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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00114
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 15, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00114
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text








Special Events
Cite
Black Heroes

Editorial, Page 4


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA '1!:;:Y
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAI ESVILLE, FL. 32611

National Poison
Prevention Week
March 20-26

Story, Page 6
I1


Named ACA
Head JV Coach

Story, Page 8


Aucilla
Science Fair
Winners

Story, Photos, Page 12
II


Monticel lo

H YEAR NO.21.50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


E


SM 1

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15,2006


Planners Draw Line



On Comprehensive



Plan Amendments


PLANNER BRAD MUELLER, left, and Jack Hamilton
talk about zoning issues following Thursday night's
Planning Commission meeting. Mueller made the line-
in-the-sand declaration. (News Photo)

Second Candidate

Pre-Qualifies For

Elective Office


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A second candidate has pre-
qualify for elective office in
the November election.
Shirley Washington, a for-
mer School Board member,
pre-qualified last week for the
District 3 School Board seat, a
position she held for three
terms previously.
Fred Shofner, who presently
holds the office, defeated
Washington in 2002.
Elections Supervisor Marty
Bishop explained Friday that
it's not unusual for candidates
to pre-qualify so early in an
election year.
"I've had candidates pre-
qualify as early as January,"
said Bishop, adding that the
qualification period for the
November election is noon-to-
noon July 17 21.
He said the main motivation
for qualifying early is that it
allows candidates to open
campaign accounts, begin


spending on political adver-
tisements, and collect the nec-
essary signatures to get their
names on the ballot.

Washington X|
Is Seeking
Former Seat
Candidates can qualify for
office one of two ways: either
by paying a fee equal to one
percent of the salary the office
pays; or by gathering the sig-
natures of one percent of the
eligible voters in the particular
district the candidate is run-
ning in.
In the case of District 3, the
salary of the office is $23,386
and the qualifying fee is
$935.44, versus one percent of
the eligible voters, which
comes out to 14 signatures.
"Financially, it doesn't make
sense to pay the qualifying fee
since the state came up with
the rule allowing people to
qualify by petition," Bishop
said.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Planning Commission
on Thursday night drew a line -
in the sand, insofar as the
wholesale approval of
developer initiated
Comprehensive Plan
amendments.
Whether the line will stick,
however, will depend on the
County Commission, which
ultimately has the say in such'
matters -- barring citizens' ap-
peal to the judicial system.
By votes of 8-1 and 9-0, the
planners rejected two Compre-,
hensive Plan amendments thar.
would have changed a com-
bined 208 acres from
agriculture-5 (one house per
five acres), to agriculture-3
(one house per three acres).
Planner Brad Mueller made
the declaration that more or
less establish the rationale for
the denial of both requests
from developer John Lewis.
former owner of the Super
Lube franchise in Tallahassee.
"I don't know why it's be-
come the job of this board to
change' the Comprehensive
Plan to help outside developers
meet their targets," said Muel-
ler, drawing applause from the
two projects' many opponents.
"I do not see a line drawn in
the sand and I would like to
draw that line."
The planners' denial came
despite Planning Official Bob
Arredondo's recommendation
that the first rezoning request
-- involving a 48-acre parcel
off the Ashville Highway -- be
approved.
Among Arredondo's stated
reasons for approval of the
first request: the parcel is in
close proximity to the city and
would provide a transition
zone from the larger agricul-


planners Deny T o tive impact on State Road 59
and on Old Tung Grove Road;
Sand the development would
Rezoning Re uests encourage higher residential
Rinfill in an area that is distant
from the county's emergency
ture areas; the property is sur- tency with the Comp Plan, and services, such as fire and am-
rounded by mixed-use subur- the lack of infrastructure to ace.
ban residential to the south and support the development. uanc
west; and the change sup- A minimum of 12 people --
ported the Comp Plan's objec- The second request -- for a-- most of them surrounding
tives to encourage higher 160-acre parcel off Old Tung property owners -- spoke out
residential in-fill in close prox- Grove Road near US 90 and 'against the rezoning, which ul-
imity to the city. the Leon County line -- drew timately would translate into
more opposition, beginning the clustering of 53 single-
The planners, however, with Arredondo, who recom- family homes on the 160 acres.
overwhelmingly rejected these mended disapproval. Almost to a person, the sur-
arguments, finding instead that "The land is not presently rounding property owners
the request carried no compel- served by a paved roadway (See Planners Page 2)


.. '
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A : v,, ,', ," "'


AMONG the many nearby property owners who spoke out against the proposed rezon-
ing of the 160-acre parcel off Old Tung Grove Road were Mila and Milton Ignatz. Here
the couple speaks with, from left, planner Bill Tellefsen and Planning Official Bob
Arredondo after the meeting. (News Photo)


ling reason for approval, other
than the developer's stated rea-
son that the change was
needed for the development to
proceed.
The finding was in keeping
with the several citizens who
spoke out against the project,
citing concerns of urban
sprawl, the project's inconsis-


that meets county standards
and contains sensitive wetland
areas," Arredondo wrote in his
recommendation.
Among his cited concerns:
the request was premature,
given the county had other
land more suited for ag-3 de-
velopment; the development
would have a significant nega-


questioned the rationale of
placing a development in a
flood plain and highly sensi-
tive recharge area for the aqui-
fer.
"I think it's highly irresponsi-
ble to put such a high density
development there," said Mil-
ton Ignatz, an adjacent prop-


EDC Head Presents Reports


THE MANSION at Dixie Plantation is one of the stops on this year's the Historical As-
sociation's Tour of Homes, scheduled for the weekend of March 25,26. Tickets are
$25 for adults and $5 for children. The admission fee covers both days. Photo by
Merry Ann Frisby.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The chairman of the Eco-
nomic Development Council
(EDC) reported to the City
Council last week that his
group is making progress on
several fronts.
Among the projects that Mi-
chael Reichman said the EDC
was working on were imple-
mentation of a two-percent
tourist development tax' and
establishment of an enterprise
zone.
Reichman said the tourist de-
velopment tax, which would
be on this year's ballot, could
-generate as much as $30,000
or more annually.
"The money will be used to
promote Monticello," he said.
As for the establishment of


an enterprise zone, Reichman
said the group was in the pre-


liminary stages of investigat-

(See EDC Head Page 2)


Police Eye Suspect In Robbery
Of Revell Oil Company Staffer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

City Police Investigators
have developed a suspect in
the Feb. 6 armed robbery of
Revel Oil employee, Estelle
Ringer.
However, MPD Sgt. Roger
Murphy said further details
could not be released because
the suspect has not yet been
apprehended.
On the morning of Feb. 6, a
masked gunman approached
Ringer when she was leaving
the office, going to the com-


pany parking lot, with the
bank bag on her way to make
the company deposit at the
bank.
The gunman approached
her and pointed a silver hand-
gun at her and demanded the
money.
Ringer gave him the money
and he ordered her back in-
side.
About one hour later, Leon
County Sheriffs Office was
notified of small grass fires in
which checks and receipts
from the Monticello robbery
were burning.
The evidence was sent to
the lab for analysis.


138T]


-. -- ----- -- -- ---- -- --- ---_- -- -- ..---._L-l ~ ..










Watermelon Festival Queen


Jeftterson r

SBoys &


k.











-NAMED Jefferson County High School Boys
:Maresja (Esha) Deshon Barrington.


Planners I
(Continued From Page 1)
erty owner. "It's two thirds
mile from the top of the hill to
Paddy Sink. If a lot of houses
are placed there, we can see a
disaster because water runs
faster downhill if it's devel-
oped."
He also questioned the de-
veloper's right to access the
property via a road that Ignatz
said crosses his property and
that he gave the developer no
permission to use.
Others reiterated concerns
about the development's poten-
tial to aggravate the area's
flooding problems, impact on
the quality of the drinking wa-
ter, and diminish the area's ru-
ral quality of life.


EDC Head
(Continued From Page 1)
ing the option. He said anIy.
growth in the workforce will .
translate into immediate bene-
fits for the community, in term
of payroll dollars.
"Economic development is
never an effort that gives in-
stant gratification," Reichman
said. "You've got to be patient
and work hard. You have to
look at the long range benefits
and remain persistent.


.:* ''*i/ .''"^ '
an "l .u



and Girls Club Youth of the Mon


Draw Line In San


"I don't want to subsidize a
developer's paving of the road
with my tax money," said one
resident. "And I don't want to
subsidize the maintenance of
the road either for a developer.
I want to draw the line on the
road."
The planners quite agreed,
voting 9-0 to deny the applica-
tion.
In other action, the Planning


Commission unanimous
proved an application
Max 'Bilinski to subdiv
80-acre parcel into eight
acre lots.
The parcel will remain
which allows one house
five acres. Bilinski's re
therefore, calls for a
density than is present!
mitted.


Pageant Qualifications
Watermelon Queen must par- Applicati
RAY CItN ticipate in certain activities to Chamber ol
Managing Editor include appearances at all no later tl
scheduled events of the festi- M,, ',h 4


Watermelon Festival Oueen-
Pageant Co-Chairs Roslyn
Bass and Linsey Taylor report
the pageant qualificaitons.
S *Entrants must be 15 years
old but not more than 19 years
S old by Dec. 31, 2006.
*Contestants can not have
been married, be married, nor
have any children.
*Entrants chosen as Wate-
r melon Queen cannot marry
while reigning queen, nor be-
come pregnant, and doing re-
S suits in forfeiture of the title.
The First runner-up is then
named queen.
*Entrants must have a 2.0
SGPA for the last grading pe-
Sriod completed at the time of
application.
*No former queen is eligible
th was for the pageant.
*Entrants must be full time
d county residents.
*Entrants are required to
perform in an opening number,
ly ap-- talent competition, evening
from gown competition, a question
ide an and answer session, a personal
ht 10- interview with the judges, and
a photo competition.
*If an entrant misses more
Sag-5, than one rehearsal, she will be
se per Ji-qujiified from the pageant
quest, and fofeit the regsitration fee.
lower Just cause may be cleared
y per- through the chairpersons.
*The individual chosen as


4thAnnual


-f .


Forest capitall State Park
Hwy south Perry Florida
SWeekehM Pa;: $5,00
For More Information Call 850.584.5366

FOR A MOTEL & CAMPING LIT (ALL 850584.5366


Jra lordan with southern Lite, Swinging Bridge,
S--CrF (utaBluegrals Band, Roscoe (anady Band,
Riverbend Bluegras Band and
BluegrassParlor Band.



,1 o IO


,J- t. t
educa
ft tl


val, the Perry Forest Festival ll' J
Parade and the Springtime Tal-
lahassee Parade, and the subse-
quent year's Watermelon
Festival Queen Pageant, and
any activities leading up to the
pageant.
Forfeiture to do so, will re-
sult in forfeiture of the title.
*A recent photograph must
be submitted with the applica-
tion.


ions are due at the
f Commerce office
han noon Friday,

.m.S. a~X


JEFFERSON COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
NOTICE

The Board of Directors gives notice that one or more
Members of the Board of County Commission and/or
City Council may be present at the EDC Board's
monthly meeting.

Meetings are held the third Monday at 11 AM at the
EDC Office, 1475 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello, Florida.

For More information, or to receive an
agenda, please call 850-997-6559 or e-mail
jcedc@earthlink.net


Accounting
Administrative Office Technology
Air Conditioning Technology
Applied Business Technology
Automotive Technology
Computer Information Systems Reg
Cosmetology Registe
Criminal Justice Now!
Drafting Technology
Early Childhood Care & Education
Health Care Assistant
Agriculture Technology
Industrial Electrical Technology
Machine Tool Technology
Medical Assisting
Medical Laboratory Technology
Nursing
Paramedic Technology
Pharmacy Technology
U Radiologic Technology
tion Respiratory Care Technology
o Surgical Technology
Technical Studies
e. Welding and Joining Technology


IAL LI I%
speed of
life Sout


'hwE


-J
r


229.225.4096
www.southwestgatech.edu.
est Georgia
NICAL COLLEGE


PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006


You are cordially

invited to attend


Hors D'oeuvres


for the Brain and Soul

with

Robert Olen Butler

(Pulitzer Prize winning author)


along with

Elizabeth Dewberry

(distinguished author)


and Michael Purvis

-(local musician)


Sponsored by

The Monticello Rotary Club

On Saturday, the eighteenth of March two

thousand and six Six o'clock in the evening
Monticello Opera House

Monticello, Florida
$30 per person
TICKETS ALSO SOLD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006 PAGE 3


RLW~I *
R M R D
SODOTH I;sTHT ANHEP O
ACIVEHM


a l l I -ll, i h l' l -. ,l',I r i, -
1. ii I '., ,i "l l 'II 11 I l ,,.,rI


IVjI r Irlli ll l'l I I, Ii ii
|ll l'; ii. I1' I _, \ .'- 1 1 ,.,,,h h ., ,
a ,l 11 .\. v ,,, ,.'11, Iri ,-I', r hl

\\ ,hlllf lt\i, ,,l FJ, ll.,lli'-

"li learn more ab)ut lEdward
Jnt..- I tI.V, %,id' all ", l hl
iljtd vi'le(,, (.l J t xLi\.

IR Name
'Robert Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monriello FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardlones corn



MKNSESOFIVSI


BLIND DILLON and the Willon kept the crowd dancing during the Home Town Get
Down Mardi Gras, recently,


*ia 1* HUMANE SOCIETY Shelt
Sand adoptable pet Show
Ik Mardi Gras. (News Photos


4-H Board

Sets Meeting

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


:er Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
fdie, decked in beads at the
s)


You Can Count
On The
Monticello
News


~4~ 1: "I

:II ~





i


ip!
liY
,~




~P"\.""$


Mardi Gras King Dan Schall and Queen Alana Chambers toss bead to the crowds as
they stroll the streets.



Student Volunteers Earn

Community Service Credit


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


With weekly adoption-
booths and temperatures
quickly beginning to rise,
members of the Humane So-
ciety are'conducting weekly
dog washes, beginning 11
a.m. Saturday at the Shelter.
Volunteering at the shelter
acquires community service
hours, which are a definite
plus on college and scholar-
ship applications.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista will document hours
worked by students at the
shelter, upon request.
"Community service hours
are one. of the main factors
looked at by, colleges, for aca-
demic scholarships," said Au-


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program
866-FUND-549.


cilla Christian Academy
Assistant Principal Mike
Harvin. "And for the Bright
,Future Scholarships (awarded
-annually by the state of Flor-
ida), at least 70 hours of com-
munity service is required."
'Community service hours
are a definite plus on college
scholarship applications," said
Harvin. "Colleges like to see
students who are involved and
active in their communities
because those are the kinds
of students that they want at-
tending their schools."
Other than dog washers,
volunteers for additional
Scores around, the shelter are
always needed and greatly ap-
preciated, by both the Society
members and the animals.
Other types of work in-
cludes basic yard work, clean-

LOST DOG
Brov.n & White
12 yr old neutered male
very fienedl\ but almost deaf
last scern Sarrda', 3'4.',f6
off Ashv[ille HWY Brock RdJ
Please call
(day) 556 2893
(evening) 997-5746


J.C.WENTWORTH
AiNN IIURY I' AR IAS I: ) I' .M


ing, training, petting, nuzzling
and familiarizing the a"nfimials
to respond positively to hu-
mans.
To volunteer or for further
information call 342-0244.


1r~


The 4-H State Executive-
Board Meeting will be held
March 17 19 at Camp Ocala.
The meetings are held in or-
der to plan state events and
provide youth leadership for
the Florida 4-H Program'.
Teens 13 18 are encour-
aged to attend.
Anyone interested is asked to
contact the Extension Office
at 342-0187 for a registration
packet or visit .the. state 4-H.
Website
http://4h.ifas.ufl.edu/events/ind
ex.htm
Adult chaperones for this
event are appreciated.


i ell


-i -- .- -
... ... J; ^ j


A/OFO IC

A MUMBHER Qj:: NOPRTH- F;..ORKIDA CANCER CARE NETWC


SOUTHEAST
REGIONAL CANCER
CENTER A MEMBER
OF THE NORTH
FLORIDA CANCER
NETWORK HAS
BEEN PROVIDING
THE PEOPLE OF
NORTH FLORIDA
AND SOUTH
GEORGIA THE
HIGHEST QUALITY
OF CANCER CARE
SINCE 1989
DEDICATED TO
BRINGING YOU THE.
ADVANCES OF
TOMORROW\ TODAY

2003 Centre Pointe Blvd
Tallahassee FL, 32308






Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax:850-671-5900


R sIearc Isa vesLlI1Ivs


Happy

Birthday

I- Crazy)








. \n ,


~-I.


3RK


Southeast Regional Cancer Center and the North Florida Cancer Network
were established to promote the finest principles of medical care. Can-
cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.
The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-
ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community, not just a
patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We
are in this together.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

BER RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Special Events


Every school child has
probably heard of George
Washington and Paul Revere,
but African-American hero
Ned Hector hasn't made it into
most history books.
Now visitors to the Valley
Forge area will hear about
Hector and other black heroes
of the American Revolution
and Civil War, through special
events and tours.
African-Americans' proud
history of service in our
Armed Forces began with the
American Revolution, when
more than 5,000 soldiers of
African descent fought in the
Continental Army.
Many shared the hardships
of the winter encampment at
Valley Forge, when the
Continental army was forged
into a fighting force that went
on to the American
Revolution.
Some won their own free-
dom as well; others found
themselves and their descen-
dant relegated to slavery.
At special events throughout
the year, visitors will meet Ned
Hector, who was a hero of the
Battle of Germantown.
At Valley Forge, every Sat-
urday through the summer


months, they'll meet Hannah
Till, George Washington's
cook, who was born into slav-
ery and worked hard to buy
her freedom.
The compelling stories of
soldiers, slaves, and abolition-
ists from the Revolution
through the Civil War are told
at special events throughout
the Valley Forge area, and on
guided tours of the region.
Visitors to Valley Forge Na-
tional Historical Park, Brandy-
wine Battlefield, Johnson
House Underground Railroad
site and other sites will hear
stories of ordinary people with
extraordinary determination
who changed the nation's his-
tory.
The Valley Forge Conven-
tion and Visitors Bureau has
developed tours to cater to
visitors' preferences. Self-
guided African-American
Heritage Discovery Tours let
visitors travel at their own
pace, stopping to shop or visit
the region's many gardens,
museums and attractions.
African-American Freedom
Trail Group Tours are ideal for
family reunions, conferences,
conventions, and religious and
military reunions.


From Our.Photo File
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HISTORICAL RESEARCHERS Laura Kammerer and David Ferro, examine old founda-
tion piers of the old Whitfield Hotel in Lloyd, in Sept. 1990. The hotel was built in
1932 and a favorite stop for passengers on trains stopping in Lloyd. Archaeologists
searched the site for any remaining artifacts before the area was to be developed.
(News File Photo)


Let's Cheer Regular Folks


I am fed up with reading
about weirdos and would like
to say a word for what I call
regular folks.
SFirst, let's dismiss the weir-
dos. Who are they? They are
the people who do bizarre
things.
The tragedy is their bizarre
behavior catapults them into
the spotlight and next thing
you know they are raking in
millions on the speaking and
book circuit.
.There are 17 daytime talk
shows and they regularly fea-
ture dysfunctional people who
say shocking things. Heaven
help us if they are typical
America!
Enough about wierdos. You
know who they are.
New about the regular folks,
who are they? Oh, they are the
people who go to work, raise
their kids, save for their retire-
ment, go to church, and take
family vacations.
They are the Dads who take
their sons out in the backyard
and toss a ball around. Or take
their sons to see a football


Publisher's

Notebook


K; *


.Roll Cic/fo


game.
They are the Moms who are
Brownie and Girl Scout lead-
ers, who make emergency re-
pairs when a youngster's
clothing is torn or a button is
off, and do the million or so
other things Moms do.
They are folks who give
something back to their com-
munity by serving in some ca-
pacity be it public office, or
service through a civic club, or
volunteering to help in one
project or another.
They are the folks who teach
Sunday School, who serve on


the church board and commit-
tees, and lock the church after
choir practice.
Who are these regular Il,1k- '
They are the people who. obey
the laws and pay their taxes.
They appreciate the work of
law enforcement officers, and
firemen, and EMTs.
They play with their grand-
children, clip grocery coupons,
and greet neighbors warmly.
You won't see these regular
folks on TV. They are too or-
dinary, they are too
predictable, there's no pizzazz
about them.


Fact is, in some circles these
regular folks are called dull.
They don't do drugs, shoot
at police take what's not theirs,
hate their mothers, or hire hit-
men to bump somebody off.
Why, these folks are so dull
that they take responsibility for
what they do or don't do. Isn't
that a novel approach in this
age of winning and blaming
everybody for everything
that's ever happened to us?
I'm telling you how dull
regular folks can be. They
mow yards, plant flower beds,
and paint their houses.
Truth is the regular folks that
I enjoy won't make the talk
shows and that's okay..They
woh't rake in piles of money
on the talk or book circuit and
that's okay too.
What they will do is live
pretty balanced lives, take care
of their children, live as re-
sponsible citizens, and in their
own unique way make a differ-
ence in the lives of others.
May God bless regular folks!
Where would we be without
you?


* .-


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
March 13, 1996
The Ku Klux Klan's visit
here Saturday was a bust.

The School Board recently
approved an agreement with
North Florida Community
College. The agreement is for
NFCC to provide college level
academic courses to select
students here during the 96-97
academic year.
Noel K. Desmond, of
Chiefland has announced his
candidacy for the Florida
House of Representatives,
District 10 Seat, being vacated
by Allen Boyd.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 12, 1986
High School Principal Kelly
Kilpatrick has asked the
School Board to do
something--anything--with the
main building that houses
JCHS administrative offices.
Fifty people have recorded
complaints with the City of
Monticello about local cable
television services.

According to the 1980
Census, 818 adults over the
age of 25 in Jefferson County
have had less than four years
of education.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 11, 1976
Howard Middle School PTA
presented its first annual
variety show Feb. 27 to a
cheering audience of some 500
people.


The Aucilla Lady Warriors
put together the season's finest
performance while capturing
the District 4-A basketball
championship at Aucilla gym
this weekend.
Lt. Fred Wilder has been
elected to the board of direc-
tors of the Armed Forces Com-
munications and Electronics
Association in Washington,
D.C. He is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Wilder.

FORTY YEARS AGO
March 11, 1966
Walker's Stable was one of
the main attractions at the Tour
of Homes on April 2 and 3.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Wheeler announced the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Linda Lou, to James E.
Wheeler.

Mr. and Mrs. George Curry
honored their daughter, Karen,
on her ninth birthday Saturday
by taking her and a group of
friends to see "Sound of
Music" in Tallahassee.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1956
Members of the TEL Class of
the First Baptist Church gave a
surprise party for Mrs. Dan
Davis Saturday afternoon hon-
oring her 87th birthday.

Mr. and Mrs. William
McLain Price of Jacksonville.
Fred Williams has been
named Honorary Captain and
Most Valuable Player of the
Jefferson High basketball team
for the 1955-56 season.


National Unity Needed


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I'm not a particularly emo--
tional person. My personality
has been helped in this regard
along the way by unique
events such as serving in com-
bat, which tends to harden
ones outward sentimental na-
ture.
This morning was an excep-
tion to the norm. I stumbled
across an old World War II
movie playing on TV and sud-
denly found myself wrapped
up in the unique essence of
that era.
I was deeply moved by the
realization that the extraordi-
nary and unequivocal unity of
all Americans to win that war
and preserving our way of life,
(as portrayed by the actors),
was indeed real and factual.


It made me proud to be an
American, although it was my
parents generation that lived
this greatness and deserves the
credit.
Then my warm sense of
pride for a distant unique na-
tional unity turned to depres-
sion when I fast forwarded to
America and its citizens today.
We again find ourselves in a
war, but this time it is as
though people are so interested
and preoccupied with their
own selfish interests and daily
lives, that they could care less.
I would like to believe that
this situation is due to the very
nature and uniqueness of this
conflict, where we don't have
massive armies locked .in
deadly battles, capturing and
holding enemy terrain.
Instead, we are fighting a
faceless, non-uniformed and


convert enemy of the very
worst order and intentions.
They are the most brutal of
enemies, fully willing to inten-
tionally kill innocent men,
women and children to further
their causes of world domina-
tion.
It is outright frightening that
Americans do not recognize
the magnitude and significance
of this world conflict.
Please wake up!! These people
make no apology for their
open desire and intention to
wipe us and all other freedom
loving people off the face of
the earth and create a single
world of cleric controlled and
dominated Islamic nations.
Freedom's cries for the ur-
gent necessity of a unified peo-
ple, steeped in one purpose to
defeat this genuine evilness, if
falling on deaf ears in this


Firm Does Right Thine


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

Government is to be feared
because it has the power to en-
force its will on its citizens. It
has guns. It has jails. It has
money.
The average citizen lacks all
of these, making it difficult to
fight back. The ballot box and
the court of public opinion are
about our only weapons.
Yet, government has grown
so large, so distant from the
voters, that it frankly fears lit-
tle from either.


So what is left for the de-
fense of our rights and our
property? A principled leader
is a grand ideal.
Such a leader in a position of
influence who actually be-
lieves in right and wrong
rarely happens. When it does,
there is no more powerful
force on earth.
The free market, given a
chance, is a potent force; a
place where consumers control
policy and products with their
dollars. No need for govern-
ment intervention.
Bad products or policies fail;


good ones flourish. Yet, a prin-
cipled leader in the free market
has become almost unheard of
in our modern world where
government seems to be the
answer to almost every ques-
tion.
When was the last time you
heard a corporate execurtve
talk about his company's poli-
cies from a philosophical posi-
tion? When did you last hear
one talk about individual
rights? And when was the last
time you heard of a corpora-
tion announcing that it would
turn down business because a
policy was "just plain wrong?"


country. Unlike WWII when
people clearly understood the
devastating consequences of
losing that war, Americans to-
day are oblivious to the im-
pending disaster if the war on
terrorism isn't brought under
control and soon.
To make matters worse, in-
stead of fostering national
unity, our legislators are run-
ning around sticking their fin-
gers in each others eyes over
the war in Iraq. "Iraq didn't at-
tack us", well Germany and It-
aly didn't attack us during
WWII either. I don't recall any
legislator of that day bemoan-
ing that our war was with the
"Imperialists" Japan after Pearl
Habor and not the "Nazi's" in
Germany. Evil is evil!
To try and make the case that
(See National Page 5)






Miracles do happen.
And so it is true with a bank
called BB&T. BB&T Corpora-
tion based in North Carolina,
and the second largest bank in
the Washington D.C. area, an-
nounced that it will not lend
money to developers who plan
to build commercial projects
on land taken through the
power of eminent domain.
The Supreme Court shocked
the nation last Fall by issuing a
ruling that upheld local gov-
ernment's right to use eminent
domain powers to evict home-
(See Right Thing Page 5)


Cite Black Heroes --Opinion & Comment


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Letters...


Resident Surprised At

Reaction TO His Letter


Dear Editor:
When I wrote a small piece a
couple of weeks ago, I did not
expect it to draw retaliation.
I truly expected it to prompt
change.
I thought the safety of the
people of Monticello, (espe-
cially children) was a concern
that would bring results.
Instead it brought a come
back of excuses.
These are the facts I would
like to address:
*It is useless to call in a
complaint when a car speeds
by so fast, that it is gone be-
fore you can even look at the
license plate.

The Air Force would have a
hard time catching some of
these cars!
*I think dispatch headquar-
ters can hear the same "boom"
that rattles my silverware and


my windows.
*If some action is not taken,
I believe the situation will get
completely out of hand. No
child will be safe walking the
streets and people will not be
able to get any sleep at night.
However, if the people of
Monticello are going to. con-
tinue to turn the town over to
the enemy (Satan), to the point
of displaying sin before our
children and God, I guess
maybe this matter is a waste of
time.
My greatest fear is knowing
that the wrath of God is evi-
dent in many areas of the
world, including the USA, but
most cannot see it, or simply
do not care.
I guess they fail to under-
stand the prophecies of God's
word, or maybe they are just
seeing how far they can push a


holy God.
My prayer is that all eyes
will be open to the true written',
word'of God.
Then and only then will,
change come to America and-
our town.
Amen.'
A.R. O'Quin ,

Ambulance

Service Here

Excellent
Dear Editor:
Monticello is fortunate to
have a fine ambulance service.
Recently, I needed to make
a quick trip to the hospital.
My husband and I were im-
pressed with their expertise, as
well as with their kind and car-
ing attitude.
Sincerely,
Helen Gleasman


We loved the Mardi Gras,
and had a glass of wine, so
what we must also teach our
children (if they choose to
drink) to do it responsibly.
Not everyone who drinks
wine or beer is a drunken bum.
Get a life and look at yourself
first.
God is everywhere. We may
pray and worship in our pri-
vate ho'ne. Not everyone is in
church to pray and worship as
we can clearly see.
Aysel Marsella


Hair, center, is John Nelson,


Dear Editor:
Let me say this to all the peo-
ple that made negative re-
marks about the beer and wine
served at the Mardi Gras:

Ms. Amert must be at all the
churches counting the people
that attend. That would be


really impossible for one per-
son.
Is that what she goes to.
church for? Let's not judge
other people or we will be
judged ourselves.

Don't forget, Jesus changed
water into wine.


PRESENTING the Service to the VFW Award to Aaron
left. Shirley Washington is at right.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006 PAGE 5


.Right Thing


(Continued From Page 4)
'Owners and demolish their
houses for community devel-
opment.
The practice, necessary to
'implement the ugly policy of
- ';stainable Development, has
tCreated an unholy alliance be-
tween local officials and
,wealthy, politically-connected
developers.
Now they are free to build
projects that promise to pad
the pockets of politicians and
government coffers, while en-
riching the developers. The
property owners be damned.
The decision opened the way
for local officials to move at
full speed on projects in com-
munities across the nation.
-The National Conference of
Mayors has led opposition to
legislation in Congress that
would halt federal dollars to
'fund such projects, arguing
that the legislation would di-
niinish government power to
control community develop-
ment.
And there is danger in just,
trusting government to solve
the'eminent domain land grabs


with legislation. Many times
the special interests and their
shark-trained lawyers know
exactly what words to remove
from legislation to render it
worthless.
Yet the politicians take the
gutted legislation and tout it as
landmark property rights pro-
tection. It happens all the time.
It recently happened in Ala-
bama to legislation particularly
aimed at correcting the horri-
ble wrong of the Supreme
Court decision in the Kelo
case.
As property owners are
brushed aside, helplessly
watching their homes being
bulldozed to the ground,
BB&T takes a refreshingly dif-
ferent view of the scene.
Rather than progress, the
bank sees their customers be-
ing crushed under the power of
an out of control government
which is ignoring the voters
who put them in their positions
of public trust.
Said BB&T CEO, John Alli-
son, "The idea that a citizen's
property can be taken by the
government solely for private
use is extremely misguided; in


National Unity


(Continued From Page 4)
Saddam Hussein and Iraq were
not Lerrorist and/or potential
terrorist supporters makes as
much sense as trying to make
the argument that Attila The
Hun was really a nice guy be-
cause he once gave his mother
flowers! Hogwash! That's just
an argument cooked up for po-
litical divisiveness and it is do-
ing its job on Americans.
Make no mistake that the en-
tire middle east group of na-
tions will do whatever they can
to bring America and the free
world to her knees. Without
the massive militarymight to
challenge us directly, 'they
know their only option is'to"
support and fund' teYrotist' or-
ganizations willing to do their
dirty work.
For years their only avenue
was through the Palestinians,
but today radical Islamic fun-
damentalists are surfacing to
show their true colors and in-
tentions in many nations

Center Set

Clothing

Giveaway

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tri-County Ministries will
hold a Clothing Giveaway 9
a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday, Mar.
18 at the Harvest Center loca-
tion on the corner of Highway
259 and Springhollow Road.
All sizes of men, women,
children, and infants clothing
is available for the taking.
There is also a wide selec-
tion of shoes, purses, and other
accessory items.
The community is welcome
to come, browse, and enjoy the
camaraderie and excitement of
the event.
... '1


nately, our brave service mem-
bers are killing them in place
in Iraq and Afghanistan as fast
as they show up, rather than on
the streets of Monticello.
What we need now is strong
American support for unity of
purpose. Unfortunately, as
long as many opposition party
members in Congress are quite
willing to stoke the fires of di-
visiveness for pure political
gain at the expense of national
unity for defeating terrorism,
that once great American soli-
darity has been lost.


fact it's just plain wrong." The
bank felt "obligated" to take a
stand by refusing to lend
money to any developer who
acquired his land through the
use of eminent domain.
By standing for principle and
doing what is right, BB&T has
a chance to influence others in
the banking industry to follow
suit. And that is a force of
power government fears most.
It's proof that the free market,
when left alone, works:
Money drives everything.
Cut it off and even the most
powerful forces dry up and
blow away.
Money is the reason why
property owners fear the gov-
ernment land grabbers. It's the
message behind the old saying,
"You can't fight city hall."
Why? Because you don't have
the money to enforce its
schemes.

BB&T just started a small
snowball rolling down the hill
that could liberate millions
from the threat of losing their
homes to eminent domain.

As the nation is ravaged by
Sustainable Development and
its eminent domain ponzi
scheme, BB&T's answer is so
simple. Just don't do it. Serve
your customers. It's the perfect
free market solution. Property
right advocates everywhere
need to converge on their own
local banks to spread the world
of the BB&T revolution. Give
praise for those who follow,
and picket lines for those who
don't.
Meanwhile, patriots should
pause in their embattled
trenches just long enough to
open their arms to welcome
BB&T as the new recruit in the
camp of Freedom's Heroes.


CalicO Spring

Arts & Craft Show

i .r g ,19., -
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. $,Inday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.



i t '




Ornamental Iron Painted Glass '' Handcrafted Furniture
Clothing Jewelry Folk Art Ceramics Pottery
Seasonal Decorations Wood Crafts Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints Painted Antiques Food Court .
Spence Field Moultrie, Gergia
(Sunbelt Expo site)
4 miles Southeast of Hwy 319 on Hwy 133
$5 per person
(Children 12 and under free with a parent'
FREE PNRIKING
For more information (229) 985-1968


I www.gir gotech org

www.girlsgotech.org


4 Girl Scouts.


HOSLEY WEBB was honored for his Community Service of 33 years of dedication to
the Post, and never missing a meeting, nor being late.


Emergency Loans

For Drought Victims


Mark Demott of the County
Farm Service Agency reports
that federal disaster assistance
loans are available to eligible
family farmers, recently af-
fected by drought.
Jefferson and surrounding
counties are eligible as natural
disaster areas, based on dam-
ages and losses caused by on-
going drought that began Aug.
1,2005.
Farmers and ranchers who
sustained physical and produc-
tion losses as a result of the
disaster and who wish to apply
for an Emergency Loan to as-
sist them in recovering form
the loss resulting from this dis-


aster may apply a 1416 East
Base Street, Unit 1, Madison,
FL, 32340.
Phone number is 850-973-
2205.
Each application will be ex-
amined individually to deter-
mine the type of Emergency
Loan benefits for which the
applicant is eligible.
Farm Emergency Loans
may include funds to repair or
restore damaged farm
property, as well as reimburse
applicants for expenses already
incurred for such purposes.
Loans based on qualifying
production losses may include
funds to reimburse applicants


for production expenses which
went into damaged or de-
stroyed crop and livestock en-
terprises and to produce new
crops.
Payment terms depend on
the purposes for which the
loan is used and the applicant's
ability to repay the loan.
The Emergency Loan Pro-
gram is limited to family size
farm operators. The loan
amount is limited to 100 per-
cent of the calculated actual
production loss and 100 per-
cent of the actual physical loss.
The loan amount is further
limited to $500,000 total emer-
gency loan indebtedness.
If It Hlappens In
.Jiferton CounlV.
You'll Read II In1 lie
Ionticello News


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


LIFE

a SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healtlier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. k's a dividend that builds a
strong com071Un17ity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


All Who Drink Wine Or

Beer Are Not Drunks


YYlbl


- -- 1


796
Cbnai















PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006


Lifestyle


TRADING hot dogs and pizza for donations for the Helen Keller Foundation are L-R:
Tanner Diehl, Alan Lennon, Cynthia Mahoney, Movie Gallery manager, and Rob
Cooley, district manager. (News Photo)


National Poison Prevention


Week Set March 20-26


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

National Poison Prevention~
Week is scheduled March 20-
26.
"Poison Proof Your Home,"
is the theme for the week.
This focus on poison-proofing
the home is part of the annual
campaign to educate the pub-
lic on the dangers and preven-
tion of accidental poisonings.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Walker of
Tallahassee announce the en-
gagement of their daughter
Lindsay to Josiah Wycliffe
Oxendine Bullock, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Wallace Bullock of


Children under the age of
five are particularly vulner-
able to accidental poisoning,
because of their natural curi-
osity about the world around
them. What they see, touch
and reach is generally put into
their mouths.
Almost 60 percent of all
calls to the poison informa-
tion center involve exposures
to one of the following five
groups:
*Acetaminophen is used as


Monticello.
The wedding is planned for
Saturday, April 15 at Myrtle-
wood Plantation in Thomas-
ville, GA.
The couple will honeymoon.
in Destin.
They will make their home
in Monticello.


MR. & MRS. MICHAEL WILBUR LAWRENCE


Mr. Lawrence

Marries

Ms. Lewis
Michael Wilbur Lawrence
and Shabrina Shalon Lewis
were married Wednesday, Feb.
22, 2006 at the Mitchell
County Court House.
Performing the ceremony
was Probate Judge Susan Tay-
lor.
Mrs. Lawrence is the daugh-
ter of Mae Eva and Silas
Lewis of Monticello.
Mr. Lawrence is the son of
Erma Jean Lawrence of Bain-
bridge, GA. and the late Jake
L awrence.


an aspirin substitute, pain re-
liever and fever reducer, and
often found in children's
medication.
Toxic symptoms are de-
layed and can cause profound
effects, particularly liver dam-
age.
*Ethanol-containing prod-
ucts including mouthwashes,
perfumes, colognes, hand
sanitizers and adult cold
medicines.
Toxic symptoms include
sleepiness, drop in blood
sugar and shallow breathing.
*Common hand soaps and
detergents may cause upset
stomach, persistent vomiting,
diarrhea and even dehydration
if ingested.
Automatic dishwasher de-
tergent may be caustic.
*Hypochlorites, which may
include bleach, pool chemi-
cals and supplies and cleaning
products.
Toxic symptoms can in-
clude irritation to the mouth
and stomach, and potential
burs to the mouth, throat and
esophagus.
*Hydrocarbon containing
products, which include gaso-
line, kerosene, charcoal
lighter fluid, automobile prod-
ucts and lamp oil.
Toxic symptoms may in-
clude vomiting and if the
product enters the ;lungs, fe-
ver, coughing, shortness of
breath, wheezing or chemical
pneumonia can occur.
For poisoning emergencies,
call the Poison Information
Center, toll free 24 hours a
day, at 1-800-222-1222

211 Provides

SArea Social

Services

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

United Way phone number
211 is a service created for
people in need to find a social
service agency.
24 hour Crisis counsel-
ing is provided along with a
wide range of referral services
for the eight county Big Bend
area.
From cell phones, dial 224-
NEED (6333.)


Volunteers Collect $133

For Keller Foundation


DEBBIE SNAPP
SStaff Writer

Volunteers were collecting-
donations for the Helen Keller
Foundation on a recent Satur-
day in front of the Movie Gal-
lery on South Jefferson Street.
Movie Gallery has been an
active supporter of the Helen.


Keller Foundation for some
years now.
Hot dogs, pizza, and soft
drinks were served to the
crowd in exchange for their
generous donation.
Some $133 was collected.
The Helen Keller Foundation
works to prevent blindness and
deafness by advancing re-


Laurel Burkart, daughter of
Rebecca and Arnold Burkart
of Monticello was inducted
into the Gamma Beta Phi Soci-
ety on Sunday, Feb. 26 at the
University of West Florida in
Pensacola.
Gamma Beta Phi is an honor
and service organization for
students in colleges and uni-
versities in the United States.
It recognizes and encourages
individual excellence in educa-
tion, promotes the develop-
ment of leadership ability and
character in its members, and
fosters, disseminates, and im-
proves education through ap-
propriate service projects.
Burkart is a junior Music
Education major at UWF and
participates in the Symphonic
Band and University Choir as
well as serving as piano ac-
companist to many student
performers.


ANDERSON


Anderson

Completes

Marine Basic
John C. Anderson III, son of
John and Angie Anderson of
Marianna, graduated Feb. 3,
2006 from Marine Corp Train-
ing Depot at Parris Island, SC.
H1e was meritoriously pro-
moted to Private 1st Class, af-
ter finishing in the top four of
his platoon.
Anderson will continue his
training beginning March 7,
2006 at Camp Lejune, NC.


Church Will
Sell Dinners
Memorial MB Church will
sell chicken dinners complete
with drinks for $6, beginning
11 a.m. Saturday.
SProceeds will benefit the Pa-
tor's Aid Board.


Flower Power
LET HAPPINESS BLOOM
Forty years after the poet Alien Ginsberg coined
the term flower power (1965), research proves that
blossoms actually do spread the happiness and joy the
hippies once belle.ved. The Journal of Evolutionary
Psychology published "An Environmental Approach to
R AL DES N Positive Emotion: Flowers." The article describes
ORAL DFSICNSL research studies conducted by Jeannette Haviland-
SINCE 1934 Jones, Ph.D. "Flowers have immediate and long-term
positive effects on emotional reactions, mood, social
behaviors and even memory for both males and females," Jones said. Jones found that the presence
of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and positively affects social
behavior far beyond what Is normally believed. Upon receiving a gift of flowers, the participants of
this study, responded with true smiles and reported positive moods that lasted for days. WomeQ and
men were spontaneously given a flower while riding alone in an elevator: Both the women and men
who received flowers demonstrated. increased eye-ontaict- 'conversatinrr;stood-tn -closer-piuximrily
to the researchers, and produced more and truer smiles than those who did not receive flowers.
"When it comes to receiving flowers, men and women are on the same playing field," said Jones. "It
seems that we all express extraordinary delight and increase our social behavior."
190 E Dogwood Street -Monticello 850.997.2015 6 www.gellingsflowers.com


Her main instrument is piano
and she also plays clarinet in
the band and sings soprano in
the choir.


search and education.
Joining the volunteers were
Movie Gallery Manager
Cynthia Mahoney and Rob
Cooley, district manager. Both
taking part in the fundraiser by
visiting with the donors and
updating them on the good
works of the Foundation.
Each year Movie Gallery has
in-store promotions to raise
money for this great charity.
Last year Movie Gallery do-
nated $708,012 to the Founda-
tion through its "Be A Star"
program.
Support for the cause from
other companies is
encouraged, and is rewarding.
Special recognition to Pizza
Hut for the donation of pizzas,
and to the Coca Cola Corpora-
tion for the coke products and
trailer usage for this
fundraiser.


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Tallahassee's Original Assisted Living Community
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Service
850-562-4123 x3207 ~ North Monroe St. ~
Lic. #99 www.encorsel.com




193 NW US HWY. 221 GREENVILLE, FL. (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walking welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



$0 Plan Premium Medicare Advantage Plan Now
Available For Jefferson County Residents
Expands Coverage Over and Beyond Original Medicare
Freedom To See Any Doctor or Hospital that
Accepts Medicare
Call 1-800-561-6490 For More Information
Medicare Plan Finders



S Let us take care of your love one!!
Open 24 Hours
-- -Ow- nerr:n-Am tRansem-Reddick .

Sheltering Administrator: Juliet Reddick
Your Love
One!! Phone#: (850) 508-7648 or (850) 877-0561
Lic.# 10741


Laura Burkart Inducted

Into Gamma Beta Phi


LINDSAY WALKER AND JOSIAH BULLOCK


Lindsay Walker
Will Marry Josiah Bullock


_____ j










Festival Queen Pageant

Rules, Regulations


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Watermelon Festival Queen-
Pageant CO-chairs Rosin Bass
and Lines Taylor announce the
Pageant rules and regulations.

Each contestant will have a
sponsor. Sponsorship is $100
per contestant. Checks are
made payable to the Water-
melon Festival.

*A meeting to include all
contestants and committee
members will be held 6 p.m.,
Wednesday, April 5, at the
Chamber of Commerce.

*Rehearsals will e held on
Monday and Wednesdays,
and are not open to the public.
Only contestants, chairpersons,
and choreographers are to at-
tend.


*The group number will be
in coordinator with the theme
of the pageant. All contestants
will be required to provide
costumes as specified by chair-
persons.
*A tea/interview will be held
for contestants and judges the
day of the pageant. This will
count for 1 5 points of the
overall score.
*Contestants will be required
to attend the Kick Off event at
the Opera House for introduc-
tion to the public.
*Final dress rehearsal will be
held at the JCHS auditorium
6:30 p.m. Friday June 9.
Dress rehearsal needs to pro-
ceed the same as if it were the
night of the pageant.
All costumes, talent props,
and the like are to be there re-
hearsal night, or they will not-
be used the night of the pag-


eant.
*Each contestant is allowed
one backstage helper for final
dress rehearsal and the
pageant.
Tickets and name badges
will be provided for these indi-
viduals. Name of the helper
must be submitted by June 5.
*Opening Number is judged
on coordination with the
group, personality, and overall
performance, for 15 points to-
tal.
*Talent competition is based
on talent and presentation for a
total of 25 points.
*Evening gown competition
is based on poise and overall
appearance, for a total of 25
points.
*Question and answer ses-
sion is based on self-assurance,
sincerity and diction, for 20
points.


*The narration for each con-
testant in the evening gown
competition will be prepared
by the contestant and reviewed
by the chairpersons.
All narrations will be consis-
tent as to information provided
and may have to be limited to
the allotted time for the stage
walk, Information must be
submitted by May 22, 2006.
*Information contestants
wish to have recited for their
talent segment must also be
submitted by May 22, 2006.
*After the queen and court
are chosen, all contestants
should remain on stage for
photographs.


4-H To Report
Activities
All 4-H Club Reporters are
asked to submit a monthly arti-
cle to the 4-H Office five days
prior to the first of each month.
The purpose is to keep all in-
formed of projects, events, and
activities in progress.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1,5, 2006 PAGE 7

Homes Of Mourning


Orene Connell Smith
Orene Connell Smith, 87,
died Saturday, March 11,
2006.
The graveside services were
held at 11:00 a.m. EST Tues-
day at Broomsage Cemetery in
Jefferson County. Visitation
was Monday March 13, 2006
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Beggs Fu-
neral Home Monticello Chapel
(850-997-5612).
She was a lifetime resident
of Wacissa and was a home-
maker.. She was of the Pente-
costal faith.


Housing N
We accept a
2/2 $615 -3/2 $715 -
Pool & Your

575-(


Survivors include four sons,
Tom Smith of Wacissa, Frank
Smith of West Palm Beach,
and Buddy and Danny Smith,
both of Tallahassee; a
daughter, Eldie Sauls of Tho-
mas County, Ga.; two brothers,
Noah Connell of Old Town
and Clyde Connell of Tallahas-
see; a sister, Pauline Rudell of
Wacissa; and numerous grand-
children and great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, N.R. Smith
Sr., and two sons, N.R. Smith
Jr. and Aubry Smith.


* *




I Caring For Our Seniors
Fo*u


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Archbold Home Health Services has established
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* -:- Home Health Aides
Jarn
* *" Complete Reimbursement Management






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tf Archbold Home Health Services
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.Hor
.Monticello, FL
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SFL License #20143096 GA License # 136-037




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Office Hours:
Mon Fri: 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sat: 8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon

For an appointment, call
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We accept:
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006


Sports


ACA Downs Echols 13-3


For Sixth Win Of Season


,BILL BROWN

Tuesday was another good
day for Warrior baseball, as
the team defeated a clearly
outclassed Echols County, 13-
3, for the sixth win of the sea-
son.


This win followed an earlier
loss, the only one of the sea-
son, to Lanier County, GA.
Dustin Roberts pitched the
first four innings, getting his
third win of the season. He
gave up one hit, no runs and
struck out eight.


Chris Tuten worked two
thirds of an inning, walked
two and struck out one.
Casey Gunnels followed
with one hit, two runs and one
strikeout:
Stephen Dollar finished,
working two thirds of an in-
ning and gave up one run on
one hit. He struck out two.
Offensively, the Warriors
generated 13 runs on nine
hits, with major damage being
done by catcher Josh
Carswell. He had two dou-
bles and five RBI.
He was followed by first
year player Elliott Lewis with
three singles in three trips to
the plate.
Others hitting safely were;
Jim Stephens and Matt
Bishop, each with a double,
and singles by Tuten and
Reggie Walker.
The season record is 6-1.
District play started Thurs-
day with John Paul II on Fin-
layson field, and continued
Friday at Munroe.


a LIp* ?;,,P
-~ -. -p;..: ._-)T1
i- ..~~l"~;~k ~ ;'? -a i~


CASEY GUNNELS left hander, belts the ball over 1
fence in center field, at a recent ACA practice. (Ne
Photo)


the
ws


Buckhalt Retires; Anderson

Coaches Warrior JV Team
Mason Shiver, each scored Newberry and Shiver, one run
FRAN HUNT one run. each.
Staff Writer Warriors lost to Perry 12-1 ACA lost to Florida High,
"Perry is a real good hitting 7-3, in the final game under
The first five games of the- team," said Demott Anderson. Buckhalt's leadership
Warrior JV baseball season The Warriors committed Vollertsen, one single, one
were played under the leader- three errors, run; Witmer, one run; and
ship of Bill Buckhalt, prior to Wheeler pitched the game, Jones, one run on a wild
his retirement, struck out one, gave up ten pitch.
Demott Anderson has hits and eight walks. ACA lost to Perry again,
been named head JV Coach, At the plate, Anderson had 10-1.
assisted by Stewart Wheeler. one single and one run; and Anderson attributed the loss
In the season opener against Buddy Vollertsen had one to errors, of which there x\ ere
NFC, the Warriors lost 40-3. --single. four.


ACA was ahead until the fi-
nal inning when NFC scored
three runs to take the win.
Casey Anderson, Casey
Wheeler and Luke Whitmer,
each went one for two.
Anderson pitched the game,
struck out five, walked three
and gave up two hits.
The Warriors lost to Madi-
son, 14-4/
ACA committed five errors.
Wheeler pitched, gave up
ten hits, eight walks and
struck out three.
At the plate, Witmer and
Anderson each had a single
and scored one run; Wheeler
hit a single; and Lewis and


The Warriors tied Maclay
8-8.
Anderson pitched the game,
struck out eight, and shut out
Perry going into the sixth.
"We were ahead 8-0 at that
point," said Demott
Anderson. "Then Maclay
came back and tied us on er-
rors."
At the plate, Vollertsen had
one single, one run; Brian
Scholte and Witmer, one run
each; Lewis, one single, one
run; Marcus Roberts, one
double, one run; Kent Jones,
one single, one run; Wheeler,
two singles; Anderson, one
single, one run; and Jacob


Casey Anderson pitched,
gave up six hits, four walks,
and struck out one.
"We were really off," said
Anderson. "Perry made the
routine plays and the outs for
the win."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High-
School varsity softball team
split its last two games to
stand 1-2 on the season.
The Lady Tigers defeated
Rickards 24-11.
Coach Earline Knight said-
JCHS did not scored until the
third inning, Rickards making
their first run in the first.
Ireshia Denson went one for
six with a double; Keandra
Seabrooks went three for five,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director-
Kevin Aman has reports the
schedule for the Spring Sports
Jamboree, Saturday, March
25.
All games are limited to
three innings or 45 minutes;
whichever comes first.
The regular season will be-
gin Monday, March 27 and
pictures will be taken at the
assigned times before sched-
uled fist games.
Assignments are:
At 10 a.m., field one, FMB
and Jefferson Farmers
Market; Coach Pitch, Chicken
Delite and C & F Fencing; T-
ball, Bishop Farms and Jeffer-
son Farmers Market.
10:45 a.m., field one, Mon-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School
baseball team lost the season
opener 6-2, to the Trinity-
Catholic Knights, last week.
"The Bees didn't have too
many days to practice before
the season opened, but they
did play very well, and we did
commit some errors," Coach
Quinton Adams said.
Greg Doston pitched a


HMS Softball

Roster Noted

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Corinne Stephens re-
ports the roster for the How-
ard Middle School softball
team.
The Lady Bees consist of 14 -
girls this year.

They include; Mariah Brin-
son, Lena Odom, LaAshlie
Norton, Misty Washington,
DeVonna Arnold, Cardreca
Walker, Kieria White, La-
Toya James, Lanesiya
Massey, Anna-Lee Montgom-
ery, Brionna Jones, Emily
Howell, Simone Williams and
Shenese Young.


hitting all singles; Heather
Miller went three for six, one
double and two singles; Je-
maria Cuyler went two for
five, one triple, one single,
and was the winning pitcher.
The Lady Tigers fell to Ma-
clay 13-3.
Seabrooks went one for
two, with a home run; Cuyler
went one for two with a
single.
"Our softball team is
young," said Knight. "Hope-
fully as they gain experience
at the high school level, the
errors will cease."


ticello Milling and Williams
Timber; Coach Pitch, Kiwanis
and Hiram Masonic Lodge;
T-ball, Capital City Bank and
Rotary.
11:30 a.m., field one, FMB
and Williams Timber; Coach
Pitch, C & F Fencing and
State Farm Insurance; T-ball,
Rotary and Jefferson Builders
Mart.
Field two, Joyner's Travel
Center and Jackson's Drug
Store.
12:15 p.m., field one, Mon-
ticello Milling and Jefferson
farmers Market; Coach Pitch,
Kiwanis and Chicken Delite;
T-ball, Bishop Farms and
Capital City Bank.
S1 p.m., Coach Pitch, Hiram
Masonic Temple and State
Farm Insurance.
- For further information con-
tact Aman at 342-0240.


great game, giving up only
one run.
- At the plate, Devondrick
Nealy smacked a home run,
bringing in. two runs; and
Marquise Dodson hit an in-
the-park home run.
Doston, went two for three;
Teylor Richards, two for
three; Tavaris Johnson, one
for two; and Breon Macon,
going two for three.
Demontray Johnson, went
two for three; and Doston
and Dobson, had a total of ten
strikes.


HMS Baseball

Roster Told

7RAN HUNT
;taff Writer

Howard Middle School has-
reports its roster for the base-
ball team.
Coaching the Bees this year
is Quinton Adams, assisted by
Steve Hall.
There are 14 boys in the
Beehive this year.
They include; Jarvis Akins,
Gerrold Austin, Demarco Bel-
lamy, Breon Crumity, Mar-
quise Dobson, Greg Doston,
and Shelderrick Duhart.
Issac Gilley, Raymond
James, Demontray Johnson,
Zanterian Macon, Teylor
Richards, Tavaris Thompson
and Devondrick Nealy.

HMS Posts

Softball Dates

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Howard Middle School.-
posts the schedule for its soft-
ball team.
All games are at 4 p.m., un-
less otherwise specified.
Action begins for the Lady
Bees with Wakulla, March
14, there; Shanks, March 15,
here; Wakulla, I p.m., March '
17, here; Madison, March 29,
here; and Shanks, March 29,
here.
Madison, April 4, there; Ha-
vana,. 1:30 p.m., April 6,
there; Steinhatchee, April 10,
here; Havana, 1:30 p.m.,
April 11, here; and wrapping
up the season, Steinhatchee,
April 12, there.
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w wwv.floridakidcare.org
TTi 1-877-316-8748
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ACA Tennis Team

TO Hold Car Wash
ACA Tennis team will hold The car wash will be held at
a carwash 8 a.m. to noon Saur- Dunn's Furniture parking lot,
day, March 18. 1244 North Jefferson Street.
Items needed for the event Monies raised will go to-
include: wards tennis needs.
*Rags, sponges, old wash- For additional information,
cloths. Coach Tonya can be reached at
*Old towels for drying cars. ',997-2365.
*Hand brushed for scrubbing
tires. Monticello News
*Garden hose.
*Soap/cleaner for washing Keeps You
cars. Informed!
*5 gallon buckets. Informed!!


I "N & IA I)S(AN!)'G LawnSeIrvic















WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN

877-4550


Maclay Beats JCHS;

JCHS Beats Rickards


Spring Sports Jamboree

Set At Park Saturday


Howard Middle Fall

To Trinity Catholic


Next Event
March 25th

SI 26th
3 Events
Left This Year
SCome Join
".. In The Fun!

For More Info, Call John Knight
850-584-7999 or 850-371-2525
6580 Hwy. 19 South Perry, FL 32348


I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006 PAGE 9


Warriors Win Two

Both No Hitters
in four at-bats; Tuten went
BILL BROWN two for three, a double and
two RBI; Gunnels, one for
Last week proved to be a-- three, one RBI, and two stolen


rare one in the lives of the
Aucilla Warriors baseball
team. A 13-3 win over
Echols County on Tuesday
was followed by two no-
hitters.
Chris Tuten tossed a 20-0
win over John Paul II on
Thursday and Casey Gunnels
followed with another no-
hitter against R. F. Munroe on
Friday.
Tuten struck out four while
dispatched nine via the
"whiff' route.
Only two Munroe batters
reached base, on, a base on
balls, and the other, an Au-
cilla error in.the bottom of the
seventh.
In the John Paul II encoun-
ter, Aucilla mustard 15 hits
led by Glen Bishop's home
run, single and three RBI.
Elliott Lewis had three hits


bases, one, a perfectly exe-
cuted steal of home.
Josh Carswell, one for three,
two RBI; Dustin Roberts, two
for three, both doubles, two
RBI; Stephen Dollar, one for
two, one RBI; Jim Stephens
and Reggie Walker each went
one for one, doubles.
On Friday, the Munroe game
was close, 2-0, until the fifth
when the Warriors scored five
to take a commanding lead.
The fifth also saw Dollar get
the first Warrior hit of the
game, a single over shortstop.
He was followed by a double
off the bat of Gunnels, double
by Carswell, and a triple by
Tuten.
Carswell and Tuten had two
RBI each.
The four hits in the Aucilla
fifth were their only hits of
_ the game.


Awarded a plaque as second place winners in the
Sheriff's Men's Horseshoe fundraiser are, from left


Rodney Willis and Curtis Willis. At right is Sheriff David
Hobbs.


Mood Swings Win 3


FRAN HUNT
5taff Writer
The Monticello Mood-
Swings won three of six
matches against the Golden
Eagle Wings Thursday.
Team Captain. Patty Hardy
said it was a difficult day to
play, with extremely strong
gusts of wind.
"The ball would go up, and
the wind would catch it, and
there it would go, over the
fence and out of bounds," said
Hardy.
"I'd much rather see a cold
day or a hot day than a windy
day to play," she said.
Team #1, Katie Brock and


Lisa Jackson, won its
matches, 7-5 and 6-4.
Team #2, Hardy and Cindy
Wainright, won the first set,
7-5, lost the'second, 4-6 and
lost the tiebreaker, 4-6.
Team #3, Kelly Hetherington
and Susan Goodwin, won by
forfeit.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff
and Laura Delvecchio, won
its sets, 6-4 and 6-1.
Team #5, Linsey Taylor
and Trisha Wirick, lost its
sets, 2-6 and 3-6.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and
Jennifer Ellis, lost its sets, 4-6
and 3-6.
The ladies square off
against the Glen Girls, 9:30
a.m., Thursday at Tom Brown
Park.


ACCEPTING a plaque as second place winners in the
Sheriff's Women's Horseshoe fundraiser are, from left:


Joann Andrews and Sally Cole.
at right.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 200


LEGALS .
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
recommendation regarding a pro-
posed major subdivision. The pro-
posed major subdivision is to be
located about one mile south of
unincorporated Ashville on
approximately 111.48 acres on a
portion of parcel numbers 05-2N7E-
0000-0021-0000 AND 05-2N-7E-
0000-0020-0000. Interested parties
may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Planning Commis-
sion meeting on April 13, 2006 at
7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344 The
meeting may be continued as neces-
sary. From the Florida "Govern-
ment in the Sunshine Manual", page
36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state or of
any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any
meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the

Sewing

Classes
4-H members 9 years of age
and older learned the basics of
sewing recently at the Ex-
tension Office.
Senior advance classes were
also held.
Instruction was given by
Agent Heidi Copeland with
Gladys Neely assisting..
The students made outfits
from pajama to skirts to eve-
ning gowns.
They learned the techniques
of a sewing machine, how to
lay out and cut a pattern, and
how to use an iron.
Students kept accounts of
their classroom work in their
project record books.
Parents were on hand to help
them to log: what they liked
best about the class, and what
particular project they were-
working on.
They noted the progress of
their performance during the
classes.
These classes are held
throughout-the 4-H year,
Students are then invited to
model their newly crafted out-
fits at a Fashion Revue.
The Revue this year "Water-
way To Great Fashion" will be
held 7 p.m. Thursday, Mar. 16
at the old high school.
The outfits worn in the Re-
vue will be judged in catego-
ries from active sportswear,
school wear, dressed for work,
special occasion, and my
choice.


ooaru, agency, or cummllmlissluon I
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he
or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings,
is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based. Prior o the
meeting interested persons may con-
tact the Jefferson County Planning
and Building Department at 850-
342-0223 or write the Department
at 445 West Palmer Mill Road,
Monticello, FL 32344 and provide
comments. The development pro-
posal may be reviewed during busi-
ness hours of the Department office.
3/15, c
The Jefferson County Planing
Commission will review and make a
recommendation to approve or not
approve a minor residential
subdivision application for
approximately '58.33 acres on the
southeast corner of St. Augustine
Road and Armstrong Road parcel
number 13-1S-3E-0000-0010-0000.
Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County
Planning Commission meeting on
April 13, 2006 at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as such matter may
be heard, in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based. Prior o the meeting
interested persons may contact the
Jefferson County Planning and
Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the
Department at 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344
and provide comments. The
development proposal may be
reviewed during business hours of
the Department office.
3/15, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO. 06-03-ca:
notice of sale: DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY
f//k/a BANKERS TRUST
COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR ASSET
BACKED SECURITIES
CORPORATION LONG BEACH
HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2000-LB1, Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH T.
ROSE, JR. et ux., et al.,


16
LEGALS. .


Defendant(s) NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order or
Final Judgment Scheduling
Foreclosure Sale entered on
February 27, 2006 in this case now
pending in said Court the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the north steps of Jefferson
County Courthouse, intersection off
of US Highway 19 and 90, Room 10
Monticello, Florida 32344, at I1rLIO
a.m., on the 23 day of March, 2006
the following described property as
set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment to-wit: LOT 3,
PARKWAY PINES SUBDIVISION
PHASE 1 ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK B PAGE 86 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. ORDERED at
JEFFERSON County, Florida, this
27 day of FEBRUARY, 2006.
ORDERED at JEFFERSON
County, Florida this 27 day of
FEBRUARY, 2006. Carl D.
Boatwright, As Clerk, Circuit
Court, Jefferson, Florida; SPEAR
& HOFFMAN P.A., 708 South Dixie
Highway, Coral Gables, Florida
33146, Telephone: 305-666-2299.
3/8, 3/15/06, c
Call for Bids Project: Air
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Handler
at Christ Episcopal Church
Monticello Florida. Scope of project
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air
conditioning systems in the existing
church and removal and disposal of
four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
form successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. EDT
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following
date and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office, 425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: The Estate of WILLIAM


LYTILE MOON, Deceased Case No.
06-31-06 NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the Estate of
William Lytle Moon, Deceased, is
pending in the Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, c/o Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida 32344. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdiction
of this Count WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THE. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this Notice is
March 15, 2006. Dated this 10th day
of March, 2006. Brain T. Hayes, FL
Bar I.D. #0034687, P.O. Box 1275
Monticello, FL 32345,
850-997-2065; Attorney for William
G. Moon, Personal Representative
of Estate of WILLIAM LYTLE
MOON, Deceased. 3/15, 3/22/06, c

HELP WANTED
Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like
dunderheads, dopers, drama
queens, please. Call Ron Cichon
@ 997-3568.
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville, FL is looking for a
Case Manager with a B.A. in
social or behavioral sciences
preferred; or an equivalent
combination of education
(minimum of A.A.) and
experience in working with
juvenile offenders preferred.
Applicants will also be required
to pass a background check. It
is an essential function of the
position that the staff member
must be capable of physically
restraining the students if when


necessary.
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville, FL is looking for a
Nurse with a Associate Degree
in nursing and current license to
practice in the state required. A
minimum of six months clinical
or public health and emergency
nursing preferred.
Please submit a resume to
Barbara Broomfield by fax @
850-948-4227 or email to

Barbara.Broomfield@youthserv
ices.com
3/10, 15, 17, 22, pd
We are looking for a full time
employee to do outside
maintenance, drive our facility
van and other duties as directed.
Job requirements: willing to
work a flexible schedule,
generalist knowledge of
plumbing, electrical and
carpentry. Must have a good
driving record and pass a drug
screen and criminal background
check. Inquire at Pine Lake
Nursing Home in Greenville.
Ask to speak to Ron Poppell or
Cahty Krentz. Apply in person
between 9pm and 4pm or Call
948-4601.
3/8, 3/10, c
Wood worker wanted: Basic
Experience with wood working
Tools Required. Must be self


motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, 8, 10, c
Registered Nurses Intensive
Care Unit $5000 Recruitment
incentive (With one year of
experience) Archbold Hospital
in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above
full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an
excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries.
CONTACT: Burse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or email
rtaylor@archbord.org, EOE
3/10, 15, 17, pd
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
'Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Prior
experience working with
children who have emotional
issues required. Some local
travel required. License


Southern Division



WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding,
Read welding symbols and measuring. Standard AWS
Welding Test in Flat Position.

Applications available

Georgia Department of Labor
Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


Dental Coverage
Retirement
Disability Insurance
Educational Assistance


Uniforms

BENEFITS THAT STABILIZE YOUR FUTURE


Equal Opportunity Employer
Mail: PO Box 7750 Thomasville, GA. 31758-7750
Phone: (229) 228-9780 Fax: (229) 226-2718


/ 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
D~'NTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


1630 E JACKSON ST.At
locatedd behind Langdale Auto Ma


B business ,






D directory


BURNETTE PLUMBING &

WELL SERVICE
S Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs

Carto BunetMserPume


CUMMING APPLIANCES


850-997-7468

850-997-5132


90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES

CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER


Register's

Mini-Storage
*.315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


IEED HELP?


RAB THE LINE
Ne have over 40 years of answers about
-euromuscular disease. Getting help couldn't
:e easier. Our lifeline is toll-free.


1-800-572-1717
Nww.mdausa.org


CARROLL HILL AUTO.ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"





Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

(on Caroll Hil) 229-226-0717


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available

562-2962



MONTICELLO 'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 9 3 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Muscular Dvstropf l Association


_~_L L~_ _~LIILY





mucua Lysrpry 5uuauf


p,









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006 PAGE 11


.. u,. _? l
S -'- - -"'


/ ".- .. *,; "* "^ ;;: ,;"i. .';, .-' -- "'" .'Eg b : -T ': ? ,:;,,-y^ ; ^ '*?.-
,.- -
.: .. .,, .;: .. k .. ..:. -. -- : :,, : :.,.,. -
-- ._ B =-
~i,- : .
I;- :: .. ,


urI1nk ?tA NT~FL'U~?. -;"AITTA14iT.


Da,.QA~ET..4~ .5-


i.m.1.,


required. Shift: Monday-Friday 2 and 4 Door Model As Low As Treadmill $500, Gas Grill with Lost Cockatiel Whistles theme
Variable hours. Some late $750 down 850-536-9111 ~ side burner $25 (OBO). Call from Andy Griffith Show and
afternoon work required. www.JumpinJims.con Ask For 997-4253. Yankee Doodle Aucilla Shores
OPS-FEMA Team Leader Mr. Deal. tfn area. Please call 342-9929.
(#2264) Masters degree with 11/2, tfn Dresser 6 drawers, hickory
from an accredited university or 2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250, 1700 wood, $35, Deep Freezer 22 cf. REAL ESTATE : -
college with a major in the field mi. Nice, $3000 OBO must sell. $45 or trade for pressure Lare Auction Real Estate and
of counseling, social work, 508-3851 treated wood. Knick Knack5 9 personal Poe 3 Land
508-3851shelf $5 Call 510-0998, Personal Property 3 Land
psychology, nursing, 3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd 341486. Parcels in Suwannee and
rehabilitation, special education, 993 Ford F250 New Tires, 3/10,1, ., Madison County. For info.
health education, or as related brakes, tune-up. $4,500. 3 10,y15, 17, pd M Ba 888-821-0894,
human services field with one 1995 Ford Crown Victoria new egistered 6 year old Dark Bay www.jwhillandassociates.com.
m) vpar of full time or .Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
(1) year of full time or tires, looks and drives like new. hilly $2000. Nothing here a bulldozer can't
equivalent related professional Reduced to $3,500 below NADA Call Mike 519-6506. fix! 2.5 acres in NE area of
experience or a bachelor's Book. Dayton3/15,17, pd County, private dirt road,
degree from an accredited 997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Dayton Portable Generator mobile homes allowed, rolling
university or college with a Auto, LLC. 4000 Watts Like New $400. Call mile h es allied, merchantable
major in the field of counseling, tfn, c 997-8082.pine trees just $10,000 per acre,
social work, psychology, 3/10, 15, pd R Winsto Connell, Realtor
R. Winston Connell, Realtor
nursing, rehab. special SERVICES 850-933-6363 Mobile or After
education, health education, or FOR RENTS Hours 850-948-5000
a related professional Health Care Equipment -It's a real estate jungle out
experience. Clinical supervision Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Prime downtown office space there! Hire an experienced
experience preferred. Shift Medicare Call for a assessment now available in Cherry Street e! uyig or Selling?
variable. of your needs. 997-3553. UPS Commons. Jack Carswell, Lynette's the Realtor with
Clinical Supervision Specialist available 997-1980. experience, knowledge and a
(#1451) Masters Degree from an 1/19, tfn 11/30, tfn, c successful Track record. The
accredited university or college The Episcopal Church Country Living 1 bedroom, 1 one who'll always put your
with a major in the field of celebrates it diversity. Tolerance bathroom located between interests first. The one with a
counseling, social work is nota weakness, but our Wacissa and US 98, $450 long list of satisfied customers.
is nota weakness, but ourto e u er
psychology, nursing, strength. Christ Episcopal monthly. 997-6653. Count on her to be your Expert
rehabilitation, special education, Church, three block N of the 3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd guide through the real estate
health education, or related courthouse. Sunday service at 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Between jungle! Lynette C. Sirmon,
human services health care, or 10:30 a.m. 997-4116. Wacissa & 98 $450 997-6653. Realtor Associate 850-933-6363
management field. Shift 8 am 5 3/15, c 3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, c or after hours 850-348-5000 R.
OPS-FEMA CRISIS We read the Scriptures in their # bedroom, 1 % bath, in County, Wlnston Connell, Realtor.
COUNSELOR (#2262) A cultural and historical context. $600 per month. 997-3368 3/15, 17, c
COUNSELOR (#2262) A
SChrist Episcopal Church, three 3/15tfn, c Nice Brick Home on approx. 1.7
Baccredted unieriy rcol block N. of the courthouse Commercial Building. 1,700 sq. ac. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
accredited university or college
with a major in counseling, Sunday service at 10:30 a.m. ft, 2 bath, 1 '/ acre property hardwood floors, fireplace,
wit a maor k couselig, 997-4116. $550 per month. Hwy 19, 5 Florida room, deck 2 miles from
social work, psychology, miles N of town 561-718-0896. downtown Monticello on paved
rehabilitation, special education nursing, Peters Satellite -- Your Dish 3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd road. $249,000. 997-2387 or

health education, or a related Satellite dealer. We offer Furnished downstairs efficiency. 933-0904.
human services field; or other equipment, installation, repair, Large bedroom, living room, 3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Bachelor's degree from an parts, and prompt service. We bath on 4 acres. Monticello. 20
accredited university or college also offer Go-Karts, utility minutes to Tally. $400 includes
with one (1) year of full time or trailers and lawn mowers utilities 997-2422 or 251-11l08. WANTED OLD
equivalent work or volunteer Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd 3/8, 10, c COCA-COLA Bottles
experience in a social service, Road, Monticello, Fla. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, between
health care, or related field, 850-997-3377. Wacissa and 98. $450. 997-6653. 850-545-3677
Shift Variable. tfn, 1/25 3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, pd
For more information and a Backhoe Service: driveways,
complete listing of available roads, ditches, tree & shrub
positions: removal, burn piles. Contact W ant to W ork
www.apalacheecenter.org (850) Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
523-3217 or (800)226-2931 4/28, tfn
Human Resources 2634-J Healthy Weight Loss available in North Florida?
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee, only at Jackson's Drugs, Due to growth we have new job
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen & Hoodiacol is designed to curb
FDLE background check An the appetite, burn fat and Opportunities in our modern poultry operations
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative increase energy levels resulting In Live Oak, Florida all shifts
Action Employer Drug-Free in considerable weight loss over
Workplace. time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key Apply Now!
Tri-County Electric ingredients incorporated intoJ *
Cooperative, Inc. is currently rice bran oil with natural We want to interview people who can come to work regu-
accepting applications for the flavoring to give it a palpable larly, provide quality work, demonstrate good workplace
following positions.: 1. A taste. In addition to weight loss,
following positions.: 1. A taste. In addition toweight loss, citizenship, work safely and be a dependable team play.
lineman at the entry-level you may see benefits for the citizenship, work safely and be a dependable team play.
position. The position would be hair, skin and nails from the Must be able to perform the essential functions of the jobs
based out of the Madison office. Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in with or without accommodations, and be legally autho-
However, the individual will be rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is rized to work.
required to live in the a cactus found in the Kalahari
Monticello Area. Position will Desert of South Africa.
require outage stand-by during Unsurpassed as an appetite Weekly Perfect Attendance Bonus of $.95/hour or greater!
the week and the weekends as suppressant, it not only limits After 60 days + Perfect Attendance
required. All applicants must appetite but increases the sense Breast Deboner $8.31 $9.26
posses a valid Florida CDL of satiety. This tends to limit Packers $7.7 $ 71
Class A license. 2. A lineman at total caloric intake by 30-40%
the entry-level position. The without experiencing hunger. Night Sanitation $8.11 $9.06
position would be based out of Significant weight loss should ,Live Hangers $10.00 $11.20
the Perry Office. The individual result from such a drop in Maintenance $8.20-$13.20 + $.95 PA
will be required to live in the caloric intake.
Perry, Florida area. The 5/18, tfn
position will require outage Interiors by Traci, Traci Ability to work rapidly and with dexterity is important for
stand-by during the week and Register Certif.ed Interior successful performance of these jobs. Medical insurance,
the weekends as required. All Decorator. 850-997-3176, life insurance, dental, vision and prescription drug
applicants must possess a valid 850-264-167,, programs, paid vacations, 9 paid holidays, credit union.
Florida CDL Class A license 3. Tracilinte. iors@aol.com
An automotive mechanic at the 3/8- 3/31, c
advance level position. The Appliance Repairs: washers,
position will be based out of the dryers, stoves, refrigerators. Gold Kist INC
Madison Office. The applicant Owned and operated by Andy 19740 US I-wy 90 W
must have working knowledge Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Live Oak. Florida 32060
of diesel and gasoline engines Message. 386-208-0205 English 386-208-0190 Spanish
and hydraulic systems in 2/11, tfn AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER EOE-AA-M-F-V-D
addition to basic automotive APPLICATION ALSO ACCEPTED AT EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS LOCATIONS
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
repair and maintenance. The 5i-8n0 uicSng. Rspn 1416 North Ohio 200 West Base St.
salary will be based upon 6/2, s/d, tfnMadison, FL
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal -- ..............
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. offers a _.
benefit and retirement package. The Sky 's the lim it
The closing date of the accepting sky's lim it
applications is March 31, 2006. for our growth and your opportunities.
Applications may be obtained Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
from Tri-County Electric Digital Reception Services has openings for ,
Cooperative's offices. SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
Applications should be returned $33,000-$36,000
to the attention of Tri-County 'or our TALLAHASSEE location. We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT REQUIRED
Electric Cooperative's WE OFFER PAID TRAINING! For more detailed information, please visit: www.hrmcacclaim com/apply/drscareers
Engineering and Operations ***WE OFFER A FAST PATH FOR ADVANCEMENT AND
Department. Tri-County CAREER GROWTH!***
Electric Cooperative reserves All of our field management staff were promoted from field technicians.
the right to reject any and all Most promotions occur after 6 continuous months with the company.
applications. 850-973-2285. DRS Satellite Installation Techs are provided with
appl -icion. paid training a company owned truck
3/8 3/3 1, c tools a variety of shifts


AUTOMOTIVE


No ( Ihlit ( lhin, Jusi LO ,
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks


benefits (medical/dental insurance, life insurance, tuition reimbursement, 401K plan with matching funds, bonuses,,
paid vacations, holidays, and sick time)
For more detailed information, please visit: www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers DIGITAL
or call: 1-877-351-4473. RECEPTION
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE. SERVICES, INC.
SERVICES, INC.


KELL Y& KILLY
PROP KRIIES


For all of our listings visit
www.cbkk.com

997-5516


10 High Acres with mixed use Int/Bus. City water and
sewer available. I-10 Frontage! $ 800,000
12.90 Ac. Wooded tract with large hardwoods. Great
home site. Caney Creek on property. $ 193,500
15:88 Acres on Thomas Rd. Great wooded tract for
week-end getaways. Aucilla Shores. $ 75,000
2 Lots Available on Crype Mrytle. Pecan groves and
pastures with exceptional views. $ 134,160
-------------------------------------


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Just Listed! Won't Last Lonq! Indian Hills
Area 1568 sq. ft. looks stick built mobile-
home on 6 acres with creek, pond, pasture, a
real nice package $145,500

Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Rentals Available
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


.. .... I .... .


I


- - - - - - - - - - - - - -









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 15, 2006


SEVENTH GRADE winners in the ACA Science Fair and
their categories include Biological: Anna Finlayson,
first; Caroline Mueller, second; G. H. Liford, third.


EIGHTH GRADE ACA Science Fair winners, and their
categories include: Biological: Ryan Pricier and Brian
Scholte, first; Clay Fulford, second; and Wilson Lewis,
third. Chemical: Brandon Dunbar, first; Seth Whitty,



Cooley Sculpture

'Seminole Family'

Unveiling Wednesday


The Unveiling of "Semi-
nole Family, sculpture by
Bradley Cooley and Bradley
Cooley, Jr, of Lamont, takes
place 10 a.m. Wednesday, at
the R.A. Gray Building in Tal-
lahassee.
"Seminole Family" is a cast
bronze sculpture depicting a
Seminole family, circa 1830s.
The family figures are wear-
ing clothing made from trade
materials.
The jewelry (Creek silver)
was made by the French Cana-
dians, and traded to the Creeks


and Seminole.
The gorgets (crescent shaped
pieces of armor for protecting
the throat) around the neck of
the man and boy were a device
carried down from the British.
They are reminiscent of the
armor from the French and In-
dian Wars.
It is sited at the northwest
corer of the R.A. Gray Build-
ing, and is the second of four
planned figural groups depict-
ing native people of Florida.
A reception will follow the
unveiling.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As the temperatures con-
tinue to rise, and spring
quickly approaches, Humane
Society members are seeking
area foster homes, to prepare
for when the animal "baby
'boom" hits the county.
"We have a small shelter
and foster homes enable us to
house more animals," said
spokesperson Martha Jean
Martin.
"These animals are better
off in foster homes than at the
shelter because they receive
more one-on-one time with
humans and it helps them to
learn to socialize and interact
with humans," she said.
In order to qualify as a fos-
ter home for a shelter animal,
residents are required to fill
out an application and sign a
foster contract.
"This way, foster families
know what is expected," said
Martin.


She added that the shelter
does supply all of the animal's
medical needs, and food, al-
though most foster families
supply the food.
Fosters are required to bring
the animal to a Petsmart
adoption booth once a month.
"It's better if the fosters can
stay with the animal at the
booth," said Martin.
"They do have the right to
decide who adopts the animal
and who doesn't."
Fosters bringing animals to
Petsmart are responsible for
transportation of the animal to
and from the booth.
"For the most part, we pre-
fer not fostering puppies and
kittens because they have to
go to the vet so often for vac-
cinations, plus the little ones
do adopt rather quickly," said
Martin.
To apply to be a foster home
for one of the many animals
at the shelter, call Martin at
997-6229.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


ACA Science Fair

Winners Told


* ."'' ,..: ,. z .. : "" "' "'^ ::".; P ::" ":*' :: '*^. ,
..



Chemical: Taylor Baez-Pridgeon, first; Shane West-
berry, second; Kent Jones, third. Physical: Kaitlin Jack-
son, first; Clark Christy, second; Sarah Sorensen, third.


second; Joe Mizell (not pictured), third. Physical: Syd-
ney Plummer, first; Jessica Hunt, second; Lane Fral-
eigh, third.


R



; ^ .'.. -'-' .





K ^i




PHILLIPS

Adult School

Meeting

Wednesday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Jefferson County Adult
School will sponsor a com-
munity meeting, 6 p.m.,
Wednesday at the Union Hill
AME Church.
Topics covered will include
education for adults, GED,
basic skills and ABE, parent
child interaction, homework,
FCAT, personal growth, em-
ployment skills and the like.
For further information call
342-0141.



"Y'. I

'" .. .


PREVENT



H,*I


First Birthday
Ava Lynne Phillips of Coco-

nut Creek celebrated her first
birthday Tuesday, Feb. 21, "
2006 with family and friends
at the home of her grandpar-
ents Katie and Randy Elkins in
Monticello.
She is the daughter of Sarah
and Austin Phillips and the
younger sister of Devyn Phil-
lips.
Her great grandparents are
Janet and Charlie Elkins and
Jane Harp of Monticello.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
annual Science Fair was, as
usual, a huge success.
Seventh and eighth graders
worked on their individual ex-
perimental research projects,
which culminated in an oral
and visual presentation to the
judges.
There were 19 seventh
grade and 24 eighth grade stu-
dents participating in the
event, who had been working
on their projects for the past
two months.
Winners from the three dif-
ferent categories at each grade
level, were presented with
awards for first, second and
third place winners.
At the seventh grade level,
winners included; Biological,
Anna Finlayson, first, Caro-
line Mueller, second and G.
H. Liford, third.


Chemical, Taylor
Pridgeon, first, Shane
berry, second and


Baez-
West-
Kent


James, third.
- And in Physical, Kaitlin
Jackson, first, Clark Christy,
second, and Sarah Sorensen,
third.
At the eight grade level,
winners included; Biological,
Ryan Pricher and Brian
Scholte, tying for first, Clay
Fulford, second and Wilson
Lewis, third.
Chemical, Brandon Dunbar,
first, Seth Whitty, second and
Joe Mizell, third.
And in Physical, Sydney
Plummer, first, Jessica Hunt,
second, and Lane Fraleigh,
third.
The projects were judged on
the students' knowledge of
their subject and their proper
use of the scientific method in
designing and conducting
their experiments.


The State Farm Insurance
Rela\ For Life team will host a
Chicken Dinner I1 a.m. till 2
p.m. and 4 p.m. till 6 p.m. on
Friday March I"
The Dinner \\ ill be served at
42- South Jefterson Street.
It \ll include chicken,
beans, slain. a roll. cold drink,


and a special Irish green des-
sert.
The cost is $6 at the door, or
$5 if prepaid. 997-8282 to pur-
chase tickets.
Proceeds will benefit the
American Cancer Society
through the Jefferson County
Relay For Life.


Th Reirmet ilag

Tht ees orin Wndr


Choices


* :: ile-. L. ,._ -,LF #7641
F .ntll,:. rl i r iN

* H j d,, P-.:. r:. ..,:zi
/Cafteria/Caf6
/Walking/Bike Trails
,Artist Series
/Learning Center
/Wellness Programs
/Christian Atmosphere
/No Entrance Fee


Benefits


/Village Square Shops
/24 Hour Security Service
/Medical Staff-
24 Hour Duty
/Boaiing; Fishing, Tennis &
Shuffleboard
/Private Custom Built Homes
/Rental Homes-I & 2 BR
/Rental Apartments-
Efficiency, I and 2 BR
/Lawn Maintenance
/Paved, Lighted Streets


ADVENT CHRIS'TAN VILLAGE
AT- 11n l ING PARK
Dowling Park Dr., 16 miles west of Live Oak, Florida
(386) 658-5291 Toll free (800) 647-3353
www.acvillage.net
S"Enjoy warm friendly neighbors in
S a multi-denominational Christian environment."


Call us today and experience the unique Village lifestyle
with a tour and a free overnight stay in our Village Lodge.


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


State Farm Team

Sets Relay Fundraiser


Opportunities


Humane Society

Seeks Foster Homes


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.