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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00113
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 10, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00113
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
    Main: Classified
        page 15
    Main continued
        page 16
Full Text
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Fraud Losses

May Be

Recovered

Editorial, Page 4


Sorority Raise

$2,015 For

Relay For Lif -

Story, Page 6 _


Educational

Rally Planned

Saturday

Story, Page 16
I


S Friday Morning


138T YEAR N.2050 CENTS Pub he
138TH YEAR NO.20, 50 CENTS Publishe,


inesdays


& Friday


FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2006


City To Internet:
E~y W Ii^^Hil~S


COUNCILMAN BRIAN HAYES discusses the purchase of
Graybar equipment with City Attorney Bruce Leinback
following Tuesday's meeting. (News Photo)

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FaSu bub dvias io o n


FB oni ^ Mii i iHH


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council on
Tuesday night adopted a
Comprehensive Plan
amendment that paves the way
for the 70-unit Crooked Creek
subdivision just west of town
on US 90.
The amendment changes
the zoning of the 85-acre par-
cel from mixed-use/suburban
residential to low density resi-
dential.

Agencies
Cite Few
Concerns
Mixed-use/suburban residen-
tial allows four houses per
acre, whereas developer Riley
Palmer plans to put one house
per acre.
The City Council's action
followed the review of the
amendment by several state
agencies, most notably the De-
partment of Community Af-
fairs (DCA).
With the exception of a few
minor concerns expressed by
agencies other than the DCA,
the state pretty much approved
the plan.
The DCA essentially found
the amendment consistent with
Florida law and the city's
Comprehensive Plan.
The department's only rec-
ommendation was that the
amendment should include
"access management tech-
niques", such as turning lanes,
limited access points and street
designs to ensure the safe flow
of traffic along US 90.
The DCA's recommendation
followed the findings of the
Apalachee Regional Planning
Council (ARPC), another of
the agencies that reviewed the
plan.
In its assessment, the ARPC
noted that the proposed subdi-
vision will increase traffic on
US 90, a "regionally signifi-
cant roadway under the Apa-


lachee Strategic Regional
Policy Plan."
That plan calls for developers
to participate in the elimination
or mitigation of impacts to the
regional road network, with
"access management practices
that preserve the safety and ef-
ficiency of US Highway 90."

The ARPC additionally rec-
ommended that the developer
should consider adopting
measures that reduce vehicle
trips on the highway.
Examples of the measures
that the ARPC recommended
include alternative roadway
connections to adjacent devel-
opments, establishment of par-
allel roads, and interconnected
pedestrian and bicycle paths.

The Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP), for
its part, requested additional
information, noting that "the
amendment package did not
contain the level of detail nec-
essary for an adequate envi-
ronmental assessment."
"The department requests in-
formation on how services will
be supplied to the proposed
residential development," the
DEP letter states. "The method
by which each of these serv-
ices is provided has the poten-
tial to increase the
environmental impact resulting
from the development."

The DEP also noted that the
available data depicts the
southern portion of the prop-
erty as containing wetlands
acreage that is connected to a
larger wetlands system.
Among the information the
DEP requested: an analysis of
potable water and wastewater
demands and provision, storm-
water management, and a wet-
lands survey.
The Department of State
(DOS), Division of Historical
Resources, found that the pro-
posed subdivision appeared to
(See City Okays, Page 2)


Yes,



LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

First, a little history on the
city's attempts to provide Inter-
net service, in order to provide
a better perspective on the lat-
est twist in the continuing
saga.
Begin with the city entering
a contract with Graybar Elec-
tric Company for $227,644
worth of equipment to provide
Internet service to residents.
At almost the same time, the
city enters a contract with
AT&T for $2,060 monthly to
provide Internet connectivity.
Whoops, somebody some-
where didn't do their home-
work. Bottom line: the equip-
ment doesn't work the way it's
supposed to function.
The city then cancels the
contract with Graybar and tells
the company to remove its
equipment from city property.
This after hiring a high-paid
consultant who informs the
city that the setup as Graybar
proposes it will not work.
The meter, meanwhile, con-
tinues running on the AT&T


contract, to the tune of more
than $14,000 to date.
More meetings follow. More
head scratching: What to do?"
What to do? An idea is bo.:rn'
or better yet, resurrected: Ne-
gotiate with Graybar to buy
some of the equipment and es-
tablish, if not Internet capabil-
ity, at least intranet capability.
The difference being that
Internet allow citizens to plug
into the system and access the
worldwide web, among other
things; whereas the intranet
would be limited to city em-
ployees and the monitoring of

Of course, it's pointed out at
one meeting that if the intent is
solely to monitor the city's 31
lift stations, it can be accom-
plished much cheaper than by
purchasing the Graybar equip-
ment. But that's another story.
The council ultimately
authorizes Councilman Brian
Hayes to negotiate with Gray-
bar's Tallahassee representa-


tive for the purchase of enough
equipment to establish intranet
capability.
Which brings the story to the
present.
On Tuesday, Hayes briefed
the council on the result of his
negotiations with Graybar.
Bottom line, Hayes said, he
was able to get Graybar to
agree to $59,000 for the equip-
ment, down from the initial
asking price of $63,000.
"From my standpoint, it was
a very successful negotiation,"
Hayes said. "I recommend we
borrow the money and buy the
equipment. This would be a
start. It would give us the basis
for the Internet."
A degree of hemming and
hawing followed.
Mayor Julie Conley didn't
want to appear opposed to the
proposal. In fact, she sup-
ported it, she made a point of
saying. But she had concerns
about where the money was
going to come from.


OFFICERS from the Sheriff's Department examine some of the marijuana plants they
seized recently. Projected street value of the seizure was $480,000. From left, Sally
Cole, Chris Smith, and Dwayne Hayes.


Festival Committee Ponders

How To Pay City For cleanup


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Watermelon Festival
Committee met Monday eve-
ning to continue planning for
the 56th festival scheduled
June 1-17.
Among key items of discus-
sion was the payment for extra
Police duty, as was done last
year.
In addition, Festival Chair
Mary Frances Drawdy re-
ported that she received notifi-
cation that the City requested
the Committee to pay for clean
up, a new wrinkle this year.


As the City Council had not
yet met to discuss the matter
while the Festival Committee
meeting was in progress, it was
unknown how much money
was involved.
In addition to the above
mentioned costs, the Commit-
tee will have to come '-p with
funds to help pay for the liabil-
ity insurance at the Rodeo, if
this event is to happen.
On the plus side of the
ledger, Progress Energy had
donated $1,000 towards the
festival, to be used as neces-
sary, and Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank has agreed to
sponsor the Woman's Club


Fashion Show.
The committee plans to seek
sponsors for various events, to
help make the annual Water-
melon Festival a reality.
This year, special emphasis
will be given opening events,
including the Kickoff Dinner,
the bed race to follow, and mu-
sic for listening and dancing in
the Opera House Garden, pro-
vided by Jimmy Gillis and his
one man band.

Pageant applications are
available with the deadline set
for the end of March.
(See Committee, Page 2)


She reminded the council
that the original intent was for
the city to finance the cost of
the system from the fees that
would be generated from sub-
scribers to the Internet. Absent
the Internet capability -- i.e.,
no subscribers -- where was
the money to come from? Con-
ley wanted to know.
"I don't want us to end up
looking for the money in the
Budget later," she said.
Councilman Tom Vogelge-
sang, a member of the technol-
ogy committee that did the
research that set the foundation
for the initial purchase of the
equipment, also expressed res-
ervations.
"We have an underlying as-
sumption here that the equip-
ment is going to work," Vogel-
gesang said.
But ihe fact was that that as-
sumption had yet to be tested,
he said.
"I know that time is of es-
sence," said Vogelgesang, re-
sponding to Hayes' assertion
that he had promised Graybar
a quick response on the negoti-
ated price. "But I think we
need to see that this is going to
(See Internet, Page 2)


Deputies

Seize 120

Pot Plants


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Sheriffs Office Investiga-
tors Sally Cole and Chris
Smith, assisted by the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment, recently seized 120
marijuana plants.
The projected street value
of the plants is $480,000.
A complaint was received
March 3 that marijuana was
being cultivated in a residence
on Noel Drive.
Cole and Smith were able to
develop enough information
to obtain a search warrant.
Law enforcement officers
discovered that the mobile
home was being used almost
exclusively to cultivate mari-
juana.
Cole reports that there was
one "grow room" in
operation, and another in the
process of being set up.
As well as the marijuana,
air-cooled lighting systems,
carbon dioxide generators,
fans and air conditioners, and
numerous controllers and tim-
ers, were also seized by offi-
cials.
"Much of the high-grade
marijuana in the US is pro-
duced in indoor growing op-
erations," said Cole.
She said that the National
Drug Intelligence Center re-
ports that by cultivating in-
doors, marijuana growers
conceal their illicit activities
(See Deputies, Page 2)


County Dems

Schedule

St. Pat's Event

Story, Page 13
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LOPouncall Decoldes, To

Proceed With Deal








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006


Internet Capability


Site Of New Subdivision


THE Crooked Creek Subdivision is slated for an 85-acre parcel just west of town.
Houses in the subdivision are expected to begin at $200,000. (News Photo)


City Okays Comp Plan


(Continued From Page 1)
pose no adverse effect on any
historic resources.
The DOS, however, empha-
sized that its review was "cur-
sory" at best, and it placed the
burden for safeguarding the
parcel's archaeological and his-
toric resources squarely on the
city.
"It is the city's responsibility


to ensure that the proposed
(amendment) will not have an
adverse effect on significant
archaeological or historic re-
sources," the DOS letter states.
Palmer, is reported to be
working with the DEP on the
wetlands delineation issue and
is supposed to have begun a
traffic study to satisfy the
-ARPC's traffic concerns.


City Clerk Emily Anderson
informed the council that the
expressed concerns of the vari-
ous state agencies will be ad-
dressed in the preliminary plat
review.
Houses in the proposed sub-
division will start in the low
$200,000, according to the de-
veloper.


Watermelon Committee Ponders


(Continued From Page 1)
Luncheon and Fashion Show
Chair Amanda Ouzts said
plans were underway for the
event, expected to be held at
the Opera House.
It was decided to charge
$15 per ticket for the event.
The committee decided that
a representative will meet with
officials to secure the former
JCHS Auditorium for the pag-
eant and Gospel Sing dates.
The committee will vote on
the artwork for the Festival
Booklet cover, April 3.


Grand Marshal for the pa-
rade will be selected at that
meeting as well.
Fewer food booths will be
used this year, to allow those
who participate to make a little
more money.
Food booth spaces are
$58.25, including tax.
Spaces for the Arts and
Crafts are $69.55 tax included.
Drawdy reported that a chair
person for the Antique Car
Show.was still needed.
Interested parties are en-


Watermelon Festival

Pageants Deadline Told
X 5 photo are due at the time:
RAY CICHON the application is submitted.
Managing Editor Contestants in the Princess
Pageant must by 11 years old
The application deadline for by April 15, 2006, and no
the Watermelon Festival Prin- more than 14 by Dec. 31,
cess Pageant, and Little King 2006.
and Queen Pageant, is March Contestants for the Little
31. King and Queen Pageant must
All applications and photos be five years old by April 15,
are due on that day. 2006, and no more than seven
Applications are available at years old by Dec. 31, 2006.
Monticello Florist and Gifts, Co-Chairs for the pageants
Jackson's Drug Store, and at are: Lauren Blank, Christy
the Chamber of Commerce. Clark, Sarah Ann Hofmeister,
An entry fee of $25 and a 3 Nicolle Honcell, and Leslie
Rabon.

.


IT'S THE QUESTION
NO ONE \V'ANTS TO ASK THEMI.EL"' ES
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Deputies
(Continued From Page 1)
from law enforcement
authorities and thieves, con-
trol the growing environment
to produce high-grade mari-
juana, and harvest numerous
crops each year.
The investigation continues
and arrests are pending.


(Continued From Page 1)
work. It seems to me that we
need to test this. The same
technology that we need to
have the Internet work, we
need for the intranet. If we de-
cide to move forward with
this, I want it made clear that it
might not work and we won't
have Graybar to fall back on."
Don't forget also, Vogelge-
sang cautioned, that the
$59,000 would purchase only
the equipment. It would re-
quire another $13,000 or so to
make the intranet system vi-
able.
Tom Love, a citizen well
versed in electronic and eco-
nomic matters and active in the
technology committee, offered
that he favored going forward
with the purchase, with a cou-
ple of caveats.
One, he reminded the coun-
cil, was the earlier statement of
City Superintendent Don An-
derson.
"Don said we could do the
lift stations cheaper, for
$40,000 or so," Love said.
"This purchase would solve
the problem, but at a premium.
If you're not planning on going
on with Internet, this is not
worth it."
His second caveat, he said,
was that if the city went ahead
with the purchase, it had to be
understood that it was doing so
based on the assumption
voiced by Vogelgesang that
"you're hoping it will work."

It's difficult to equivocate in
the face of certainty, however,
and Hayes and Anderson's re-
peated expressions of the
rightness of the purchase ulti-
mately swayed the council.

"It's an economic fact that
we need the Internet in today's
world," Hayes argued. "And I
think the city will end up with
the Internet in the end. If the
city has to spend more money,
so be it, it's a good investment
in economic development.
Sometimes, you just have to
take a chance."
Anderson, meanwhile, as-
sured the council that the cost
to make the intranet viable
would be $12,000 above the


$59,000 for the purchase of the
equipment.
"Unless something unfore-
seen comes along," he added, a
remark that elicited depreca-
tory laughter from some on the
council, most notably Conley.
Even so, she and Vogelge-
sang voted with the rest of the
council to authorize the city
clerk to seek a bank loan for
the purchase of the equipment.
"I vote very reluctantly," Vo-
gelgesang said.
He added that he supported
wholeheartedly the Internet en-
deavor and that he would do
everything in his power to
make it successful.
"I just want to make sure
that we go into this with our
eyes wide open," he said, re-
ferring to his earlier stated
concerns.
Coining after the fact, and
adding finality to the decision,
was City Attorney Bruce Lein-


'" ~rB1
(. izi


back's report, relative the out-
come of his negotiations with
AT&T.
The council weeks earlier in-
structed Leinback to negotiate
a possible reduction or cancel-
lation of the AT&T monthly
charge.
"They're willing to let us off
the hook for a price," Leinback
said.
That price, he said, was
$35,000 for a complete discon-
nect and $15,049 for half a re-
duction of the number of T-l
lines.
If the city continued with the
present setup of four T-1 lines,
the cost over the two-year pe-
riod of the contract would be
$55,000," he said.
If any council member had
any lingering doubts about the
rightness of continuing to pur-
sue Internet capability, Line-
backer's report appeared to
settle that matter.


Refuge House Offers

Helped For Abused


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Break the Silence, Stop the
Violence is the theme for Ref-
uge House.
Refuge House services are
for victims of both domestic
and sexual violence.


Refuge House provides such
services as emergency shelter,
individual counseling, group
counseling, injunction assis-
tance, community education
and training, information and
referral, and advocacy.
Saving lives, building hope,
and ending violence is only a
phone call away 342-3518.


Free Walk-In Pregnancy Testing
Birth Control Services' & Information
Confidential, Compassionate
Abortion Services
Provided by a Friendly & Caring Staff
Licensed and Inspected by the
State of Florida


ISAahassee


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006 PAGE 3


Jefferson County High School

Posts 4th 6 Weeks Honor Roll


Jefferson County High
School reports the honor roll
for the fourth six week mark-
ing period.
Appearing on the "A" Honor
Roll are: Jennifer Blake,
Loran Cox, Takayla


McIntosh, Darin Mills and
Kelvine Salters.
Appearing on the A/B Roll
are: Alexander Shandaria,
Crystal Brinson, Mrisa Bues-
chel, Nicole Bynum, Tammy
Davis, Kayangelia Gadson.


Scott Goodlin, Jazmaun Hall,
Latoya Henry, Courtney Hol-
mes, Zanquisha Jones, Merrial
Keaton.
Vuk Lutovak, Shaumese
Massey, Santana Mitchell,
Shavondria Norton, Charles
Pitts, Andrew Redmond, Sierra
Tyson.
Students earning a 3.0 grade
point average include: Shan-
dadria Alexander, Michelle
Allen, Maria Balboni, Cedric
Banks, Nikki Barrignton,
Crystal Bellamy.
Aressa Balckmon, Jennifer
Blake, Crystal Brinson,
Shayne Boxie, Marisa Bues-
chelm, Nicole Bynum, Tabitha
Carlton.
Jisheng Chen, Loran Cox;
Melissa Crumity, Tammy
Dvis, Ireshia Denson, Latoya
Footman, Kayangelia Gadson,

JCHS Class
Reunion Set
The Jefferson County High
School Class of 1996 is plan-
ning its tenth year reunion ih
May.
Class members wishing to par-
ticipate in planning the reun-
ion should contact Miranda
Gillyard at (850) 342-1710,
Stephanie Poole at (321) 624-
8055 or Patricia Jones-
Walker at (850) 264-5226.


The Monticello Rotary Club
will present the second annual
program of Hors D'oeuvres for
the Brain and Soul, 6 p.m.,
Saturday March 18, at the Op-
era House.
This unique blend of litera-
ture and music features Pulit-
zer prize winning author Rob-
ert Olen Butler, distinguished
author Elizabeth Dewberry,
and musician Michael Purvis.
The audience will hear ex-
cerpts from the works of the
two renown authors, and mu-
sic performed by Purvis.
Butler will read from a book
he is currently writing, "Wee-
gee Stories." It is based on
photographs by a photographer
who worked for the New York
City tabloid papers from the
mid 1930's to mid 1950's in
lower Manhattan.
This will be the premier
reading form this new book.
Dewberry will be reading


from her new book "His
Lovely Wife." The book is
scheduled to be available in
bookstores the week of this
event.
This will be the second pub-
lic reading by Dewberry from
her newest offering.
Joining Butler and Dewberry
is Michael Purvis, a well
known local musician and vet-
erinarian.
Purvis will blend his music
with the author's words for a
refreshing and engaging pres-
entation that will feed the mind
and soul.
Tickets for the performance
are $30 per person and include
heavy hors d'oeuvres. A cash
bar will be available.
The event is the Monticello
Rotary Club's signature fund-
raiser, with proceeds to fund
the Club's community projects.
For additional information
and to purchase tickets, call
997-5552.


Scott Goodlin, Lateshia Green.
Kandice Griffin, Tiffany
Griffin, Jazmaun Hall, Brittany
Harvey, Richard Hawkins, La-
toya Henry, Courtney Holmes,
Zanquihsa Jones, Merrial
Keathon, Michelle Keaton,
Kasha Larry.
S Alex Lingle, Vuk Lutovak,
Sahumese Massey, Tameka
Massey, Takayla McInstosh,
Geneva Miller, Heather Miller,
Darin Mills, Santana Mitcell,
Tyler Murdock.
Sahvondria Norton, Nicole
Parrish, Charles Pitts, Shalin
PItts, Keyondra Pleas, An-
drew Redmond, Colita Rivers,
and Ana Martha Rosas.
Kelvin Salters, Keiona Scott,
Angela Scurry, Michael Silcio,
Carmen Skipworth, Tabitha
Smith, Tyson Sierra, Lucius
Wade, William Wade, Bruce
Wilson.


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a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU
in Mind
-ll 850-9979981 8 '
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62478 .


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Charges Pending In prckge Deal'
DlselTPRMOc O.r Fw P hac

Single Vehicle Crash :iRotaryutter
was driving his 2001 Ford -Boom Pole
FRAN HUNT north on Nutall Rd., when he Drawbar
Staff Writer traveled onto the northbound .16 ft Dual Axel Trailer l. .
shoulder of Nutall Rise Rd. 'Includes Warranty
Charges are pending against and collided with an oak tree. iOther Pkgs Available .
Elbert Delwith Hartsfield, 50, Hartsfield sustained no inju- CHECKS CREDIT CARDS _- ..


of Monticello, following what
FHP reports as an alcohol re-
lated vehicle crash Sunday on
Nutall Rise Road, in Taylor
County.
FHP'reports that Hirtfield


ries but was transported to
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Why We are


Republicans
Our political background actively validates that
old saying "opposites attract". Norma's family
were lifelong Democrats and Warner's were
staunch Republicans. When we moved to
Jefferson County in 1977, Warner registered as a
Democrat simply to be able to have a choice in
local primaries.
In 1994 we both actively supported and
campaigned for Ross Perot and thereby helped
elect Bill Clinton as president. In retrospect this
was a grave mistake and we both then changed our
registration to Republican and eventually have
become actively involved politically in the local
Republican Party. In 2004 we ran for, and were
elected to be precinct committeeman and
committeewoman in precinct two.
In the broadest sense, we actively believe in and
support the Republican Party locally as well as
nationally because it is most closely allied with our
core beliefs and goals:
1. Individual responsibility and accountability for
our own beliefs and actions.
2. Love and honor of our country.
3. Involvement in and support of our local
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A


1H8


52









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
1A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
:Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
,-- .::. .. ....... ....- ........:....:..:.o....



Fraud Losses May


Be Recovered


_ Opinion & Comment


There may be hopeful news
for investors who believe they
have been the victim of invest-
ment fraud. A provision in the
federal tax code called Section
1665 may offer potential tax
benefits.
If your investment loss quali-
fies as a theft loss under Sec-
tion 165, it may be possible
for you to deduct the full
amount of your loss immedi-
ately against ordinary earned
income, all in one year. If
your loss exceeds your taxable
income in that year, you are al-
lowed to get a refund for pre-
vious taxed paid. A theft loss
deduction, if appropriate, can
Suffer a number of advantages:
There is no limit to theft
loss deduction, unlike the
$3,000-pre-year capital loss
limit. In other words, it could
take you 34 years to fully de-
duct a $100,000 loss as a capi-
tal loss.
It may reduce or even
eliminate tax payments.
Depending on your cir-
cumstances, you may qualify
for a tax refund.
According to the experts at a



Kiddie Port


Despicable

BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Child pornography has got to -
be one of the more despicable
crimes an individual can com-
mit. Frankly, it makes me sick
to write about it. But it's real.
In an article in the Feb. 19,
2006. issue of Parade maga-
zine, attorney Andrew Vachss,
notes that child pornography is
one of the fastest growing
"businesses" on the Internet.
He observes that the produc-
tion of child pornography is
incredibly inexpensive and
easy, requiring only the equip-
ment on can purchase in any
discount store. Once a picture
is taken and posted in cyber-
space that picture lives forever.
As Vachss says, "images on
the Internet can never be de-
stroyed. The only things 'used
up' in the child pornography
business are its victims."
Pornography of all kinds is
more available, accessible, and
affordable than ever before.
Literally, anytime you get on
the Internet you are just two
clicks away from some of the
most morally reprehensible
material ever produced.
Pornography of any kind is
about presumed pleasure and
profit. But for the victim it's
about exploitation, abuse, en-
slavement. violation, emo-
tional destruction, and some-
times physical death. Child
pornography simply takes all
these tragic outcomes to an
even deeper level of debase-
ment.
As Vachss puts it, "No child
is capable, emotionally or le-


firm called JK Harris 165
Services, An investment loss
in which unethical behavior
was involved or suspected
may qualify an investor for re-
lief under the provisions of
Section 165.
When brokers or investment
salespeople fail to abide by ac-
cepted sales practices and
money is lost, that loss may
qualify as investment theft.
The same is true when an in-
vestment was taken with the
intent to defraud your deprive
you of it if the sales process
was misleading, unsuitable, or
violated any laws. If there is
no reasonable expectation of
recovering your loss, may be
able to receive substantial tax
benefits through a Section 165
accelerated deduction.
Similar benefits may be
available to an investor who
has invested money in a com-
pany that has suddenly disap-
peared either going out of
business or going bankrupt. a
Section 165 deduction may be
possible depending on the spe-
cific circumstance surrounding
the bankruptcy.



n Most


Crime
gally, of consenting to being
photographed for sexual pur-
poses. Thus, every image of a
sexually displayed child be it
a photograph, a tape or a DVD
records both the rape of the
child and an act against hu-
Smanity." So called Kiddie porn
is egregiously named. There's
nothing cute about it.
As gambling is driven by
compulsive gamblers, yet it
sucks money from many cas-
ual gamblers .as well, so child
pornography is driven by pe-
dophiles, yet it entices the cu-
rios and the emotionally
crippled too. Certainly it at-
tracts the corrupt those who
demand the product and those
who profit from it. Men are
primarily responsible, of
course, but women are also
participating as purchasers and
purveyors, sometimes using
their feminine personas to at-
tract and reassure the victims.
Other than pedophiles,
probably no one but the most
extreme libertarian or maybe
no more than a very few mem-
bers of the American Civil
Liberties Union would defend
child pornography. It is a hei-
nous crime.
Resources are available for
those wanting to help. The Na-
tional Association to PRO-
TECT Children is one such
nonprofit agency. This organi-
zation offers assistance to vic-
tims of childhood sexual abuse
as well as knowledge and con-
tacts for those wishing to work
the political process on behalf
of children.
This is admittedly a very
(See Kiddie Porn, Page 5)


i- M
~0~~"i" !


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I have noticed that some par--
ticular people, who write let-
ters to the editor, persistently
use the words appalled, of-
fended and shocked. I suspect
that these same people use up
all their energy writing letters.
The people that I know who
actually try to get positive,
things done, do not use these
words in normal conversation.
Most of these negative letters
appear in large city newspa-
pers. They use the kind of
words you use when you are
hiding behind a typewriter. In


small southern towns, people
know, are related to, do busi-
ness with or run into each
other frequently.
We choose not to alienate
our neighbors the way people
in a big city, who seldom see
each other, can do. We cannot
afford to do this if we want to
accomplish things.
One difference between peo-
ple who talk and people who
"do things" is social grease.
Social grease is personalized
courtesy, and opening your
hear enough to be interested
in your.ncighbor. Social grease
lubricates. Socia. grease sof-
tens the ragged edge of intem-


operate thoughts or emotions.
Words of kindness or sug-
gestion help accomplish true
change. Try using the words
appalled offended and shocked
in a conversation. Listening
ears will shut down and no one
will pay any more attention.
Social grease I am sure, origi-
nated in the South. Don't you
remember the town crazy lady
who had "nerves?" Every
Southerner charged with a
crime is declared, "with the
wrong crowd" or "high strung"
by his family.
I have served on many com-
mittees in Monticello. Often
the participants have widely


New Car Dance Steps


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Recently, I found myself in
the uncomfortable position of
needing to purchase a new ve-
hicle. This wasn't a new proce-
dure for me, but one I have
learned to despise.
I affectionately refer to this
agonizing process as "doing
the new car dance". I learned
my car trading "skills" from
my dad. He was a master of
"the deal." Just about the time
the salesman thought he had
my dad all wrapped up and ea-
ger to lay waste his billfold,
my dad would slip in yet an-
other twist before sealing the
deal. I can still see the frustra-
tion on the faces of those poor
car salesman.
While little has changed
when it comes to buying a car,


(except for the inflated prices),
the process remains the same.
It is the only major purchase
we make as Americans
wherein we have allowed the
procedure to get totally out of
hand.
We wouldn't think of buying
a plasma TV, new carpeting or
groceries in the same manner
we have allowed ourselves to
be manipulated when buying a
new vehicle.
Can you imagine your local
grocery store having a can of
spinach priced at $8.75? While
you are trying to catch your
breath, a vegetable salesperson
suddenly appears to say that
the store paid $7.25 (their in-
voice) for each can of spinach,
.but this week only, you can
buy it today for just fifty cents
over their invoice, or $7.75.
WOW! What a deal. But wait!
If you want a better deal and


can delay your purchase a few
days, all the vegetable items
will be on a special sale at the
State Fair Grounds this week-
end.
Sound ridiculous? Well that
is the same process we allow
ourselves to be put through
when buying a new vehicle.
Why there is sticker price, in-
voice price, price after manu-
facture's rebate, price after
cash back and of course that
special dealer incentive thing.
All in all, the objective is to
get as much out of you as pos-
sible, while making you feel
you are really getting a one of
a kind deal. In order to accom-
plish this objective, everyone
must "do the new car dance."
So what is doing the new car
dance? Well it starts with you
showing up at a dealership to
look at a new car. I call this
process, "stepping into the


differing views and goals. So-
cial grease has smoothed the
way for each and every group
to finish the task.
I read about a meeting in an-
other town where a participant
wore an Aunt Jemima outfit,
and of another where they
threw punches. I will bet be-
fore the hitting, the words ap-
palled offended and shocked
were b'.,idied ,il:ui
The "doer", the people who
do get out and get things done,
soften their verbiage and try to
see the other person's point of
view. The "doers" are willing
(See Short Takes, Page 12)


shark tank."
After the proverbial niceties,
you finally tell the guy what
car you are interested in and
without warning you find
yourself seated at one of the
multitude of sales desks bor-
dering the showroom.
It's here where old Bob starts
his body punching. Using a va-
riety of proven words and
phrases, his objective is to see
how anxious and willing you
are to throw your wallet at him
for the car of your choice.
A skilled salesperson can
easily manipulate you into
freely telling him how much
you are willing to spend, how
deeply in debt you are willing
to go and how little you will
accept for your trade-in.
Then there is the salesman's
routine secret trip to the sales
manager to see if they can sell
(See New Car, Page 12)


Liberty's Spirit Awakens


TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

There is never an important
lesson that bullies never seem
to learn: you can only push
people so far before they begin
to push back.
We are starting to such a re-
sponse to Big Brother's assault
on American liberties as aver-
age Americans are beginning
to push back and say no.
No issue has grabbed the na-
tion's attention like the inva-
sion of illegal aliens. As
hundreds of thousands poured
across the US border over the
years, changing our culture, af-
fecting our crime rate and di-
minishing standard of living,
frustrated Americans were told


by government that there was
nothing to be done about it.
Suddenly, early in 2005, a de-
termined group of volunteers
organized vigils at the hottest
spots along the border, photo-
graphing and reporting on the
highly organized invasion.
As the news media began to
carry these reports on the
nightly news, Americans be-
came incensed.
The tide began to turn. Con-
gress has taken action, passing
several pieces of legislation
aimed at strengthening the bor-
der, including larger budgets
for the Border Patrol and fenc-
ing.
What Congress has not done
yet is pass the Bush Admin-
istration's scheme for amnesty
fnr tllhpq lawherpolopr Anrd


that's another good thing
Americans had enough and
pushed back.
Protection of private property
finally hit the front pages in
2005, after blatant theft by
government.
The use by local communities
of Eminent Domain to take
private homes simply to raise
tax revenues or line the pock-
ets of private businesses has
caused pain and outrage for
several decades.
In a shocking decision by the
Supreme Court (Kelo Vs. Lon-
don, CT), such grabs of private
property were legalized, set-
ting off a nationwide cry of
outrage and the creation of
property rights protection leg-
islation at all levels of govern-


ment.
Property owners are demand-
ing that government protect
their rights and are pushing
back.
Also on the private property
scene, efforts were launched in
Congress in 2005 to "fix" the
Endangered Species Act
(ESA), perhaps the worst law
to ever be enacted in Congress.
For more than 30 years the
ESA has been at the root of
massive property invasions,
destroying whole industries
like timber and ranching.
Americans are beginning to
understand that there is some-
thing very wrong with the
United Nations. Sold on an
image of being simply a place
(See Liberty Spirit, Page 12)


From Our Photo File










Y- .














AS CANDIDATE Dr. John Ward, center, and incumbent Walter Edwards, right, listen,
candidate for County Commission, David Mignano responded to questions from pan-
elists Ron Cichon and Jack Hyden in the candidate's forum, in Aug. 1990. (News File
Photo)


- -p-


~i~s~BBBL'








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Resident States Zoning


Changes Set Precedents


Dear Editor:
Commissioner Tuten has
misled the public when it
comes to Comprehensive Plan
Amendments.
On Oct. 20, 2005, the Com-
mission reviewed a Comp Plan
Change, at which time Com-
missioner Tuten stated "a vote
to change density does not set


Kiddie Porn
(Continued From Page 4)
ugly subject, but it seems to
me that Christmas ought to be
talking more about it, perhaps
even leading the charge for ap-
preciate legal, social and min-
isterial response. Obviously we
care about child victims. We
can also demonstrate care for
pedophiles as human beings
tragically in the grip of horren-
dous sin.
I don't think it is self-
contradictory to push for more
stringent laws and consistently
applies criminal justice for
child porn perpetrators even as
we work spiritually to reach
their hearts. Accountability
and forgiveness are twin
themes in Scripture from
which I and every other be-
liever have benefited. So it can
be for those who seem the
worst among us.
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., a
syndicated newspaper colum-
nist in almost 100 newspaper
and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids,
Mich.)

HIGHWAY



230


All roads lead to one or
another of MDA's 230 clinics
helping people affected
by neuromuscular diseases.

Muscular Dystrophy Association


a precedent."
I called Commissioner
Tuten about this change and
was also assured that this was
a one time deal and that it was
best for that particular parcel.
Well, Commissioner Tuten,
here we are again with two
more Comp Plan Changes be-
ing considered.
During our phone conversa-
tion on March 2, you com-
mented that a landowner
should be able to do with his
property as he or she sees fit,
and "how would I feel if I had


83 acres and would lose 25
percent of the property value if
it had to be sold with an agri-
cultural zoning."
I'm sorry, Commissioner
Tuten, but since when is the
Commission in the business of
compensating land owners for
lost property value by chang-
ing the zoning?
Zoning codes have been put
in place to keep out unwanted
development and commercial
businesses in rural areas.
I moved here from South
Florida to get away from urban


NOW.
Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


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sprawl and unscrupulous de-
velopment.
In working for city govern-
ment, I have previously wit-
nessed an agricultural corridor
such as the Ashville Highway,
go from farming to total hous-
ing development, over a period
of a couple of years.
This resulted in increased
taxes because of the need to
widen the road from two lanes
to six, and the increased need
for traffic lights, police and
fire protection.
I guess it is felt that the
money for compensating a
landowner needs to come from
my pocket.
The only thing I see from
your term in office is that you
are in the business of develop-
ing "from the inside out" and
you don't really care about the
integrity of the established
zoning code requirements, or
the opinions of your constitu-
ents.
Sincerely,
Stephanie F. Hunt


'%

47" ,
[ --
- ;,, t :,.'


r


S Accounting
Administrative Office Technology
Air Conditioning Technology
Applied Business Technology
Automotive Technology
.Computer Information Systems Registel
C..smetology
'Crminal Justice Now!
[Dratting Technology
Early Childhood Care & Education
He alth Care Assistant
A.gric ilture Technology
Indlusrial Electrical Technology
Mrr.ine Tool Technology
Medical Assisting
Medical Laboratory Technology
Nursing
Paramedic Technology
S Pharmacy Technology
.. Radiologic Technology
ion Respiratory Care Technology
ilion Surgical Technology
Technical Studies
he Welding and Joining Technology


educa
att!


Speed of 229.225.4096
speed f www.southwestgatech.edu
life Southwest Georgia
wwlECHNICAl COLLEGE



ivwvw.gir lsgotech.org


) Girl Scouts.


accepts


the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugS, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, MVagazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram


You are cordially

n vited to attend


Hors D'oeuvres


for the Brain and Soul

with

Robert Olen Butler

(Pulitzer Prize winning author)


along with

Elizabeth Dewberry

(distinguished author)


and Michael Purvis

(local musician)



Sponsored by

The Monticello Rotary Club

On Saturday, the eighteenth of March two

thousand and six Six o clock in the evening

Monticello Opera House

Monticello, Florida


^l~ fl *'" "';' ;!.*: = l.*~ i;' !;', ,, : '- ,*..' .,;' r ;-. '-- **


___


" I


--~--~-----~IL. --I C- --- ---~--~b-- ,p- ~p--Qg~


(fner


-- --
















PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006


Lifestyle


Cassie Crocker To

Marry Justin Nails


Dr. and Mrs. Charles
Crocker of Monticello, an-
nounce
upcoming marriage of their
daughter, Cassie Paige
Crocker to Justin Clayton
Nalls.
Crocker is a 2002 Summa
Cum Laude graduate of
Brookwood School in Tho-
masviile.
She is currently a senior at
the University of Florida and
will be graduating on May 6
with a Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree in Graphic Design.
While attending the Univer-
sity of Florida, she has been a
member of the Phi Sigma
Theta National Honor Society.
Her paternal grandparents
are the late Dr. Uncas T.
Crocker and Mrs. Carrie
Crocker of Monticello.
Her maternal grandparents
are the late Mr. John T. Craig
and Mrs. Catherine Craig of
Durham, NC.


Nails is the son of Dr. and
Mrs. Jim Nalls ofHavana.
He is a 2000 National Merit
Scholar graduate of Arch-
bishop Rummel High School
in New Orleans, LA.
In 2004,,he graduated Magna
Cum Laude from Mississippi
College where he earned a BS
in Psychology.
He is currently attending
Beeson Divinity School at
Samford University in Bir-
mingham, AL where he is re-
ceiving his Masters' degree in
Divinity.
His paternal grandparents are
the late Mr. Chester Nalls and
Mrs.'Thelma Nalls of Havana.
His maternal grandparents
are the late Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Robinson of Gainesville.
Crocker and Nails will wed
at 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 20,
2006 at Immanuel Baptist
Church in Tallahassee.
Upon return from their hon-
eymoon, the couple will reside
in Birmingham.


JAMES MACON III AND LALEATHA JACKSON



Laleatha Jackson To

Marry James Macon III


James Macon III and
Laleatha Jackson will ex-
change vows 3 p.m., April 1,
2006, at Memorial MB
Church.
A reception will follow a the
Opera House.
Jackson is the daughter of
Wise and Mamie Jackson, Sr.
She is presently employed by
Tallahassee Memorial Re-
gional Medical Center.
She is a 1995 graduate of
Jefferson County High School,


and attended Tallahasee Com-
munity College.
Macon is the son of James
Macon, Jr. and Minister
Rosena Singleton. He is em-
ployed through the Union with
Miller's Electric.
He is attending Tallahassee
Community College pursuing
a degree in electrical engineer-
ing.
The couple will reside Talla-
hassee.


CASSIE CROCKER AND JUSTIN NALLS


Garden Club To Present,

Petite Flower Show
The general public is encour-
DEBBIE SNAPP aged to participate in the horti-
Staff Writer cultural segment.
This show will meet the re-
The Monticello Garden Club-- quirements for a Petite Stan-
will present a Petite Standard dard Flower Show.
Flower Show titled "Chil-: The National Garden Club
dren's Storytime" Monday, Inc. (NGC) standard system of
March 20 at the Chamber of awarding will be used and top
Commerce. awards may be given, if mer-
Admission is free and open ited.
to the public after 2 p.m. on Competition in the Horticul-
Monday, during regular Cham- ture Division is open to any
ber hours. amateur grower. The Design
Entries will be received on Division is open to Garden
Sunday, Mar. 19 between 3:00 Club members.
and 4:00 p.m., and on The Garden Club consists of
Monday, Mar. 20 between the the Camellia, Founders, Mag-
hours of 8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. nolia, and Mignonette Circles.
Judging will begin at 11:00 Anyone wishing to submit a
a.m. on Monday, Mar. 20, fol- design entry and for a com-
lowed by a luncheon at noon. plete listing of the General
Design entries will be placed : Rules, Horticulture Rules, Di-
on assigned tables and shelves vision ,,: Horticulture, Ruls?,
and:'the. Chamber, :420 !Westtqa Design Rules, and Division I
Washington Street. ... :,: i Design Rules information can
Small design classes will in- contact Kay Martin at 997-
clude such Reading Circles as: 4566.,
Little Mermaid, Little Red For more information about
Riding Hood, and Alice in the Flower .Show contact
Wonderland. Chairman Linda Demott at
Miniature design classes will 997-3376 or Co-Chairman
include such Nursery Rhymes Angie Taylor at 997-3636.
as: A Tisket, A Tasket, Little This Flower Show is held in
Boy Blue, Come Blow Your the memory of Club member
Horn, and Humpty Dumpty Mary Sue Gamble Reed, who
Sat On A Wall. died in October 2005.


Sorority Raises $2,015

For Relay For Life Event


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of Xi Lambda Up-
silon Chapter of Beta Sigma
Phi met at the Wacissa Meth-
odist Church at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Feb. 28 for their Pan-
cake Dinner.


-:;1
A~


First Birthday
Joseph Salancy celebrated
his first birthday Tuesday, Feb
28, with a family dinner party.
Attending this special occa-
sion were his parents Ann and
Fred Salancy; his siblings Mi-
chael, Abby, and Julianne; his
grandparents Catherine and
Richard Spinnenweber; and his
Godparents Mark Dunn and
Vivian Bruno, and their fami-
lies.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

First Baptist Church Relay
For Life Team will hold a
White Elephant Sale and Bake

Church News

Bethel AME Church will
hold a Pew Rally Program 3
p.m. Sunday. Guest speaker is
Rev. Bernard Hudson, Ford
Chapel AME Church, with the
church choir.
***
Philadelphia MB Church
celebrates the anniversary of
its pastor, Rev. Joseph Francis.
Guest speaker is Alonza Fudge
and congregation from Hick-
ory Hill MB Church.
***
New Bethel AME Church
pall bearers Lodge #2 meets
1 p.m. Saturday. All members
are encouraged to attend.
***
New Bethel AME Church
will observe its annual Ushers
Anniversary Program 3 p.m.,
Sunday. Guest speaker is Min-
ister Joyce Sabree, of Shiloh
AME Church of Monticello.


Sale 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Mar. 11 in memory of Walter
Boatwright.
The Sale will take place at
the church location on West
Washington Street.

"Something for everyone will
be for sale," remarks member-
Arlene Young.
"There will be furniture,
baby items, and clothing arti-.-
cles just to name a few things,"
she adds.
The baked goods will be all
homemade and will be sold as
whole dessert items or as pre-
sliced cakes and pies, and indi--
vidual cookies, brownies, and
other special goodies.

The American Cancer Soci-
ety Relay For Life gives every--
one the opportunity to fight
back and to make a difference
in the battle against cancer.

One in three Americans will
be diagnosed with cancer in
their lifetime.
Relay brings people together
from all walks of life with the
common goal of eliminating
cancer.


Norma White

TO Speak At

Bethel AME

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Norma S. White, the 25th-
National President of Alpha-
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.,
will be the speaker at Bethel
AME Church, 11 a.m., Sun-
day.


White is a native of Jackson-
ville and a graduate of Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical
University.

She is also the author of nu-
merous books, and the Past
Supreme Basileus of Alpha
Kappa Sorority, Inc.

Questions may be answered
by calling the church at 997-
6651, or Althera Johnson at
245-6211.


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Hostesses for this annual
dinner were Barbara Boland
and Emily Walker.
Pancakes, sausage, old fash-
Sion bacon, fruit, orange juice,
and coffee were served.
After dinner, president Con-
nie Boland called a short meet-
ing to order.
Betty Messer won the eve-
ning's raffle. Funds raised
from the raffle will be directed
to Hospice.
It was reported that the
Chapter Relay For Life team
has raised, to date, $2015.
In attendance this evening
were: Barbara Boland, Connie
Boland, Carolyn Cheshire,
Linda Demott, Katrina Guerry,
Betty Messer, Alice Sander,
Mary Ann Van Kleunen,
Emily Walker, Velinda Wil-
liams, Carolyn Wright, and
guest Ruby Whitson.


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positive effects on emotional reactions, mood, social
behaviors and even memory for both males and females," Jones said. Jones found that the presence
of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and positively affects social
behavior far beyond what is normally believed. Upon receiving a gift of flowers, the participants of
this study, responded with true smiles and reported positive moods that lasted for days. Womeg and
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who received flowers demonstrated Increased eye contact In conversation, stood In closer proximity
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Homes Of Mourning


William Flowers, Jr.
William Arch "Billy" Flow-
ers, Jr. age 63, died Sunday,
March 5, 2006 in Tallahassee.

The graveside service will be
held 11:00 a.m. Saturday,
March 11, 2006 at Broomsage
Cemetery in Jefferson County.
Visitation (viewing) will be
6-8 p.m., Friday March 10,
2006 at Beggs Apalachee
Chapel. Interment at Brooms-
age Cemetery. Memorial con-
tributions should be sent to
Cody Pentecostal Holiness
Building Fund, 3862 Tram
Road, Monticello, FL 32344.

William Flowers, Jr. was-
born in Adel, Ga. and grew up
in Miccosukee. He was a life-
long resident of South Georgia
and North Florida. He was a
Baptist and worked as an auto
mechanic.

He is survived by: 3 sons,
Michael Flowers of Crawford-
ville,William Arch Flowers, III
and wife, Teresa of Elk Park,
NC, Bobby Flowers and wife,
Vickie of Tallahassee, a
brother Leon Flowers and
wife, Doloris of Perry, 3 sis-
ters Lillian Mercer and hus-
band Royce of Thomasville
Hilda Cannon and husband
Harley of Perry, Tynia Wig-
gins and husband Jim of Perry,
7 grandchildren, Tamara,
Ryan, Amber, Alexandra,
Courtney, Katie, and Chase.


Florence Wild Glover
Florence Christina Wild
Glover age 95, a retired Secre-
tary died Monday March 6,
2006 in Thomasville, Georgia.

Funeral service was held at
11:00 a.m. on Thursday March
9, 2006 at First Baptist-
Church, Monticello, Florida.
Interment followed at Rose-
land Cemetery in Monticello.
Family received friends from 6
to 8 on Wednesday, March 8
2006 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel.

Mrs. Glover was a life long
resident of Jefferson County,
born three miles south of Mon-
ticello, on German Lane (so
named because her father was
German and five other German
families lived on that lane in-
cluding her grandmother) She
belonged to the Gladiolas and
Cherokee Garden Circles since
1951.

She was married to the late__
James Hansel Glover who died
February 1, 1975. They were
parents of one child, Linda
Carol, who died October 28,
1962 at age 18.
She was preceded in death
by her three brother: Herman
Wild, Lorenzo Van Wild, and
William Lamar Wild.
She was a member of First
Baptist Church, since the age
13. She taught Sunday School
for beginners to senior's age
groups.


Ida Marie Ford Martin
Ida Marie Ford Martin, age
92, a secretary died Wednes-
day, March 1, 2006.

A private'burial is planned.
Culley's Meadow Wood Fu-
neral Home, Riggins Road
Chapel (850-877-8191) is han-
dling arrangements.

She was born May 14, 1913,
in Philadelphia. She was the
daughter of the late Ida and
Ralph Ford.

Survivors include a daughter,
Diane Johnson (and husband
Thomas) of Monticello, and
five grandchildren, Peggy
Leight of Monticello, Nancy


Leight of Billings, Mont., Jen-
nifer Leight of Inkon, Idaho,
Kathryn Leight of East
Stroudsberg, Penn. and Mi-
chael Leight of Riverview.

She was preceded in death
by her husband of 54 years, Ja-
cob Martin, a daughter, Joan
Martin; a daughter, Joan Mar-
tin Leight; and a sister Edna
Leona Reed.


She was a loving mother and
grandmother. May she rest in
peace.


Beatrice Washington
Lee
Beatrice Washington Lee,
age 79 died Monday February
27 in Ft. Lauderdale.
The graveside service will be
at 12 noon on Sunday March
12, 2006 at Walker Cemetery
in Lamont.
Local survivors include a
daughter Barbara Whaley and
husband Sgt. Major Retired
Herbert Whaley of Lamont.


Nellie Greene Walker
Nellie Green Walker age 79
a retired Crate Mill employee
died Friday, March 3, 2006 in
Tallahassee.

The service will be at 2:00
p.m. Saturday March 11, 2006
at Memorial Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Monticello with
burial at Boland Community
Cemetery. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 2:00
p.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Friday
March 10, 2006 at Tillman Fu-
neral Home in Monticello,
with a wake being held from
5-7 p.m. on Friday at Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church in
Waukeenah.
A native of Monticello Mrs.
Walker was a retired crate Mill
employee having worked at
Mills in Monticello and Jack-
sonville. She was a longtime
member of Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church in Waukeenah
where she was a beloved
church mother.
Honoring her memory and
treasuring her love are her hus-
band Willie Walker of Monti-
cello sons, C.J. (Lether)
Johnson of Lamont, FL, David
(Jennie) King, Crawfordville,
Roscoe (Emily) Greene, Mon-
ticello, Jerome (Glenda)
Walker, Fredericksburg, VA.,
Rodney Walker, Augusta,
GA., Minister Willie Walker,
Jacksonville, daughters; Delo-
res (James) McCloud and
Elder Patricia (Judson) Bald-
win, both of Jacksonville, and
Lessie Walker of Monticello.



Rosa Lee Wilson
Rosa Lee Wilson age 89 a
retired Housekeeper, died
Tuesday, February 28, 2006 in
Tallahassee.
The service will be at 11:00
on Saturday March 11, 2006 at
St. Paul Primitive Baptist
Church Miccosukee, with bur-
ial at Old Union Cemetery in
Monticello. Family will re-
ceive friends (viewing) from
2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, March 10, 2006 at Till-
man Funeral HOMe.
Mrs. Wilson was a longtime
--resident of Leon County where
she was a Church Mother at St.
Paul Primitive Baptist Church
in Miccosukee. She was.also a
member of Lodge #10 of the
United Sons and Daughters of
Joshua and Lodge #43 of the
Della Walker Chapter of the
Order of Eastern Star.
She is survived by six sons:
Johnny Wilson, Sam (Gladys)
Wilson, Roosevelt (Barbara)
Wilson, and Minister Jimmy
(Felicia) Wilson all of Micco-
sukee, Tommy (Mildred) Wil-
son, Monticello and Joseph
(Christine) Wilson, Sr., of
Newburgh, NY; five daugh-
ters Elnora Hall, Clevor Dale
Wilson, Mary Wilson, and Ella
Mae Wilson all of Miccosukee
and Marie (Ken) Davis of
Waldrof, Md., 50 grandchil-
dren, a host of great and great-
great grandchildren, her
brother John (Geneva)
Johnson, Monticello; Sisters,


the Rev. Rebecca (Willie)
Ross, Monticello, Minister
Shirley (the Rev. Claude) Gib-
son, Mae L. Pampey, and the
Elder Zola (Elder 'Chester)
Leonard, all of Tallahassee, 26
grandchildren and 34 great-
grandchildren, along with nu-
merous nieces, nephews, and
other relatives and friends
(See Home Page 13)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Tri-County Ministries pre-
sents a week of Revival 7 p.m.
nightly Monday, March 13th
through the Friday, the 17th, at
the Harvest Center.
"Come and join us for a
week of refreshing and re-
newal, as two powerful, and
anointed men of God break to


IN MEMORY
Arthur (Al) Ford
July 5, 1960-Feb. 28-2006
Arthur (Al) Ford died on
February 28, 2006 at the
Tampa General Hospital.
Funeral Services will be held
11 a.m. on Saturday, March 11
in Tampa.
He is sadly missed.
The Cuyler Family

IN MEMORY
We Remember Mama
Henrietta Nelson Ransom
On March 7, 2005 our
family witnessed the passing
of a peaceful life to eternal re-
ward, as our beloved jewel,
Henrietta Nelson Ransom, was
summoned by God to embel-
lish his crown of Resurrection
preparation.
Even as we bring to mind
"Mama," one year later, we are
pleasantly reminded that on
the spectrum of life, our be-
loved mother and grandmother
has come full circle: birth, life,
and eternity.
So, look up everybody and
be encouraged, even more, for
ye shall be sorrowful, but your
sorrow shall be turned to joy.
Oh, "Mama, we love you al-
ways; we miss you still; we'll
see you in God's Kingdom, for
great is his faithfulness to each
of us and His grace and mercy
endures without end.
Glory be to God.
Your children
and grandchildren
Ransom Family


us the bread of life."
Pastor Beau Cooksey from
Magnolia Baptist Church,
Whigham, GA. will speak on
the 13th and 14th.
Pastor Artavis Tookes from
Damascus Baptist Church in
Madison will speak on the
15th through the 17th.
The Harvest Center is lo-
cated at 1599 Springhollow
Rod. 997-4859.





-






CARD OF THANKS
The family of Willie Lee
"Smiling Willie" Robinson
would like to thank everyone
for their love, kindness and
support during our time of be-
reavement.
It greatly touched our hearts
and will never be forgotten.
We would also like to extend
very special thanks to Rev. Is-
sac Manning, Jr. and the entire
Beth Paige MB Church con-
gregation, Al Hall and staff of
Tillman's Funeral Home in
Monticello, and Big Bend
Hospice for making our tough
times smoother.
Thank you. May God con-
tinue to bless you all.
Bernice Robinson,
and family
CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Elnora
Keaton Armstead would like
to offer its most sincere thanks
for the prayers, words of com-
fort, and other acts of kindness
extended to the family during
the illness and death of our be-
loved mother, grandmother
and aunt.
May God bless you richly.
Eliza Jones,
Ida Wilcox.
and family


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006 PAGE 7

4-Hers Plan


Fashion Show


SUSAN LITTLE and her Yorkshire Terrier, Jasmine
were among the visitors at the recent Mardi Gras.
(News Photo)

Hospice Sponsors

Camp Woe Begone


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Caring Tree Program of
Big Bend Hospice and the
Challenger Learning Center in-
vite children ages 6 12 who
have experienced the death of
a loved one to join in a day of
fun, support, exploration, and
expression at Camp Woe-Be-
Gone, a special event for
grieving children.
This grief odyssey will be
held. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Satur-
day, May 20.
Campers will enjoy a day
filled with sharing circles,
creative arts, a space simula-
tion, music, and a time of re-
membrance.
Breakfast, lunch, snacks, T-
shirts, and transportation to
and from the Challenger Cen-
ter will be provided.


"We have only 30 spots for
this year, so potential campers
are encouraged to register
earlyy" states Catherine Arnold
Big Bend Hospice Community
Relations Representative. She
Ican be reached at 566-7491 for
more information and to regis-
ter.
One notable change this year
is that there is no charge for
camp, although donations are
greatly appreciated.
Another change is that camp-
ers will be trying out the Chal-
lenger's new 'Micronaut' Space
simulator.
This simulation is especially
designed for young school
aged children.
This camp is a community
outreach of Big Bend Hospice.
Arnold is also available for
speaking to groups and organi-
zations about this camp or any
other Hospice service.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 4-H Fashion Revue-
"Waterway to Great Fashion"
begins 7 p.m. Thursday, Mar.
16 in the old Jefferson County
High School auditorium.
4-H members participating
should be at the auditorium by
6:40 p.m.
Members must sign up for
the Revue by Friday, Mar. 10,
and the garment needs to be at
the Extension Office no later
than Monday, Mar. 13.
If 4-H members have any
questions they may contact
Gladys Neely at 342-0187.
The garments must be made
by the member and must be
cleaned and pressed.
Members will model for the
judges at 2:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Mar. 14.
Items will be judged for con-
struction as well as fit and
suitability.
4-H members can partici-
pate in the Clothing Selection,
a part of the Fashion Revue
this year.
Members who would like to
model an outfit that is in their
closet or would like to buy an
outfit for the Fashion Revue
must let Neely know by Mar.
10.


Members can participate in
five categories in the Clothing
Selection. They are: Active
Sportswear, School Wear,
Dressed for Work, Special oc-
casion, and My Choice.
Anyone from 5 18 years of-
age may enter the Clothing Se-
lection.
Five Juniors and five Seniors
will represent Jefferson
County at District Events.

State Farm

Dinner

Fundraiser

The State Farm Insurance
Relay For Life team will hold
a St. Patrick's Chicken Dinner
11 a.m. 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. 6
p.m. Friday, Mar. 17 at the
agency location 425 South Jef-
ferson Street.
The meal will include
chicken, beans, slaw, a roll,
drink, and a special dessert of
Irish green.
The cost is $5 for prepaid
ticket purchase, or $6 at the
door. For tickets call
997-8282.
Proceeds will benefit the
American Cancer Society
through the Jefferson County
Relay For Life, Around The
World In 18 Hours.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Chamber of Commerce
will meet noon, Tuesday,
March 14, to hear speaker Bill
Law, Tallahassee Community
College President.
The Chamber Raffle, begun
at the February meeting con-
tinues. "It was a huge success,
with three gifts raffled," relates
President Margaret Levings.
"Our thanks go out to all
who attended and bought tick-
ets and to Ron Cichon who en-
thusiastically jumped up dur-
ing the meeting and sold an-
other big round of tickets to
help the cause."
The Chamber Raffle is a way
for the Chamber to give back
to all the members who have
so generously given over the
years.
The Chamber purchases
merchandise, services, trips,




Brotherho

TWO Schola

The Brotherhood of Christ
Episcopal Church announces
the availability of two scholar-
ships for deserving County
residents, graduating from
high school in 2006.
This is the second year of the
scholarships program.
Scholarships will be awarded
to one male and one female
graduate in the amount of
$500 each.
Applicants must be active in
their churches, in the commu-
nity and be of outstanding
character.
The Brotherhood holds sev-
eral fundraisers each year with
the proceeds used to improve
the lives and welfare of county
residents.
The major fundraiser is the
annual Gourmet Dinner held at
the Christ Episcopal's Gerry
Hall each spring.
This year the dinner is set
for Saturday, April 29.
In addition to providing these
scholarship opportunities, the
Brotherhood has provided gifts
for underprivileged children at
Christmas, supported the op-
erations of the Food Pantry,
and other community needs as
they have arisen.
Scholarship applications are
available at the guidance of-
fices of JCHS and ACA, or
through any member of the
Ministerial Association.
Criteria includes:


anything a member would like
to offer at a reduced rate, and
then raffles them off.
The goal is to give the mem-
bers special mention for their
contribution, build up the raf-
fle fund, and in the near fu-
ture, purchase these items at
full price.
The more tickets sold, the
quicker the goal is reached.
The gifts raffled at the Feb-
ruary meeting, and the winners
were: Marianne Arbulu, floral
arrangement from Gellings;
Judge Bobby Plaines, a gour-
met gift basket prepared by
Carrie Ann and Company;
Danny Monroe, a box of Eng-
lish Truffles, hand delivered
from England, donated by The
Avera-Clarke House Bed and
Breakfast.
"You won't want to miss the
March meeting and Chamber
Raffle, it promises to be just as
good," states Levings.
Chamber Board Members
encourage local trade.




Ad Offers

irships
*Must be a county resident.
*A 2006 graduating senior
*Attending full time a two or
four year post secondary
school.
Applicants must submit two
letters of recommendation, one
from a teacher or guidance
counselor, and one from their
minister or designee.
Applications must be re-
ceived by 5 p.m., April 14,
2006, at the Christ Episcopal
Church Office.
For additional information
call 997-4116.


TCC President Law


To Speak At Chamber


Tri-County Ministries

Plan Week's Revival






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006


alico Sprin The Opera House Stage Company Presents

Arts & Craft Show Golden Pond
March 8 & 0 On Golen Pon
Saturday 9:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m. Vnday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
I By Ernest Thompson
SM Friday and Saturday,
I March 3, 4, 10 & 11

OveFr 300 bOoBths of A & Cra i D Dinner 6. 30 P.M show 8:00 P.M.
Ornamental Iron Painted Glass rX Handcrafted Furniture S n ay, March 5 ~ 3:00 p m
Clothing W Jewelry Folk Art Ceramics .'Pottery l-iay, JMarcl 3:0 p m.
Seasonal Decorations M Wood Crafts -* Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints M Painted Antiques M Food Court \ Ier ad SlO
Spence Field Moulrie, Georgia5.00 mem ers, $30.00 others
Suinbe l E-poS2 .0 0it&
4 miles Southeast of Hity 319 on H\ 133 .o.. / w SO Only
S$5 per person 2.00 embers, $15.00 others
(Children 12 and under free with a parent)
FREE PARKING
FREE PARKING va r ed for dinner. Call 997-4242
S For more information (229) 985-1968
www.cafiicorafts.com nfo4k B.a .oo Wii f i i "i ,BI





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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10 2006 PAGE 9


Lady Warriors Lose To


Madison 4-17; Trenton 20-16


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JV softball-
team now stands 6-3 on the
season after dropping the past
two games.
The Lady Warriors lost to
Madison 4-17.
"Madison is the toughest
team we've played to date,"
said Coach Frank Brown. "
Brown attributed the loss to
Madison's catcher being ex-
tremely efficient at the game.


"She was an older girl with
a lot of experience," said
Brown. "A lot of times when
we attempted to steal bases,
she cut our girls down."
Brown added that the Lady
Warriors were also very "er-
ror prone" on defense. "We
did not play up to our stan-
dards".
Taryn Copeland pitched all
but the final inning. She had
one strike out, and gave up
ten walks and 11 hits.
Mallory Plaines pitched the
final inning, striking out no


batters, and giving up three
walks and two hits.
Olivia Sorensen, two sin-
gles, one walk, one run and
put out once; Kaielyn Levine,
two singles, one walk, two
runs; Skyler Henna, one sin-
gle, one walk, put out once;
and Plaines, one single and
put out twice.
Savannah Williams, two
strike outs; Miranda Wider,
put out twice; Copeland, one
strike out; Nikki Kisamore,
one strike out; Erin Kelly, one
walk and, put out once; and
Michaela Roccanti, one put
out.
Lady Warriors fell to Tren-
ton 20-16.
"It vas close, but no cigar,"
said Brown. "Trenton is a
good team, but they weren't
as good as we thought, after
the ,ime they beat us into the
mud."
Brown said the two teams
were pretty evenly matched,
ACA got off to a late offen-
sve start, and at one point
luring the game, the Lady
Warriors were at a 12 run
deficit.
"We played catch-up for the
rest the game and got it within
four. If we had more time, we
could have won it," said
Brown.
Sorensen, one double, two
walks, one RBI one run and
one put out; Levine, one sin-
gle, one walk, one run, one
RBI and three put outs;
Hanna, three singles, one tri-
ple, one strikeout, three runs,
two RBI; and Plaines, three
singles, one triple, one strike-
out, four runs, one RBI.
Williams, two singles, two
walks, three runs, one RBI,
one put out; Wider, one
single, one triple, three RBI,
three put outs; Copeland, one
single, one walk, one strike
out, one run, three RBI, two
put out.
Kelly, one single, one walk,
one run, three put outs; and
Roccanti, one single, three put
outs.


- '" "," ." -". '. .,


' .
A m








ACA JV softball players Sunnie Sorensen slides into
home, and her sister Olivia makes the tag, at a recent
practice session.


Mood Swings Win Four

Matches With Glen Arvin


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
Swings, the women's A-
league tennis team, won four
matches against the Glen
Arvin Classics last week.
Team Captain Patty Hardy
said the weather was ex-
tremely beautiful warm and
sunny, for a day of tennis.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost its sets, 6-4
and 6-2.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, lost the first
set, 4-6 won the second, 6-4
and won the breaker, 6-3.
Team #3, Kelly Hetherin-
gon and Susan Goodwin, lost
the first set, 4-6, won the sec-
ond, 6-4 and won the tie
breaker, 7-6.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff
and Angie Delvecchio, won
by forfeit.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Trisha Wirick, lost by
forfeit.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and


Jennifer Ellis, won its sets,
6-4 and 7-5.
The ladies will face off
against the Golden Eagle Tal-
ons 9:30 a.m., Thursday at the
Golden Eagle Country Club.


.

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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The annual Rotary Club.
Sandbaggers Classic raised
more than $1,800 to used to
offer vocational scholarships
to county residents.
More than 30 golfers turned
out for the tournament
Wednesday, which resulted in
the team of Fred Golden, De-
Wayne Freeland, Ken Foster
and Rosemary Turner win-
ning the Last Place trophy.
Low Gross trophy was won
by the team of Lee Maupin,
Russ Beggs, Jason Beggs and
Grant Nichols.
Low Net trophy was won by
the team of North Florida Ab-
stract, John Gebhard; Rhen
Gebhard, Don Anderson and
Melissa Foote.
Following the tournament,
golfers enjoyed a Rotary rib
eye steak dinner with all of
the trimmings.
"The Rotary Club wishes to


thank everyone who made
this event special," said
James Muchovej, spokesper-
son.
Sponsors include Brian
Hayes, Capital City Bank,
Dale Boatwright, Bobby
Plaines, Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank, Jack Brinson,
Jefferson County Kennel
Club, Jefferson Builders
Mart, Monticello Family
Medicine, Monticello News,
Morris Petroleum, David
Ward, Riley Palmer Construc-
tion, Royal Mini Storage
Marty Bishop, Progress Er-
ergy and VMS Maintenance
Services.
"Also, the Rotary Oub
would like to thank those lo-
cal merchants who donated
door prizes," Muctbvej
added. /
These include Coffee
Break, C & D's Pro Shop, Jef'
ferson County Country Club,
Pizza Hut, Movie Gallery,
Edwin Watts, FMB, Discount
Auto Parts, and Courtyard
Cafe.


ACA Varsity Girls

Down Maclay 7-3


JCHS Competes

in invitational

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High,
School track team ran well
during the Leon Invitational.
However, temperatures
dropped drasitcally before the
meet was completed, so the
invitational was not com-
pleted.
Tremaine Parker finished
the high hurdle with 16.0 sec-
onds.
Daryl Young ran the 100
meter in 10.9 seconds; Jon
Dady, 11.0; and Desrick
Jones and Lucius Wade, 11.1
seconds.
Young, Dady, Jones and
Wade ran the 4 x 100 relay in
43.2 seconds.


Lady Tigers

Tell Roster
The Lady Tigers are being
coached by Earline Knight
and there are 15 girls on the
team this year.
These include: Meresha
Barrington, Chanta Brooks,
Shanice Brooks, Jemaria Cuy-
ler, Ireshia Denson, Shanka
Farmer, Stephanie Fountain,
and Brittany Harvey.
Also, Majetta Jefferson,
Zan'Quisha Jones, Heather
Miller, Kiarra Powell, Kean-
dra Seabrooks, Britterica
White, and Cassandra Wil-
liams.




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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity softball team lost
two of its last three games, to
stand 5-3 on the' season.
The Lady Warriors downed
Maclay for a 7-3 win.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the
entire game, struck out one,
walked one and gave up
seven hits.
Chelsea Kinsey went two for
four with two RBI; Bethany
Saunders and Shaye Eason
each went one for two.
Madison defeated the Lady
Warriors 14-3.
Hobbs pitched three innings,
struck out no batters, gave up


no walks and gave up eight
hits.
Saunders pitched two
innings, struck out none, gave
up six walks and allowed four
hits.
Saunders and Lindsey Day
each went ore for two.
Trenton beat the Lady Tigers
5-3.
Hobbs pitched the entire
game, struck out five and
walked three.
Hobbs went two for four
with a double; Kinsey went
two for, four and Day went
one for two.
The Lady Warriors go up
against Lafayette 7 p.m.,
Thursday, there, and RF Mun-
roe, 6 p.m., Friday. Both are
away games.


JCHS Falls To Hamilton

11-1; Stand 1-3 On Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Jefferson County high
School varsity baseball Isot
to Hamilton 11-1 to stand 1-3
on the season.
"We ran into a buzz saw,"
said Coach Jim Norton.
"Hamilton is a real good team
and we gave up so many
walks that they would fill the
bases and then get a base hit.
That's all it took for Hamilton
to beat us."
Returning to the Tigers for
the first start of the season,
Thomas Lyle served as the
JCHS pitcher. He gave up 12
walks, six hits, and struck out
two, in the game of no Tiger
defensive errors.
"We did play solid
defense," said Norton.


"Thomas is a little rusty
right now, but he'll get
better," Norton added.
In comparison, the Hamilton
pitcher gave up no walks,
three hits, and struck out six.


ESTHER FULFORD, three years old, caught her first fish
Saturday. Her grandfather Gary Fulford and father Ste-
phen Fulford were with her.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006







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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006


New Car Dance Steps


(Continued From Page 4)
that car for such a "low price."
When the salesman returns
after a considerable waste of
time, you are shocked to learn
that "his boss" just can't "do
the deal" at such a low price.
You, of course, shake .your
head at the phenomenal num-


Short Takes
(Continued From Page 4)
to compromise and do not take
a disagreement about a point
of view as a personal insult.
Those who are too timid to
get out from behind their type-
writers are missing the real
stuff of life. They isolate them-
selves in a shelter of anger and
alienation. I will bet that these
letter writers really want some
exchange of ideas but by using
inflammatory language, they
cause others to shy away from
them. They miss real personal
interaction with real people.
I suspect that when these
writer's ideas remain unchal-
lenged; they get mentally slow
and angrier at each letter.
Syndicated Columnist Su-
zanne Fields recently said of
these types; "... A stagnating
swamp of sour indifference"
about "Lilliputians guarding
their little nests..." I would
rather spend my time with peo-
ple who do not use the words
appalled, shocked, and .of-
fended. I pefer to hang out
with the "doers."


bers and enter a state of mild
shock.
The next part of the new car
dance goes like this, "Well
what price are you willing to
pay to get you in this car
today?" This is where my dad
used to look the guy straight in
the eye and say, "Look Fella,
I'm not going to buy and sell
the car at the same time." If
you are foolish enough to give
the guy a dollar figure close to
his numbers, you just sold
yourself a car! If not, he is off
to the sales manager once
again, to see if he will "come
offa little on this price".
He returns after yet another
lengthy delay and miracu-
lously has "convinced" the
new car manager to drop the
price a few hundred dollars,
"to earn your business."
Eventually, if you buy a ve-
hicle, we all leave feeling
"comfortable" with the deal we
have made. Deep inside, how-
ever, we are all being honest
with ourselves and wondering
just how badly we were actu-
ally taken in this mystery proc-
Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
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the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at.
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American
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ess.
Although I feel that my intel-
ligence is being insulted
throughout the entire proce-
dure, please don't "twist the
knife" by implying that the
dealership only made fifty
bucks on this deal! They make
thousands! The salesman
makes enough to support his
family, the new car manager is
making a bundle more than the
salesperson, the dealership
manager is making even a big-
ger cut, the owner is making a
killing, the regional manager
for that car manufacturer is'
stuffing his pockets, the CEO
and board of directors are
cleaning up, stockholders are""
getting big dividends, not to.
mention all the workers, engi-
neers, secretaries, designers
and testers.
They can't do that on my
and your mealy little fifty dol-
lars per sale profit.
We are all caught like rats in
the trap! Never knowing the
exact .cost of manufacturing
the vehicle and wondering
how may thousands of dollars
above those actual costs we are
supplying to bloat the bank ac-
counts of those in the auto in-
dustry. Isn't free enterprise
-,-grand?


Liberty Spirit AWakensprivacy and liberty whenithas
(Continued From Page 4) documents; invade homes literally no effect on fighting
where nations can come to air without search warrants,; wire terrorism. Americans are be-
their grievances and keep the tap at will; even setting up a ginning to push back against
peace, the UN has instead has national ID card which every those who seek power for
-become a scandal-infested, state will be forced to provide power's sake.
hellhole bent on infecting the by the end of next year. Finally, this Christmas, Ameri-
world with the disease of As a result, Congress has taken cans (not just those who con-
global control. a surprising turn in refusing to sider themselves to be funda-
Last year saw a shift in public re-authorize the Patriot Act, mentalist Christian) have had
opinion 'against the UN and which was passed by Congress about enough of the multicul-
Congress is threatening to only days after the 911 attacks tural claptrap which dictates
withhold US dues payments and was never read by a single take precedent over Christian
unless something is done. member, traditions.
Americans like their independ- Free Americans are refusing to This year, Americans began to
ehice and sovereignty and are quietly give up their personal push the bullies aside and take
pushing back against the UN's back Christmas
-,self-imposed boundaries.
The public schools continue to "
turn out stupid kids, even after ...Rrz D
billions have been spent on
new buildings, higher paid
teachers and federally-dictated BDill
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006 PAGE 13


Sheriff's Horseshoe


Tourney Earns $486


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The County Sheriffs Office
horseshoe tournament netted
some $486 for the American
Cancer Society through Relay
For Life.
There were a total of 11
teams in attendance, including
two female teams and nine
male teams.
Winning first place in the
female division was Cricket
Edwards and Brenda Hobbs.
Taking second place was
the team of Joann Andrews


The Jefferson County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
(JCDEC) is busy preparing for
the upcoming elections.
At its Feb. 14 meeting, Sena-
tor Skip Campbell from Brow-
ard County, candidate for
Florida Attorney General, pre-
sented his vision for the office.
Senator Campbell's speech
was dynamic and provided the
audience with many good rea-
sons why he should be elected
in November.
The JCDEC second annual
St. Patrick's Day of Fun is
scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 16, at Gerry H-all,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Police De-
partment was recently
awarded a new Decatur Gene-
sis Handheld Radar unit for
its active participation in traf-
fic law enforcement.

MPD Sgt. Roger Murphy
said the Florida Department
of Transportation, and the In-
stitute of Police Technology
and Management, awarded
the $500 radar unit to MPD.


and Sally Cole.
In the men's division taking
first place was the team of T.
J. Zystra and Dustin Mat-
thews.
Winning second place was
the team of Rodney Willis
and Curtis Willis.

The first and second place
winners in each division were
awarded with a plaque.
The JCSO will conduct an-
other fundraiser for the Relay
For Life, 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Tuesday, near the courthouse.
Sausages dogs and drinks
will be sold for $3.


425 North Cherry Street.
Guest speaker is democratic
gubernatorial candidate Sena-
tor Rod Smith.
A variety of traditional Irish
dishes will be served.
The event is a fundraiser to
benefit the County Library. A
donation of $10 per person is
suggested and participants are
encouraged to bring a book for
the benefit book sale to be held-
in April.

For more information or res-
ervations, call Eleanor Hawk-
_ins at 997-2863, or Gladys
Roann at 997-5209.


He added that it is part of an
ongoing program that rewards
law enforcement agencies for
active participation in state-
wide programs to enforce
traffic laws, particularly dur-
ing certain holiday periods
when crashes are up.

Specific violations targeted
are Driving Under the Influ-
ence, Speeding and Seat belt
violations.
This specific award was for
active enforcement for a pe-
riod surrounding the 2005 La-
bor Day holiday.


, ,- I...: .,.- ,

CITY POLICE car is equipped with new hand held radar
unit.


Homes Of
(Continued From Page 7)
Kathryn Brown Dalton
Kathryn Brown Dalton of
Thomasville, formerly of
Monticello died Sunday,
March 5, 2006 at her
residence.
The funeral service was held
March 9, 2006 at 3:00 p.m. at
Whidden-Shiver Funeral
Home Chapel. Interment will
follow at Laurel Hill
Cemetery. Officiate is the Rev.
Mitch Clements and the Rev.
Dr. Milton C. Gardner.
Mrs. Dalton owned and op-
erated Southern Hospitality
since her mother's death in
2004. She was born to Wil-
liam C. Brown and Martha
Knapp Glover. She was born


Mourning
Sept. 6, 1949 in Thomasville,
GA and was a member of
Summerhill Baptist Church.
She was a warm and caring
person who would do anything
for anyone and will be missed
by her family and friends.
Kathryn is survived by: son
Jim Titus and wife Lisa of
Thomasville, grandchildren:
Jennifer, Chris and Amanda
Davis of Thomasville,
brothers: Hank Brown, Doug
Brown both of Thomasville,
sister-in-law Sharon Brown of.
Thomasville, niece: Alicia
Brown of Thomasville, uncles:
J. Forrest Knapp, Jr. of Tho-
masville and Col. Robert E.
Knapp of Brunswick. She was
preceded in death by a brother
William Cody Brown.


WINNING first place in the Women's Sheriff's Horseshoe Relay for Life fundraiser
are: Cricket Edwards, Brenda Hobbs, shown with Sheriff David Hobbs.


FIRST PLACE winners in the Sheriff's Men's Horseshoe Relay for Life fundraiser are:
T.J. Zystra, Dustin Matthews, pictured with Sheriff David Hobbs.


Solid Waste Dept.


Helps Wakulla Co.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Wakulla County residents
got an opportunity to get rid of
some of their hazardous waste
materials last Saturday, thanks
to the Jefferson County Solid
Waste Department.

"The Wakulla County Solid
Waste Department is not set up
to take and store hazardous
wastes," explains Solid Waste
Department Director Beth
Thorne. "This is why we ar-
ranged a household hazardous
waste day for them. It's part of
a cooperative agreement be-
tween the Jefferson County,
Solid Waste Department, the
Wakulla County Commission,
Veolia, and Keep Wakulla
County Beautiful."

The event ran 8:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. in Veolia, a small com-
munity on Trice Lane
Thorne says residents not
only were able to get rid of
their hazardous wastes, they
were also able to dispose of
nonhazardous products.
Among the items disposed
were used oil and antifreeze
and old computers parts from
monitors and printers.
"It was a good day to clean
off storage shelves," Thorne
says.
All told, Thorne says 109
vehicles dropped off items at
the site, including nine area
businesses.
"We set up so that residents
could drive beneath a tent,
where several inmate volun-
teers would offload their cars
and trucks," Thorne says. "One
resident, coming under the
tent, said, 'It's just like a fast-
food restaurant. We don't even
have to get out of our cars!"'


Sam Flowers Jr., of the Jef-
ferson County Solid Waste
Department, and officer Bruce
Denson, of the Jefferson
County Correctional Institu-
tion, supervised the inmates.

Thorne says workers sorted
the cans of paint, pesticides,
acids and other small waste
products into separate bins.

Rosemary Bottcher, a chem-
ist who resides in Jefferson
County, tested the unknown
products and determined


where they should be placed in
the sorting process.

Thorne says the cans of old
paint were placed on pallets.
Once the pallets were three
cans high, they were shrink-
wrapped and put into a larger
dumpster, she says.

"This part of the operation
was supervised by John Peck,
who is employed by the Jeffer-
son County Solid Waste De-
partment," Thorne says. "Mr.
Peck was also responsible for
transporting the collected ma-
terials safely back to Jefferson
County, where they will be
disposed of or recycled in a
safe and earth-friendly
manner."


A lawn mower. Power
tools. Recorded music
through headphones.
Live music without
headphones. Repeated
exposure to these noise
levels (85 decibels) can
cause gradual or sudden
hearing loss a condition
thai affects one i ten
Americans. For an
evaluation of the noise
levels in your work or
home environment, and for
a complete assessment
of your hearing health, call
a certified
audiologist. [-,r .
more informaii:,r '
contact the Arr, -rr .jn /
Speech-Language-Hearing
Association at 1-800-638-
TALK or visit www.asha.org.


O AMERICAN
SPERECi -[ANGUAGE
HEARING
ASSOCIATION






You Can Count
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Monticello

News







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CLICK. ZIP.
FAST ROUND TRIP.


BETH THORNE, Marj Law, and Rosmary Botcher help
out at the Wakulla County Cleanup.


County Democrats Plan

St. Patrick's Day Event


City Police Awarded

Handheld Radar Unit


-- c :


.s -"-
~p:,








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCl IT COURT FIOR
JEFFERSON COI NTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
Number: 06-26-rPR: IN RE:
ESTATE OF DOLLI 11 AE


What's your body'
greatest *.*siE3:s'?
If you're over 35, your bones
and joints aren't what they
used to be. Learn how to
reduce your risk of injury by
calling 1-800-824-BONES, or
by visiting www.aaos.org or
www.sportsmed.org.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
We keep you well connected
American Orthopaedic Society For Sports Medicine


a UI-s~---- ----~
LEGALS

MALLOY, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMiINISTRALTION: The
administration of the estate of
IOLLIE MAE MALLOY, deceased
File Number 06-26-PR is pending in
the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello.
Florida 32344. The name and
address of the personal
representative and of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. AL, INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
TIIE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
credits of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must


LEGALS
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITIIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice on March 3, 2006.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. BUCKINGIIAM
BIRD, P.O. Box 247 Monticello, FL
32345, 850-997-3503, FL Bar ID
#006176; Harold Malloy, 5055 N.
Jefferson Street, Monticello, Florida
32344
3 3, 3/10/06, c
Call for Bids Project: Air
Condition/Heat Pump/Air Handler
at Christ Episcopal Church
Monticello Florida. Scope of project
includes purchase and installation
of four (4) complete heating and air
conditioning systems in the existing


LEGALS
church and removal and disposal of
four (4) water to air systems located
in the ceiling of same church to be
completed within 90 days of award
of contract. Bob Henderson, Project
Manager, will receive sealed
proposals from Licensed
Contractors in accordance with the
plans and specifications prepared
by Christ Episcopal Church.
PLANS: Bid documents will be
available from the Project Manager
after 01 March 2006 for
LICENSED CONTRACTORS
ONLY. Call 850-997-4116 for
information concerning document
availability. Documents are
available for review at the church
office, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344. BOND
REQUIREMENTS: 100% labor
and materials payment and
performance bond may be required
form successful bidders at the
Project Manager's option. PRE BID
MEETING: There will be a
mandatory pre-bid meeting
conducted at Christ Episcopal
Church, 425 North Cherry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344 on the
following date and time: Thursday
16 March 2006, at 4:00 p.m. ED)T
BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be
received until 4:00 P.M. EST, and
read aloud publicly on the following


LEGALS
date and location: Date: Friday 7,
APRIL 2006 LOCATION: Christ
Episcopal Church office, 425 North
Cherry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. The Project Manager
reserves the right to waive any
irregularities and to reject any and
all bids.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 4/5/06, c
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC.
PLAINTIFF VS. VELICIA J.
SMITH, IF LIVING, AND IF
DEAD, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND
ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST VELiCIA J. SMITH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VELICIA
J. SMITH, IF ANY; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS
WHO MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF
ROBERT C. LANGIS, A/K/A
ROBERT CHARLES LANGIS,
DECEASED; 123 LOAN, LLC;
JOIN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION DEFENDANTS)


LEGALS
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Feb.
27, 2006 entered in Civil Case No.
05-155-CA of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
JEFFERSON County, St.
Augustine, Florida I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the NORTH DOOR of the
Courthouse at the JEFFERSON
County Courthouse located at
County Courthouse, Monticello, Fl
in St. Augustine, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on the 23rd day of March, 2006
the following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 2 AND 5
OF NOBLES ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO A
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF
TIE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT
BOOK B, PAGE 19 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS
IIEREBY EXPRESSLY MADE
Dated this 27th day of February,
2006 Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of
the Circuit Court; The Law Office
of David J. Stern, P.A., Attorney
For Plaintiff; 801 S. University


Portable Toilets

Billy S h ian Septic
850-509-1465 cell o
850-997-0877 home 0
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0
-4 family reunions, parties 0

Ev ts a Types


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN

SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


Register's Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997 -2535


997-0039 Lie. & Insured


Lawn & Landscaping
------------------
Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount I
---025 Eas--ahan -- 7-4550--
11025 East Mahan ~ 877-4550.


B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing
'i
r/ '


Brad McLeod
Cell: (850) 210-2942
_.ii ,850) 545-2325
S. (850) 997-1451 "


Mack'McLeod
Cell: (850) 10-0346
Home: (850) 997-3091


10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336


Your Local Professional Painters

.! .3.-;,-, ~- Exterior
Lic & Ins #4676











Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Th._ --- '


Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 il -.--3620
'w[ -Bi T h ,0ga^-iii t, ,w'f)^ ^i? ,v ,r ,^^^^ v '*^/ ;,,*?'3ti~i9ieA~iH(


Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764
Fax 850-997-8388


We accept all manufacturer coupons.


-1 0 C hevron



Swisher Sweet Sale
Flavor Cigar Tubes .59 each
(Reg.. grape, peach, stra\ berry)
Honey Kings Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pkg.) $2.49

Flavor Blunts 5pk $1.89
Little Cigars Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. or $8.89 Carton
Cigarillos Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.89
Blunt Cigars Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.99
Kayak $1.11 can $5.19 tube (5 cans)


CARROLL HILL Auro ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

(on Carroll ill) 229-226-0717


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cg #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.

CUSTOM HOMES


Comnimeria andd Agriculture Buildings


Pn: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711


LA CHIUTA Craig

Larichiuta
- 0. .__. Lloyd, FL32337
,- o4 5imnerock -'
e-Clay ...
-Sand 997-6788
1Top Soil


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

E 997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.

850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Ti iuii:;, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (.',. ) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O H. Lic InSRO97i265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


Three Sisters

Mystery Chief

Michael Humphrey

Of
Jefferson County Forestry

March 16, 2006

Certified Angus Beef


-EI


Appliance Service Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured

Needs @ Residential & Commercial
97-5648 FREE ESTIMATES 997-4100
^y /-3i4o


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-



LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM- SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

BIG BEND
COMMUNICATIONS Co


N/e have over 40 years of answers about
neuromuscular disease. Getting help couldn't
De easier. Our lifeline is toll-free.


Muscular Dystiophy Association


Tyrone iDavis
Salcs Manager


Trade
p ull1, 0riig
it fit! licle
jtve Ilet
'r' eY


1-800-572-1717
Nww.mdausa.org


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HE.A TING & COOLING COMPANY



......... ,. ^ :. ._. *'L ,:
tj: ,,

Sales ~ Service ." ,- ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned -', Office: (850) 342-3294
Lie. i# RA0067121 ,L_, CELL: (850) 509-2903


A&S Flooring, L.LoC.
43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service is Our Business on and off the Road"


EDO KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


Ultimate


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877-7222

s Very large selection to choose from
4 All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold


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850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
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850-997-5443 Home


~.1- ~~.~1.~... -


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"*`


-IF- T IL IIs


u 6L





DIRE. C-.TORL-.Y


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CallI Andy Ru~add Fogr,








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006 PAGE 15


LEGALS HELP WANTED AUTOMOTIVE FOR SALE


Drive Suite 500; Plantation, FL
33324, 954-233-8000;
0542873(GMAP); In accordance
with the Americans with disabilities
act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation should
contact Court Administration, at
the Jefferson County Courthouse at
850-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
3/3, 3/10/,06, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on March 13,
2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce, 420 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made
which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based. For information
contact the Jefferson County
Planning Department at 445 West
Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, Fl
32344, telephone 850-342-0223.
3/3, 3/10/06, c
HELP WANTED
Tri-Count) Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is currently
accepting applications for the
following positions.: 1. A
lineman at the entry-level
position. The position would be
based out of the Madison office.
However, the individual will be
require outage stand-by during
the week and the weekends as
required. All applicants must
posses a valid Florida CDL
Class A license. 2. A lineman at
the entry-level position. The
position would be based out of
the Perry Office. The individual
will be required to live in the
Perry, Florida area. The
position will require outage
stand-by during the week and
the weekends as required. All
applicants must possess a valid
Florida CDL Class A license 3.
An automotive mechanic at the
advance level position. The
position will be based out of the
Madison Office. The applicant
must have working knowledge
of diesel and gasoline engines
and hydraulic systems in
addition to basic automotive
repair and maintenance. The
salary will be based upon
experience and training.
Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. is an equal
opportunity employer and a
drug free and smoke free work
place. Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. offers a
benefit and retirement package.
The closing date of the accepting
applications is March 31, 2006.
Applications may be obtained
from Tri-County Electric
Cooperative's offices.
Applications should be returned
to the attention of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative's
Engineering and Operations
Department. Tri-County
Electric Cooperative reserves
the right to reject any and all
applications. 850-973-2285.
3/8 3/31, c
Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568
tfn
Joann Bridges Academy in
Greenville, Fl is looking for a
Case Manager with a B.A. in
social or behavioral sciences
preferred; or an equivalent
combination of education
(minimum of A.A) and
experience in working with
juvenile offenders preferred.
Applicants will also be required
to pass a background check. It
is an essential function of the
position that the staff member
must be capable of physical
restraining the students if and


when necessary. Joann Bridges
Academy in Greenville, FL is
looking for a Nurse with a
Associate Degree in nursing and


current license to practice in the
state required. A minimum of
six months clinical or public
health and emergency nursing
preferred. Please submit a
resume to Barbara Broomfield
by fax @ 850-948-4227 or email
to

Barbara.Broomfield@youthserv
ices.com
3'10, 15, 17, 22, c
Registered Nurses Intensive
Care Unit $5,000 Recruitment
Incentive (With one year of
experience) Archbold Hospital
in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above
full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an
excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries.
CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or email:
rt.ylor@archbold.org EOE
3 10, 15, 17, c
Wood Worker Wanted: Basic
experience with wood working
Tools Required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, 8, 10, c
Driver Covenant Transport.
Excellent pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers, 0/0,
Solos, Teams, & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)695-7279 x19.
3/3, fcan
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn

SER iC'ES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite-Your Dish Satel-
lite dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and
prompt service. We also offer
Go-Kart, utility trailers and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150
Old Lloyd Road, Monticello,
Fla 850-997-3377
1/25, tfn. c
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Interiors by Traci: Traci
Register, Certified Interior
Decorator 850-997-3176,
850-264-1670,
Tracilnteriors@aol.com
3/8-31, pd
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

LOST


Lost Cockatiel whistles theme
from Andy Griffin Show &
Yankee Doodle Aucilla Shores
area Please call 342-9929.


1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tire, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book.
997-6806 Wilson Auto, LLC.
tfn, c
2005 Kawasaki Ninja 250 1700
mi. Nice $3,000 OBO must sell
850-508-3851
3/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd


FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980. 11/30,
tfn, c
Furnished downstairs efficiency.
Large bedroom, living room,
bath on 4 acres. Monticello 20
min. to Tally. $400 includes
utilities. 997-2422, 251-1108
3/10, pd
Commercial Building 1,700 sq.
ft. 2 bath, 1 /2 acre property
$550. per month. Hwy 19, 5
miles North of town.
561-718-0896.
3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Country Living 1 bedroom, 1
bathroom, located between
Wacissa and US 98, $450
monthly. 997-6653.
3/10, 15, 17, 22, 2429, 31, c
One bedroom on acre. Partially
furnished, no pets, $575 per
month, credit check. 997-6991


Barnyard Roaming Rhode
Island Red Roosters $10
Purebred Limousin bull, born
7/04 Call 997-0901, leave
message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
pd
Heavy living Room Suite 8 piece
$75, Seen by appointment only.
Bedroom Suite Dresser, chest of
drawers and bed frame $50.
850-997-1884.
3/10, pd
Nice Brick Home on apporx. 1.7
ac. 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom,
hardwood floors, fireplace,
Florida room, deck, 2 miles
from downtown Monticello on
paved road. $249,000 997-2387
or 933-0904.
3/8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Dresser 6 drawers, hickory
wood, $35, deep freezer 22 CF.
$45, or trade for pressure
treated wood. Knik Knack Shelf
$5 Call 510-0998, 342-1486.
3/10, 15, 17, pd
Dayton Portable Generator
4000 watts Like New $400. Call
997-8082
3/10, 15, pd
Registered 6 years old dark bay
thoroughbred Philly $2000 Call
Mike 519-6506.
3/10, pd
Treadmill $500, Gas Grill with
side burner $25 (OBO) Call
997-4253


-- .. .


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

SPool & Youth Activities

575-6571


Your dedication to the road is why millions of Americans have fo
1 riI,-. ,', j '- ,: : i .:11" .- ..:.- rx. .i. j n :



S$34 5(O-57.E: 0 ,d-'..-~,n, n ., -i- :

': ir ...:n.r E: ..ael:c. ij n : r.'i .. l ,. : jl1:1on ,r. :I I
Apply Online schneiderjobs.com
Il i ,:. 1-il 1 l -_ i CI-- E ilI-1 ,:11-4-1 i
SCH&iEIDER
.f---aafilUlufU


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding,
Read welding symbols and measuring. Standard AWS
Welding Test in Flat Position.

Applications available
Georgia Department of Labor
Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


Dental Coverage
Retirement
Disability Insurance
Educational Assistance


Uniforms

BENEFITS THAT ST:BI1LIZE YOUR FUTURE


Equal Opportunity Employer
Mail: PO Box 7750 Thomasville, GA. 31758-7750
Phone: (229) 228-9780 ~ Fax: (229) 226-2718


KELIA & KEILY
PROP RTIES


For all of our listings visit
www.cbkk.com

997-5516


* 10 High Acres with mixed use Int/Bus. City water and
sewer available. I-10 Frontage! $ 800,000
* 12.90 Ac. Wooded tract with large hardwoods. Great
home site. Caney Creek on property. S 193,500
* 15.88 Acres on Thomas Rd. Great wooded tract for
week-end getaways. Aucilla Shores. $ 75,000
* 2 Lots Available on Crype Mrytle. Pecan groves and
pastures with exceptional views. $ 134,160


... ... e .,,,.. .... ..... ........- ----.... .. ------


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Country Living 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house w/
bath, big shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100
pecan trees and a nice pool a real dream for
a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
-acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 Iooro. Now $9,500 per
acre!!!

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000


Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


~_ _Im


~3e~


--- -D I


-- - - - - - - - - - -







PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 10, 2006

Education Rally
Saturday At HMS


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The fifth annual Educa-
tional Partnership Rally will
be held 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.,
Saturday at Howard Middle
School.
County native and former
Miami Dolphins cornerback
Sam Madison will be on
hand.
The event is sponsored by
Madison Avenue For Kids
Foundation, Inc., and the
Educational Partners of Jef-
ferson County.
"Sam enjoys giving his time
to speak to our youth because
he sees the need for a com-
mitment to education and
health in our community," said
spokesperson, Mary Madison,
Sam's mother and rally coor-


dinator.
Registration begins at 9:30
a.m,. and children must have
a parent or guardian present
in order to participate in the
day's activities.
Children will enjoy group
time with Sam Madison, and
will receive autographs.
Parents will participate in
group sessions focusing on
the importance of parental in-
volvement in education and
healthy choices for their chil-
dren.
"It is so important for us to
get this message out, because
our children's success largely
depends on the commitment
made by their parents," said
Madison. "It is time for par-
ents to step up and make a
difference."
In addition to Madison Ave-
nue For Kids Foundations,


Inc., and the Educational Part-
ners of Jefferson County,
rally partners include; Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars Post 251
and Ladies Auxiliary, Family
Literacy (under the patronage
of the Jefferson County Adult
School), the Boys and Girls
Club of Monticello, the Jef-
ferson County Retired educa-
tors Association, the School
Volunteer Mentoring Pro-
grams, and the County Health
Department.
Sam Madison was the
second-round draft choice out
of the University of
Louisville, in 1997, and is
considered the most prolific
cornerback in Dolphins' his-
tory.
He ranks third in the fran-
chises' all-time interception
list with 31, and he amassed
276 tackles and 78 assists,
along with two interceptions
returned for touchdowns.


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2005 Dodge Ram 3500, Larimie Sport, Crew Cab,
Diesel, White over Tan, Leather, LOADED! Chrome
Wheels, Step Bars, Full Power... Only $34,877.
2005 Ford Focus ZX5 SE, Lt Tundra over Grey Cloth,
Power Pkg., Auto., Balance of Factory Warranty.
Only $13,977.
2003 Toyota Tacoma Prerunner SR5. Crew Cab, Auto.,
Power Pkg., Tool Box, Silver over Grey, Cloth.
Only $17,977.


2004 Ch(erolet K2500HD LS, ,\ Cab, 4x4. White over
Grey, Cloth, Power Pkg. No Stories. Only $18,577.
2004 Ford Mustang Deluxe, Fire Red over Grey Cloth,
Power Pkg., CD Player, Alloy Wheels, 28,948 miles.
Only $14,577.
2004 Ford F150 Reg, Cab 4x4, XLT, Shadow Grey over
Grey Cloth, Power Pkg., Leveled, Custom Grill. Only
$18,977. ,
2002 Ford F150 King Ranch 4x4, Medium Blue over
Saddle Leather, LOADED! Only $18,977.


2002 Ford F250 XLT Crew Cab 4X4, Toredoh Red over
Tan Cloth, 1 Owner, Clean Truck, No Stories! $18,887.
2004 Ford Crown Victoria LX, Desert Tan over Tan
Leather, V8, Alloy Wheels, CD Player, Power Seats,
26,957 Miles. Only $14,977.
2004 Ford Sport Trac XLT, Pueblo Gold over Camel
Cloth, Power Pkg., Tow Pkg., Super Clean, 29,153
Miles. This Week Only... $20,477.
2005 Ford Escape XLT, 5DR, AWD, Summit White over
Grey Cloth, 6 Cyl., Auto., Power Pkg., Balance of
Factory Warranty, 25,668 Miles. Only $17,377.


Parts & Service Hours: 8S0-584-6178 800-763-4589
Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:30 2A41 South Byrmo Budler Prmar4a Perry F
& Sat. 7:30 3:00 SHOP ONLINE AT WWW.TIMBERLANDFORDCOM
Sales Hours: **Excluding Crown Victoria, Freestar, Ford GT, Mustang GT, E-Series and Super Duty. Ford Credit financing required.
Mon. Fri. 7:30 6:00 Not all buyers will qualify. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 4/3/06. See dealerrfor qualificatisand complete
details. Allprices plus tax, tag, title & state fees. Plus Dealer fees. Rebates apply where applicable.
& Sat. 7:30 5:00 Not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures for illustration only.


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