites or groups they're thinking
of doing business with. They
can then view easily under-


stood green, yellow and red
verification symbols beside
each search result.
"By using a very sophisti-
cated identity verification scor-
ing technology, we can obtain
a trust rating for any site on the
Web," explains GeoTrust CEO
Neal Creighton.
Sites that can be verited as
safe receive a green rating.
Sites that don't have enough
data to be verified but aren't
known to be fraudulent receive
a yellow rating. Known
fraudulent sites display a red
warning sign.
If a site is deemed to be both
verified and secure for the ex-
change of private data, it re-
ceives a lock icon next to the
green verification rating.
In addition, the service also
offers a Site Report link that
users can access to get more
information from additional
sources, including TRUSTe,
BizRate and CNET. Consum-
ers can use this data as an ad-
ditional way to choose what
sites to do business with.
In the case of fake merchant
Web sites, the service would
show a yellow or red icon and
have little additional verifica-
tion information.
Consumers who ran security
searches would know to keep
their distance.


From Our Photo File

., -- .. -



7 .













/ f





BUS BARN Employee Luke Anderson investigates the damage caused by rocks hit-
ting the bus, in Sept., 1990. Rocks pelted the bus after a JCHS game with Wakulla,
there. It was not known if the vandalism was related to the game or not. (News File
Photo)


- Opinion & Comment


Perfect Abs? Probably Not


Health gurus have deter-
mined all those marvelous ma-
chines designed to give you
washboard abs are a lot of
nonsense.
You can accomplish the de-
sired results doing crunches on
your bedroom floor.
But, ab machines were hot
items a while back.
You'll recall commercials for
the Ab Cruncher, Ab Buster,
Ab Blaster and host of other
machines designed to give us
perfect abs?
Another fad has come and
gone. Of course we spent hun-
dreds of millions of dollars, if
not billions, on those machines
designed to give us rippling
abdominal muscles.
I wrote a column about abs
in March of last year and said
that come bathing suit weather
we'd know how folks were do-
ing with their ab machines.
Well, I made my own unsci-
entific survey which is to say I
took note of people I passed
while walking the beach last


Publisher's

Notebook


;Ip- -~l~r~plr~nr~~r4


RnCic/unl


summer.
I saw that same kinds of
folks I've always seen at the
beach, big bellies, big butts
jiggling flesh, cellulite and an
occasional person with rip-
pling abs.
Did the ab machine people
take us ? Naw, we threw our
money at them.
My hunch now is you can
get a heck of a deal on an Ab
Buster at a garage sale.
Fact is, one garage sale
junkie told me the most com-
mon items at yard and garage


1'*



X3


sales were pieces of exercise
equipment.
Health Riders which were
the rage a couple of years ago
are now turning up at sales.
What's next? I have no idea
but the exercise gurus will
think of something.
You can bet on that because
we Americans continue to seek
the fountain of youth. We want
to look like the youth, pretty
and handsome people who
peek at us from our televisions
and movie screens.
So the market is flooded-


with creams, pills, pastes and
exercise equipment to help us
look like we want to look.
Not mention the availability
of various surgical procedures
to do what the creams, pills,
and paste won't.
We've got all manner of diets
and diet pills, powders, and
supplements. \
And our favorite celebrity is
i probably hawking one of the
J products. What a country!
Lest I forget to ask, since I
began this piece recalling the
ab craze, how are your abs?
Have you achieved the wash-
board stomach you always
wanted? No.
Take heart. You can pick up
an Ab Buster at a nearby ga-
rage sale cheap. Very cheap.
And, if you faithfully use it,
your abs will improve. Maybe!
There's the rub, of course. No
exercise machine is worth any-
thing if we don't use it regu-
larly.
Me? I'm thinking about ton-
ing up my earlobes. Could be
the next craze, you know!


Independent Voices Needed


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
March 20, 1996
The County Commission
now has a third option to con-
sider in its effort to increase
the collection rate on fees for
the ambulance service.

Two Georgia men were
killed here Sunday night in a
two-car collision on Ashville
Rd.

The planed City Council
meeting to consider possible
disciplinary action against
Street Superintendent Bobby
Cardwell has been canceled,
pending the outcome of the
court case.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 19, 1986
Councilman Joe Carroll
wants a city ordinance against
churches that make too much
noise.
Ten Jefferson County farm-
ers have received letters from
the Farmers Home Administra-
tion stating that "advance ac-
tion" was going to be taken
against them because of loan
to failure.
Commissioners have written
to the Public Service Commis-
sion requesting a feasibility
study on toll free dialing from
Jefferson County to Tallahas-
see.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 18, 1976
A new vocational school fa-
cility moved closer to reality
for Jefferson County last
Wednesday, v-he.u t.wlr-,: .I,,.


the school board heard the ar-
chitects regarding their firm's
qualifications to prepare plans.
A family reunion was en-
joyed recently at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Wright in
Holly Hills.
Monticello Fire Department
handled 15 fires which ac-
counted for some $22,400 of
damage during February.
Thirty-one man-hours were re-
quired at the location of the
fires.
FORTY YEARS AGO
March 18, 1966
So far as the county is con-
cerned the 1966 election will
be a very minor one, the quali-
fying deadline having passes
Tuesday at noon with only one
race having developed. This
race will be between Mrs.
Deryle Boland Walker and
James Boland Jr. for the school
seat from Dist. No. 5.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1956
Dave Williams has been
named Chairman of the Cancer
Fund Drive.
Monticello Elementary 4-1-1
Club officers named are Betty
Jean Carter, Dorothy Hentz
and Eva Ward.
Robert Lenton, Sammy
Plaines, Henry Reams, George
Mills, Jake Bassett, Sharon
Blair, Louis Poindexter, Char-
les Weillner, John Roberts,
Claude Allen, and Frankie
Rudd plan to attend the Key
Club convention in Daytona
Beach.


BY DENNIS FOGGY

In his recent column, Con-
gressman Boyd described the
influence that his parents and
the times had on his political
upbringing. It was as though
he was describing my own en-
try into the world of politics.
My Grandfather was a strong
union member and a
Democrat. My parents, also
having experienced the Great
Depression were admirers of
FDR and registered
Democrats. Accordingly, when
I came of voting age, my par-
ent's influence and political be-
liefs naturally influenced me to
also become a Democrat.
It was in the early and mid
1960's when my political feel-
ing began to shift. Unlike Con-
gressman Boyd who was
raised in the South right here


in Jefferson County, I was see-
ing things as a Yankee from
Iowa.
It was a time of racial tur-
moil and anti Vietnam war
sentiment mainly on college
campuses. I remember impas-
sioned speeches by towering
southern Democratic leaders
such as Arkansas Senator Ful-
bright warning of the devasta-
tion in store for America if
segregation was abolished.
I can still see Alabama Gov-
ernor George Wallace standing
in the doorway at the Univer-
sity of Alabama defying a fed-
eral order by President
Kennedy to allow two African
Americans admission.
Majority of Southern politi-
cians at tle time were Demo-
crats and segregationists and
the major support for the quag-
mire in Vietnam was also com-
ing from the same quarter.


It wasn't hard as a college
student to find my way into the
,Republican party under these
circumstances. A lot had
changed and changed signifi-
cantly from my parents gen-
eration and the well intended
policies of FDR, in the post-
WWII and Korean War eras.
There is an old expression that
"If you are under 25 and not a
Democrat, you have no
heart, and if you are over 25
and are not a Republican, you
have no brain". Well, follow-
ing the Nixon years, I finally
matured politically.
Like Congressman Boyd
said, there are positions in each
side, Democrat and Republican
that he likes and dislikes. Ac-
cordingly, I found myself actu-
ally spending time studying
the candidates and their posi-
tions. Not TV or radio "sound
bites" but actually digging into


all information that I could
find prior to election day.
It didn't take a mental giant
to figure out that it would be
pretty stupid to tie myself
down to a particular political
party, platform or point of
view. Trying to defend some
of the wacky positions and far
out ideas just because "the
pany elite said so" insulted my
intelligence.
It would seem quite natural,
therefore, that the vast major-
ity of Americans should be In-
dependent thinkers and voters,
with a very small minority
buying into the. "whole enchi-
lada" in either the Democratic
and Republican parties.
ULnfortunately, many in-
formed Americans voters have
developed political tunnel vi-
sion. Like a couple of my dear-
est friends and former
(See Voices Needed, Page 5)


Caregivers Face Strains


The majority of the 4.5 mil-
lion Americans with Alz-
heimer's disease live at home,
where family and friends pro-
vide most of their care. Caring
for a loved one with Alz-
heimer's disease, a progressive
brain disorder that not only af-
fects memory, but gradually
destroys a person's ability to
learn and carry out daily ac-
tivities, can be emotionally and
physically challenging.
As memory loss and other
symptoms worsen, the amount
of time and energy caregivers
and families spend taking care


of their loved one increases.
The "Memories to Treasure"
program provides people who
care a loved one with Alz-
heimer' s tips on caregiving
and information about the dis-
ease, while helping them con-
nect with their loved one
through the art of scrapbook-
ing.
"Alzheimer's caregivers have
unique needs; "Memories to
Treasure offers resources to
help facilitate interaction with
loved ones ," says Gail Hunt,
president and CEO of the Na-
tional Alliance for Caregiving.


"Engaging in meaningful ac-
tivities, such as scrapbooking,
allows time spent together to
be more positive and can
benefit everyone involved."
While people with mild Alz-
heimer's disease often experi-
ence problems with short-term
memory they may recall
memories from the distant
past.
Looking at old photographs
and keepsakes may lead to
conversation about people and
past events, and be enjoyable
for everyone involved.
"Activities, such as scrap-


booking, can be beneficial for
families facing Alzheimer's
disease," says Benjamin Selt-
zer, M.D., director of the Alz-
heimer's Disease & Memory
Disorders Center, Center, Tu-
lane University Health Sci-
ences Center, New Orleans.
"Engaging in meaningful ac-
tivities with a loved one is only
one facet of caregiving; how-
ever, it is also important to
know that there are treatments
available that can help slow
symptoms of the disease."
"Memories to Treasure can
(See Caregivers, Page 5)


~-~---~--~I~-----~


P~eLe~-eb-~---- -~L-l~- -









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...



Writer Comments On Earlier

Article By Congressman Boyd


Dear Editor:
I read with great interest the
article by Allen Boyd in the
March 8, 2006 edition of the
Monticello News, re: "Borrow,
Spend Plan Ripped."
Apparently those ads being
run in the "News" by the local
Republicans are beginning to
pinch on the Democrats.
Mr Boyd tells us that he is a
Democrat because of the
teachings of his parents of the
great things done by Franklin
Roosevelt in the '30's.
I'm deeply touched by such
expressions of familial unity
and responsibility, but history
has shown that FDR's actions
were less than wonderful
hence our entry into WW II.
Soon after taking power in
1933, Mr. Roosevelt con-
vinced a complaisant Congress
to grant him "emergency war
powers" to act arbitrarily to
wage a "war on the
depression."

One of the first acts he insti-
gated was the confiscation of
the gold coinage in circulation
at that time, forcing the popu-
lace to accept "Federal Re-
serve Notes," in their stead, at
face value.
Thus a $20 gold coin was
exchanged for a $20 Federal
Reserve Note, what had no
backing except the "full faith
and credit of the -United
States."
Within a year gold was traded
at $34 an ounce vs the $20 that
"the people" were given when
forced to turn in their coins, an


effective loss of 60 percent of
their buying power.
Who profited?
Mr. Roosevelt also national-
ized virtually all industry in
the United Sates, including
farming, and put price controls
on all goods.
His regime was rife with
communists, himself being a
fan of "Uncle Joe Stalin," at a
time when Stalin was starving
.millions of people in order to
achieve his aims.
History has shown that in
spite of all these dictatorial
measures, the depression con-
tinued virtually unabated until
the country's entry into 'the
second World War.
The majority of Americans
were opposed to entry into the
conflict in Europe but the Roo-
sevelt regime was committed
to getting us directly involved.
History (again) show that
Roosevelt and his cronies were '
warned that the attack on Pearl
Harbor was imminent, and pre-
vented that information from
being forwarded to naval and
army commanders in Hawaii,
resulting in the murder of
thousands of people (but he
did get his war!)
Thanks to the entry into the
conflict, millions of men were.
rerhoved from the unemploy-
ment rolls and put into
uniform.
Thousands of government
contracts were let to build all
the material soon to be de-
stroyed in battle, effectively
giving full employment to all,
including women, (and my


mother too.)
Mr. Boyd. having been in
"public service" for 17 years,
should look at the results that
two party governance has
brought us, and perhaps think
a little outside the Liberal vs.
Conservative box.
My thinking is that rt. .:' poC:
litical factions cannot po-.iblyV.
represent' the views and besti
interests of a rniioin as large.
and diverse as the US. .
SGeorge Washington. n my .
view the best man to sen e as
President. we've had to date,
said 'in* his farewell address.
that we should stay, out-of,
Europe's wars, avoid entan-
gling alliances, treat all nation '
equally in matters of trade, and'
stay out of the internal affairs'
of other nations.
He also advised us to avoid,.
the creation of political fac-
tions. With.two party govern-
ance for moire than 150 :,ears, '
we have ignored this sage ad-
vice and we are reaping the
dividends.
Conitari war' and debt Ibasi
destroyed every empire. ..
Perhaps instead of lamenting
"one party, rule" in
Washington, Mr. Boyd should
inake an effort to offer, real
legislative control over gov-
ernment and uphold his oath of
office, i.e. to support and de,.,
fend the Constitution, instead
of supporting and defending
the Democratic Party.
Maybe things would change
for the better.
With kind regards,
Jack Shelley


Dear Editor:
In the 'Rules of Civility &
Decent Behavior' written by
our first President George
Washington, rule #56 states:
"Associate yourself with men
of good quality, if you esteem
your own reputation; for it is
better to be alone than in bad
company."


Dear Editor:
Many times I have written to
criticize the Planning Commis-
sion's decisions.
SBut this time I write to ap-
plaud them for a job well done.
On Thursday, March 9, the
Planning Commission denied
two Comprehensive Plan
Amendment requests to rezone
more agricultural land, by
votes of 9-1 and 10-0.
They found no compelling
reason to approve them.
They did Jefferson County


Tuesday evening the 14th of
March I had the honor, the
privilege, and the pleasure to
be in the company of men and
women of the highest quality,
and true patriots worthy of rec-
ognition.
. There were military veterans
and spouses, from pre World
War II, World War II, Korean


proud on this night. The hear-
ing room was full and re-
sounded with passionate,
sensible and amicable debate.
I know there will be future
discussions on. Jefferson
County's growth issues and
here will be differing opinions.
But today, 1 wanted to take
the time to congratulate the
Jefferson County Planning
Commission for the wise, judi-
cious, and well studied deci-
sion they made on March 8,
2006.
Wayne Searcy


Caregivers Face


(Continued From Page 4)
be accessed online- at
www.memoriestotreasure.com.
The Wed site offers tips on
caregiving, information about
Alzheimer's disease and a
Memory Checklist to help
guide discussion with a physi-
cian. Caregivers will also find
instructions to create a scrap-
book with a loved one facing
Alzheimer's diseases.

When caring for someone
with Alzheimer's, keep these
tips in mind to help provide
the best care possible:
Your loved one may be-
come frustrated while bathing,
dressing or eating. Try to be
calm and reassuring during
such moments.
Keep your loved ones in-
volved. Plan an activity, such
as scrapbooking, for a time of
day when your loved one
seems to be at his or her best.


Take time for yourself and
build a strong support network.
Let your family and friends
know when you need it.
Seek information so that
you can make choices about
care and treatment for your
loved one.


War, Vietnam, and conflicts
since.
1 am convinced that the ex-
tent and quality of our future
freedom, rights and security is
being determined by our atti-
tudes, determination, and sac-
rifices today.
I am equally convinced that
the freedoms, rights, security,
and privilege we-enjoy today is
a testament to, and a result of,
the patriotism, determination,
and sacrifice of those patriotic
citizens gathered Tuesday eve-
ning to celebrate the 87th
Birthday of the American Le-
gion, and to recognize the
milestone of one of their own.
Local citizen, World War II
veteran, and American Patriot,
Butler Walker, was presented a
certificate recognizing 60
years of membership in the
American Legion.
Presentation was made by
fellow World War II veteran
Chester Cox.
The American Legion Post
49 meeting, recognition, and
presentation was adjourned to
enjoy a festive dinner set up by
the Post leadership and the
Post Auxiliary Organization.
It was a wonderful evening
shared by a group of people
with shared interest: love of
country, faith in one another,
and a belief in the future of our
great nation.
God Bless America, God
Bless the American Legion,
and God Bless American Vet-
erans.
Fred L. Shofier,
Commander,
American L.eoinn Post 49


Voices Needed


j(Continued From Page 4)
-'.olleagues, their political
viewpoint is single minded.
One holds abortion rights as
her single most predominant
issue and she, therefore, finds
comfort in the Democratic
Party's position for abortion on
demand.
The other is a devout Repub-
lican because he hates big gov-
ernment and taxes and sees the
conservative anti-tax and
spend policies exactly to his
liking. In both cases, their
part could introduce some of
the most outrageous and ri-
diculous policies and it would-
n't maner as long as their
particular issue was main-
-tained


Those who are willing to
elect someone to political of-
fice based upon such a narrow 1
criteria, deserve the adverse
impact that may come with
other party policies they were
unwilling or too .lazy to con-
sider.
Being an Independent and
not a Democrat or Republican,
eliminates all the predisposed
viewpoints that come with
those political parties and al-
lows me an objective evalua-
tion of all sides of the issues.
It is not surprising, therefore
that I vote for the candidate I
believe is most capable and
qualified to represent me. It
should be no surprise, there-
fore, that I have not voted, a


kv



.... :'R I


iiel


PRINCIPAL Artis Johnson of the Adult School, presents
'Aaron Betsy with his GED certificate, as the 28th Adult
School graduate this year. (News Photo)



Aaron Betsy Earns

GED At Adult School


RN IFLiNI'-' i
'-af~rhc .,,


Aaron Betsy is the 28th
Adult School graduate to earn
his GED this school year.
SHe said the reason behind
him staying focused on ob-
taining his GED, was not only
to prove to himself and his
grandmother, but to everyone
else, that he could do it.
"Besides, I want to make
something, of my life rather'
than being in and out of.trou-
'Ible all the time," said Bei,.
"'This is only the beginning."
He plans to enroll in college
and study computer technol-
ogy.
Betsy's second option, is to
study medicine. He hasn't yet
made up his mind which field
he would rather pursue.

"I really don't know which
college I like, but I think the
University of Florida is my
first choice," said Betsy.

"I'm so proud of myself,"
said Betsy. "The feeling is
great, and I encourage anyone
who wants to do something
with their lives to just do it.
"Never say 'can't', and last


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


btt tolwast,:.I optlcdlJik# to -""
ulH,,. Rey, nA.,ison ficr i
at,.ig,tha, time t1q 1 p mi-tii
vate and teach me, along with
others, to never give up."




Calico Spring

Arts & Craft Show

hlN-t 18 19, 2NCB
Saturday 9:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m. Sunday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.




A*
S' I' l .



iiJ

Oe (I 3 '-o t. rip A6' ils, C, F.ai. S
Ornamental Iron Painted Glass M Handcrafted Furniture
Clothing Jewelry Folk Art Ceramics Pottery
Seasonal Decorations W\ood Crafts Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints ? Painted Antiques Foodi Court .
Spence Field 71 Multre, Georgia
S.. nbdel E'.po site)
4-1 mle- Sotaheiast 'o Hy 319 on Hwy 133
$5 per person
(Children 12 and under free with a parent)
FREE PARKING
For more information (2291 985-1968


LIFE

H.lSAVER


When you invest in our community
through United W'ay, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


Post Commander Praises

Military Veterans, Spouses


Planners Complimented

On Zoning Decision


p.--Y I


III


"straight ticket" since the early
70's,
Congressman Boyd is also
correct in saying that "we
can't increase spending, cut
taxes and cut the deficit. The
math doesn't work!" My Inde-
pendent take on this is stop the
spending!
But of course the two politi-
cal parties will bash heads over
tax cuts instead, because cut-
ting spending of our hard
earned tax dollars for and poli
tician' will end their fun.
Additionally, it provides that
inevitable "class warfare" so
essential in today's politics.
Pitting the "poor tax payers"
against the "rich getting tax
breaks" cleverly takes our fo-
cus off the essential issue of
cutting spending. President
John Kennedy recognized the
value of .increasing federal
revenue by cutting taxes. By
today's standards, he would
have to be thought of as a Re-
publican.
I have always strongly felt
that any .politician who is -
elected to office, should be
serving their entire constitu-
ency..and not just moving
along in "lock step" with a
particular political party.
.Unfortunately for us, the po-
larizatiorn along party lines is
so rampant that I doubt if there
is an independent thinker or
anyone with "guts" left in
Washington.
Hummm,! I wonder if I could
run for Congress? Let's see;
retired military (combat vet-
eran), retired public school sci-
ence teacher and political
Independent. I have no politi-
cal party baggage or payoffs
thereby assuring the people
that nothing is keeping me
from always doing what is
right for our folks and not
"kowtowing" to the wishes of,
or singing the praises of a par-
ticular political party.














PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006


Lifestyle


SHARE Pickup Day

Scheduled Saturday


Aucilla SHARE Pick-up and
- Distribution Day is set for 9 -
10:30 a.m. Saturday, Mar. 25
Shat the Central Baptist Church
Located at 655 Tindell Road, in
SAucilla.
Participants will need to turn
in their Registration Copy and
"Volunteer Service Report at
This time.
Volunteer Service is any-
- thing done for someone other
than family without pay.
SAucilla SHARE has no food


storage facilities. If food is not
picked up, it will be forfeited
and the package will be sold ro
someone else.
Cash donation to help pa,
for gas expenses will gladly be
accepted.

SHARE is a not for profit or-
ganization that builds and
strengthens community,
through volunteer service.
SHARE offers savings on -
food.


Homes Of Mourning


Lee Otis Blackmon
Lee Otis Blackmon age 45,
of Monticello died March 17,
2006 Saturday at Capital Re-
gional.
Blackmon was a native of
Donaldsonville, GA and lived
in Monticello 28 years. He was
a Laborer.
He is survived by Gloria J.
Blackmon (wife) of Madison,
Demetris Blackmon (son) An-
nie P. Blackmon (mother),
Cleo Blackmon (father-
deceased) Clemmie (Linda)
Blackmon, Atlanta, GA
(Brother), Jerry (Josephine)
Blackmon; Monticello, Aunts:
Bertha (John) Anderson,
Newart, NJ, Mary J. (George)
Lawton, Akron, Ott, Lola
(Shelly) Nobles, Monticello,
Pearlie Weems, St. Petersburg,
Maggie Melton, Ashford, AL;
uncle: Tom Blackmon, Mari-
anna; Wash Gallon (grandfa-
ther), Monticello, 2
granddaughters, Nieces, neph-
ews, and sorrowing relatives
and friends. Funeral services
will be held Thursday, March
23, 2006. Graveside Service as
Hickory Hill Cemetery with
Rev. Willie Hagan officiating.
Interment will follow at Pall-
bearer Cemetery, Bassett Dairy
Rd.
Branch Street Funeral Home
handling arrangements.
Olive June Duval
Services for Olive June Du-
val of Thomasville, GA are on
June 14, 2006 at St. James
Catholic Church in Danielson,
Conn. Mrs. Duval died March
15, 2006 at Archbold Memo-
rial Hospital in Thomasville.
Born June 14, 1923 in' Dan-
ielson, Conn. She was the
daughter of the late Wilfred
Thomas and Antoinette Galli-
chant Thomas. On May 4,
1946 in Danieldson, Conn. she
married George R. Duval who
preceded her in death. Mrs.
Duval was a homemaker and
of the Catholic faith.
Survivors include daughters,
Diane Weare, NH, Dr. Mi-
chelle Duval and Jerry Hock-
ing of Monticello and five
Survivors include daughters
Diane McInerney of Marlton,
NJ, Carol Duval of
Tallahassee, FL, Nancy and
John Lawton of Weare, NH,
Dr. Michelle Duval and Jerry
Hocking, Monticello and five
grandsons. Memorials may be
made to Hospice of Southwest
Georgia, 818 Gordon Ave.,
Thomasville, GA 31792 or to
Jefferson County Humane So-
ciety. Visitors may sing he on-
line register "+
www.allenfh.com. ALLEN &
ALLEN FUNERAL HOME.

William "Spike" Tillman
William Tillman age 81 a
Funeral Director Embalmer
died Wednesday, March 15, in
Tallahassee.
The service was held
l:00p.m. on Monday, March
20, 2006 the Old Jefferson Co.
High School Auditorium ir
Monticello. With burial
(with military honors) at Texas
Hill Cemetery in Monticello.
Honoring his legacy and
cherishing his love are his wife
of 56 years Doris R. Tillman;
daughters, Shirley Norton, De-
troit MI, Elizabeth T. (Leon)


Whetsel, Perry, Fl, Joyce '1
Francois Frank, Orlando, FL,
Gali T. (Sylvester) Jones, and
Kecia T. Hawkins, both of
Monticello, FL and a son, Wil-
liam Henderson of Gainesville,
his beloved 108 year-old
mother Mrs. Sevilla B. Tillman
of Monticello, sisters Bessie T.
(Joseph) Early, Almeda Lane
and Willie T. Williams, all of
Monticello; sister-in-law Bar-
bara S. Sparks of Perry a de-
voted family friend Rohdam M
Cuthbert, Monticello, 14
grandchildren and three (3)
great grandchildren, numerous
nieces, nephews, other rela-
tives, including the manage-
ment and staff of Tillman
Funeral Home and the count-
less families whom he was
honored to serve during his il-
lustrious career.
Memorial contributions may
be made in Mr. Tillman's
name to Big Bend Hospice,
1723 Mahan Center.
--Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL
32308.
Mr. Tillman was a native and
lifelong resident of Monticello
except for the time he spent in
the U.S. Army during WWII-
and his attendance ai the At-
lanta College of Mortuary Sci-
ence, from which he graduated
in 1947.

Growing up in the funeral
service business which his late
father, Robert Clemon
Tillman, established in 1931,
William succeeded his father
in 1965, running the day-to
operations. An accomplished
funeral director and embalmer,
Mr. Tillman was highly re-
garded by his clients and col--
leagues. The Tillman Family
over the years, has operated
funeral home locations in
Monticello, Madison and
Perry, FL.

A very personable man, Mr.
Tillman served as chairman of
the Board of Deacons, trustee
and choir president at his be-
loved Greater Fellowship. He
was the originator and sponsor
of the Fifth Sunday Gospel
Sings, a program started over
25 years ago. He also had been
president of the Jefferson
County Voters League and the
Cavaliers Social Club. He held
membership in the United
Sons and Daughter of Joshua,
Soon Mission Lodge No. 13
and H.E. Daniels (Masonic)
Lodge, 532, Pha.











S190 E Dogwood Streeit i- i
* FLORAL
* SINCE

,, Checi






t -,-- 1 .t


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

First Baptist Church Relay
for Life team raised more than
$900 at its White Elephant and
Bake Sale, Saturday, March 11
in memory of Walter Boat-
wright.
"We had some of everything
to sell, and we stayed busy the
whole time," remarked Team
Captain Arlene Young.
Team members and volun-
teers helped to sell furniture,
baby items, and clothing arti-
cles and similar articles.
Baked goods were mostly all
homemade and sold as whole
dessert items or as pre-sliced
cakes and pies, individual
cookies, brownies, and other
specialties.


Many individuals came by
just to make a monetary dona-
tion, and others stayed a while
to help where needed.
Volunteers took all the left-.
over goods from the Sale to:
the Lighthouse Children's
Home Thrift Shop.



Pageant
Deadline
March 31
Co-chair Christy Clark of the
Watermelon Festival Princess
Pageant alerts all that the ap-
plication deadline is Friday,
March 31.
Applications, fees, and con-
.tetants photos are due at that
time.


, :.t& & ( $ & g 4
















Sillks 6
it













.onticello 850.997.2015 vvw.well ncsflowers corn .
, i t S & t 6 : ,I i : ,6 4 it


Photos Sought For

Relay For Life Luminaria


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


-Id~ .- 1i,. A~

I''


DURING a recent 4-H sewing class at the Exte
fice, Sarah Jones, left, receives instruction
Heidi Copeland in making the ruffle for her ski
Photo)


Kiwanians Partner Witl

Healthy Start To Prom<

'Back To Sleep' Campaig


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Kiwanis Clubs of Mon--
ticello, Madison, and Perry re-
cently teamed up with The
Healthy Start Coalition and the
related health departments to
promote the "Back to Sleep"
campaign.
Together 375 onesies (one
piece sleepers) were purchased
with the "Back to Sleep" logo.
Each county received 125.
The campaign's primary fo-
cus is to reduce the risk of
Sudden Infant Death Syn-
drome (SIDS) or "crib death."
The term describes sudden,
unexpected deaths of an infant
younger than 1 year, usually
between the ages of 2 months
and 4 months.
Research also indicates Af-
rican American babies are 2
times more likely to die from
SIDS as white babies.
Infants who are placed on
their stomachs to sleep are
more likely to die of SIDS
than those who are placed on
their backs.



Soft bedding incr


Honor loved ones lost to
cancer by participating in the
County's Relay For Life Lumi-
naria Ceremony.
On Friday, April 22, part of
the Luminaria Ceremony will
feature a slide show, complete
with inspirational music and
photos submitted of anyone
who lost the battle to cancer
and is remembered by loved
ones.
Email to:
lisa.reasonerj6ic@statefarm.co
m
She will send them to the
mansion Of- necessary persons. Photos may
ns from be posted to, or dropped off at
irt. (News County Health Department, at-
tention: Joyce Steele, 1225
West Washington Street, Mon-
ticello, FL. 32344.
h If you want the photo back,
be sure to list your name and
ote address on the back of each
photo.
SAlso be sure to list your hon-
n h oree's name on the back of
eases the each photo, even if it's


risk of SIDS.
Experts recommend choosing
a firm mattress and a safety
approved crib.
Keep the crib free of toys,
stuffed animals, and extra cov-
ers. These items can cover the
infants face and cause the in-
fant to suffocate.
Another contributing factor
of SIDS, is co-sleeping, with
babies sleeping with their par-
ents or other siblings.
Experts also say do not let
anyone smoke around your
baby and to avoid products
that ci.iln to. Iedtce SIDS as
i,,,.l i l nie n:OI been tested and
are not safely ,ippi:;. .e
In the tri-county area the in-
fant death rate is 2.5 times
higher than the state average
for all races.
The infant death rate in non-
white populations is almost 3
times higher than the state av-
erage.
For more information con-
tact George Hinchliffe, execu-
tive director for the Healthy
Start Coalition at 948-2741.


'' t~ f

;


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
"T 'dba
I -Ti7 Av4'I MFunevLMcl owne
V'. B d 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
"- L' Monticello, FL. 32344
8501997-5553
Alfonza "Al"' Hall William Tillnian Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
sonalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets
























"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care *Free Blood Pressure
w^ Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
.166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553


Woo dmont


By Encore Senior Living
Tallahassee's Original Assisted Living Community
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Service
850-562-4123 x3207 North Monroe St.
Lic. #99 www.encorsel.com



193 NW US HWY. 221 GREENVILLE, FL. (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fce program.
Serving Madison. Jefferson & 1iTaylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare. Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome. 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



$0 Plan Premium Medicare Advantage Plan Now
Available For Jefferson County Residents
Expands Coverage Over and Beyond Original Medicare
Freedom To See Any Doctor or Hospital that
Accepts Medicare
Call 1-800-561-6490 For More Information
Medicare Plan Finders


First Baptist Church

Raises $900 For Cancer


I ---- -~ I -- I --I -


Grandpa Jack or Auntie Jane,
or the like. Personalize pho-
tos as you choose.
Please act quickly as it is a
- tremendous job to put this
photo/music presentation to-
gether.
"I assure you it is tastefully
done, or I wouldn't think of
asking you for your
assistance," says Lisa Rea-
soner, marketing/publicity
chair for County Relay.
"Think about it and take ac-
tion today," she adds.

Diabetes
Education

Day April 6
Accu-chek and Winn Dixie
have partnered to offer resi-
dents a free Diabetes Educa-
tion Day, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Thursday, April 6, at Winn
Dixie.
A certified Diabetes educa-
tor from Tallahassee Memo-.
rial Hospital will speak about
diabetes, managing the dis-
ease, diet, and will be con-
- ducting glucose testing.


** .


z~;~i~etsg~
''
i.".,










Electric Wheelchairs Available

For Qualified Individuals


Miracles on Wheels makes
available Electric Power
Wheelchairs to non-
ambulatory Senior Citizens (65
years and older,) and the per-
manently disabled of any age,
if they qualify.
Usually, there is no charge or
out of pocket expenses for the
power wheelchair, including
shipping and delivery to the
home by a technician, who
makes the final adjustments to
fit the individual, and demon-
strates how to use and main-
tain it.
No deposit is required and
there is no obligation for deter-
mining eligibility.


Electric wheelchairs are pro-
vided to those who cannot
walk and also cannot operate a
manual chair sufficiently, or
Safely enough to care for them-
selves in their residence.
They do have to be able to
safely operate a joystick con-
troller on the armrest, and un-
derstand basic instructions.
There are additional qualifi-
cations, including that their
doctor -approves, and recom-
mends their need for a ower
wheelchair.
For more information about
the program, call 1-800-749-
8778.
The Miracle on Wheels pro-


Sgram's main purpose and goal
is to develop public awareness
Sthe assistance options that exist
to allow senior citizens and the
permanently disabled to re-
main independent in their
homes without incurring extra
expense.
Without this awareness and
assistance the, senior and
his/her family may prema-
turely choose a nursing home
or take on expensive in home
care, simply because they can-
not move safely, or quickly.
enough, form room to room, to
get to the bathroom, the
kitchen or answer the phone or
doorbell.


1st Baptist
Team sets
Fundraiser
The First Baptist Church Re-
lay for Life team will host a
Spaghetti Dinner from 5:00
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday, at the
Fellowship Hall.
The cost of $5 per meal, eat
in or take out, includes spa-
ghetti and a tossed garden
salad, bread; dessert, and cold
tea.
Team Captain Arlene Young
or a team member can be
reached at 342-1188 for more
information.
S All proceeds will benefit the
American Cancer Society Re-
la, For Life efforts to help
fight cancer.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 7



GOSPEL SING

,j ^featuring


I THE REEDEMED FROM TIFTON, GA .
F WED. & FRIDAY @ 7:00



^ Lamont United a

Methodist Church

a, Lamont, Florida
47 Join us for refreshments after the sing

'3 ... ........


-:.t~zzttzz;;S;;;~ r~~~~:::: ~ ~ ~ .~~~:~:::i: W.VI;x V~~.W;;~;.V.V..:::~:~:.M~


Caring





For Our





s Seniors


Tallahassee's ONLY
p full-service
home care company, offering:

Oxygen
S, Medical Equipment
'-... ,' infusion

Nursing
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy

# 222-1723 Home Health Aides
Companions/Sitters
HHA #21078096 HHA #2018096. HHA #299991472
: I; L.; IL ii 1 i~i~ SM


J E li ,






.. YC .'r -R :
SOUTHEAST CR R ONAL


A MEMBER OF NORTH FLORIDA CANCER CARE NETWORK


-SOUTHEAST
REGIONAL CANCER
CENTER A MEMBER
OF THE NORTH
FLORIDA CANCER
NETWORK HAS
BEEN PROVIDING
THE PEOPLE OF
NORTH FLORIDA
AND SOUTH
GEORGIA THE
HIGHEST QUALITY
OF CANCER CARE
SINCE 1989
DEDICATED TO
BRINGING YOU THE
ADVANCES OF
TOMORROW\ TODAY

2003 Centre Pointe Blvd
Tallahassee FL, 32308


Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax: 850-671-5900


Southeast Regional Cancer Center and the North Florida Cancer Network
were established to promote the finest principles of medical care. Can-
cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.
The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-
ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community not just a
patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We
are in this together.


'~`~'~'2~'~'~~~-~CCCCC'~'~~~CCCCC~'~ r -'---_-_'_2~__ ______C_~~~~C~CC~~~TTCCC






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006


WELCOME

TO HISTORIC MONTICELLO

DURING


TOUR OF HO


MARCH


25-26


Adults $25 Children $5


House


Bed, Breakfast & Special Occasions



580 W. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5007

Joe L. Roberts
Owner

Badcock
ItOME FURNITURE
&more


405 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Bus. 850-997-4323
Home: 850-997-2406
Fax: 850-997-3130


Farmers
&
Merchants Bank



Member F.D.I.C.
200 E. Washington St. Monticello

^o^tt ceff C-^zW^'f

230 N. Jefferson St. ~ Monticello, FL
.. 850-997-4342 800-513-6860
Fax 850-997-1404
www.myfsn. com/monticeflo
florist ru6453@aol.com


1290
S. JEFFERSON


MONTICELLO


342-1050


i, Caminez,
Brown
v &
Hardee, P.A.
Attorneys at Law
997-8181


BOYD SOD

FARM


221 MONTICELLO, FL.
-997-6222


CAP IT OFF GRAPHICS

ICREENPRINTINC

345 Railroad St.
997-6023
Joe and Margaret Nicolosi

Wendy's Exxon
Travel Center
US 19 South
(just past I-10)

[ 997-9628
E,(ON


rMarty Bishop vti
Supervisor of Elections


380 West Dogwood Street
Monticello, Florida 32344


Tel: (850) 997-3348
Fax: (850) 997-6958


STATE FARM

INSURANCE


E-mail
soejeffersonco@aol.com


LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR,
STATE FARM IS THERE.'
Call or visit me today.


Tommy Surles
State Farm Agent
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus: 850-997-8282
tommy.surles.bw9i@statefarm.com
Providing Insurance
and Financial Services


Bari's Liquor Store



1277 S. Jefferson St.
S997-4410


ES


Avera-Clarke


Robert R.
Plaines


County Judge


DUNNS FURNITURE



1242 N. JEFFERSON STREET
997-2013
60 YEARS 1946 2006


Morrow insurance
Agency

(tfuto-Owners Insurance

380 s. Jefferson St.
Mionticello, FL. 32344
997-3912 -






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 9



TOUR OF HOMES

STour Dixie Plantation

SVisit Gracious Monticello
Homes
See Antique Auto and
Carnival Museum

SEnjoy Food, Music and
Local Crafts


North Florida
Abstract & Title Co. Inc
850) 997-2670


220 S. Cherry St.-Monticello
E-mail: nfabstract@cs.com
"Serving the area for over 25 years"


Monticello
Christian
Academy
1590 North Jefferson St.
997-6048


The Staff & Students of
MCA.


VMS INC.



1455 N. JEFFERSON ST.
997-5000


Steve C. Walker
Realty, LLC
850- 997-4061


1317 Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL
342-3201


GREAT ADVENTURE
OU1I-1 IRS


*Merril's, Chaco's, Crocs, Georgia Boot, *Columbia,
Woolrich, Royal.Robbins, Life-Is Good, Fl :i 1A.:i.:r,
*Crabtree and Evelyn, Burt's Bee's *Boker Knives, Coast
LED's *Pet Supplies *EMOTION KAYAKS
255 N. Jefferson Street Monticello, Fl 32344
850-997-5900
www.greatadventureoutfitters.corn



A Branch Street
FUNERAL &HOIMEF1


THOMAS GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Director
Kathi Sloan Hansberry
Licensed Funeral Director


997-2024
750 Branch St.
Monticello, Florida


250 S. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL
Residential Development
Commercial Hunting Land
www.stevewalkerrealty.com


MONTICELLO'S ONLY FULL SERVICE HARDWARE
EDENFIELD w /^e HARDWARE
"We Are Just Around Th' Corner."
155 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Florida 32344


Mark & Trisha Wirick
Owners/Managers


(850) 997-2144
(850) 997-4624 (fax)


105 W. Anderson St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Chicken Delite

635 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Fl 32344
997-4939


Philip Sheats
Contractor
545-8493

Custom Homes
Lic. & Ins.
LC. #CR-co33480


Danny's Collisons


Customs, LLC

765 E. Washington St.
997-1500



Sorensen Tire
Center

1300 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Register's

Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hi.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535



Sa Tallahassee East
KOA

Campground
346 KOA Rd.
Monticello, FL 32344
Tallehokoa@aol.com
997-3890 1-800-KOA-3890


a


I


~t3~i77---2















PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006


S rts
^|j L


ACA JV Girls


Split Two


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JVs split
games with NFC and Carra-
belle.
NFC defeated ACA 14-4.
"NFC was definitely the
better team on the field this
game," said Coach Frank
Brown. ."Both our offense
and defense were lacking and
it was reflected in the final
score."
Taryn Copeland pitched four
innings and Mallory Plaines
pitched the final 'two. Be-
tween them, they gave-up 14
walks and struck out one.
At the plate, ACA bats
rarely connected with the ball.
Olivia Sorensen had one
strikeout, two put-ouits; Kate-
lyn Levine, one walk, one
strikeout,. ne put-out, one
RBI; Skylar Hanna, one sin-
gle, one strikeout, one
put-out; and Savannah Wil-
liams, one single, two put-
outs, one run.
Erin Kelly, three put-outs;-
Miranda Wider, one single,
one walk, one strikeout, one
run; Michaela Roccanti, one
single, one walk, one put-out,
one run., one RBI; and Cope-
land, two singles, one RBI.


Lady Warriors defeated
Carrabelle 18-8.
"Our defense shut Carra-
belle down," said Brown. "I
was really impressed with the
way Aucilla stepped in, filled
the voids and got the job
done."
Copeland pitched the entire
seven innings, giving up 16
walks and striking out seven.
Olivia Sorensen, four sin-
gles, one walk, one put-out,
three runs; two RBI; Levine,
two singles, one double, one
walk, one strikeout, one put-,
out, three runs, one RBI; and
Williams, one single, one
walk, one put-out, one run.
Shelby Whitmer, two sin-
gles, one run, one RBI;
Plaines, two singles, one tri-
ple, one hit-by-pitch, one put-
out, two runs, one RBI; Kelly,
two strikeouts, two put-outs;
Keli Dollar, one strikeout;
and Wider, 'one single, three
put-outs, one run, oie RBI.
Sunnie Sorensen, one
strikeout; Nikki. Kisamore,
one single, two walks, one
strikeout; Ashley Evans, one
single; Roccanti, three
singles,'one triple, one walk,
one strikeout, three runs; and
Copeland, three singles,, one
double,' one strikeout,, one
put-out, and four runs.,


Monticello Demons Men's

Team Posts Season Roster


Coach Roosevelt Jones posts
the starting roster and playing
positions for the Monticello
Demtons.-- -- -'1"'s
Nicholas Russell, pitcher,
Johnny Rivers, firstbase, Mi-
chael Meeks, second base,
Warren Allen, shortstop, and
Ronzo Wade, third base.
Kelvin Jones, left field,
Deandre Howard, left canter,
Wilbo Ellis, right center,


Johnny (last name not pro-
vided), right field, and E.
Flemming, catcher.
Oiler Denmons include Joe
Andrew, Andy Burley, Dar-
ron 9Wutg, Fr.ankie Steen,
Monterious Rivers, Shraze
Hills, Demetrius Hicks, and
William Everett.
Jones continues to look for
an assistant coach. Interested
persons can call 342-1209 or
322-1871.


Lady Diamonds Softball

Team Tells Season Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Coach Roosevelt Jones re-
ports the roster and field'posi-
tions of the starters for the
Lady Diamonds.
Shericka Parrish, catcher,
Kidra Thompson, pitcher,
Nikki Cooks, first base, To-
nya Young, second base,
Tasha Samuel, shortstop, and
Lashawnda Parker or Keandra
Seabrooks, third base.


Kista Hill, left field, Lisa
Crumitie, left center, Letitia
Fead, right center, Allane An-
derson,. right field. ..
Also on the Lady Diamonds
this year are Chandra Tucker,
Valerie Robertson, Shanice
Brooks, and Tasha Smiley.
Serving as the assistant
coach iss Michael Meeks.
SJones sends an invitation to
all young ladies who would
like to play for the Lady Dia-
monds to call 342-1209 or
322-1871.


Ladies Tennis Team

Places In 10th Spot


L ady Tigers Compete in

Taylor Invitational


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High-
School girls track team made
a strong showing during the
Taylor Invitational Tuesday.
Quaneshia Franklin finished
fourth in the 100 meter with
15.09 seconds.
Sdhe finished third in the
200 meter with 30.63
seconds, and she ranked first
in the long'jump with 14'.
Jazmaun Hall finished first
in the shot put with 26' and
didn't place in the discus with-
51'.


Ceata Crumitie ranked
fourth in the shot put with 24'
and second in the discus with
76'.
Deidra Arnold finished
fourth in the 100 meter with
14.81: seconds, and she
ranked fourth in the 200 me-
ter with 31.79 seconds.
Leisha Mitchell finished
fourth in the 100 meter with
15.54 seconds.
Alexia luggins ranked third
in the 100 meter with 13.88
seconds, and third in the 200
meter witli 30.17.
As a team, Huggins,
Mitchell, Arnold and Franklin
finished fourth in the 4x400
with 56.04 seconds.


TARYN COPELAND winds up for the fast ball during an
ACA practice session. (News Photo)



Warriors Stand 10-1

On The Season


BILL BROWN

The Aucilla Warriors varsity
baseball team continued it's
winning ways last w6eek get-
ting the tenth win of the sea-
son with one loss.
Tuesday, John Paul II was
the ninth victim in a 22-5 win.
Dustin Roberts got the vic-
tory giving up four runs, none
e.iicd u hits and' truck
L..ul II
Tie Anicll deten e gave
little help, committing five er-
rors.
Roberts' record is 4-1.
Offensively, the Warriors
pounded out 18 hits, led by
Casey Gunnels with four for
four, four runs, two stolen
bases and one RBI.
Roberts went three for four
with six RBI; Others hitting
safely were Josh Carswell,
one for three; Chris Tuten,
one for three, one stolen base,
two RBI; Glen Bishop two for
two, one RBI; and Matt
Bishop, one for five.
A. J. Connell, two for five;
Stephen Dollar, one for three,
two RBI; and Reggie Walker,
two for three.
Thursday brought Apalachi,
cola to Finlayson Field for the
first meeting of the year, and
they departed with a 12-0 loss
on a no-hitter off the arm of
Tuten, his second no-hitter of
the year and fourth win
against no losses.
He walked three and struck :
out six.
Warrior bats were active,
getting 12 hits to account for
the 12 runs.


Roberts was two for two
with two RBI; Gunnels had a
triple in three at-bats; The
other hits were off the bats of
Carswell, one for four; Tuten,
one for three; Glen Bishop, a
double and two RBI; Dollar,
one for one; Connell, one for
two, two RBI; Matt Bishop,
one for two and Jim Stephens,
one for one.
Two away games. Hamniltnii
County, Monday MlaL-cl 20,
and Carrabelle, Tuesday,
NMarch 21.
As Spring Break is here,
there will be no other games
until March 28 when ACA
travels to Chattahoochee to
face Cottondale at 4 p.m.



Tiger Boys

Run In

Invitational

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
Schoolboy's track team faired
well during the Taylor County
Invitational.
In the 110 hurdles, Jon
Dady ran 15.2 seconds; and
Breon Parker ran 16.01 sec-
onds.
In the 100 meter Daryl
Young ran 11.3 seconds.
Kevin Knowles finished
fourth in the 800 meter with
two minutes, 12 seconds.
Parker, Dady, Young and
Lucius Wade ran the 4 x 100
in 44.2 seconds.


GLEN BISHOP went 2 for 2 with 1 RBI against Johi
Paul II, scored a double and 2 RBI against
Apalachicola. The photo was taken at a Warrior prac
tice session. (News Photo)


Your dog recommends brisk walks on a regular basis. So do, we. Our
Season is that physical activity reduces risk factors for heart disease
and stroke. (Your dog's reasons may vary.) To learn more, call
1-800-AHA-USA1. Or visit us at http:// American Heart
www.amhrt.org on the World Wide Web. Association,.'
Fighting Hea Diseas.
and Sroke


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
Swings, the women's A-
league tennis team, won three.
of six matches last week
against the Glen Girls, and
now stand at.tenth place in the
league.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost the first set,
6-7, won the second, 6-1 and
came back to take the third, 6-
1 .
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, lost its sets,
7-6 and 6-3


Team #3, Kelly Hetherington
and.Susan Goodwin, lost its
sets, 7-5 and 6-2.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff
and Angie Delvecchio, lost its
sets, 6-3 and 7-5.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Trisha Wirick, won its
sets, 6-2 and 6-3.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and
Jennifer Ellis, won its sets 6-2
and 6-2.
The Mood Swings will not
play this week due to Spring
Break, but will return next
Thursday against the Sets in
the City, 9:30 a.m., at Forest
Meadows Park.


Now you don't need one
of these to get your
Federal payment.

Call 1-888-382-3311 to learn where _
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 11


Boys, Girls Club Gets

Grant For Flag Football


. .. .' ..
..




33.
.P -:"-"a '''--'^ ,.. /;? .".".--







STEP UP FLORIDA Relay Games promoting healthy lifestyles with Trey Johnson,
back, recreation coordinator,Haylee Vecker FSU volunteer, Denijay Maxwell and
Shedreonna Mitchell
:*, ', '' % .,, .. '; .- --'. : ,- ,' -; ,7
,, .,t, ,, -. o .-- ,%i"-'. .'" :.. :*s ': ;, L' "
; '.. .'.. .,, '. .2 g.. ,- : a,.;.a',' .. ,-." .'"g;-, .. at' ,,t,: .


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff \ writer

Recently, the Boys and Girls-
Club of the Big Bend received
an NFL Grant for the Jefferson
ounr, Boys and Girls Clubs
. to start up an NFL sponsored
flag football league.
The primary goal of the
league is to generate excite-
Sment about a non-contact sport
that i- open to all ages, male
and female, throughout the Big
Bend
To "kick off' the inaugural
flag football season, the Frank-
in Count;, Club hosted a "Su-
per Sarurday" at Carabelle
High School.
More than 200 children were
in attendance from all three


Big Bend counties, Jefferson,
Leon, and Franklin.
With a day that held "perfect
football" weather, the children
were divided into four age
groups, 6 8; 9 11; 12 13;
and 14 and up.
Along with the friendly com-
petition, the children had the
opportunity to participate in an
NFL Punt, Pass, and Kick
competition.
"With several upcoming Su-
per Saturday's of flag football
planned for the near future, I
strongly believe we've taken
the first step in creating some
positive excitement in this
newly formed league," said
Program Director James Mer-
cado.
The Boys and Girls Club of
the Big Bend would like espe-


JV Warriors Down

Carrabelle 9-4


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

JV Warriors defeated Car-
rabelle 9-4, last week. The
team stands 3-5-1 on the sea-
,son.
Coach Demott Anderson
said the Warriors are coming
together very well and if
ACA can remain jelled, they
can win the remaining games
in the season.


Casey Anderson pitched,
striking out ten, and giving up
six hits and three walks.
Brandon Dunbar had two
singles. Luke Whitmer and
Marcus Roberts each had one
single; and Jacob Newberry,
one single and two walks.
Following Spring Break, the
Warriors are slated to face off
against Carrabelle for the sec-
ond time of the season, 4
p.m., March 28, here.


Imagine Interiors Adds

'Soft Stuff' Creations


'.4,.
(4
I1 .,t,. ,
iw-'.


PARTICIPATING in Step Up Florida activities were, from left, Kavon Blue, Kimmire
Thomas, Shawn Blue, Denijay Maxwell, Rye Dunlap, Ladarion Smiley, Kean Thomas,
and Shedreonna Mitchell.


ACA Girls Tennis Team

Stands 3-2 On The Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Following the first five
matches of the season, the
Aucilla Christian Academy
girl's tennis team stands 3-2
on the season.
The Lady Warriors won 4-3
against Thomasville in the
season opener.
In singles matches, Court-
ney Connell lost to Kristin
Gee, 1-8; Kaitlin Jackson de-
feated Katie Spence, 8-1; Re-
bekah Aman defeated Jessica
Oglesby, 8-0; Elizabeth Shir-
ley won over Frances Lilly, 9-
7; Caroline Mueller defeated
Laura Fletcher, 8-5; Sarah
Sorensen lost to Mary Poole,
8-9 and Nikki Hamrick lost to
Kiara Holton, 1-8.
In doubles action, Connell
and Shirley lost to Catherine
and Sarah Hardy, 4-8; Jack-
son and Mueller lost to Lilly
and Laura Fletcher, 7-9; and
Aman and Hamrick lost to
Laura Lilly and Sarah Rice, 6-
8.
When the Lady Warriors
went. up against Apalachicola,
ACA blanked them for a 7-0
win.
In singles action, Connell
defeated Jackie Roland, 8-1;
Jackson defeated Tiffany
Creamer, 8-0; Aman defeated
Adrienne Jones, 8-0; Shirley
defeated Danielle Gay, 8-0;
Mueller defeated Brittany
James, 8-0; and Sarah
Sorensen lost to Roland, 6-8.
In doubles, Connell and
Shirley defeated Roland and
Gay, 8-0; Jackson and Muel-
ler defeated James and
Creamer, 8-0; and Aman and
Sorensen defeated Jones and


Creamer, 8-0.
When the Lady Warriors
went up against Maclay, ACA
suffered the first loss of the
season, 6-1.
In singles, Connell lost to
Devon Cavanaugh, 0-8; Jack-
son lost to Carolina Sanchez,
5-8; Amap lost to Macie I
Wilkins, 2-8; Shirley lost to
Sarah Brooks, 3-8; Mueller I
defeated Julia Yang, 8-6; and
Sorensen lost to Becca Mayo,
0-8. j
In doubles, Connell and
Shirley lost to Cavanaugh and
Wilkins, 2-8; and Jackson and
Aman lost to Sanchez and
Brooks, 1-8.
The Lady Warriors lost 5-2
against.John Paul.
Connell lost to Erin Conroy,
1-8; Jackson lost to Kelly
Conroy, 4-8; Aman lost to
Shannon Wagner, 6-8; Shir-
ley lost to Cayce Hook, 8-9;
Mueller beat Pippa Simmons,
8-4; Sorensen lost to Patricia
Young, 0-8; and Hamrick lost
to Abby Salancy, 1-8.

In doubles, Connell and
Shirley lost to the Conroys, 1-
8; Jackson and Mueller won
8-7 over Wagner and Young,
5-8.
The Lady Warriors won
against North. Florida Chris-
tian, 6-1.
Connell won 9-7 over Alex
Hart; Jackson won against
Eurie Rho, 8-1; Aman de-
feated Katie McClure, 8-2;
Shirley lost to Kim McClure,
6-8; and Mueller won 8-0, by
forfeit.
In doubles, Connell and
Shirley defeated Harte and
Rho, 8-4; and Jackson and


Mueller defeated
McClures, 8-0.


the


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Imagine Interiors and An-
tiques at 168 East Dogwood
Street, adds a new collection,
"Soft Stuff," by Judy Reazin.
, Soft Stuff' is a mixture of
traditional and whimsical
handmade, fabric creations.
Items on display include ta-
ble linens, aprons, bibs, books,
pillows, quilts, and knit blan-
kets.
In addition, "Soft Stuff' pro-
vides fanciful toys such as
stuffed bears, dogs, rabbits,
and dolls .
Reazin also accepts special
orders that can be placed with
an associate at Imagine An-
tiques.
Imagine Antiques offers a
large assortment of fine an-
tiques, glassware, and collecti-
bles.
Other services include pro-


Summer Fun!!


Hands-On and Minds-On, Mad Science"
is the Leading Fun Science Provider for Kids.


We offer:

* Workshops
* After-School Programs
* Special Events
" Assemblies C'
* Birthday Parties
* Preschool Programs '~'
* Vacation and Summer Programs C-a- '


fessional furniture refinishing
and repair, decorative painting,
and interior decorating.
Business hours are Wednes-
day through Saturday 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. or by appointment.


Advertise In

Your Local

Paper


cially 'to thank all the volun-
teers, the FSU Intramural
Department, the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department,
the Florida Department of
Health, and the Governor's
Square Mall Lids Department
store for their time, efforts, and
donations to make this 1st An-
nual Boys and Girls Club of
the Big Bend Super Saturday
Flag Football Kick Off a com-
plete success.


Boys, Girls

Partake In

Step Up FL.

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Recently the Florida Depart-
ment of Health sponsored
"Step Up, Florida."
The event's primary purpose
was to educate and encourage
the residents of the County
about choosing and practicing
healthier lifestyles.
The Monticello Boys and
Girls Club of the Big Bend
showed their support by par--
ticipating in the event.

25 Club members partici-
pated in relay games and
walked the trail that surrounds
the Recreation Park and lis-
tened to Mayor Julie Conley
read the proclamation of the
event.




DO

NOT

ENTER


Great pioneers don't hesitate.
MDA research pursues,
every possible avenue.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


SCHOOL OF DANCE
Ballet Jazz Tap
SRegister for Suirnier & Fall Classes NOW
Ages 3 to Adult
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if


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893-0771
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Corner of Bradfordvilk Road and Quai Valkly Roaul


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Tallahassee
Re-kindling the Joy of Learning

High School Courses for Credit
&
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We are offering English, Math, History and Science
for High School Credit or
for Middle Grade Replacement
Dates: June 5-June 23 & June 26-July 24
Time: 8:30 am-12:30 pm & 1:00 pm-5:00 pm
Monday thru Friday

Call (850) 893-4692
Or visit us at
15(K) IMiccosutkcc Road, T allahassce.


I







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006
* i


The Leaders



Of Car



Care.........


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 13


S- _~ p1 '. -. w. ---NEI


The Leaders



Of Car



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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006


WIDW


F6 x n Fofrw es












:BRENDA FOX creates her Fox and Feathers collections added to Imagine Interiors on
:West Washington Street. (News Photo)



'Fox-N-Feathers' Business


Features Unusual items
are welcome to come in and Residents possess
:FRAN HUNT browse through her catalogs talents that wish to t
: taff Writer to find the item. "I will do crafts may contact


Her love for birds and na-
ture prompted Brenda Fox to
recently open her new busi-
ness in town, Fox-N-Feathers
Home & Garden.
Located between Abbot's
Nursery and Time Saver (Pe-
tro) on West Washington
Street, business hours are 9
a.m. through 5:30 p.m., ex-
cept for rainy days and Mon-
days.
Fox-N-Feathers offers a va-
riety of bird baths, fountains,
statues (some painted and
some natural), bird houses,
bird feeders, wind chimes,
yard flags, colorful wind
socks, and some stained-glass
sun catchers.
Also, arts and bric-a-brac
made by local artists, garden
tools, garden sets (for both
adults and children), bird
seed, 10,',:. r' ,i1deit made '
hand ii.:.' -' .; "b'
salts, framed watercolor, pen'
and ink paintings of nature in-
cluding butterflies, bees, and
quail, and planters.
"The favorite of the custom-
ers tends to be the bird baths
and the fountains," said Fox.
She added that if residents
want to find "That hard to
find special something", they




A;00


my best to locate whatever
anyone wants," she said.
In the late summer or early
fall, Fox would like to be able
to offer classes to residents.
"I want to experiment with
faux rock, and I know a local
artist who works with free-
form sculptures," said Fox. "I
would like to get with many
different people, who have
talents in different artistic ar-
eas, anu oiner classes on those
different subjects."
Fox wishes to feature local
artists and will sell works on
consignment. "I want to keep
the county's money in the
county as much as possible,"
said Fox.
Fox decided to come to the
area when her husband was
promoted from Jacksonville
to Tallahassee.
"We own land just west of
.'* ri:l'rt ell and I wanted to
y"'-'ti 'this"u'sit'fii es's fr,''" said
Fox..: "I've:met so maiy':inter-
esting people since I've
opened the shop. God has
truly blessed me with the
business here.
"I want to see-which.way
the business goes and what
the people here prefer," she
added.


[hor asvI YoncdA



Swi#Lcb whoever




1-800-771-1144
1610 E. Jackson St. Thomaile, rom Ta.ahassee 24 minutes North on
1 Thomasville Road


464-4492.


ng artistic
each their
t Fox at


LEGALS

The Jefferson County Road 'Dept. is
asking for sealed bids for an equip-
ment trailer, 20 ton capacity pintle,
with ramps, wood deck, tongue
jack. Lights and brakes must meet
DOT certifications. Bids will be ac-
cepted through March 31, 2006. All
bids must be sealed and delivered to
the Road Dept. Office at 1484 South
Jefferson St., Monticello, FL, 32344.
Bids will be opened April 5, 2006.
Our office phone number is 850-
997-2036..
3/22, 3/24706 "
In accordance with FL Statue:.
Public Auction April 15, 2006 at
10:00am 2000 Ford Vin#
IFAFP6634YK112364; 1983 Dats
Vin# JN6NDOIS9DX271837; To be
sold as is for towing and storage
charges. Conditions and, terms at
auction. Dave's Towing 7261 East
Washington St. Monticello, Fl 32344
S .;R8 -:, .14 1"l


a ailable from the Project Manager
aflcr 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
a.ialability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
lorm successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal

Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
lo March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
dale and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ-
Episcopal Church office, 425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24,29, 31, 4/5/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: The Estate of WILLIAM
LYTLE MOON, Deceased Case No.
06-31-06 NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the Estate of
'William Lytle Moon, Deceased, is
pending in the Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, c/o Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida 32344. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections ,that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdiction
of this Count WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
'FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR ,THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THi, DAFE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All creditors of the
.ucccucnt ana other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file


3 -22- c laUI ims with 11 111tiS COUrl
(. ror ni., Pi. r: T\." -T TELATR T REE
Clnll Hc I'nIII II.dll r l FRSTMONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
at Christ Episcopal Church ;. THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
Monticello Florida. Scope of project THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
includes purchase and installation AFTER THE DATE OF SERVIC
of four (4) complete heating and air OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
of four (4) complete and ON THEM. All other creditors of
conditioning systems in the existing OIl decedent an persons having
church and removal and disposal of ca dmcedot and paganst avtng
four (4) water to air systems located claims or demands against the
in the ceiling of same church to be dcedens estate must file their
completed within 90 days of award claims with this Cou WITHI
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project DTE O TH S F TER TE
Manager, will receive sealed PUBLICATION OF THIS
proposals from Licensed NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS,
Contractors in accordance with theS AD O CTIOS
plans and specifications prepared NOT SO FLED WO TIO
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: d d esFOREVER BARRED. The date of
PLANS: Bid documents will be
the first publication of this Notice is


March 15, 2006. Dated this 10th day
of March, 2006. Brain T. Hayes, FL
Bar I.D. #0034687, P.O. Box 1275
Monticello, FL 32345,
850-997-2065; Attorney for William
G. Moon, Personal Representative
of Estate of WILLIAM LYTLE
MOON, Deceased.
3/15, 3/22/06, c

N8O (ICE'- .. -
The friends of Jefferson County
Public Library will meet Thursday,
March 23, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the
Jefferson County Public Library.
Items for discussion are the revision
of the By-laws and the upcoming
Book Sale. The Book Sale will be
held at the Public Library on
Saturday, April 29. Book Donations
are now being accepted. Books can
be brought to the Library. If you
have books and they need to be
picked up, contact Book Sale
Chairman Eleanor Hawkins.
3/22, c
There will be a Local Mitigation
Strategy Meeting held on 27, March
2006 at 1:00 p.m. in the Emergency
Management Bldg. Conference
Room.
3/22,3/24/06, c

HELP WAN 'j :
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville, FL is looking for a
Case Manager with a B.A. in
social or behavioral sciences
preferred; or an equivalent
combination of education
(minimum of A.A.) and
experience in working with
juvenile offenders preferred.
Applicants will also be required
to pass a background check. It
is an essential function of the
position that the staff member
must be capable of physically
restraining the students if when
necessary.
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville, FL is looking for a
Nurse with a Associate Degree
in nursing and current license to
practice in the state required. A
minimum of six months clinical
or public health and emergency
nursing preferred.
Please submit a resume to
Barbara Broomfield by fax @
850-948-4227 or email to

Barbara.Broomfield@youthserv
ices.corn
3/10, 15, 17 22. pd

Cashier,, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon


@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
Servers/Cooks must be 18.
References Required. Call Brian
at 284-7899.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Huddle House now hiring
experience waitresses and cooks.
We offer above average wages
and health insurance with
2-weeks paid vacation per year.
Please come in and file an
application or call 342-3284 and
ask for Jack.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and 'two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Prior
experience working with
children who have emotional
issues required. Some local
travel required. License
required. Shift: Monday-Friday
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
OPS-FEMA Team Leader
(#2264) Masters degree with
from an accredited university or
college with a major in the field
of counseling, social work,
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or as related
human services field withone
(1) year of full time or
equivalent related professional
experience or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited
university or college with a
major in the field of counseling,
social work, psychology,
nursing, rehab. special
education, health education, or
a related professional
experience. Clinical supervision
experience preferred. Shift
variable.
Program Supervisor (#1451)
Masters Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in the field of
counseling, social work
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or related
human services health care, or
management field. Shift 8 am 5
PM Monday Friday.
OPS-FEMA .. CRISIS'
COUNSELOR (#2262) A


.1 "pfrik -~ S]0]

S100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Point Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


1630 Eh JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto Maill


Business





Directory


BURNETTE PLUMBING & CARROLL HILL AUTO.ELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and

B WELL SERVICE register "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Small Engine Repair
Family Owned Since 1902 M n l Sto rage For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Family Owned Sin ce 1902 Mvinif t- raae Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~ 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Repairs for all makes & models.
Water Heater Repairs -All Repairs4 M f US 19 Southc Pickup & Delivery Service Available
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs 4 Mile off US 19 South Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. 562-2962

I .997-2535 (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717 562-2962



MONTICELLO'S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY
CUMMING'SAPPLANCE N EED HELP? Call Andy Rudd For STEWART

85097 7 RAB THE LINE Appliance Service HEATING & COOLING INC.

ehave over 40 years of answers about Sales ~ Service ~ Installation Change Outs
Ne have over 40 years of answers about Needs Residential Commercial
90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES neuromuscular disease. Getting help couldn't Residential Commercial
*e easier, Our lifeline is toll-free. 9 5
CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER lifelin997-5648 Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
1-800-572-1717 Lie. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903
Nww.mdausa.org Muscular Dystrophy Association


I


"WI s











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006 PAGE 15


HELP WANTED SERVICES


Bachelor's Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in counseling,
social work, psychology,
criminal justice, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services field; or other
Bachelor's degree from an
accredited university or college
with one (1) year of full time or
equivalent work or volunteer
experience in a social service,
health care, or related field.
Shift Variable.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
3/22, c
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is currently
accepting applications for the
following positions.: 1. A
lineman at the entry-level
position. The position would be
based out of the Madison office.
However, the individual will be
required to live in the
Monticello area. Position will
require outage standby during
the week and the weekends as
required. All applicants must
possess a valid Florida CDL
Class A license. 2. A lineman at
the entry-level position. The
position would be based out of
the Perry Office. The individual
will be required to live in the
Perry, Florida area. The
position will require outage
stand-by during the week and
the weekends as required. All
applicants must possess a valid
Florida CDL Class A license 3.
An automotive mechanic at the
advance level position. The
position will be based out of the
Madison Office. The applicant
must have working knowledge
of diesel and gasoline engines
and hydraulic systems in
addition to basic automotive
repair and maintenance. The
salary will be based upon
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. offers a
benefit and retirement package.
The closing date of the accepting
applications is March 31, 2006.
Applications may be obtained
from Tri-County Electric
Cooperative's Offices.
Applicants should be returned
to the attention of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative's
Engineering and Operations
Department. Tri-County
Electric Cooperative reserves
the right to reject any and all
applicants. 850-973-2285.
3/8-3/31

SERVICES
Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn
We think women should have
leadership positions in our
church, and they do. Christ
Episcopal Church, three block
N of the courthouse. Sunday
sP' "ice at 10:30 a.m. 997-4116.
3/22,r

Peters Satellite -- Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.
tfn, 1/25
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting


in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into


rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Need a clean or organized
House? Call 850-997-3176,
850-26- 1670,
3/8 3/31,,
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Handyman: Home Repair
drywall, pressure washing,
painting int./ext trim, wood
working, siding. Housekeeping
850-251-4575, 997-3587
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn

FREE
FREE Ca. tv.i .1 good home. (all
997-1277. Tiny long hair, gray,
spayed, about 7 years old.

FOR SALE
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
3/22, 24, pd
5 piece Bedroom set large
dresser/mirrc;-, 2 chest of
drawers, bedside table, solid
wood, white french provincial
$2C1. 997-6275
3,22, c
Mattress/Box bed set: pillow
plush double sided pillow top
mattress/box set, 4 inch pillow
top. List $989 sell for $248.
850-52, 1422.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd

22' CF Deep Freezer $45 or
trade for pressure treated wood.
6 Dresser Drawers Hickory
Wood $35 Knick Knack Shelf
$5. 510-0998, 342-1486
3/22, 24, pd

REAL ESTATE
Steinhatc.ee/Dixie County, side.
Gulf fishing/scalloping. Trade
older 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
3/4 acre private heavily wooded I
lot, Hwy frontage, structurally
sound. Blocks from boat ramps,
road to nowhere, Pinelog Creek
landing. Approx. value
175-200K will trade for house
with acreage outside Monticello.
(352) 498-2832
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5. 7, 12, pd
Buy Gwner in Christmas Acres,
2.2 Acres, '97 Fleetwood, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace,
askir2 S82K 877-3123
3/17,22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, pd
4/1 wood frame house on 3
acres.' Located in Wacissa.
Moving must Sale NOW!
Asking $135,000 OBO. Tim
342-3586 or 528-4484


WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles

850-545-3677


FOR RENT AUTOMOTIVE


Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c

3 bedroom, 1 I bath in Country
$600 per month. 997-3368
tfn 3/17, c

Secure Gravel Lot 100 x 100, 12
x 16 Office Bid. 2685 S.
Jefferson St. 850-997-8727, $300
month.
3/22, 24, 29, 31, c

3 bedroom, 1 /2 bath, in County,
$600 per month. 997-3368
3/15tfn, c
1 bedroom, 1 bath, between
Wacises and 98. $450. 997-6613.
3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd


No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn

2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250, 1700
mi. Nice, $3000 OBO must sell.
508-3851
3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd

1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500 below NADA
Book.
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson
Auto, LLC.


Registered Nurse Home Health

$1500-$3000 Recruitment Incentive -
FT Positions
Per Visit Positions $35 per visit premium pay for
admissions Archbold Home Health Services is cur-
rently seeking qualified applicants for the above posi-
tions to serve Leon, Madison, and Jefferson Counties.
One year of home health experience preferred. We of-
fer competitive compensation and an excellent benefit
package.

Contact: Nurse Recruiter, Archbold

Medical Center 229-2287-2713, Fax:

229-551-8733. rtaylor@archbold.org

Visit our website: www.archbold.org

EOE





Want to Work

in North Florida?

Due to growth we have new job
Opportunities in our modern poultry operations
In Live Oak, Florida all shifts

Apply Now!!
We want to interview people who can come to work regu-
larly, provide quality work, demonstrate good workplace
citizenship, work safely and be a dependable team play.
Must be able to perform the essential functions of the jobs
with or without accommodations, and be legally autho-
rized to work.


Weekly Perfect Attendance Bonus of$.95/hour or greater!
After 60 days + Perfect Attendance
Breast Deboner $8.31 $9.26
Packers $7.76 $8.71
Night Sanitation $8.11 $9.06
Live Hangers $10.00 $11.20
Maintenance $8.20-$13.20 + $.95 PA

Ability to work rapidly and with dexterity is important for
successful performance of these jobs. Medical insurance,
life insurance, dental, vision and prescription drug
programs, paid vacations, 9 paid holidays, credit union.



Gold Kist INC
19740 US- Hwy 90 W
Live Oak, Florida 32060
386-208-0205 English 386-208-0190 Spanish
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER EOE-AA-M-F-V-D
APPLICATION ALSO ACCEPTED AT EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS LOCATIONS
1416 North Ohio 200 West Base St.
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL


The sky's the limit
for our growth and your opportunities.
Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
Digital Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
$33,000-$36,000
or nur TALLAHASSEE locate on We offer set siedu!es, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and morel Experience preferred but NOT REQUIRED
WE OFFER PAID TRAININGI For more detail ed format on. please visit www hrmcacclaim comnapply/drscareers
***WE OFFER A FAST PATH FOR ADVANCEMENT AND
CAREER GROWTH!***
All of our field management staff were promoted from field technicians.
Most promotions occur after 6 continuous months with the company.
DRS Satellite Installation Techs are provided with
Said training a company owned truck
Stools a variety of shifts
Benefits (medical/dental insurance, life insurance, tuition reimbursement, 401K plan with matching funds, bonuses,
paid vacations, holidays, and sick time)


For more detailed information, please visit: www.hrmcacclaim.como/apoply/dcrscee
or call: 1-877-351-4473.
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Fl 32344
(850) 997-5516
www.cbkk.com
Perry Location:
(850) 223-2370


Spring Is The Perfect Time to
Plant New Roots
60 Acres ofhigh land with 20 Year
plantedpine. $480,000
11.68Acres on 19 N. Zoned mixed
use Business/Residentia $ 233,600
S3 lots available within walking
distance to downtown area.
Starting at$ 75,000
a .20 acres on the Sopchoppy River.
Greatfor those weekend get-a-ways.
Waterfront Property $ 69,500
a 3 Lots available on Waukeenah Hwy.
Great location, high ridge withplanted
pines. Starting at$95,880
rf


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Just Listed! Won't Last Lonq! Indian Hills
Area 1568 sq. ft. looks stick built mobile-
home on 6 acres with creek, pond, pasture, a
real nice package $145,500

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


SI I -=#&i]


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--~L 311


I------ -


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~mrr~--uo~numr~rrli..









PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 22, 2006


Study Suggests



Amount For Water



Impact Change


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


A preliminary analysis by an
engineering firm indicates that
the city could reasonably
charge new developments that
tie into its water system a $982
impact fee per house.
The study by George &
Hutcheson Engineering Inc.
defines a systems development
charge (SDC) as a fee specifi-
cally designed to help govern-
ment entities finance the capi-
tal improvement projects asso-
ciated with growth.
"The SDC is a charge that is
used by many water utilities to
assign to future customers the
capital cost associated with
growth," the report states.
The city presently charges no
fees other than the tap fee for
new hookups and the monthly
user fee for all customers.

"Monticello is experiencing
and will continue to experi-
ence a period of rapid growth,"
the report finds. "As the city
experiences this growth, it
(will) need an additional
source of revenue to finance
the capital improvements that-
are associated with the growth.

The engineers arrived at the
figure of $982 using method-
ologies established by the
American Water Works Asso-
ciation (AWWA) in a publica-
tion titled "Principles of Water
Rates, Fees and Charges".
The particular methodology
selected to determine the SDC
for Monticello was the "incre-
mental cost method". This
method, as described in the
AWWA manual, assigns to
new developments the cost of
system expansions that are
needed to serve the new devel-
opments.
In most situations, however,
the utility will not collect suffi-
cient funds from the SDCs to
fully fund a major system ex-
pansion, the AWWA manual
notes.
States the report: "Although
SDCs are used to minimize the
amount of debt financing re-
quired for capital expansion
and improvements, these
charges will not entirely elimi-
nate the need to incur debt for
capital improvements."
It goes on to state that while
new developments in existing
utilities service areas are gen-
erally considered desirable,
"the source of funding for the
water systems expansion is a
recurring dilemma.
"System development
charges assign the cost of the
growth to the new customers
rather than to existing custom-
ers, (even though) existing


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customers in areas of growth
may benefit somewhat fror
the charges."
Water system expansion
most commonly financed b
SDCs include wells, treatment
facilities, high service pump
and transmission mains.
The report lists five project
that the city is expected to un
dertake in the next 10 years to
meet the demands of growth
These project, and some of th
projected costs:
Extension of the water sys
ter north on US 19 to the Jel
ferson County Kennel Clu
and beyond; $905,952;
The inter loop connection
in the Pecan Grove and Holl
Hill subdivisions; $347,890;
The Spring Hollow
Waukeenah Highway intercon
nection; $107,200;
Connection of the Peal
Street well site water main;
-11,734;
Connection of the Rock
Branch water main loop, front
Goldberg to. Morris roads
$44,000.
Total expected costs of th
combined projects
$1,416,776.
The report notes that project
tions of the expected growth
came from interviews with cit
staff and their knowledge o
present development applica
tions as well as anticipated de
velopment applications.
The reports furthers note
that some of the projects ai
speculative and may not occur
"However, they represent th
best information available an
represent potential growth
the report states. "There als
will be other future develop
ments that the city is unaware
of at this time."
The report concludes that th
$982 system developers
charge should apply to res
dential units serviced by a 5/
inch meter. It recommends th;
the SDC for commercial an
nonresidential use be calci
lated based on the meter size.
"It is realized that this fe
may be a financial burden, pa
ticularly for existing develop
ments that are considering
connecting to the city's water
system," the report note
"SDCs are inherently depend
ent upon density of develop
ment and therefore present
dilemma for smaller rural-typ
systems such as Monticello.
"As previously stated, SDC
may not collect sufficient
funds top fully fund maj<
capital improvements," the re
port goes on. "Consideratic
should also be given to system:
development charges of nearby
utilities."
It further recommends an ii
crease in rates and taps fees


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lical Staff-
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it
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supplement capital improve-
ment projects, given that the
SDC alone won't finance the
undertakings.
The city's water and sewer
committees are scheduled to
hold a joint meeting 6 p.m.
Tuesday, March 28, to discuss
the matter.














Monticello

News


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Help prevent damage from bark beetles,

diseases, and wildfire through practices

that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.

* Control understory
plant competition.

* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT


mr 11 ^ 1 S a;


* Use prescribed fire.

* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.

* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


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Choose Capital Health Plan
es
re yP

le It's Medicare Made Easy by the local -
id :||. health plan you have known and trusted ::
for more than 20 years.
so
p-
re Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus j

le : offers Part D prescription coverage and .
nt i": more benefits than original Medicare, including:

8 Routine checkups & preventive ca3e Eyeglswes'
at Routine eye exams He.ith education prorirams .& classes -
d Hearing exams Fitness center reimblr smenier" i
-- .-II .. --- ,
be e : .
r- i .To Learn How You Can Enroll, Attend a FREE Seminar about

Ig -:: Capital Health Plan .-ifef,- .
er *i: Refreshments will be served.
s.
- I Call 850-523-7333 To Reserve a Seat
p-
a 0:. (TTY/TDD):850-383-1534
Pe Monday Friday, 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

s Or log onto www.capitalhealth.cornimedicare
nt :

e- JEFFERSON COUNTY
an Semn,-i', I be he.d r Monticllo-Jefferson Chamber of Commerce

y : at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 3rd
X,-
n- PAIR
to r
.i .. LEON COUNTY |
i.( Seminars wrI b held ,l Capital Health Plan's Governors Square Auditorium i:

at 10 a.m. on:
Tuesday, April 4th Tuesday, April 18th Tuesday, May 2nd :X.
Thursclay, April 13th Thursday, April 27th Thursday.M.y 11 th



GADSDEN COUNTY
Semmrina w.1 i he hidj i The Women's Club f Gadsden County '

iat t0 a.m. on Thursday, March 30tlh:

X-M
WAKULLA COUNTY
Sp~mroar w:l L;e helId al The Wakulla Senior Center
::1: at 33 V:cha l Dr ve Cral.t o'd.ll, : ii
at 10 a.m.on Wd-nesday, March 29th ii:i


1:,] Capital Health Plan pita
"I ... '****.. 2140 Centerville Road, TaIlahassee, FL 32308 :'
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