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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00115
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 17, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00115
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Sports
        page 10
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
Full Text

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GPINEViLLbE, FL. 32611


Wacissa UMC


Learning Begins Relay Fundrail
At Home Set March 2!

Editorial, Page 4 Story, Page 6




SFriday Morning







Monticf


138TH YEAR NO.22, 50 CENTS


Published


Charles Smith
Director JCHS

Boys, Girls Club

Story, Page 7


UI


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dnesdays & Fridays


Kelly Properties
Fundraiser
Brings $2,500

Story, Page 14
II


ews

FRIDAY, MARCH 17. 200i


Growth ManLjement Expert




Talks Of Looming Challenges


Puts Burden On Public

To Ensure Compliance


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

'Florida's population is grow-
ing at the rate of 1,100 people
per day, a situation that poses
challenges for the protection
and preservation of the state's
natural resources and its qual-
ity of life.'
That essentially was the mes-
sage that Charles Pattison, ex-
ecutive director of 1000
Friends of Florida, brought to
the 35-or-so people who at-
tended the public forum and
discussion on growth manage-
ment at the Woman's Club last
Friday... ,
Sponsored by the Jefferson
County Citizens for a Sustain-
able Future -- a local group
calling for planned and man-
aged growth -- the conference
was the first of what the group
intends to be an educational
series on growth management
issues..
The 1000 Friends of Florida,


meanwhile, is a nonprofit,
statewide organization that ad-
vocates responsible planning
for the state's population
growth.
Pattison told the group that
the state's Growth Manage-
ment Plan was one of the best
in the country. He said com-
prehensive plans were also the
best way to get desired zoning
issues implemented and en-
forced.
But don't depend on elected
officials or state agencies to
necessarily follow or enforce
the dictates of comprehensive
plans, he said.
Indeed, but for the input and
agitation of citizens, the dic-
tates of comprehensive plans
would often go ignored, he
said.
"Our Growth Management
Plan is as good as any in the
country," Pattison said. "But it
puts the burden on citizens to
make sure that the law is en-
forced. No matter 'what the


frequently based on what
elected officials want to do on
any given night."
Don't look to the Department


of Communir, Affairs (DCA)
-- the state agency charged
v\. h ,': erlooking zoning issues
-- to neces-aril do the right


CHARLES PATTISON, executive director. of 1000
Friends of Florida, speaks with a resident following his


policy may say, (decisions) are-talk at the Women's Club last Friday. (News Photo)


thing either, Pattison said.
"If the DCA doesn't hear
from people, it substantially
lessens its interest to hold firm
to planning principles," Patti-
son said. "On one level, these
issues are dull; on another.
level, it's the most important
thing that you can do. The
thing to remember is that the
law is on your side, but some-
'times you have to help it
'along."
Meaning that to ensure com-
pliance with the dictates of thq
comprehensive plan, citizens
must sometimes take legal ac-
tion -- unsavory as the option
may be.
"At some point, you may
have to file a challenge," Patti-
son said. "All enforcement
comes down to the public. At
some point, you have to know
when to draw the line."
He cited. the example of a-
woman in Martin County.
Contrary to the stated density
level the comprehensive plan
permitted in her neighborhood,
the commission approved a de-
Svelopment that consisted of 10
four-story units.
Pattison said the woman
challenged the decision and
won at the circuit court level.


He said the developer appealed
the lower court's decision and
lost again at the appellate
court. Ultimately, the case
went to the Florida Supreme
Court, which ruled in the
woman's favor.
Bottom line: the developer
was forced to tear down the 10
units at a cost of millions "be-
cause the comprehensive plan
set how development would
take place in that community,"
Pattison said.
On the down side, he said,
the case took seven years to
litigate and cost the woman an
untold amount, even though an
attorney had done much of the
work pro-bono.
"You can win," Pattison em-
phasized. "You certainly won't
win if you don't say anything
about a project that you think
is inappropriate."
..-.... H e ;aid tie Ie-;c.on applied to'
his organization as well.
"Our function is to educate
and advocate," Pattison said.
"But if it doesn't work, we liti-
gate sometimes."
Yet given the high number
of requests for assistance that
his group received, its state-
wide mission, and its limited
S(See Growth Page 2)


Planners Keep Drawing


Rules For Wetlands Use


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Members of the Planning
Commission's subcommittee
continue wrestling with the
formulation of guidelines that
aim ultimately to tighten the
county's rules on development.
So far, the subcommittee has
come up with two proposals
that it will present to the full
board for discussion 7 p.m.
next Thursday.
One proposal calls for a 50
percent reduction of the back-
ground density when it comes
to transferring credits from
wetlands to uplands.
Meaning that for zoning
categories Ag-3, Ag-5 and Ag-
20 where wetlands are in-
volved, it will require twice as
many wetlands acres as upland
acres to justify a house.
Take the Ag-5 category,
where a developer can place
one house every five acres.
Say the developer has a 100-
acre parcel, it means he can
place 20 houses on the prop-
erty.
Now say 40 of the 100 acres
are wetlands. Under the cur-
rent rule, the developer is still
able to put 20 houses on the
property.
The 40 acres of wetlands, in
other words, count the same as
the upland acreage, or one
house per five acres for a total
of eight houses. This despite
the fact that, in actuality, de-
velopment is not permitted in
wetlands.


Under the subcommittee's
Proposed rule, the 40 acres of
wetlands will count for half the
background density. Instead of
one house every five acres, in
other words, it will require 10
acres -- twice as many -- to
justify one house.

Process In
Early Stage ,

Bottom line, the developer
will be credited for four houses
on the 40 acres of wetlands,
for a total of 16 houses on the
100-acre property.
The rule would apply to
Ag-3 (one house per three


acres) and Ag-20 (one house
per 20 acres).
The second proposal estab-
lishes a minimum dry lot size,
something that doesn't exist at
present. The proposal calls for
a minimum dry lot size of 1-
1/2 acres.
The rule is intended to pre-
vent unscrupulous developers
from running lots into the wet-
lands for the sake of meeting
the desired acreage require-
ment for a particular zoning
designation.
Absent the proposed rule, in
other words, a developer could
conceivably concentrate all the
allowable units on a margin of
(See Planners Page 2)


TWYNETTA HOWARD, Teacher of the Year, gets con-
gratulations from School Superintendent Phil Barker.
(News Photo)


THE John Denham-lnman House, on 555 W. Palmer Mill Road, is one of the houses
on the Tour of Homes. The Italianate styled structure, built in 1872, is currently a
bed and breakfast inn. (News Photo)


School District Recognizes

Teacher Of Year, Nominees


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The District Teacher of the
Year, and the two nominees
were recognized at the School
Board meeting, Monday eve-
ning.
Twynetta Howard, of Jeffer-
son Elementary School, Dis-
trict Teacher of the Year, was
Presented a plaque of recogni-
tion by JES Principal Kay Col-
lins.
Howard will also qualify for
$1,200 from the State in recog-
nition of her selection.
She will now compete in the


selection of the Regional
Teacher of the Year.
Should she win this honor,
Howard will then compete for
the State Teacher of the Year.
Howard Goes
To Regional
Next, Then
Possibly On
TO State
Teacher of the Year Nomi-
nee of Jefferson County High
School, Julia A. McBee, was
recognized with a plaque by
Principal Chalmus Thomas.
She also received $250 from


Farmers and Merchants Bank,
presented by Jerry Boatwright.
Teacher of the Year Nomi-
nee of Howard Middle School,
Debrosha Larkins received a
plaque of recognition from
Principal Juliette Jackson.
She also received $250 from
FMB, presented by Jerry Boat-
wright.
Addressing the teachers, Su-
perintendent Phil Barker con-
gratulated them on their
selection.
"I can think of no higher
praise than to be nominated by
your peers for recognition," he
said.


I AM


: i i I I I I I I


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Jr. Leadership Students


Awarded Certificates


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The final Junior Leadershp
Program Session for the year
was held recently with 12 stu-
dents taking part in the con-
cluding Ambiance Awards
program.
Students completing the Jun-
ior Leadership program in-


clude Aressa Blackmon, Alana
Chambers, Joanna Cobb,
Tammy Davis, Brittany
Hobbs, Amanda Hunt, Melissa
Martin, Tameka Massey,'Tony
Roberts, Keiona Scott, Angela
Scurry, and J.T. Ward.
Father Mal Jopling, Rector
of Christ Episcopal Church
spoke briefly to the students
about employment in faith
based ministries.


He inspired the students to
"Take responsibility for your-
selves and the opportunities set
before you. Make your strug-
gles successful."
Ron Cichon, publisher and
owner of the Monticello News
followed with a presentation
concerning the importance of
community and civic aware-
ness.
Local businessman and en-


B |: |. tilll -N P 2ilfiV I M'm *
i f l I ... *>'" *.jH.... i t, m g

JUNIOR LEADERSHIP Group completes its course and receives certificates. Back,
left, Superintendent Phil Barker, Coordinator Diane Freeman., Front, left, Tammy
Davis, Tameka Massey, Alana Chambers, and Aressa Blackmon.


trepreneur Joe Land gave stu-
dents copies of his book
"Unleashing the Power
Within."
He spoke with them about
. taking responsibility for the di-
rection of their lives, taking
advantage of opportunities set
before them, and making their
* struggles successful.
Land also gave a brief syn-
opsis of the previous five
Leadership Classes, cluminat-
.ing in this final program.
As this was the last class in a
series of six, awards were pre-
sented to the students for their
attentiveness and for their de-
sire to expand their horizons.
After a lunch prepared by
Chamber Director Mary Fran-
ces Drawdy, awards were pre-:
Isented.
Framed certificates were pre-
Ssented to each of the students
along with a $100 scholarship
sponsored by the Kiwanis and.
Rotary; a $50 savings account
iimade possible by personal do-
nations collected and contrib-
uted by the County Republican
Party Executive Committee
and their.guest including Fred
Beshears, John Culbreath,
David Frisby, Tim Peary, and
B.A. Sandell:
Students also received Movie
Gallery tickets and Pizza Hut
meal tickets.
Superintendent Phil Barker
was in attendance to show his
support for the Leadership pro-
gram.
He presented Coordinator
Diane Freeman and Assistant
Coordiantor Judson Freeman
with Achievement Awards and
thanked them for their efforts
with the students.


FOUNDER of Junior Leadership Group, back left, Chief David Frisby, Coordinator Di-
ane Freeman, with students, front, left, Brittany Hobbs, J. T. Ward, Joanna Cobb,
Melissa Martin.


CHAMBER DIRECTOR Mary Frances Drawdy, back left, Coordinator Diane Freeman,
front, left, Amanda Hunt, Tony Roberts, Angela Scurry, and Keiona Scott. (News Pho-
tos)


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
MONTICELLO CITY COUNCIL
WATER AND SEWER
COMMITTEES

There will be a joint meeting of the
Monticello City Council Water and
Sewer Committees on Tuesday, March
28, 2006 at 6:00 p.m. to discuss
implementation of systems charges for
water and sewer and other current and
proposed projects for those utilities. The
meeting will be held at City Hall, 245 E.
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida.


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REGIONAL
CENTER
OF THI
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17, 2006 PAGE 3
. m _


Frank Blow
Owner, Radio Shack

Why I am a

Republican
I am a strong believer in the Second Amendment, the
right to bear arms. I believe that the ability to arm
ourselves for the protection of our homes and families
is the most profound indication of true and total
freedom. Our forefathers understood the importance
of this right as they wrote "a well regulated militia
being necessary to the security of a free state, the right
of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be
infringed" (U.S. Constitution, amendment 2).
Thomas Macauley, in 1850, said "the right to be
armed is the security without which every other is
insufficient". George Mason said "to disarm the
people is the best and most effective way to enslave
Lthii...." There are many quotes on this subject, but
of course, not everyone throughout history has been in
favor of the right to keep and bear arms. One famous
quote is "The most foolish mistake we could possibly
make would be to allow the subjected people to carry
arms; history shows that all conquerors.who have
allowed their subjected people to carry arms have
prepared their own fall". The year was 1938...the
speaker was Adolph Hitler.
While other political parties ard groups have tried to
diminish and weaken our right to keep and bear arms,
theRepublican Party has consistently) defended these
rights. That is among the many reasons I am a
Republican.



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are in this together.









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

SEiR RON CICHON
SPublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office.
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Love Of Learning


Begins At Home Opinion & Comment


Reading aloud may be the
single most important activity
parents do with their child.
That's because a child who is
read to is more likely to enjoy
reading and will want to learn
to read. Once a child becomes
passionate about reading he
or she will have the opportu-
nity to enjoy a lifetime of
learning.
According to Dr. Andrea
Pastorok, education psycholo-
gist for Kumon Math and
Reading Center, reading aloud
stimulates the brain and serves
as the foundation for literacy
development.
Studies show that the more a
person reads, the better he or
she becomes at it and students
who read the most are ,more
likely to stay in school and ex--
perience academic achieve-
ment..... ., ..
Dr. Pastorok recommends
these tips to make reading
aloud fun and interesting for
your children:
1. Begin reading aloudto
your child as soon as possible.
Reading to infants helps them
develop a sense of the rhythm
and pattern of language.
2. Remember, the. art of lis-
tening is acquired. It must be
taught and cultivated
gradually. Read slowly enough


for your child to.build mental
pictures of what he or she has
just heard.
3. Reading aloud helps chil-
dren develop their imagina-
tions and creativity. Looking at
illustrations also encourages an
appreciation of art.
4. If chapters are too long for
one reading session, find a sus-
Spenseful stopping point.
5. Use plenty of expression
when reading, If possible,
change the tone of your voice
to fit the dialogue and adjust
the pace of your voice to fit the
story.
6. Avoid long descriptive
passages until the child's
imagination, vocabulary and
attention span are capable of
handling them.
7. Unusually active children
may find it difficult to sit and
listen. Paper, crayons and pen-
cils allow them to keep their
hands busy while listening.
8. Encourage conversation
about what is being read. Fos-
ter a child's curiosity with pa-
tient answers to their
questions.
9. Remember to set aside
regular reading times each day
for your child to read on his or
her own. (NAPS)


Some Olympians


Short Takes & Other Notions
I


Merry Ann Frisby

I read the Monticello News
today and discovered the sub-
ject of local letter writers ex-
tensively covered. Without
any advanced knowledge, Ron
Cichon and I both wrote about
public expression in the news-
.papers. I compared Monticello
to other papers but we covered
some of the same ground. I
also noted that there were also
quite a few letters to the editor
in Wednesday's paper as well.
I say Hooray!
Interest in our community
and earnest debate can only
improve our town. For the
most part, our participants in
both public meetings and me-i
dia are a cut above other
places.
I saw a news clip of Korean'
legislature. At least a dozen'
men engaged in a girlish face-
slapping contest: After watch-:
ing a few minutes of this, I
was hoping for a solid Jolhn


Wayne upper cut. The slapping
looked silly, undignified and
unmanly.
Can you imagine this kind
slapping in any meeting in our
town? It just will not happen,
not any time soon. We have
too many folks raised by
Southern mothers. Manners
are important to us.
Years ago, I was working in
the Jefferson' Count. :Court-
room. At the time, there was a
lady who weighted about 300
pounds. I forget where she
worked, but she had a function
in the courtroom as I did.
She came into the court with
the rear hem of her skirt
caught up in the waistband of
the skirt. Her entire bottom
was exposed. No one said a
word, no one laughed. After an
entire plea colloquy, a female
inmate got up, walked over
and pulled her skirt down..
Nothing was ever said.
On a rainy day in a different
'county, I attended a trial of a


Trash Good Behavior Taurus: Bunch


BY REX M. ROGERS


You don't have to watch-
the Olympics very long to un-
derstand why they're the best
reality show on television.
Jaded sports pundits say the
games are boring, but what do
they know? The 2006 Winter
Olympics in Turin, Italy have
demonstrated once again why
the games enjoy such enduring
allure.
My family and.I have avidly
watched the games every cy-
cle for thirty years, thrilling at
victory and agonizing at
defeat. There's something in-
credibly pure and compelling
about athletes giving their all
for a chance to reach the inter-
national pinnacle of their sport.
The Olympics are a spectacle
of pageantry, patriotism, world
class talent, desire, discipline,
and "heart." The games are a
showcase for athletically gifted
individuals whose emotions
are as real and as raw as the
winter snow. Olympic athletes
provide us with incredibly he-
roic efforts, not just to win the
gold or even to honor the
homeland, but to fulfill the
Olympic spirit, to compete, to
leave every ounce of effort on
the field of play.
Ice skaters fall, hurt them-
selves then finish their
routines. Downhill skiers
forced outside the course by
the treacherous nature of the
mountains still finish the run.


Cross country skiers without
the talent to ever win a medal
slide to the finish with as much
emotion as any gold medalist,
has ever felt.' Teenage athletes
excitedly look into cameras
and say into microphones
whatever is on their minds, to-
tally unaffected, honest -
laughter, tears, shouts of utter
joy or frustration. How can
you not appreciate this un-
scripted drama?
But despite all the best ef-
forts of the International
Olympic Committee to protect
the integrity of sport and to af-
firm sportsmanship, still, the
Olympics are comprised of
people and people do not al-
ways do the right thing. Ath-
letes and coaches are dis-
missed for doping. Athletes are
disqualified for cheating or for
some other infraction of the
rules of competition.
Coaches have been known to
improperly award points to
athletes from theirs or a fa-
vored country. Fans some-
times commit unsportsmanlike
acts. These are sad develop-
ments, but even these instances
offer spectators worldwide a
chance once again to celebrate
the beauty of fair competition.
Then there are individuals
who are a morality play all
their own. Before nearly every
Olympics at least one athlete is
heralded as the world's greatest
in his or her sport. They're
touted by media as "bad boys"
(See Trash Good Page 5)


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I must admit that I am not-
very good at looking at the
night sky and finding "Leo the
Lion" or the other star constel-
lations. For the life of me, I
can't see how that cluster of
stars even comes close to any-
thing remotely resembling a
Lion, yet today, millions of
people around the world have
a belief that these distant ob-
jects have a direct and pro-
found influence on their lives.
The term for this errant be-
lief is Astrology, invented by
the ancient Greeks hundreds of
years before the birth of
Christ.
Let's make one thing per-
fectly clear before going on.
There is a significant differ-
ence between Astrology and
"Astronomy". Astronomy is a


real and very complicated sci-
ence of mathematics and theo-
retical physics practiced by
some of the smartest people in
the world like Albert Einstein.
Astrology is an ancient hocuss
pokus" psychological game
that should have died out thou-
sands of years ago.
The very thought that the
alignment of planets and stars
can have any affect on our
daily lives, is totally absurd in
2006. For starters, the Greeks
believed that the earth was at
the very center of the entire
universe.
This gigantic error in creat-
ing a completely erroneous
reference point from which
they created all of their astro-
logical charts, should be
enough for any intelligent per-
son to recognize the fallacy of
this practice.
Additionally, planet rotation
and positioning is slightly off.


man accused of stealing tele-
phones. Most of the witnesses
against him were transgender
people. Men who were living
as women.
The main witness was named
Michelle. She looked like a
pulling guard for the Rams,
and spoke in a high and exag-
gerated voice.
There was a fisherman in the
court, I suppose because the
weather prevented him from
being at sea. ;
The defense attorney asked
Michelle if her former name
was Luke, she bellowed out in
baritone "yes if it is any of
your business!" The fisherman
left the courtroom, got on his
CB radio and told the entire
fleet of fisherman about the
spectacle at the courthouse.
By trial's end, the place was
full of men in white boots
hooting at all the unusual girls.
The Judge had to call a recess.
'He threatened to clear the
'courtroom if decorum was not .




Of Bull
Every four years here on earth,
we add one day in February to
make up for the day (turn)
lost over each of the four pre-
vious 365 days in our planet's
rotation.
Actually, that is not accurate
either and every 1000 years or
so, another separate adjustment
is required to attempt main-
taining accuracy.
Now, apply this planet rota-
tion problem to the Greek
charts over a few thousand
years and heavenly bodies are
no longer in the original Greek
positions.
Accordingly, people today
that think they are born under
the sign of Libra, actually fall
under an entirely different
"sign". Reading and believing
the Libra prognosis, therefore,
doesn't actually apply.
A professor at a leading uni- i
versity conducted a simple ex-
periment. He wrote Astrology


maintained, and that cured the
problem.
This would have never hap-
pened in Monticello. I have
seen'very little rude public be-
havior, and I like it that way.
However, I fear the results if
new people do not understand
our ways. Let us make an ef-
fort to help newcomers adjust
to the politeness we take for--
granted.
NOTE: The ne.t two weeks 1
\%%ll be im Mississippi with a
group from Christ Episcopal
Church. I hope that we can
lend a hand to some victims of
the hurricane. On March 18,.
the night before I leave, I will
be attending the' Robert Olen
Bulter performance at the Op-
era Hpuse. His take on life is
just the encouragement I need
to face what I suspect may be
surprising devastation. Robert
Olen Butler's performance last
year was funny, well spoken
and full of hope. I will tell you
about the trip when I return.





reading'ss" for each of the vari-
ous "signs" under which peo-
ple are born. He gave each
student a '"reading" corre-
sponding to their "sign" (date
of birth). The students read the
readings and then the class dis-
cussed their accuracy as it per-
tained to each individual
student.
Remarkably, the overall "ac-
curacy" rating according to the
students own interpretations,
was an impressive eighty-six
percent. The professor then
told the students to pass their
paper to any other student
who's "sign" was different
than theirs. Surprise! Every
sheet was exactly the same
reading, except for the-title,
such .as Leo, Taurus, Libra,
etc.
He thus proved that the skill
in keeping this nonsense alive
was in the broad generalities
See Bunch Of Bull Page 5)


Problem Gamblers Get Help


Americans spend more on
gambling than all other recrea-
tion combined. For most, it's a
fun diversion but for a few,
gambling can become a seri-
ous, life altering problem.
Problem gambling is behav-
ior that causes disruptions in
any major area of a person's
life. It affects as many as six to
nine million Americans.
Would you recognize a gam-


bling problem in someone you
know? It may be easier if you
know the signs. Here are some
questions from the National
Council on Problem
Gambling.
If you or someone you know
answers yes to any of the
following questions, it is likely
that gambling has become
problematic.
1) Have you gambled until


your last dollar is gone?
2) Have you often gambled
longer than you had planned?
3) Have you lied about your
gambling to friends or family?
4) Have you used your in-
come or savings to gamble
while letting bills go unpaid?
5) Have you made repeated
attempts to stop gambling?
6) Have you broken the law
or considered breaking the law


to get money to gamble?
7) Have you borrowed
money to finance your gam-
bling?
8) Have you felt depressed
or suicidal because of your
gambling losses?
9) Have you been remorseful
after gambling?
10) Have you gamble to try
to get money to meet your ti-
(See Gamblers Page 5..


rom Our Photo File
From Our Photo File
.-AA~~I .2 .~. I .


WOMAN'S CLUB President Lottie Berry, left, Secretary Marge Fraser, Second VP
Ruth Krebs and First VP Amanda Ouzts met in Sept. 1990 to plan a Luncheon and
Fashion show for the Opera House centennial celebration in Oct., 1990. (News File
Photo)


i I


: ; :


AV 0












Bunch
(Continued From Page 4)
that are common place and
likely to happen in everyday
life.
.Like all other psychic
"Seers," those people gullible
and desperate to believe, fail to
hold the astrologers and other
psychic seers accountable for
their extraordinary percentages
of errors. One foretold thing
happening (most likely be
chance) clearly trumps the
hundreds of "predictions" that
never came close to materializ-
ing.
Maybe I should see if I can
be a "psychic" for the Monti-
cello News. Let's see, I predict
a Democrat or Republican
iand not an Independent) can-
4idate will win the next presi-
lential election; I' see gas
prices going up at the pump;
the cost of buying land or a
house will increase by next
Pear and we will have a terror-
st threat sometime by next
year
:' Now for.the big one, --- the




Trash Gc
(Continued From Page 4)
or "bad girls" because of their
devil-may-care attitudes or
rebel-like lifestyle.
Then they get to the Olym-
pics and don't win anything,
partly if not largely because
they've squandered their talent
and their -opportunity on arro-
gance. They .believed the me-
dia hype and thought they did-
n't have to sacrifice, only to
watch some underdog with ar-
guably less talent take their
place on the medal podium.
'This year's poster boy for
flippancy might be American
downhill. skier Bode Miller,
who made the cover of
Newsweek before the games
due in part to earlier athletic


Of Bull
cost of celery, will go way out
of sight! Now like those other
folks, you can't hold me ac-
countable for anything that
doesn't happen, only those
"predictions" I kind of got
right!
My astrology reading for last
week said that "money was in
my future, I should be cautious
of my neighbor's ulterior moti-
vations and staying close to
family was necessary due to a
potential illness."
Well, I am still waitingg on
the money, I haven't seen or
talked to a neighbor in over a
week and no one in the family
got sick.
Seeing that this is ta\ refund
and flu season, the obt ious
commonality of these "astrol-
ogy predictions" probably
came true for thousands of
Americans, thus proving that
the Astrologist. is worthy of
credibility.
Ya!-Right! For intelligent
people, "Taurus" is simply just
a bunch of bull.




Dod
achievements and due in his
part to his "I'll do it my way"
attitude that the media loves so
much


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17, 2006 PAGE 5

Writer urges Protection

For Children At Park


Dear Editor:
Many families went to the
Recreation Park Saturday to
watch their children's baseball
practice.
It was a typical day at the
park, a basketball game, a
birthday party, and a dozen un-
supervised children ranging in
age from four to 12.
One little boy wanted to play
on the play ground while his
brother had his baseball prac-
tice, but he couldn't, because
two of the unsupervised chil-
dren kicked him and pushed
him down.
Allegedly, last week, an even


more serious incident occurred
between two children.
We are forced to send our
children to school out of the
county. .
Are we going to have to go
out of the county for recreation
as well?
I am writing this letter to
urge the authorities to patrol
the Recreation Park more fre-
quently.
I am also asking for all par-
ents to be aware and to help
.protect our innocent children
while they play.
Leslie Wilkinson


Fire Leaves Family

Temporarily Homeless


ANDREW PFLIEGER of JES Boys and Girls Club play on
outdoor equipment during study break. (News Photo)



Workshop To Discuss


On theflipsideisAmerican Uses Of Vacated HMS
speed skater Joey Cheek, who to make their presentations at
has donated his $25,000 Gold RAY CICHON :hat time.'
medal money for' the 500 m Managing Editor The workshop "as se[ for 6
and his $15,000 Silver medal p.m, Tuesday, April 4.
bonus from the 1000 m to a The use of Howard Middle- Among other groups.known
charity called Right to Play. School, once it, becomes va- to -have interest in the facility
The 'money is designated to cant in May, and relocates to are the Boys and Girls Club,
help Sudanese refugee children the Jefferson County High and Charles Parrish who pro-
in Chad. Cheek is winning ac- School property. was dis- posed a Martin Luther King,
colades on and off the ice.for cussed 'at the School Board Jr. Center.
his attitude, humility, and gen- meeting Monday. The purpose of the workshop
erodity. On the agenda was Jacque- is to obtain complete details of


But that's the Olympi
good and the not so gooc
alongside the excellent.


Gamblers Get Help


(Continued From Page 4)
nancial obligations?
"Problem gambling is not a
bad habit or a moral weakness.
It's a serious condition that re-
sponds well to treatment," ex-
plains Keith Whythe,
executive director at the Na-
tiioal: Council on Problem
Gambling.
Whyte says that anyone can
develop a problem with gam-
bling. It can affect men or
women of any age, race or re-
ligion, regardless of their so-
cial status. Some risk factors,
individually or in combination,
might make a person more vul-


nerable:
A stressful life ever
as the death of a loved o
vorce, job loss, injury/d
ity
An early big win
Pre-existing mental
problems such as depri
anxiety, alcoholism
Family history of
tions such as alcoholism
pulsive gambling and
addiction.
There is hope and he
problem gamblers and
loved ones and many I
who seek help do recover


line Carpenter, rounder ot tne
es, the Love, Force, and Encourage-
d right ment Center, who presented
activities planned for the va-
cated Howard Middle School,
; should'they be allowed to use'
ihe faci irs 2' V"
A frer numerous members 6f
Capenter's team completed
it such their presentation, the Board
ne, d- decided to hold 'a workshopp
ai- and invite all wh6'had an inter-
[isabil-
est in using the vacated HMS,


health
session, Juvenile

--Arrested
addic-
com: At Park


rug. -

elp for
Their
people


r.


In today's rapidly changing healthcare environment,
nurses have more career options than ever before.
They also have flexible work schedules and attractive
starting salaries. And nursing is both personally and
professionally rewarding. Nurses .
really do make a difference in /-,,l'e,
people's lives.

Join us for a seminar and hospitality
hourto discussthe career opportunities in nursing.
Staff from all areas of nursing will be available to
provide a wealth of information about the many
different careers in nursing. Also, representatives
from area colleges and the technical college will be
present to discuss educational opportunities.


Tuesday, March 21

6:00 p.m.

John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital
East Tower Classroom (Ground Floor)
Times have changed, andso have you...and the time has never been
better to make the ncw advantages of a nursing career your own.
Archbold Scholarship
information will be available.

For more information please call (229) 228-2713.



MONTICELLO

NEWS
YOU CAN'T BE WITHOUT IT!!


hovw the buildings is to be
used, by whom, how it will be
maintained, the source of
fuiiding for its operation, and
related matters.
I ." "


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Lamont family of four--
was left temporarily homeless
following a fire in their home
Friday. night.'
Count} Fire Rescue Chief.
Mark Manthe\ s said they re-
cei\ed the call at 9:13 p.m., to
respond.to a structure fire at
the home of the Little family,
located at 534.Freeman Road.
"The fire started in a back
bedroom and the bedroom
was fully engulfed when we
got there," said Matthews


The. blaze was soon con-
tained, however, there was
heavy smoke and heat dam-
age to the rest of the structure.
"The house was not a total
loss, but it is not livable now
because of the severe smoke
and heat damage," said Mat-
thews.
The Fire Marshall was con-

tacted to investigate and de-
termine the cause of the blaze.
The Red Cross was also
contacted to assist the family.
Red Cross has since do-
nated $550 for the mother and
three children to purchase
food, clothing and pay for, a
hotel.


Ghost Trackers Schedule

Next Tour Here March 25


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

This month's Haunted Tour-
is set for 8 p.m. March 25
starting at the Chamber of
Commerce.
Following the ghost tour, a


ghost hunt takes place in the
old 1827 cemetery, if enough
interest exists.
The tour is $10 per person
and the ghost hunt is $10 per
person.
To make reservations call.
562-2516.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


A male jun\enile was ar-
rested March 6, at the Recrea-
tion Park on charges of
attempting to physically as-
sault a female juvenile.
He currently awaits trial.
Major Bill Bullock reports
that on the evening of March
6, Corp. Gerald Knecht re-
sponded to a call for assistance
from citizens at the park.
Apparently a ball practice
was being conducted there.
Upon his arrival, Knecht
learned that a girl had been
reportedly assaulted, in the'
women's restroom by an older
juvenile male.
Investigation indicated that
the male had watched the rest
room until the girl entered
and had their followed her in.
Inside, he attempted to
physically molest her, but she
got outside and ran for help.
Citizens at the park pre-
vented the male from leaving
until law enforcement arrived.


1 Choose
a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU

in Mind
Call 850-997-9981
to find out more
Steve McClelland i
FMB Insu, ',,: ". ,-- :
108 E. Wa: r ',
Monticellc HF -:.4.
A Contracted General Agency for
J R BluCross BlueShiehi
L'62478 ''090


A rewarding job with the nation's leading bottled
water company may be closer than you think.
Nestle Waters North America is hiring.
Nestle has several immediate openings at its Madison County bottling facility.
Employment opportunities are available for flexible and self-motivated individuals seeking
careers in production, maintenance, logistics and quality assurance.


Machine Operators
$112s per hour
Fork Lift Operators
$112 per hour
Blowmold Technicians
$13'" per hour
Quality Assurance Techs
51350 per hour
Line Mechanics
$1750 per hour


Nestle Waters offers great starting pay, ranging from $1125 to $1750
an hour depending upon the position. Our outstanding benefits
package includes health and dental insurance along with a 401K
and profit-sharing plans.

Stop by and fill out an application (directions below), and take the
first step toward a challenging and rewarding future
with Nestle Waters. Applications are also available
at Employment Connection centers in Madison, Perry,
and Live Oak, Florida. For more information,
call Nestle Waters at (850) 971-2100
or visit our website
at www.madisonblue.org.


e C tIOns.
) From 1-10: Take exit 262 North
through the town of Lee to SR 6.
Turn East (RIGHT) for approx.
3 miles to Hawthorn Road. Look for the
Deer Pqrk sign. Turn RIGHT on Hawthorn
Road and follow the signs to the parking area.
From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West approx. 15 miles.
Entrance is on LEFT;
Equal opportunity employer
M/F/V/D


NORTH AMERICA















PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17,2006


Lifestyle


" I i I I


Wacissa'UMC Sets

Relay Fundraiser


Church News Notes


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Wacissa United Meth-
odist Church will host a
fundraiser for the Relay For
'Life, 8 a.m.. Saturday, March
25, at the church.
Activities include: a turkey
shoot, raffle, quilt show, ga-
rage sale, bake sale, car show.
The Youth Group will pro-
vide breakfast and lunch.
The turkey shoot will be
held at the corer of Gamble
Road and Highway 59, begin-
ning at noon. The cost to par-
ticipate is $5 per shot and tur-
keys and various other prizes
will be awarded.
All activities other than the
turkey shoot, will be con-
ducted at the church, located
on highway 259 near
Walker's grocery.
The raffle will be for a
handmade lap quilt throw
with tickets at $5.


The garage sale will feature
furniture and many other
items, and the bake sale will
feature many different home-
made cakes, pies, cookies,
brownies and the like.
Registration for the car
show will be conducted 9-11
a.m.
Judging begins at noon and
prizes will be awarded at 2
p.m..
Many trophies will be
awarded, along with specialty
awards, including Best Paint,
Best Engine, Best Interior, ".
Best Progress, and more. -
For further information per-
taining to the car show, con- ,
tact Gary Snipes at 997-2134.
The Youth Group will offer
a breakfast of donuts, coffee
and juice beginning at 8 a.m.,
and lunches of hamburgers or
hot dogs and drinks, at noon.
The cost was not known at -_
press time, but is expected to
-be minimal


Donna Hazelwood Completes


ABBY STARLING works on
her 4-H sewing class. .':


Camellia Circle To Make

Lamps From Bottles


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Real Estate Technology Course The Camellia Garden Circle
will meet 2 p.m. Sunday at the
Donna Hazlewood of Steve C. home of Bobbie Golden for it's
Walker Realty, LLC has suc- regular monthly meeting, and
cessfully completed the Real- will learn how to create table
tor e-PRO course to become lamps from bottles.
one of a select few real estate To be sure to have enough
professionals to earn this pres- materials for the lamp making
tigious certification offered arid enough food for a meal
through the National Associa- after the prog bfiim, a count of
tion of Realtors.
ion of Real tors. na n guests planning to attend is
The course is an educational necessary. Contact Golden
necessary. Contact Golden at
program unlike any other pro- 997-6599, if planning to
fessional certification or desig- attend.
nation course available, a en
nation course available, A bottle cutter will be avail-
comprehensive and interactive. able.forthe ..making of vases .
1C.. I .rla...j.. H-AZELWOOD..... ... -- "Iffiother-Garden, Club news%
provide real estate profession- ...majority of consumers a mini flower show is sched-
als with technology tools mjort of consumers
needed to assist consumers in take time to conduct their uled for Monday, Mar. 20 at
the purchase of sale of a home. own research prior to con- the Chamber of Commbrce.
"The real estate industry has acting an agent. This is in honor of member Sue
undergone a fundamental contacting an agent. Reed, who spoke up for the
undergone a fundamental contacting an agent. continuation of the Garden
change over the past several "In turn, real estate profes- Club.
years, said Hazelwood. signals must be knowledgeable More entries for the horticul-
"A majority of consumers of how technology can assist ture are needed. They are to be
are taking the time to conduct -them in selling the needs of fresh miniatures or specimens
their own research.priorto_ the buying and selling public." that are naturally small.


Lloyd Home Owners

Schedule Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Lloyd Acres Home
Owners Association will have
its first 2006 membership
meeting to decide rezoning-
type propositions that will al-
low 276 additional mobile
homes to be placed within the
current boundaries.
The meeting will be held at
7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Mar. 21
at the Lloyd Methodist
Church, one block west of the


Presbyterian

Church To

Host Recital

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Presbyterian Church
will host a voice and piano re-
cital beginning at 1:30 p.m. on
Sunday, Mar. 19 in the sanctu-
ary.
The recital features three stu-
dents from the School of Mu-
sic at Florida State University.
Performing will be Alessan-
dra Feris, working on her doc-
torate in piano performance at
FSU; Luis Gonzalez, working
on his master's degree in piano
accompanying and chamber
music; and Ryan Harper, a
tenor, working on his master's
degree in voice performance'.
Feris resides in Brazil; Gon-
zalez' home is Costa Rica; and
Harper is from Canada.
There is no charge for ad-
mission.


traffic light in Lloyd.
SAt present there are 138 resi-
dencies in the subdivision, 80
percent of which are mQbile
homes.
If the two proposals are ap-
proved, all owners will be al-
lowed to divide their lots into
ore-acre parcels to accommo-
date mobile homes or conven-
tional dwellings.
"Will the Lloyd Acres Sub-
division triple its population?,"
attendance is encouraged.
Contact Willard Fuller for
more information at 342-1411.


IN LOVING MEMORY
Danielle Shanay Wade
3/09/05-3/12/05
Suffer the little children to
come unto me, and forbid
them not: For of such is the
kingdom of God. St. Luke
18:16
There is a special Angel in
Heaven that is a part of us.
It is not where we wanted
her but where God wanted her
to be.
She was here but just a mo-
ment like a nighttime shooting
star.
And though she is in
Heaven, she isn't very far.
She touched the heart of
many like only an Angel can
do.
We would have held her


l'appy St. 'Paddy's 'Day,


JOj i fs8 For a


Corned 'Beef


&


Cabbage 'Dinner
A*


m.





-A'w


The plant must have been
grown for at least 90 days, and
botanical names are'necessary
to be considered for top prizes.
There are several reference
books to help identify plants.
More than one entry may be
submitted, as long as they are
different cultivars.
Class A is container grown
plants. The container should be
no larger than 4", and double
potting is allowed.
Class B is cut specimens.
The cuttings should be 6", and
containers will be provided for
this Class.
More flower arrangements
are also needed. Member Kay
Martin may be contacted at
S.997-4566 by anyoneinterested
in entering a miniature flower
arrangement.
Times to submit an entry are
3 p.m. Mar. 19, during the Ca-
mellia meeting, and 8:30 till
10 a.m. Monday, Mar. 20.
If entries are brought to this
upcoming Camellia meeting,
they will be collected and en-
tered by member Jeanne Bren-
ner.

every minute if the end we
only knew.
So we send a special mes-
sage to the Heaven up above.
Please take care of our
Angel, Little Danielle, and let
her know we send her all of
our love.
Fawntisha, Karisha,
Jalan, Jazz'lynn,
James, and Carolyn Wade



It keeps

more than

memories

alive.




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Associations'MU
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke


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New Bethel AME pall bear-
ers lodge#2 will meef- p.im.,
Saturday. All members are
urged to attend to discuss im-
portance business.

,Salem AME Church will ob-
serve its annual choir anniver-
sar. program 11 a.m. Sunday.
Guest speaker is Rev. Mack
Roy Loggins of Thomasville,
assistant pastor of Mount PB
Church.
***
Union Hill AME Church
celebrates its annual evening
in white with musical selec-
tions by the.Holy Ghost Re-
vival Center Choir.
***
Mt. Zion AME Lloyd
Church and family celebrate
Family and Friends Day 11
a.m. Sunday, March 26.

St. Phillips AME Church will
conduct a yard sale and fish
fry (fresh water brim,) 8 a.m.
Sunday, April 1, at the Com-
munity Park at the comer of
Old St. Augustine Road and
Hwv 59..
che'e 'e

NAo /iace, OIke


and
There's
No Place Like
Your Hometown
Newspaper


Monticello

News
or ['*Keepin _
Lou infor'mned
An Ow
ojrowing Communiity


Choices Opp


/Assisted Living ALF #7641
,Skilled Nursing
,Fitness Center
/.Heated Pool/Jacuzzi
VCafteria/Cafe
/Walking/Bike Trails
/Artist Series
/Learning Center
/Wellness Programs
/Christian Atmosphere
/No Entrance Fee


Bethel AME Church will
celebrate its 141st Church An-
niversary with services at 11
a.m. and 4 p.m., Sunday,
March 26. Speaker at the
morning service is Rev. Mazie
Woodson Rojas of Moore's
Chapel AME Church, St. Pe-
tersburg.
Speaker at the afternoon
service is Rev. ,Larryissac
Scott, of First Elizabeth MB
Church in Quincy.

Mt. Morilla MB Church will
observe its :annual Dual Day
Services at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Sunday
Elizabeth Dills. Church Fam-
ily will render the morning
service, and. the Mt. Pilgrim
PB Church of Midway, FL, wll
render the afternoon service


Central.
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM B ile School,
11AM.Worship Hour.
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

My flesh and
my heart may
fail,, but God is
...hestrength, af,
my heart and
my portion
forever.

Psalms 73:26


portu n


ities Benefits


/Village Square Shops
/24 Hour Security Service
/Medical Staff---
24 Hour Duty
`iBoating, Fishing, Tennis &
Shuffleboard
,/Private Custom Built Homes
/'Rental Homes-I & 2BR
/Rental Apartments-
Efficiency, I and 2 BR
/l.awn Maintenance
/Paved, Lighted Streets


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Charles A. Smith III Director

Jefferson Boys, Girls Club


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Charles A. Smith III has


been named. Director of the
Jefferson County High School
Boys and Girls Club.
Ror the youngest of three
children, he began his pursuit
to make a difference in the
lives of children by attending
Florida A&M University and
majoring in Physical Educa-
tion.
He received his Bachelors of
Science in 2004, in Physical
Education, and his Master's of
Education with a concentration
in Sports Management in
2005.
He worked at Apalachee Ele-
mentary School as a Teacher's
Aide, and as a Counselor with
their Extended Day Program.
During this time he focused
on applying his theory into an
authentic educational setting.
Smith also worked at Bond
Elementary School as the
Sports Coordinator for the af-
ter school program.
He was able to gain other
valuable experiences during
his matriculation at FAMU by
participating in various volun-
teer programs.
In addition to the various
professional memberships, he
was the National Association
for Sports and Physical Educa-
tion "Outstanding Major of the
Year" for 2004.
Smith enjoys and is passion-.
ate about sports.
He was a member of the
FAMU baseball team for two
seasons. During this time he
was able to study the game of
baseball.
He was later a volunteer
baseball coach for the Capital
Park Sheriffs during the spring
of2005.


centives like field trips, aca-
demic and social.
On the day of his arrival to
the site, he was plunged night
into a game of Flag Football
against one of the Leon
County Clubs. A now "regular


occurrence" for the Club, as an
activity during the Recreation
period.
Other regular activities at the
Club include Power Hour,
where the students get help
with their homework.
During Technology Time,
students are helped with read-
ing, math, lesson plans, and
FCAT study;
During Enrichment Time,
students are taught life lessons,
money\ matters, and the Arts.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17, 2006 PAGE 7



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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17,200







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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17,2006:


JV Warriors Win ..


2 Back To Back


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA JVs win two back to
back.
Facing Steinhatchee, ACA
won 18-3..
Cody Kelly went four for
four with three runs.
John Stephens hit a single
and a double; Joe Mizell, one
run; Brian Scholte, one single,
one run; and Casey Wheeler,
went four for four, one
double, three runs.
Marcus Roberts, two runs,
four RBI; Brian Dunbar, Ja-
cob Newberry and Marcus
Shiver, two runs each; and
Buddy Vollertsen, one run,
two RBI.
The Warriors defeated
Madison Academy 10-3.


Casey Wheeler pitched the
entire game, striking out nine,
walking eight, and giving up
two hits.
"I was extremely proud of
him," said Coach Demott An-
derson.
.At the plate, Wheeler. went
four for four, one' double,
three runs; Luke Whitmer
went three for four with two
runs; Kent Jones went two for
three with one run; Dunbar
went two for four with one
run; Casey Anderson went:
two for four with two runs;
and Kelly scored one run on
an error.
In related news, through a
typographical error, ACA
JVs loss to NFC was incor-
rectly reported. The score
-\'as 4-3.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

NFC defeated the JCHS var-
sity baseball team 28-0/
"NFC just came out and
blasted us," said Assistant
Coach Jim Norton. "NFC has
an outstanding coach and
team.
"In the 40 years I've been
Acquainted with baseball, I
have never seen a high school
team put on a demonstration
like that hitting."
SNorton said that after NFC
was up by ten on the Tigers,
the coach took out all of the
starters and the players were-


Bass Touri

iAt Waciss;


-FRAN HUNT
'-Staff Writer

For the second consecutive-
;year, bass tournaments are
will be hosted at the head of
.he Wacissa River.
: The first tournament this
j;year will be held April 8, and
,will begin at daylight.
.: Weigh in is at 1 p.m. The
,entry fee is $20 per person,
!$10 per boat for the Big Bass
rJackpot, which will award
'100 percent of the jackpot.,
SSpokesman Kurt Walker
said that the more people
there are, the bigger the jack-
pot will be.


n't stealing bases. "He knew
that: we were clearly out-.
gunned and tried to keep the
score close," said Norton.
Pitching the first three in-
nings was.Alex Lingle, who
gave up ten runs, two of
which were home runs.
.Thomas Lyle came in the
fourth, gave up ten runs, one
Sof which was a home run; and
Arnez Ammons finished out
Sthe round on the mound, giv-
ing up eight runs, one of
which was a grand slam home
r. run'. .* ,* .. .
The Tigers committedthree
erroris and there were, three
Tiger hits.
Mario Rivers, two singles
and Breon Parker, one single.


nament

a River

Rules for the tournament;
No live bait.
No trapped fish.
Fish must be caught the
day of the tournament.
Two people per boat.
Ten fish limit.
Twelve inch size limit on
large mouth and Suwannee
bass.
All FWC rules apply.
S Walker added that these
tournaments will, be hosted
once per month.
Directions to the head of
the Wacissa River; From
highway 27, turn southeast
onto highway 59. Go straight
on highway 59. You will
dead-end at the head of the
Wacissa River.

. r' /.


JCHS Girls Beat

Maranatha 16-6


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


LADY WARRIOR Brittany Hobbs at bat during a recent
ACA practice session. (News Photo)


Lady Warriors Beat

Mayo, R. F. Munroe


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writr


1
i'


The Aucilla Christian Acad-.
emy varsity softball team
chalked up two wins last
week. ..
The Lady Warriors skidded i
by Mayo for a 5-4 win.
"Mayo is a really good i
team,' said Coach Roslyn
Bass.
Brittany Hobbs pitched nine
innings, striking out three,
walking, one and giving ,up
nine hits. ,.


Hobbs went, four-for four
with a double; Bethany Saun-
ders went two for three; Chel-
sey Kinsey went one for
three; and Joanna Cobb went
two for four.

In the first district game of
the season, Aucilla hammered
R. F. Munroe for the 7-4 win.
Hobbs pitched, striking out
five and walking four.
At the plate, she was two
for three; Nicole Mathis went
three for four; and Keri
Brasington and Shaye Eason
both went one for three.


two r
Hea
rifice
the a


The Jefferson County High and sc
School varsity softball team Jem
conquered Maranatha Mon- three,
day for the 16-6 win. ond,
"We were the recipients of a stole t
alk-a-thon," said Coach Se
Earline Knight. "Maranatha the
must ha'e handed.us a kazil- struck
lion walks and a lot of hit-by- and g;
pitches." "Sh
She added that Maranatha game,
brought in three different Sh
pitchers, but none were able for tl
to out throw the bats of the second
Lady Tigers. four r
SKeandra Seabrooks went "It
one for three, and had a dou- ball a
ble in the first that drove in cluded


HMS Loses To

Wakulla 20-1,
The Howard Middle School NC
baseball team lost to Wakulla
20-1.
Gregory Dotson had one hit
and Demontray Johnson had
two hits.
The Bees are 0-4 on the sea- 1698V
son.


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uns.
father Miller made a sac-
to bring Seabrooks in
run and went 0 for two,
;ored two runs.
aria Cuyler went one for
hit a single in the sec-
scored two runs and
wo bases.
rving as the pitcher for
Lady Tigers, Cuyler
South four, walked one
ave up two hits.
ie pitched one heck of a
," said Knight.
lanice Brooks went two
hree, hit a single in the
d, one RBI and scored
uns.
was a good day of soft-
ll around," Knight con-
d.





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FRAN HUNT Ireshia Denson went two for. .................. .. .... ....
Staff Writer three with one RIr three ~--


The Jefferson County High-
School varsity softball team
defeated Tallavana Tuesday
for a 16-9.
Coach Earlene Knight was.
extremely pleased with the.
two back-to-back wins of the `'.
Lady Tigers.
Jemaria Cuyler pitched the
game, striking out eight, giv-
ing up seven hits and four
walks. "She had 'a topnotch
day," said Knight.
.At the plate, Cuyler \ ent,
two for five, one single, one:)


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JCHS Varsity Boys

Downed 28-0 BY NFC


I I -


'..ti .,


O:m I klvk-rsnv I Iwo=


ii
~











Warrior JV Girls Defeat Mayo 20


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-_
emy JV softball team de-
feated Mayo last week for a
20-4 win.


"We were definitely the
stronger and better trained
team on the field that day,"
said Coach Frank Brown.
"Both our offense and defense
worked very well, which en-
abled us to easily score."


NFC Softball Team

Blanks Lady Tigers 17-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity softball team
was blanked by NFC 17-0.
"It wasn't a bad a loss as the
week before," said Coach
Earline Knight. "We're
loaded with ninth graders and
if we can get them out of the
mentality that every team we
play is going to beat us, we'll
have a real good roster and
see a lot of major improve-
ment in performance."
She added that the Lady Ti-
gers did however, play two
topnotch innings.
As a team, the Lady Tigers
committed eight errors.
The first two innings re-

JCHS Girls
Shine At
Hamilton
During the Hamilton Invita-
tional, the Lady Tigers track
team made a strong showing.
SChandra Tucker took first
place in the long jump with
14' 2"; and Quanesha Franklin
took second place in the long
hump vith 13' 6".
Jazmaun Hall took second
place in the shot put with 30'
6.5"; and Ceata Crumitie took
third in shot put with 28' 0".
Franklin also took first
place in the 200 meter with
28.0 seconds and third place
in the 100 meter, with 15.0
seconds.
The Lady Tigers include
Tucker, Franklin, Hall. Cru-
mity, Deidra Arnold, Leisha
--Mitchell, Keandra Seabrooks,
Shanice Brooks, and Alexia
Huggins.;


mained scoreless for both-
teams. JCHS gave up. 13 runs
in the fourth, two in the fourth
and two in the fifth.


He added that the Lady
Warrior defense totally de-
nied Mayo.
The game was called after
five innings due to the ten-run


th

0


I-4


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRT.. MARCH 17. 2006 PAGE 11

HMS Girls


entire game, striking out three
and giving up seven hits and Drop Tw o
Five walks, compared to the
Mayo pitcher, who struck out TO W akulla
Three, gave up 20 hits and 11
walks. _FRAN HUNT


Tarn C d p d te Olivia Sorensen, three sin-
Taryn Copeland pitched the gles, one double, one RBI,
gles, one double, one RBI,
three runs; Katelyn Levine,
three singles, two walks, three
Jemaria Cuyler pitched for runs; Skyler Hanna, one walk,
he Lady Tigers, striking out one RBI one run; and Mai-
ne, walking seven, hitting. lory Plaines; one single, three
ne batter with a pitch, and triples, three RBI, three runs.


giving up nine hits.
The only Lady Tiger bat.
making contact with the ball
was Heather Miller with a sin-
gle.


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SSavannah Williams, two sin-
-gles, onetriple, one strikeout,
oiie RBI, two runs; Sunnie-
Sorensen, one put out and
Erin Kelly. one single, one-
\\alk, one run.

Nikki Kisamore, one walk,
one hit-by-pitch, two runs;
Miranda Wider, one single,
o ne walk, one strikeout, one
run; Lisa Kisamore, one walk,
one run; Copeland, one
single, one walk, three RBI,
two runs; and Michaela Roc-
canti, one double, one walk,
one hit-by-pitch, one
strikeout, three RBI, one run.


Staff Writer


The Howard Middle School
softball team lost both games
of a double-header to Wakulla
Tuesday.
The Lady bees lost the first
game 20-1 and the second,
28-1.
In the first game Brionna
Jones scored the lone run for
the Lady Bees, and Kierra
White had the lone hit.
Jones, La'Ashle Norton,
Mariah Brinson and Shenece
Young all received one walk
at the plate.
In the second game, the
lone hit and run was made by
Devonna Arnold.
Jones and Lanesiya Massey
each received walks at the
plate.

LEGAL NOTICE
Call for Bid& Projeci: Mir
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Handler
at Christ Episcopal Church


Ivm1UInIIU I IUI, Un. upo, u/l u. VI ijJl-l
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air
conditioning systems in the existing
church and removal and disposal of..
four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
form successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted -at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
date and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office, 425 North


You are invited to attend an



COen jon use ford Faures
Come join the Archbold Family!


Archbold Memorial Hospital in Thomasville, GA,
.. now hiring nurses for all areas including
the NEW cardiovascular/nephrology
tower. Ak about our premium-
S p PRN rates.


THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 -
4:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M.
JOHN D. ARCHBOLD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL', .
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA
!' ~-EAST TO\VER LOBBY
-i
.- eresfiet- 'erS ur Departments
".1*-:>.Rteshments" Q; ". s1^ .^|^ Pri ,-.s

'. For aton, callU 922;2747
or :p o- r-1 .1
- -- -- -- ~ l..-f ,.. ..- n. ..... -.- .......... _


F1


Real Estate


S&


lmIorTe 0O Pa .


SABOR REALESTATE


MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor


SALES ASSOCIATE "u"
850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE YOU DESERVE / PEOPLE YOU TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL ~ COMMERCIAL ~ INVESTMENT ~ LOTS ACREAGE


;I


VIRGINIA G. BLOW
Broker Associate KellyadKelly
850.509.1844 Pnperb
Q04inLffheectrw Lw Mae,.. .Tbe*m"Awie
Scctis4f ed/ Bu&yeri-erscm 'I
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL LAND
TOP ASSOCIATE PRODUCER PAST FOUR YEARS
$$$$MULLT-MILLION DOLLAR PRODUCER $$$
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


-


PI iR


Realtor- Asso


Cot Land?
Thinking about buying or selling land? Contact the land
specialists at SouthVest Land Group, Inc. We can assist you with professional
service and a friendly, no-pressure atmosphere.
Sellers All we do is land. Your property doesn't take a
backseat to houses or anything else. We'll take photos and
use maps and exhibits to highlight your property for buyers.

Buyers Whether it's a single lot or large acreage, a
recreational retreat or timber tract, we can help you find that
perfect property.
Contact us today for a confidential discussion regarding your real estate needs.
Simply call or send us an e-mail message at southvest99@aol.com. We
look forward to hearing from you.


John A. "Al" Russell, Broker
850-906-0017 SouthVeP t 850-508
Office i el
LaOnd Group, Inc.


-4242
1-


- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ---- s. .s- s rs -.- ~r


___ _1


I ----- -----~---L----- --------


--- ------ ---


Ilyri








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17,2006


Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida.
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29,31, 4/5/06, c
NOTICE: The Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners
will hold a Workshop on Tuesday,
March 21, 2006, at 2:00 p.m., at the
Jefferson County Public Library,
375 South Water Street, to discuss
proposed renovations to the old
J.C.H.S. buildings for use as a
county government complex. Danny
Monroe 11I, Chairman
3,17/06, p(l


HELP. W, i WWI,


Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568
tfn .
Servers/Cooks Must be 18
References required. Call Brian
at 284-'899.


3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Huddle House now hiring
experienced waitresses and cooks.
We offer above average wages
and health insurance with
2-weeks paid vacation per year.
Please come in and file an
application or call 342-3284 and
ask for Jack.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is currently
accepting applications for the
following positions.: 1. A
lineman at the entry-level
position. The position would be
based out of the Madison office.
However, the individual will be
required to live in the
Monticello area. Position will
require outage standby during
the week and the weekends as
required. All applicants must
possess a valid Florida CDL
Class A license. 2. A lineman at
the entry-level position. The
position would be based out of
the Perry Office. The individual
will be required to live in the
Perry, Florida area. The
position "ill require outage


stand-by during the week and
the weekends as required. All
applicants must possess a valid -
Florida CDL Class A license 3.
An automotive mechanic at the
advance level position. The
position will be based out of the
Madison Office. The applicant
must have working knowledge
of diesel and gasoline engines
and hydraulic systems in
addition to basic automotive
repair and maintenance. The
salary will be based upon
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work,
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc.. offers -a
benefit and retirement package.
The closing date of the accepting
applications is March 31,2006.
Applications may be obtained
from Tri-County Electric
Cooperative's Offices.
Applicants should be returned
to the attention of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative's
Engineering and Operations


Department. Tri-County
Electric Cooperative reserves
the right to reject any and all
applicants. 850-973-2285.
3/8-3/31, c
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville. Fl is looking for a
Case Manager with a B.A. in
social or behavioral sciences
preferred; or an equivalent
combination of. education
(minimum of A.A) and
experience in working with
juvenile offenders preferred.
Applicants will also be required
to pass a background check. It
is an essential function of the
position that the staff member
must be capable of physical
restraining the students if. and
when necessary. Joann Bridges
Academy in Greenville, FL is
looking for a Nurse with a
Associate Degree in nursing and
current license to practice in the
state required. A minimum of
six months clinical or public
health and emergency nursing
preferred. Please submit a
resume to Barbara Broomfield
b% fak ,i,' 850-948-422" or email


to

Barbara,Broomfield@youthserv
ices.com
3/10; 15, 17, 22, c
Registered Nurses Intensive
Care Unit $5,000 Recruitmeit
Incentive (With one year of
experience) Archbold Hospital
in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above
full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an
excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries.
CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or email:


rtaylor@archbold.org EOE
3/10, 15, 17, c
Driver Covenant Transport.
Excellent pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers, O/O,
Solos, Teams, & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)695-7279 x19.
3/17, fcan
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn


S Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

S575-6571


SBUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets -DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's M ini-Storage'B ER ORE A GR
850-509-1465 cell 00 Trimming Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home o Mowing. 0 Aerial Device H
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
S family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance 2 A 10% Discount
99-235 5----- -- -- -- -- ----
Events and Types 997-0039 Lic.&Insured 911025 East Mahan -~877-4550


B-& M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTIC, INC. LA"flm : AR
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hging LL HILL AUTO LECTC, INC. LA HIUTA Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencig
Li, S 'p .a incn Co"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
Richbourg Nursery, Inc. 0. ---. Lloyd, FL32337
el .: 2i-- -... 99 Richbourg Road .. .-L. meroc
Brad McLeod C Mack M LeodClaV 'n r C-7
ell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McL Montiello, FL 32344 Thomasville Road 115 lbany Rd. Snd 9976788
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346 Moi cll o-, PL3 344 Thomasville Roa :
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091 Alany ..7 7
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on Carrol Hil) 229-226-0717 ipSoil
Fax 850-997-8388
Y c e PWe accept all manufacturer coupons, Resintial & Commercial L
Your Local Professional Painters Residential & Commercial uc. cg #1507547 I
Interior -Exterior I 10ihevron YEAGERCONTRACTING C. INC.
Lie. & Ins. #4676 WE GO THEEXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
CUSTOM HOMES
JohnWil son Swisher Sweet Sale 997-6500
*d,: .-, YWHEN YOuNEED TO SOLvE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
P itn Se vcFlavor Cigar Tubes .59 each d Adng i tiigs; We ro o
Flavor'ga e .,5~ ,. "- SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE.SERVICE
(Reg., grape, peach, strawberry) *Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
Honey Kings Buy One Get One Free PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383 'Tutorials*Removalof Viruses,Adware, Spywate
(2-5pkg.) $2.49

Septic Tank & Land Clearing Flavor Blunts 5pk $1.89
Complete Setic Sece & Repair Little Cigars Buy One Get One Free :J JEFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS .Pl H
Complete Septic Service & Repair .99pk. or $8.8 WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 3o00
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing 1.99pk. or $8.89 Carton M WCEIJE, FL 3T244O E Cl fr ut
: ', MOnTICELLO, Fk. 3 Call for quality work
Thomas B. Scott, Sr. (2-5pks.) $1.89 CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711 45 Years In The Trade
Rt 1Box 137 Blunt Cigars Buy One Get One Free Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Lamont, FL 32366 (2-5pks.) $1.99 850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620 Kayak $1.1 lcan $5.19 tube (5 cans) *Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior
Lamont, F 32366 1 s Exterior


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel,
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic T Contractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lic. #SR0971265
Visa & MastercardAccepted!


ATTENTION NOW AVAILABLE:
BUSINESS OWNERS SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
-SHOP KEEPERS- ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM-SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS
LOCAL PROFESSIONAL BIG BEND
SALES&SERVCE COMMUNICATIONS Co

997-4150


SThree Sisters
Mystery Chief


certified Angus Beef



Certified Angus Beef


Tbe Pecorator's

Warehouse, LLC


260 N. "
Cherry Street
Furnishing & Accessories


Call Andy Rudd For


I *Pr C ani


Appliance Service Lce

Needs @ Reside

997-5648 FREE EST


igiBed "resur



:8 0 9 8* I:ag igg I


MONTICELLO'S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience Repa
Sales Service Installation Change Outs CERAMI, TILE, CARPET, VINYL, Servce Is Our Business on and off the Road
Residential Commercial LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
Residential Commercial
342-9922 HOME EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Family Owned 0 Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
Li. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSRED Lamnt, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home
Lic. # Ra0067121* CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


Tyrone Uavis
iales Manager


Since 1977
sed *Bonded *Insured
ential & Commercial
IMATES- 997-4100


Sl1timate

i Aoage Auto

L 877-7222
A Very large selection to choose from
A All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold


Trade rag
push, PitalI r Dr
e Iiave hicle
W11, Everyone


6OOD (RENT, BAD (RET,

iT DOEI T MA ER


.11* S S


_~_II_ I~____


I . .


- - -- -- I m


I ww h-mv. Ir~JI~r


I


r


!


- MMOR.









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17,2006 PAGE 13
^ .: '' *i,> < l-^ .W *A r .^ rvl- *-*.- -,^ -of*' '


AUTO~Q~~


Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn


SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Handyman Home Repair:
Pressure washing, painting
int/ext, dry wall, trim, wood
working, siding. House Cleaning
- House Keeping 850-251-4575,
997-3587,
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31,pd
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peter Satellite -- Your Satellite
dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and
prompt service. We also offer
Go-Kart, utility trailers and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150
Old Lloyd Road, Monticello,
Fla. 850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetitie, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the'
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
-a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert- of' South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop .in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Free... Free Mostly Oak Wood!
For your "Fireplace" size. You
cut... You Haul. 586 Old Lloyd
Road, Call for appointment and
directions 997-4350
3/17, pd
Need a Clean or Organized
house? Call Traci 850-997-3176
3/8-31, pd
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
FOR SALE
Maftress/Box bed Set: pillow
plush double sided pillow top
matress/box set, 4 inch pillow
top. List $989.00, sell for $248.
850-528-1422.
3/17,22,24, 29, 31, pd
Brick Home on approx. 1.7
ac. 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom,
hardwood floors, fireplace,
Florida .room, deck, 2 miles
from downtown Monticello on
paved road. $249,000 997-2387
or 933-0904.
3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Dresser 6 drawers, hickory
wood, $35, deep freezer 22 CF.
$45, or trade for pressure
treated wood. Knik Knack Shelf
$5 Call 510-0998, 342-1486.
3/10, 15, 17, pd
Registered 6 years old dark bay
thoroughbred Philly $2000 Call
Mike 519-6506.
3/17, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
By Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
3/17, fcan

AUTOMOTIVE
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tire, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book.
997-6806 Wilson Auto, LLC.
tfn, c


2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250 1700
mi. Nice $3,000 OBO must sell
850-508-3851
3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd


LOST
Lost Cockatiel whistles theme
from Andy Griffin Show &
Yankee Doodle Aucilla Shores
area Please call 342-9929.

FOR RENT.:" '
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980. 11/30,
tfn, c
3 bedroom, 1 V2 bath in country.
$600 per month. 997-3368.
tfn, c
Furnished downstairs efficiency.
Large bedroom, living room,
bath on'4 acres. Monticello 20
min. to Tally. $400 includes
utilities. 997-2422, 251-1108
3/10, pd
Commercial Building 1,700 sq.
ft. 2 bath, 1 V2 acre property
$550. per month. Hwy 19, 5
miles, North, of town.
561-718-0896.
3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd


WANTED OLD
COCA-COLA Bottles
850-545-3677



Advertise In,

Your Local

Paper


Real Estate and Estate Auction:
3 prop. in Live Oak and Lee FL,
JW Hill & Assoc. Call for
information 888-821-0894.
3/17, pd
Yard Sale Saturday 8 a.m., 580
So. Waukeenah St. Crib, toys,
household & baby items.
3/17,pd

REA1iIEEFE -
Bu3 Oner in Christmas Acres
2.2 Acres, '97 Fleetwood, 4
bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace,
asking $82K, 877-3123.
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, pd
Nothing here a bulldozer can't
fix! 2.5 acres in NE area of
County, private dirt road,
mobile homes allowed, rolling
'hills area, large merchantable
pine trees just $10,000 per acre,
R. Winston Connell, Realtor'
850-933-6363 Mobile or After
Hours 850-948-5000.
3/15, 17, c.
... .......... ..


REALIKSTATE4A
Steinhatchee/Dixie County side.
Gulf fishing/Scalloping. TRADE
older 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
% acre private heavily wooded
lot, Hwy frontage, structurally
sound, blocks from boat ramps,
road to nowhere, pine log creek.
landing. Approx. value
175-200K will trade for house
with acreage outside Monticello,
(352) 498-2832
3/17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5, 7, 12, pd
It's .a real estate jungle out
there! Hire an experienced
guide! Buying or Selling?
* Lynette's the Realtor with
experience, knowledge and a
successful Track record. The
one who'll always put your
interests first. The one with a
.long list, of satisfied customers.
Count on her to be your Expert
guide through the real estate
jungle! Lynette C. Sirmon,
Realtor Associate 850-933-6363 i
Ior after hours:850-948-5000 R.
.Winston Connell, Realtor ,
3/15, 17,'c


'VIRGINIA G BLOW
Broker Associate
April 2,2006 850.509.1844
SPRINGFRENZY SEASON...
GREAT TIME TO LISTYOUR rKure'K I Y!
$115,000 3/2 Modular/3 AC, extras, Lloyd Acres
$129,900 3/2 HOME/lot, in town, like new, Martin
$129,900 2/2 HOME/2. 5AC,wood floors & walls
$129,900 3/2 HOME/lot, ha rdwood floors, York
$163,000 3/2 HOME/1 AC, historic fixer iipper
$295,000 Profitable 7 apartments, Hagan
$500,000 10,000 SF Bldg.,16 AC'S., Hwy. 90 E.
$622,000 9,470 SF COMMERCIAL BLDG
WILL LEASE/BUILD TO SUIT
COLDWELL BANKER KELLYAND KELLY PROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTY OWNED AND OPERATED.


The sky's the limit
for our growth anJ your opportunities.-.-..
Due to our EXPLODINGGROWTH.
Digital.Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
$33,000-$36,000
'or our TALLAHASSEE location. We offer set schedules, good pay. exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT REQUIRED
WE OFFER PAID TRAINING! For more detailed information, please visit- r..... I, ,..T... : ..i, i. 1. .. <
***WE OFFER A FAST PATH FOR ADVANCEMENT AND
CAREER GROWTH!***
All of our field management staff were promoted from field technicians.
Most promotions occur after 6 continuous months with the company.
DRS Satellite Installation Techs are provided with
paid training a company owned truck
Stools a variety of shifts ;
Benefits (medical/derntal insurance, life insurance, tuition reimbursement. 401K plan with matching funds, bonuses,
paid vacations, holidays, and sick time)


For more detailed information, please visit: www hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers
or call: 1-877-351-4473.
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


NOTICE OF HEARING ON

PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY

ORDINANCE 2006-02


The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following entitled
ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
ANNEXING PROPERTY CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 0.46 ACRES
LOCATED AT 500 MISSISSIPPI STREET (CORNER: OF MISSISSIPPI AND
TENNESSEE STREETS) TO THE CITY OF MONTICELLO; REDEFINING THE
BOUNCARY LINES OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID
PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. This property is further
identified on the map below. A complete metes and bound description, as well as the
entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday. A public hearing will be held on the adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday, April
4, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall.


"J( S OUTH' ,


'k--x ^^&^g ^y^&
S^ ^-^^^^i |Sba ;

*Kb.r~a '.'

^"SU^-m^- 1 ~ S^ ^ -^;c-^^


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Just Listed! Won't Last Lonq! Indian Hills
Area 1568 sq. ft. looks stick built mobile-
Shome on 6 acres with creek, pond, pasture, a
:;real nice package $145,500 '

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3.bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the High Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


-bi
rl ~QL~*l;iTPd6~~ ~h~LI~eCUi ~-r-i


--


- --









Kelly Properties

Annual Fundraiser

Brings $2,500


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The second annual Coldwell
Banker Kelly & Kelly Proper-
ties fundraiser was a huge
success, raising $2,500 with
approximately 160 residents
in attendance .
The funds raised will be
split evenly between the Re-
lay For Life, the Humane So-
ciety and the Senior Center.
"This was also a celebration
of Coldwell Banker's 100
year anniversary," said
spokesperson Brenda Kelly.
Food, desserts and refresh-
ments were provided.
The band 19 South, consist-
ing of residents Heath Bass,
Brett Kelly, and Jason and
Brian Freeland, provided the
entertainment.
Music varied from classic
rock to classic country, with
songs by Johnny Cash, Neil'
Diamond, Lynard Skynard,
and many other artists.


Kelly said coordinators
thank the many who donated
door prizes for the event.
These included: Jackson's
- Drug Store, Gelling's
Flowers, Snapdragon, Imag-
ine Interiors, Swallowtail De-
signs, Stewart's BP, Great Ad-
venture Outfitters, Monticello
Florist & Gifts, Sage, Rancho
Grande, and Jefferson Build-
ers Mart.
There was also a silent auc-
tion conducted for a one-night
stay at the Clark-Avera
House, a painting by artists
Sharon Fleita, a one-night
stay at the Cottage, and a
longhorn throw rug donated
by Great Adventure
Outfitters.
"We would also like to
thank all of those who at-
tended the event," Kelly
added. "Thanks also go to
Bill Tellefsen and Jacob
Gray, who provided entertain-
ment prior to the performance
of 19 South."


Of those 3,000 new smokers:
30 will be murdered
S60 will die in traffic accidents
750 will die from smoking-related
diseases, including lung cancer,
emphysema and heart disease.

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION
SPrevent lung disease:

Call 1^^^^^ ^-80--USA


PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 17, 2006
I
S "Accounting
Administrative Office Technology
Air Conditioning Technology
Applied Business Technology
Automotive Technology
Computer Information Systems Register
Cosmetology egister
Criminal Justice Now!
Drafting Technology
Early Childhood Care & Education
Health Care Assistant
Agriculture Technology
Industrial Electrical Technology
S Machine Tool Technology
Medical Assisting
I Medical Laboratory Technology
Nursing
Paramedic Technology
Pharmacy Technology
Radiologic Technology
Respiratory Care Technology
e uon Surgical Technology
., Technical Studies
S at the Welding and Joining Technology


ANGELA SCOTT reshelves books at the library. (News
Photo)


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program
866-FUND-549.


i

y '-" :; B .


J.G. WENTI WO\ORTH
ANN UIT P URC IASI. 'Iwt*,RAM',


The elderly. Their loved ones. Your community. \'Olu neers
1.800.899.0089 or www.voa.org. ofkAmerica*
There are no limits to caring. i


speed of
life Soui


thwest ...,.


Calico Sprinn

Arts & Craft Show

Saturday 9:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m. inday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.



i :, ^ .--./ ..


Ove 300 ihs Ar Crafts
Ornamental Iron ;.: Painted Glass Handcrafted Furniture
Clothing -.' lewelry Folk Art Ceramics Porery
SSeasonal Decorations '' Wood Crafts .: Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints '. Painted Annques >' Food Court
Spence Field 4o Mcultrie, Georgia
LSunbelt Expo irel
-4 mlde Souiheais of Hw., 319 on Hw, 133
$5 per person
Children 12 and under free with a parent)
FREE PARKING
For more information (229) 985-1968
RM.00MCEAR. MDl c iftlii@M inrraSirem


PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Earn your Associate or Bachelor Degree in:

SBusiness Legal Medical


* Computer


* Culinary


/ Financial aid available to those who qualify.
/ Choose day, evening or online classes.
/ job placement assistance available for graduates.

Call Toll Free



1.888.232.4852



I(EISER

COLLEGE

TALLAHASSEE
1700 Halstead Blvd.
Admissions Hours:
Monday-Thursday 9 am-8 pm, Friday 9 am-5 pm, Saturday 9 am-1 pm
www.keisercollege.edu


229.225.4096
www.southwestgatech.edu


TCNICAL COtLEOt