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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00111
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00111
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
Full Text

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA i: 2--..-
404 LIBRARY WEST
TUIVERSTTY OF FLORIDA
/.'A ir'f TLr T F f,. 32611


C;AI1 .A I


Financial

Future course
Offered Here

Story, Page 3


VA --tL1 ,l


Efficient

Energy Gets

Tax credit

Editorial, Page 4
l __I


Warriors

stand

4-0 on seasi

Story, Page 8


S Friday Morning
-.0


Monticello


I R'T1T VT' AP NO. 18 CENTS


ews

FRIDAY, MARCH 3.2006


New Program Aims To Prepare



Children For Academic Success


Research Shows Kids

In Program Do Better


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A local group is about to
launch a literacy and school
readiness program that aims to
better prepare preschool chil-
dren for entry into the formal
educational system.
Jana Grubbs is spearheading
the Parent-Child Home Pro-
gram, which Healthy Ways is
underwriting for the time be-
ing.
The program seeks to ad-
dress problems underscored
recently by the Healthy Start
Coalition. These problems in-
clude a high number of ele-
mentary children here having
to take special education (30.9
percent compared with the
state average of 15.1 percent);
and the high percentage of out-
of-school suspensions (26.9
percent versus the state aver-
age of 8.3 percent).
As Grubbs explained it to a
Healthy Start Coalition meet-
ing on Monday, the Parent-
Child Program targets children
between the ages of two and
four who are at risk of failing


school because of poverty and
other obstacles, such as the
low levels of education of their
parents.
"The school system strategy
is to get kids school ready,"
Grubbs said. "This program is
the bridge between the present
gap between kids who can read
and know their ABCs when
they arrive at school and those
kids who don't even know
their last name when they ar-
rive."
Grubbs referred to studies
showing that poverty-stricken
children whose parents lack a
high school education are less
likely to be exposed to reading
and interactive conversations.
These children therefore en-
ter the school system with lim-
ited language skills and are
less prepared to learn, putting
them at a disadvantage when
compared with children from
higher socioeconomic back-
grounds.
Grubbs said the research also
shows that participation in the
Parent-Child Program "sub-
stantially improves at-risk chil-
dren's school success rates."
"Children who have partici-


JANA GRUpBS, background, speaks to members of the Healthy Start Coalition about
the Parent-Child Program she.is spearheading with Healthy Ways backing. (News
Photo)


pated in the Parent-Child
Home Program enter school
ready to learn," Grubbs said.
"They perform significantly
better than their socioeco-
nomic peers and as well or bet-
ter than the overall population
on school readiness measures
in kindergarten and first grade.
They score at or above na-
tional norms on standardized
reading and math achievement


test throughout elementary
school."
The way the program works,
trained individuals make
twice-weekly 30-minute visits
to the homes and "model" for
the parent qnd children.
Meaning that the trained in-
dividuals bring along books
and toys -- often the first chil-
dren's book or educational toy
introduced into the home --


and attempt to foster, through
their examples, "a language-
rich home environment and
positive parenting skills".
During the visits, the visitors
show the parents how to en-
hance the child's conceptual
and social-emotional develop-
ment, as well as their prepar-
edness for school, through
play, reading activities and
verbal interaction.


As well as improving the
child's chances of academic
success, the Parent-Child Pro-
gram is supposed to increase
parental involvement with
their children, strengthen par-
enting skills, and improve the
parents' confidence and self es-
teem.
"Parents who participate in
the program often return to
school, get their GED, and/or
find employment, in some
cases as home visitors for the
Parent-Child Home Program,"
(Jrubbs said. "The parents also
increase their involvement in
their children's education,
meeting with teachers, helping
with homework, and empha-
sizing the importance of aca-
demic success."
G(rubbs said the school sys-
tem already has referred 16 po-
tential candidates to the pro-
gram. These are children who
have been identified as being
economically deprived, having
a home language other than
English, or having older sib-
lings who have experienced
academic difficulty or failure.
Identifying potential candi-
dates for the program was the
first obstacle, Grubbs said. She
said the second and third ob-
stacles were getting parents to
(See Program Page 2)


Planners Tighten Rules


On Wetland Properties


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The transfer of wetlands
credits to upland areas for the
purpose of determining the
number of dwelling units to be
permitted per acre.
This more or less was the
topic of discussion of a sub-
committee of the Planning
Commission on Monday eve-
ning at the Chamber of Com-
merce.
The subcommittee -- com-
posed of Brad Mueller, Corwin
Padgett and Angela Gray -- is
charged with formulating
guidelines for the calculation
of housing densities in devel-
opment projects that contain
wetlands.
Under the present rule, de-
veloper,s are able to transfer
wetlands credits one for one.
Meaning, for example, that a
developer with a 100-acre par-
cel in an Ag-5 zone (one house
per five acres) is given credit
for 20 houses, even if, say, 20
of the acres are designated
wetlands.
The developer, in other
words, is able to cluster or
concentrate 20 houses on the
upland 80 acres, even though,
in reality, the law prevents de-
velopment in the 20 acres des-
ignated wetlands.
This one-to-one transfer of
wetlands credits to upland ar-
eas is the liberal approach, and
one that obviously appeals to
developers.


The opposite and more con-
servative approach is to deny
any transfer of wetland credits,
an approach that some no
doubt would applaud and oth-
ers decry as "a taking of prop-
erty". The latter sentiment
even though construction is
presently prohibited in these
areas anyway.

Rule Aims i
TO Protect
Wetlands

Splitting their differences
(the dynamics of the subcom-
mittee are interesting. The
group reflects the makeup of
the Planning Commission,
which reflect the 'makeup of
the community i.e., it is com-
posed of advocates of both de-
velopment and of
environmental protection), the
group came up with a compro-
mise.
That compromise, which'the
group will propose to the Plan-
ning Commission for a recom-
mendation to the County
Commission ultimately, calls
for the transfer of wetlands
credits at half the background
density. Or more succinctly
put, every 10 acres of wetlands
will count for one dwelling.
The proposed rule would ap-
ply to zones Ag-3 (one dwell-
ing per three acres), Ag-5 (one
dwelling per five acres) and
Ag-20 (one dwelling per 20
acres).
Again, say a developer has a


100-acre parcel in an Ag-5
zone and 20 of the acres are
wetlands.
Rather than being allowed to
cluster 20 houses on the 80 up-
land acres, the developer
would -- under the new rule --
be allowed to cluster 18 houses
(16 for the 80 acres and two
for the 20 acres of wetlands).
The subcommittee touched
on the importance of leaving
the requirement flexible
enough that the Planning
Commission take into account
be the unique features of a par-
ticular parcel.
The subcommittee also
touched on the possible offer-
ing of incentives to encourage
clustering. One possibility is
allowing developers to place
more units than the permitted
number under the designated
zoning, if the developer agrees
to cluster.
The subcommittee also briefly
discussed the establishment of
a minimum dry-land lot size
for non-clustered develop-
ments.
No such minimum dry-land
lot size exists under the present
rules. Meaning that construc-
tion can take place almost right
to the wetlands designation
line.
The subcommittee, in fact, is
scheduled to take up this issue
when it meets again.
The next meeting of the sub-
committee is scheduled for 7
p.m. Monday, March 13, in the
Chamber of Commerce build-
ing.


,,



.; ..
S .i.-. .


KIRSTIE ALLEY, of television and movie fame, stayed with Martha and Jean Michel
Cravanzola at The Cottage Bed and Breakfast last week. Alley was in the area to pro-
mote her cause of providing parents with full information about mood altering drugs
given to children for purported learning and emotional disabilities.


Ft. Walton Beach Family Injured

In Single Vehicle Accident Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Ft. Walton Beach family
of three was seriously injured
Sunday evening in a single
vehicle crash on I-10, in Jef-
ferson County.
FHP reports that Todd
Hughes, 32, and passengers
Ilene Hughes, 28, and Isiah
Hughes, 5, were westbound
on 1-10 in the inside lane at
approximately 7:10 p.m.,
when Todd lost control cross-


ing both lanes westbound on
to the right shoulder.
The 99 Saab rolled down
the embankment, rotating
sideways, striking a tree with
its right rear.

Car Bursts
Into Flames

The vehicle continued
through several trees, rotating
forward, striking two big trees
with the right front.
The vehicle finally rotated
clockwise coming to a final


rest facing southeast, because
of the impact.

The vehicle burst into
flames shortly after the im-
pact.
The crash was not deemed
to be alcohol related and re-
mains under investigation.
The Hughes' were all wear-
ing seat belts, and were trans-
ported to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital.
The vehicle sustained $8,000
in damage.


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Health Dept.

Chili Fundraiser
Nets $335

Story, Photo, Page 6
II


r


- - - -








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006

Decorator's Warehouse

Holds Ribbon Cutting


for fresh brewed coffee and a
variety of cheesecakes.
Among items available at the
Warehouse are: hand
carved and solid Mahogany
wood furnishings, oil paint-
ings, mirrors, lamps, floral ar-
rangements, custom fabrics
(with special catalog orders,)
many good quality furniture
imports, and accessories.
The Warehouse is open
Monday through Friday 9
a.m. until 6 p.m., and Satur-
day, 9 a.m. until 7 p.m..
Fernandez may be reached
at 997-5080.


DECORATOR'S WAREHOUSE LLC. Held its ribbon cutting, Friday. Wielding the scis-
sors, is owner/operator Jena Fernandez, with Chamber of Commerce members in the
background. (News Photo)



Aucilla Christian Academy


Tells 4th 6 Week Honor Roll


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Decorator's Warehouse
LLC held a ribbon cutting
ceremony Friday afternoon.
The business, located at
260 North Cherry Street, is
owned and operated by Jena
Fernandez.
Prior to the ceremony, Fer-
nandez provided a tour of her
new store.
Following the traditional
ceremony, residents were in-
vited to join Fernandez inside


S.

C



ig


DOT devices like this exist on US 19 South and US 19
North to gather information, such as travel times in the
area. Despite the camera on top, the devices are not
used to detect speeders. (News Photo)



March National


Nutrition Month


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

During March the Florida
Department of Health (DOH)
celebrates "National Nutrition
Month", sponsored annually
by the American Diabetic As-
sociation.
The effort is designated to
focus attention on the signifi-
cance of making informed
food choices and developing
sound eating and physical ac-
tivity habits.
County Health Department
Chronic Disease Health Pro-
motion and Education Coor-
dinator Marianne Goehrig,
said that National Nutrition
Month is particularly signifi-
cant for County residents.
This is true, because nutri-
tion is the number one listed
preventative measure for
heart attack and stroke, and
the County is number one in
Florida's 67 counties in stroke
.related. deaths and number
three in heart attack related


deaths.
"You have to work to con-
trol the risk factors and also
reduce the risk of heart attack
and stroke," said Goehrig.
She added that in the
County, only 27.6 percent of
the adults eat at least three
servings of vegetables per day
and 27.1 percent of the popu-
lation report having at least
two servings per day.
These figures are signifi-
cantly less than the state aver-
age of 34.8 percent of the
population eating three serv-
ings of vegetables daily.
This years slogan for Na-
tional Nutrition Month, "Eat
Smart, Stay Healthy", rein-
forces the importance of nu-
trition and physical activity as
key components of a healthy
lifestyle.
Research has shown that a
diet low in fat, high in fiber
and rich in fruits and vegeta-
bles can reduce a person's risk
for many chronic diseases in-
cluding heart attack, stroke,
some types of cancer, type 2
diabetes and osteoporosis.


Aucilla Christian Academy
Principal Richard Finlayson
announces the honor roll for
the fourth six weeks marking
period.
In K-3/K-4 Multi-age, re-
ceiving all S+'s were: Hunter
Cain, Jocelyn Davis, Alex
Haselden, Ayush Patel, Wyatt
Reese, Elizabeth Scheese,
Grayson Sircy and Austin
Wheeler.
In K-4, receiving all S+'s
were: Grace Beshears, Kash
Connell, Marissa Cooley,
Evan Courtney, Antonio Cox,
Emily Forehand, Lydia Hall,
Bethany Hayes, Austin He-
bert, Anna Hilinski, Ryan
Jackson, Ameer Khodr, Am-
ber Knowles, Hayley Lewis,
Lynelle Loveless, Chloe
Reams, Skylar Reams, Megan
Schofill, Levi Stafford, Nico-
las Swickley, Katherine
Whichel, and Mackenzie
Wirick.
In K-5, receiving all S+'s
were: Timothy Finlayson, Jes-
sica Giddens, Camryn' Grant,
Haley Jones, Nour Khodr,
Ryals Lee, Cannon Randle,
Brandon Slaughter, Quinton
Thomas and Joe Walton.
Receiving all S+'s, S, were:
Walker Davis, Kenlie Harvey,
Elizabeth Hightower, T. J.
Hightower, Evan Hocking,
Noah Hulbert, Carly Joiner,
D. J. Key, Jenna Merschman,
Abigail Morgan, Ria
Wheeler, Tedo Wilcox and
Daniel Wurgler.
In first grade, receiving all
A's were: Traynor Barker,
Megan Beaty, Faith Demott,
Stephanie English, Sarah
Hall, Chaz Hamilton, Joe
Hannon, Tyler Hutchenson,
Jenny Jackson, Hannah
Lewis, Summerlyn Marsh.
Gatlin Nennstiel, Kirsten Rea-
gan, Ramsey Sullivan,
Kirsten Whiddon and Kate
Whiddon.
Receiving all A's and B's
were: Rebecca Carson, Han-
nah Compton, J. T. Harp, Er-
ica Keeler, Donnie Kinsey,
Emily Knowles, Lindsey
Lawson, Cole MacNeil,
Sarah Riley, Will Sircy, Na-
talie Sorensen, and Larrett
Terrell.
In second grade, earning all
A's were: Taylor Copeland,


Meagan Giddons, Erin Lee,
Ally Mall, Tomas Swickley,
T. J. Swords, Justin Welch
and Emma Witmer.
All A's and B's were: Jake
Edwards, Katie Fulford, Ian
Haselsen, Sam Hogg, Taylor
McKnight, Rean Montescla-
ros, and D. J. Wilkinson.
In the third grade, earning
all A's were: Winston Lee,
and Bryce Sanderson.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Cole Barclay, Ty
Chancey, Morgan Cline,
Ricky Finlayson, Abigail
Floyd, Cheyenne Floyd, Hal-
eigh Gilbert, Doug Gulledge,
Hunter Handley, Sarah James,
Brooklyn McGlamory, Car-
son Nennstiel, Jonah New-
berry, and Sadie Sauls.
In fourth grade, earning all
A's were: Rachel Lark, Aimee
Love, Jessica Welch and An-
nie Yang.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Tanner Aman, Justin
Brown, Devan Courtney,
Lauren Demott, Jacob
Dunbar, Kayla Fulford, Ash-
ley Hebert, Brandon Holm,
Matthew Hutchenson, and
Capas Kinsey.
In fifth grade, earning all A's
were: Tres Copeland, Jay Fin-
layson, Kaley Love, Hadley
Revell, Ashley Schofill and
Wendy Yang.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Nick Buzbee, Ashli
Cline, Joey Dowell, Russell
Fraleigh, Hannah Haselden,
Jared Jackson, Dakota
McGlamor, Whitney Mc-
Knight, Michaela Metcalf,
Hans Sorensen, Pamela Watt
and Audrey Wynn.
In the sixth grade, earning
all A's were: Matt Dobson,
Tyler Jackson and Shelby
Whitmer.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Austin Shirley, Levi Cobb,
Loretta Croy, Alex Gulledge,
Vicki Perry, Austin Ritchie,
Trent Roberts and Tori Self.
In the seventh grade, earn-
ing all A's were: Kaitlin Jack-
son and Kent Jones.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Clark Christy, Taryn
Copeland, Anna Finlayson,
Jessica Hagan, Katherine
Hogg, G. H. Liford, and
Carolyn Mueller.


In the eighth grade, earning
all A's was Wilson Lewis.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Ryan Barclay, Tiffany
Brasington, Kalyn Brown,
Alex Dunkle, Lane Fraleigh,
Clay Fulford, Jessica Hunt,
Sydney Plummer, Ryan
Pritcher, Dana Watt and Seth
Whitty.
In the ninth grade, earning
all A's were: Rhegan Clark,
Chelsea Dobson, Ashley
Echols, Rebekah Falk, Byron
Love, Michaela Roccanti and
Savannah Williams.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Erin Kelly, Katelyn
Levine, Mallory Plaines,
Olivia Sorensen, and Luke
Whitmer.
In the tenth grade, earning
all A's were: Rebekah Aman,
Benjamin Buzbee, A. J. Con-
nell, .Courtney Connell,
Stephanie Dobson, Will
Hartsfield, Prateen Patel,
Ramsey Revell, and Tristan
Sorensen.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Courtney Brasington, Jayce
Davis, Claire Knight, and Ni-
cole Mathis.
In the eleventh grade, earn-
ing all A's were: Joanna
Cobb, Caitlin Murphy, Jenni-
fer Pitts,Rikki Roccanti.
Earning ill A's and B's were:
Melissa Martin and Jennifer
Tuten.
In the twelfth grade, earn-
ing all A's were Keri Brasing-
ton, Jana Connell, Ben
Grantham, Casey Gunnels,
and Corie Smith.
Earning all A's and B's were,
Glen Bishop, Amy Blanton,
Jennifer Hagan, Jason Holton,
Katie O'Steen, Colby Roberts,
Alex Searcy, Kristin Tuckey
and Suzanne Walker.


Program
(Continued From Page 1)
commit to the program and-
finding the volunteers to make
the program work.
"The families have to commit
to a two-year period," Grubbs
said. "We want committed
families."
She said that finding volun-
teers was also not easy, given
the program's demands and the
competition for volunteers
from other organizations. It
was possible that the program
would have to hire an individ-
ual, in lieu of volunteers, she
said. In fact, it appeared that at
present that the program would
hire someone, she said.
Although a national program
that has reportedly proven
greatly successful, the program
only has two replication sites
in Florida, other than the one
about to begin here. Grubbs
said the best model for this
county, based on the rural na-
ture of the area, was a similar
program in South Carolina.
"The program there has been
flourishing," Grubbs said.
To learn more about the
Parent-Child Program or to
volunteer, call Grubbs at 997-
2644 or call the school system.



The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee will
meet at 9:00 a.m.
March 8, 2006 at
the Jefferson
County Extension
Office
275 North
Mulberry Street.




Jefferson
County Road
Department
will be
repairing the bridge
that goes across Cow
Creek on Goose
Pasture Road, and that
road will be closed
Thursday and
Friday, March 2 and
3, 2006 Thank You!



You Can Count
On The

Monticello

News


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LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR I)R
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The Opera House Stage Company Presents




On Golden Pond

By Ernest Thompson

Friday and Saturday,

/March 3, 4,10 & 11

Dinner 6: 30 P.M -- Show 8:00 P.M.

Sunday, March 5 3:00 p.m.

Dinnerand Show
$25.00 members, $30.00 others
Show Only

2.00 memzbers,- $15.00 others

Sratyls re ed for dinner. Call 997-4242
^^^.^^-a Afl


- .. ... '.. ,.. .'


a





c.!

I


/j








Extension Office Sets
Financial Future Course


MARDIS GRAS King and Queen toss items into the
crowd Friday night. Queen is Alana Chambers; King
Dan Schall. (News Photo)


Ever Get A Pal Smashed!

JAxi sJj.



I I' I I' I


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
With the recent changes in
Bankruptcy laws, the Exten-
sion Office is offering by re-
quest, a "Building Your
Financial Future" Course for
citizens.
"As you are aware, the new
Bankruptcy Law that went
into effect last year requires
that those filing for personal
bankruptcy complete .a De-
partment of Justice approved
'debtor education program',"
said Family and Consumer
sciences Extension Agent
Heidi Copeland.
She said the Family and
Consumer Sciences Program
of the University of Florida,
Institute of Food and Agricul-
ture Sciences Extension Serv-


ice (UF/IFAS Extension) has
been approved by the Depart-
ment of Justice to provide this
educational component of the
bankruptcy process.
Copeland said the course
is a four hour program, in two
two hour segments. It will in-
clude information on develop-
ing family spending plans,
money management skills, re-
sponsible credit use, and con-
`'sumer rights and responsibili-
ties.
S There is a $20 charge for
the course.
The Department of Justice
does not allow people to be
refused participation if they
cannot pay, so registrants may
apply for fee exemptions or
reductions, in advance of the
class. ,
For further information con-
tact Copeland at 342-0187.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006 PAGE 3

"I usually vote
Republican but I'm
registered as a
Democrat so I can
vote in local elections"

How many times have you heard that
one? Or more importantly.... how
many times have you said it? Well,
there's no longer a reason for anyone
in Florida to ever say it again.
It used to be a very real trap. If there
were no Republicans running in a
County race, the entire election was
decided in the Democratic primary.
We never even got a chance to vote
for the Democrat we thought was. the
best candidate. So a lot of good
Republicans registered as Democrats.
But a recent change in the election
law allows Republicans to vote in
the Democratic primary when only
Democrats are in the race. Problem
Solved.
So... for all you Republicans in
Democrat clothing, The Republican
Party of Jefferson County has a
message for you. In fact, our entire
two party system has a message for
you.
Come home...we've missed you!


Are you sure YoU're
imnot a Republican ?
-a Why not make it official?
P Just call us at 228-4400 and...
Sl'ii H We'll do the rest!
sil'ftcl, Manow
It's Easy!
Paid for by the Jefferson County Republican Party
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate committee v ,, ., ,,,,,p ,,


CAREER DECISIONS
ARE CLOSER THAN
YOU THINK!
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PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


Earn your Associate or Bachelor Degree
SBusiness P Legal Medical


* Computer


o Culinary


/ Financial aid available to those who qualify.
/ Choose day, evening or online classes.
/ job placement assistance available for graduates.
Call Toll Free


1.888.232.4852


KEISER

COLLEGE

TALLAHASSEE
1700 Halstead Blvd.
Admissions Hours:
Monday-Thursday 9 am-8 pm, Friday 9 am-5 pm, Saturday 9 am-1 pm
www.keisercollege.edu


Miss Mary's

Family Restaurant

Exit 21 from 1-10
BP Truck Stop

Friday Saturday
5p.m. 10p.m.
Boiled ~ Fried Shrimp
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

ERON CICHON

APublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post .Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses tao: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net '




Efficient Energy


Gets Tax
Making energy-efficient
home improvements and pur-
chasing fuel-efficient hybrid
electric vehicles is no longer
just an environmentally
friendly move making these
purchases could save. you
money at tax time.
That's because the Energy
Policy Act of 2005 will offer
consumers federal tax credits
for making energy-effiecient
purchases.
Using energy-efficient appli-
ances and installing better win-
dows and insulation can pro-
vide many benefits. In addition
to lower energy bills, individ-
ual energy-saving action can
increase comfort in the home
and reduce air pollution.
By driving or buying on
leasing a new hybrid gas-
electric automobile fuel-
pfficient vehicle you can get an -
income tax credit if $2150 -
$3,400 plus better mileage
meaning lower gasoline prices
and fewer emissions.
One of the best benefits this
year is the new tax credit of-
fered by the Energy Policy
Act. Qualifying products and
vehicles can mean having to
pay less at tax time.
Eligible homeowners don't
get an instant return on what
they buy, like a rebate or dis-


SCredit
count. Instead, they itemize the
purchase on.their federal in-
come tax form and that affects
the total amount of tax they're
supposed to pay. This credit
increases a person's rebate or
lower the amount he or she
owes.
A tax credit is not like a tax
deduction. It's generally more
valuable since it reduces tax
dollar' for dollar,., vhile a de-
duction only removes a per-
centage of the tax.that is owed.
Home mortgages, charitable
giving and home office ex-
penses reduce taxable income
only by a percentage of what's
taken in tax) a tax credit, on
the other hand, reduces taxable
income directly, not a a per-
centage.
According to the Department
of Energy, you can, for exam-
p., pl, .. a.t j on -time tax,g ed.if of, .-
Lup it' $llS total for installing
efficient neiv windows, 'insulaL
tion, doors, roofs, and heating
and cooling equipment in your
home. Building materials must
meet requirements and must be
placed in service from Jan. 1,
2006 to Dec. 31,2007.
There are also tax credits for
solar energy technologies and
for fuel cells.
Some consumers may also
be eligible for state rebates.


Robertson Doesn't


_ Opinion & Comment


SShort Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

My husband and I attended
the Blest The Beast Feast at
the Opera House last week
end. Great food, lots of fun un-
til the query, "Do you want to
buy a raffle ticket?" I usually
buy raffle tickets to support the
cause of the evening, and 1.
agreed. Then I heard the
dreaded words,, issued perkily.,
IO..m il.n-, young girl "You
might even win the horse."
Horses, you see, have always
been out to get me. I am
shocked at how clever they can
be. They are creatures that are
big, hugely strong and with the i
brain case the size of a pit of
bing cherry. How they also
manage to be sly and intuitive,
I do not know.
Once, I borrowed a truck
from our friends, Mike and
Emily Phelps who live on the
Waukeenah Highway. They
have a'horse, much beloved by
them both. I drove my vehicle


out of the field, stopped to. re-
turn and close the gate.
That is when Ole Sly made
his move and slipped out. An
entire field of great grass was
not enough for him, he wanted
roadside fodder. I ran after him
and he easily skittered away as
I neared. He looked like Mr,
Ed, laughing at me.
He clopped across the road
several times, which I guess
proves, that the g;.-'is. .i..du :'
greener on the older :.idl Iirhen
I hearo:,the blast of an ail;'horn
from an approaching 18
wheeler. I froze in fear. I com-
posed a note in my head.
"Dear Mike and Emily, about
your former horse." ,
After the truck passed by, I1
screwed up my resolve to
catch Ole Sly. We careened all
over that roadside, la. li'ikc a
Pac Man dancing after the
prize. No quality of cajoling or
cursing would: lure :le Sly
back towards me.
Finally, in desperation, I put
my hands together to pray. A


passing woman noticed this
distress. She got, out yelled a
few horse words at Ole Sly and
he pranced back into his pad-
dock. I ari not sure she be-
lieved.that 1 had actually tried
hard, to get that mutt back into
his pasture.
As a young girl, I rode Dona,
a fat horse that belonged to
neighbors, the Graves family.
A group of neighborhood kids
Splanned,.a ,,a ride' Dona. She looked .epi.4ci:,
"plurlp that morning.
Mrs. Graves, an avid gar-
dener kept an asparagus patch
adjacent to Dona's pasture.
The manure kept this aspara-
gus patch packed with the deli-
cious spears. As Dona and I
rode by the asparagus patch, a
loud whooshing noise came
from behind ne. I stopped and
turned to look.
Almost immediately I was
surrounded by a stench, so bad
I have not in my whole adult
life, smelled anything so horri-
ble. I almost retched; a fog of


stink was interlaced by cur-
rents of a worse smell. Then I
noticed all of Mrs. Graves's '
asparagus chewed down. and
the fence beside Dona's pas-
ture knocked down. I realized
that the whooshing came from
Dona's nether regions.
As I joined the other kids on
their horses, Dona's "regions"
began to make a clacking noise
with each clop of her hooves.
li s.iundcd like the' cdntraption
used- on movie sets to denote;a.'
new scene.
Clack, clack, clack, whoosh!
I started out in the middle of
the lines of horses in the trail
ride. After the second whoosh,
the kid behind me complained.
I rode the rest of the way in
last position.
The point of all my horse sto-
ries, not just these two, is this.
Horses have my number. They
have group memory and they
want to humiliate me. So Su-
san King, thank you for win-
ning that horse!


Speak For All

Evangelicals


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Pat Robertson, a once influ-
ential evangelical Christian
leader, recently added another
bizarre comment to a growing
list of eccentric views. Follow-
ing Israeli Prime Minister Ar-
iel Sharon's massive stroke;
Robertson wondered on his
television program, "The 700
Club." whether God might be
punishing Sharon for "dividing
the land" of Israel by giving
acreage to Palestinians.
There were predictable reac-
tions among liberals and out-
rage from Israel, but the most
interesting responses come
from fellow evangelical Chris-
tian leaders. Richard Land,
president of the Southern Bap-
tist Conventions Ethics and
Religious Liberty Commission
said, "I am as shocked by Pat
Robertson's arrogance as I am
by his insensitivity."
Another once influential fun-
damental Christian leader, the
Rev. Jerry Falwell, prompted
similar negative reactions from
the Christian community when
.shortly after September 11 he
wondered if the nation's worst
terrorist attack was God's
judgment for American's ac-
ceptance of feminists and gays.
Os Guinness, a well-known
and well-regarded Christian


scholar and writer, said, "I
know hundreds of people who
are just terminally frustrated
with the idiotic public state-
ments of Jerry Falwell and Pat
Robertson, and with the idea
that these people represent us.
They don't."
An unsuccessful 1988 Re-
publican Party presidential
candidate, Pat Robertson had
made a career of provocative,
foot-in-mouth comments. Rob-
ertson joined Falwell in mak-
ing similar post-September 11
comments about God's judg-
ment on America. In 2005,
Robertson suggested the
United States should assassi-
nate leftist Venezuelan Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez. After
Hurricane Katrina slammered
New Orleans, Robertson won-
dered aloud whether this judg-
ment might have resulted from
America's high abortion rate.
Robertson is a fellow be-
liever in Jesus Christ, so I
honor his faith. I also respect
his leadership, including his
legacy as founder of Regent
University, founder of the
C!hrisiinn Coalition, and suc-
cessi'L I entrepreneur of many
for-pi: ofit and nonprofit televi-
sion broadcasting channels and
programming.
However, I must agree with
a number of Christian leaders
who have questioned Robert-
(See Robertson Page 5)


Parent Involvement Needed


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I was fortunate to have been
a public school science teacher,
in one of the first "A" rated
middle schools in Florida. The
success enjoyed by our school
and demonstrated by our stu-
dents on the national standard-
ized tests was not just luck or
lopsided student economic
demographics.
Early on, our school recog-
nized that lack of successful
student performance is directly
and intrinsically linked to pa-
rental involvement.
Those students who had par-'
ents interested in their educa-
tional progress and routinely
"look over their shoulder", re-


peatedly outperformed stu-
dents with parents either un-
willing or unable to."get in-
volved".
It would be quite easy to just
accept the problem or become
complacent by believing the
old adage that, "The apple
doesn't fall far from the tree".
In effect, if parents aren't in-
terested in education and
themselves were poor perform-
ers in school, their children
tend to display this same
lackadaisical attitude and
achievement.
Additionally, some parents
are just inept at being able to
control their children or con-
vince them of the value for a
quality education.
While there is little that any-
one could do about changing


long established parent atti-
tudes and behavior regarding
pLblic education, we found
there were things that could be
done to foster an environment
and opportunity for learning
that was missing in the child's
home life.
With a little extra time, per-
sonal initiative and "elbow
grease", some dedicated edu-
cators at our school found
grant money to establish an ac-
tive and educational after
school program. It wasn't sim-
ply "day care" for latch key
kids, but an actual targeted
education program designed to
assist poor performing
students. It provided the addi-
tional structured environment
and oversight not provided by
parents at home.


Health Risks In Regioi


Patricia Bates McGhee
University of Florida

Children living in the south
are up to three more likely to
battle poor health and its con-
sequences- including obesity,
teen pregnancy and death- than
those in all other regions of the
United States, even if they re-
ceive the same medical care .
A new University of Florida
study reveals.


"Hurricane Katrina gave the
world a glimpse of the dispari-
ties in the South," says Jeffrey
Goldhagen, M.D., M.P.H., the
study's lead author and an as-
Ssociate professor of commu-
nity pediatrics at the UF col-
lege of Medicine- Jacksonville.
"Our research documents just
how profoundly these dispari-
ties impact the health of chil-
dren in the region."
The study, published recently
in the journal Pediatrics, is the


first to statistically relate re-
gion of residence to measures
of child health, Goldhagan
Says.
"In fact, e no" believe that
where a clild lives may be one
of the most powerful predic-
tors child health outcomes and
disparities." He says.
The poor health outcomes re-
searchers documented in-.
cluded low birth weight, teen
pregnancy, death and other
problems such as mental "ill-


When the regular school day
ended, students enrolled in the
after school program would re-
port to the school cafeteria.
The first order of business was
a nutritional snack and social
time with their friends.
Shortly thereafter, some stu-
dents would go to the gym (or
outside athletic fields) and par-
take in some organized physi-
cal activity. The other students
would gather in different class-
rooms targeted to address a
particular student weakness.
Students struggling with math
in one group, those having
reading or'writing difficulties
in another, and so on.
SThere was sufficient time to
assist students with their
(See Parent Page 5)




n
ness, asthma, obesity, tooth de-
cay and school performance.
The eight-member research
team set out to determine
whether living in the South has
a negative effect on children's
health and whether a scientific
approach could identify which
states in the South have poorer
health outcomes for children.
UF researchers also sought to
look at what is it living in the
South that results in poor
(See Health Risk Page 5)


From Our Photo File
..T ,, ; rw f > =v ri



.. ..--------










As.








NEW recycling equipment was delivered to the county, in Aug, 1990. Dixon Hughes
landfill director, examines the truck and trailer and boxes. From left, Hughes, Jeff
Summer of Jim Hardee Company of Tampa, which delivered the equipment. (News
File Photo)










Health Risks in Area


(Continued From Page 4)
health outcomes.
To find out, researchers
computed a Child Health In-
dex that ranked each state in
the nation according to five
routine indicator of physical
health in children- percentage
of low-birth weight infants, in-
fant mortality rate, child death
rate, teen death rate and teen
birth rates. The scores revealed
that eight of the 10 states with
the poorest child health out-
comes in 'the nation- that is,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkan-
sas, Tennessee, Alabama,
Georgia, North Carolina, and
South Carolina- are in the what
the researchers defined as the
Deep South. The remaining.
Deep South states, Kentucky
and Florida, are the lowest
quarter.


Living in the Deep South
proved to be the best predictor
of poor child health outcomes,
more so than any other factor
commonly used to describe
health differences among
groups of children, including
poverty, parents' employment
status or single-parent house-
holds.
"We weren't really surprised
by the results because I think
most people thought this might
be the case," says co-author
William Living good, Ph.D., a
UF associate professor of pedi-
atrics and director of the Duval
County Health Department's
Institute for Health, Policy and
Evaluation Research. "But we
were able to apply epidemiol-
ogical principles to asses, clar-
ify and map the problem and


Parent involvement


(Continued From Page 4)
homework as well as introduc-
ing them to problem solving
techniques in their area of dif-
ficulty. At the appropriate
time, the groups would switch.
Due to the incorrigible na-
ture,of some students, it wasn't
possible to achieve 100 per-
cent success. Most
importantly, however, the vast
majority of students participat-
ing in the program saw an in-
crease in their performance
and improved grades in the tar-
geted subject areas.
Where homework was once
never completed, it was now
routinely turned in finished.


Robertson
(Continued From Page 4)
son's recent pattern of impru-
dent, biblically unjustifiable,
largely judgmental and uncom-
passionate, and oft-times self-
righteous commentary. If
Robertson made one gaffe, I'd
simply count him among the
rest of us.
.Robertson's penchant for
controversial pronouncements
comes from his theology and.
methodology. He truly .be-
lieves God speaks estra-
biblically and directly to him,
then he tends to apply this doc-.
trilne to specific individuals
and events. While I sometimes
agree with Robertson's assess-
ment of a contemporary social
or political concern, I gener-
ally do not agree with his pro-
posed solutions.
To listen to Robertson, you'd
think God was a Republican.
He came off more as a partisan
hack than as a prophet. This
often uncritical partisanship
undermines both his faith and
his credibility.
Robertson is not the best
or even any longer a leading,
representative of evangelical
Christians. He "clarified" his
views after each of the recent
notorious episodes.
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., a
syndicated newspaper cohlum-
nist in almost 100 newspapers
and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids,
Mich.)


More importantly, the learning
that went along with complet-
ing such after school assign-
ments was irreplaceable.
It is unfortunate that Jeffer-
son County has such poor state
academic for its schools. From
my experience, I would con-
clude that a great deal of the
responsibility for this situation
is undoubtedly a lack of qual-
ity parental involvement.
I would suggest that there
are things that the local school
board members should explore
(such as an after school aca-
demics program) to compen-
sate for this situation and
improve our children's learn-
ing and overall academic per-
formance.


then document this intuitive
feelings by making it scientific
and evidence-based- much like
the first epidemiologists in
London who recognized,
mapped and then defined the
cholera problem.
Researchers warn that the
study evaluated children as a
group, so the findings don't
apply to any single child's
risk. And overall, most Ameri-
can kids are quite healthy.
"Generally, children in the
world's developed countries
are healthy," says Goldhagen.
"But children who live in some
of the states in Deep South are
two to three times more likely
to die or have other health
problems as compared to chil-
dren living some states in other
regions of the country."
The reasons for these risks
are complex and are relates to
social, economic and other
public policies in the South, he
says. "These policies, which
consign 50 percent of children
of poverty, neglect quality nu-
trition and critical health serv-
ices, may differentiate children
in the South from those in
other regions," says Goldha-
gen.
"For the first time, disparities
in race, gender, education, in-
come and poverty are not the
critical issues here," he adds.
"In this study, region is the
disparity issue, and previous
studies have not taken us in
that direction."
Other researchers say the
findings are valuable and de-
mand additional research.
"This paper presents impor-
tant disturbing information,
and to vast literature demon-
strating shameful disparities in
our children's health," says
Michael Weitzman, M.D.,
chairman of pediatrics at New


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York University's School of
Medicine. "Why there are dis-
parities and what to do about
them are our society's respon-
sibility to our children."
The study raises vital ques-
tions link between public poli-
cies and children's heath, says
Peter Gorski, M.D., M.P.H., a
University of South Florida
professor of public health, pe-
diatrics and psychiatry, who
hopes the team will next study
regional differences among
groups if individuals catego-
rized by family income, educa-
tion and other characteristics.
"We need new tools and hy-
pothetical models to study the
ecology of disease, and we
need interdisciplinary profes-
sionals from medicine, public
health, economics and the so-
cial sciences to collaborate,"
says Goldhagen. "This can't be
shoved under the desk or put
on hold because the maps
show in color the disparities
that children in the Deep South
face every day."


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006 PAGE 5



.Join Sage Saturday


Evenings For Our


Outstanding


Wood-Grilled Filet


Mignon With All


The Trimmings



Every Saturday Night

S997-2341

1305 West Washington St.


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006


Lifestyle


Health Department Chili

Luncheon Raises $335


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The County Health Depart-
ment Relay For Life Chili
Lunch fundraiser raised $335
for the American Cancer Soci-
ety, last week.
This year's relay theme is
"Around the World in 18-
hours," and the Health Depart-
ment team chose the country
of Mexico, prompting the Chili
Luncheon.
Wendy's Hamburgers res-
taurant donated the cups for
the chili, and everything else
was donated by the employees
of the Health Department.
"There are 15 employees on
the Relay team, and many


SHARE Sets

Registratic


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Registration for Aucilla
SHARE, for March is sched-
uled for 10 a.m. 12 p.m. on
Saturday, Mar. 4 and 11, at
the Central Baptist Church lo-
cated at 655 Tindell Road, Au-
cilla, and at the library.
Pick up and Distribution Day
is scheduled for 9:00 10:30
a.m., Saturday, Mar. 25, at the
church location only.

IN MEMORY
We Remember Mama
Mrs. Ola Green Lamar
On Tuesday, March 4, 1986
our family witnessed the
peaceful
life to eternal reward as our
adored and beloved jewel,
Mrs. Ola Green Lamar was
summoned by God to
embellish His crown of
resurrection preparation
(Revelation 22:4.)
As each one of our steps are
ordered in Him, and each one
of our days are surely num-
bered, we do thank God for Je-
sus and His infallible Work
wherein the Apostle Paul duly
noted in part of 2nd Corinthi-
ans 5:8, that to be absent from
the body is to be present with
the Lord.
Matter of fact, he further ad-
monishes his prot6g6 in 2nd
Timothy 1:10, "But is now
made manifest by the appear-
ing of our Savior Jesus Christ,
who hath abolished death, and
hath brought life and immor-
tality to light through the gos-
pel."
Yes, there are still better
things to come in Jesus' Al-
mighty Name.
Therefore, even as we bring
to mind "Mama" 20 years
later, we are pleasantly re-
Sminded that on the spectrum of
life, our beloved mother and
grandmother has truly come
full circle: birth, life, death,
and eternity.
"Mama's" legacy sustains us
as we eagerly anticipate that
great rapture day.
Yes, Revelation 22:20 is re-
splendent to note: "Surely I
come quickly, Amen. Even so,
come, Lord Jesus."
As we're all striving for per-
fection, let us make every ef-
fdrt to be ready when He
comes.
As 1st Thessalonians 4:16-
18 emphatically states: "(16)
For the Lord himself shall de-
scend from Heaven with a


more that are lending a helping
hand," explains Team Captain
Gina Kelly.
Other team members include:
Co-Captain Marianne Goehrig,
Kim Barnhill, Victory
Conyers, Nondis Driggers,
Mike Gordon, Jackie Guyton,
Colleen Harmon, Shannon Ja-
cobs, Donna Melgaard, Jerry
Combass, Shena McFadden,
Joyce Steele, Kelly Wallace,
and Amy Wheeler.
"We have a great team and
are very excited about the
2006 Relay For Life," Kelly
said.
"We would like to extend a
big thank you to everyone that
made our chili lunch a
success," she concludes.


March

)n Dates
The Basic Food Package for
March costs $18, and has a
guaranteed retail value of $36
or more.
It consists of 8.87 oz. Cana-
dian bacon, 4.35 lb.. whole
chicken, 1 lb. ready to cook
boneless skinless chicken
breast filets, 1 Ib. turkey break-
fast sausage, 1 lb. ground beef
85/15, 1 lb. mild Italian sau-
sage, plus a selection of fresh
fruits and vegetables.
Cash, Food Stamps, and EBT
will be accepted.


LAMAR


Ptb. jh$&


shout, with the voice of an
archangel, and with the trump
of God: and the dead in Christ
shall rise first:
(17) Then we which are alive
and remain shall be caught up
together with them in the
clouds, to meet the Lord in the
air: and so shall we ever be
with the Lord. (18) Wherefore
comfort on another with these-
words."
So, look up everybody and
be encouraged, even the more,
for "ye shall be sorrowful, but
your sorrow shall be turned
into joy," John 16:20b, for the
prophet Nehemiah concludes
in his 8th chapter, verse 10:
"Neither be ye sorry; for the'
joy of the Lord is your
strength." Hallelujah!
Oh "Mama," we love you al-
ways; we. miss you still; we'll
see you in God's kingdom, for
great is his faithfulness to each
of us and His grace and mercy
endures without end.
"For we know that if our
earthly house of this tabernacle
were dissolved, we have a
building of God, a house not
made with hands, eternal in the
heavens," 2nd Corinthians 5:1.1
Thank you Jesus!
Glory be to God,
Sister Willie Lee Lamar
Bivens, (Your only daughter,
"Baby", Evangelist Dr. Ola
Sylvia Lamar (Your namesake
and only granddaughter, Rev.
Albert Bivens, Jr. (Your only
grandson)


Doers Club

Sets Meeting
The Doers Club, Diabetes
Support groups meet 12:15 to
12:45 p.m., Thursday, March
9, at the Health Department.
Guest speaker is Heidi
Copeland, Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Extension
Agent, who will discuss
choosing food portion sizes
wisely.
Recipe ideas will also be
provided for participants.


HEALTH DEPARTMENT Relay for Life team holds a chili luncheon fundraiser. From
left, Co-captain Marianne Goehrig holds homemade cornbread, as Nondis Driggers
scoops homemade chili into take out cups, held by Donna Melgaard. (News Photo)



Club Members Attend


Legend's Day At Capitol


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Five County Boys and Girls
Club members and Club Di-
rectors were invited and at-
tended Legend's Day events at
the Capitol, as part of Florida's
Black History Month Celebra-
tion.
The students attending this-
invitation only event were se-
lected to go based on their
performance at the area Boys
and Girls Clubs.
Jefferson/Monticello Club
Director Gerrold Austin se-
lected Club members who
demonstrated good behavior,
helped around the Club, and
attended regularly.
The students were invited
take part in a question/answer
session after the speakers


spoke.
Gov. Jeb Bush welcomed
Hall of Fame Baseball great
Willie Mays and former all-
star football player Emmitt
Smith.
He was also joined by Major
League Baseball players Ken
Griffey, Jr. and David Justice
and National Football League
quarterback Shaun King.


Church News

Greater Fellowship MB
Church celebrates it annual
Evening in White, 3 p.m. Sun-
day.
Speaker is District Mission-
ary Evangelist Minor
Brookins, of St. Stephens MB
Church, Tallahassee.


Cancer Society Shares

In Health care Forum


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The American Cancer Soci-
ety (ACS,) in partnership with
the Jefferson County Relay
For Life Committee, presented
the Second Annual Health
Care Provider Forum on Tues-
day, Feb. 21.
Lunch was provided by the

CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Doro-
thy Raines Akins wishes to ex-
press their sincere appreciation
and gratitude to each of you
for the cards, flowers, phone
calls, prayers, visits, food, and
other various acts of kindness
shown during their time of be-
reavement.
The family offers special
thanks to Memorial MB
Church and pastor, and Greater
Fellowship MB Church and
pastor.
Special recognition is also
given to the Branch Street Fu-
neral Home staff for providing
their best service.
"We pray God will continue
to bless each of you."
Jerome and
Nellie Kay Akins,
Marie Akins Cooper,
and family


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United Methodist Relay For
Life teams.
The Forum served as an op-
portunity to "thank" County
health providers for their com-
passion and care of local can-
cer patients and to provide
education on services provided
by ACS for those diagnosed
with cancer.
Presenters for the program
were Elaine Freni, Shirley
Montgomery, and Molly Wahl
from the Capital Area ACS of-
fice in Tallahassee.
A short video of a cancer
survivor was shown that
brought home the message that
being diagnosed with cancer is
not necessarily the death sen-
tence it once was
As a service to local cancer
patients, ACS has recently
opened a gift closet in Jeffer-
son County providing wigs,
scarves, hats, bras, prostheses,
as well as cancer patient infor-
mation packages.
It is located at the Jefferson
County Health Department an-
nex building


Theme of Legends Day is:-
"Remembering the Past...Cele-
brating the Future."


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Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:-
7 PM Bible Study

My flesh and
my heart may
fail, but God is
the strength of
my heart and
my portion
forever.

Psalms 73:26


The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


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260 N. Cherry Street


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hippies once believed The Journal of Evolutionary
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Positive Emotion: Flowers," The article describes
research studies conducted by Jeanhette Havlland-
SINCE 1934 Jones, Ph.D. "Flowers have Immediate and long-term
positive effects on emotional reactions, mood, social
behaviors and even memory for both males and females," Jones said. Jones found that the presence
of flowers rlggerS happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and positively affects social
behavior far beyond what is normally believed. Upon receiving a gift of flowers, the participants of
this study, responded with true smiles and reported positive moods that lasted for days. Womei and
men were spontaneously given a flowe-r while riding alone in an elevator, Bor th e women and men
who received flowers demonstrated Increased eye Iontact In conversation, stood In closer proximity
to the researchers, and produced more and truer,smiles than those Who did not receive flowers.
"When It comes to receiving flowers, men and women are on the same playing field," said Jones. "It
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006 PAGE 7


HALEY WINCHESTER wears head gear reminiscent of a DEBBIE BARNWELL was decked out with multi layers TRACEY JACKSON'S broad smile suggests her high
court jester at Friday's festivities, of beads and mask Friday. spirits at Friday's Mardi Gras. (News Photo)

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JAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006


Sports


ACA Girls Split


Last Two Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

^ The Aucilla Christian Acad-
3emy varsity softball team
split games with Forida High,
.and Taylor County.
In the game against Florida.
High, the Lady Warriors lost
9-1.
$ Brittany Hobbs was the
pitcher for the Lady Warriors
,nd was credited for the loss.
, She gave up 13 hits, walked
4hree batters and struck out
>ne.
At the plate, Chelsea Kinsey
vent two for three with one
walk; and Paige Thunnan
went two for three with one


RBI.
The game slated against
Treinton was rained out.
Lady \Warriors squeaked
by Taylor County 5-4.
Bethany Saunders pitched
tive innings for the Lady
Warriors and was credited
with the win.
She struck out four batters
and walked five.
Hobbs came in to pitch in the
sixth, gave up no walks,
struck out one and had one
save.
Hobbs went two for three at
the plate, with a triple; Lind-
sey Day went two for three
with two RBI and a double;
and Saunders went two for
three.


--
-** .. .. ,


,w. '. j


ACA JV ladies Keli Dollar at bat and Skyler Hanna cath-
ing.



Lady Warrior JVs


ACA Beats Maclay 9-6 Lose To Trenton


TO Stand 4-0 Season


BILL BROWN

On a day more suited for
football or mud-bogging, Au-
billa hosted Maclay and
slogged out a 9-6 victory for
their fourth win of the season.
Drizzle and several brief
showers peppered Finlayson
Field throughout the contest
on Thursday.
SDustin Roberts pitched the
first four innings, and was
credited with his second win
pf the season against no
losses.
i He gave up four hits, five
runs and struck out three.
S Casey Gunnels worked, the
last three innings allowing


one hit, one rii and stitick
out one. for his second save
of the year.
Offensively, the Warriors
.i.,11. ..J ten hits from two
Maclay pitchers, with Chris
Tuten leading the way with
three hits, and two RBI in
four trips to the plate.
Gunnels followed with two
for three: Josh Carswell, two
for four, one RBI; Dustin
Roberts, one for four; Stephen
Dollar, one for two; and A. J.
Connell, one for three.
The next home game is a
district contest withh John Paul
11. 4 p.m., Thursday, March 9.
Everyone is invited to come
out and support the Warriors
in their pursuit of another dis-
trict title.


Lady Tigers Fall

To NFC In Opener


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Tigers varsity
softball team lost the season
opener to North Florida
Christian 23-0.
The girls were bitten by the
"error bug," Coach Earlene
Knight said.
At the end of the first inn-
ning, the score was 1-0 NFC.
"We held them scoreless in
the second inning and really
played good ball," Knight
said.
"The error bug bit us in the
third and we gave up eight


points and then another 14 in
the fourth," she added.
H however,. Knight said there
were a couple of bright spots
for the Lady Tigers.
Briterrica White went one
for one with a single; and Ma-
jetta Jefferson went one for
one with a double and a steal.
"We have a very young team
this year and I expect them to
improve with some maturity,"
Knight concluded.
The game against Maclay,
slated as the season opener
last week, was canceled be-
cause of heavy rain, and re-
scheduled 4 p.m., March 9,
here.


Demons Post Team Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Roosevelt Jones re-
leased the roster for the Mon-
ticello Demons softball team.
Returning this year are: Kel-
vin Jones, Joe Andrew, Wilbo


Ellis, Jr., Nick Russell,
Frankie Steen, Andy Burley,
Monterious Rivers, Warren
Allen, Nod Thompson,
Johnny Rivers, and Vincent
Gentle.
Jones added that he expects
an additional four players to
the learn this year.


Teams Begin Practices


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


strikeouts.
Katelyn had two strikeouts;
Skyler Hanna one strikeout;
Mallory Plaines a single; and


The Aucilla Christian Acad- Savannah Williams
emy JV softball team suffered one.
the first lost of the season to Miranda Wider
Trenton, 20-1. one; Copeland wal
The Lady Warriors now and had one run;
stand 4-1 on the season. walked one and
"We were playing in the Roccanti struck ou
rain and Trenton just overran
us.," said Coach Frank
Brown. '
"We couldn't get our of- .IJ. .L
fense started, but there is one
positive note, we get to play NOW AVAIL
against Trenton one more New PoolTa
time during the season. Balls Cl
Taryn Copeland served as Other Supp
the pitcher for the Lady War- Soft Drinks. Beer
riors. She gave up 14 walks, 850-668-7
nine hits. 1698 Village Square Blvd.
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Tigers Finish Third in

Lincoln Invitational


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School track team placed
third overall out of 10-12
schools, in the Lincoln Invita-
tional, Tuesday.
"We really ran our own
against the bigger schools,"
said Coach Harry Jacobs.
Daryl Young finished first
in the long jump with 22' 1"
and in the triple jump with 41'
9".
Jon Dady finished second in
the long jump with 20' 6" and
the triple jump with 41' 7". He
also finished second in the
high hurdles with a time of
15.2 seconds.
Tremaine Parker finished
fifth overall in the high hur-
dles with 16.0 seconds.
In the 4 xl relay, the team of
Dady, Young, Parker and
Desrick Jones finished third
with 43.6 seconds.


In the 200 meters, the Ti-
gers took second, third and
fourth place, all with the same
time, 23.0 seconds. The
-JCHS' runners included Dady,
Jones and Young.
In the 100 meters, Young
took sixth place with 11.4
seconds.

Babe Ruth
Registration
Saturday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Registration for Babe Ruth
baseball will be held 9-11
a.m., Saturday at the big pa-
vilion at the Recreation De-
partment.
Coach Leroy Mobley said
the league is for boys ages 13-
15, and encourages all return-
ing players to come out and
sign up with the league again
this year.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Diamonds and the
Monticello Demons softball
teams, begin practice, 4 p.m.,
Sunday at the Recreation
Park.

Coach Roosevelt Jones said
he is looking forward to a


gLood season this year, for
both teams,
lie added lhat there are six
new giris on the Diamond
team, and four new boys on
the Demons teamn.
Jones said that he was also
looking for an assistant coach
and lie invites all males and
femnales interested in playing
to come out to the park Sun-
day.


Diamonds Post Roster


Coach Roosevelt Jones has
reports the roster for the Lady
Diamonds softball team.
Returning to the field this
year are Keandra Seabrooks,
Chandra Tucker, Nakidra
Thompson, Shanice Brooks,
Letita Fead, Valerie Robert-
soil.
Lisa icad, Tashlia P;ev,nu


Nilkki Cook, Tonya Young,
IFclice McDanici, Cynthia
Steen, Kisia F lill, Alanna An-
derson, ... Parrish,
Shondai arkier.. and Diane
}loberis on.

.lonis said he also expects
siX ew gfiris to join the team


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Howard Middle School

Reports Honor Roll


Howard Middle School re-
ports the Academic Honor
Roll for the fourth six week
grading period.
Students appearing on the
roll and their grade levels fol-
low:
In grade six, on the "A"
honor roll are Emily Howell
and Tre'Von Youman.
On the A/B roll are: Dakota
Allen, Haylee Bell, Alexus


Chambers, Branden Hill, Bri-
onna Jones, Lanesiya Massey,
Denzel Whitfield, Simone
Williams, and Shanice Young.
In grade seven, on the A/B
roll are: Jasmine Graham, Ze-
leka Houston, Sara MacDon-
ald, Leroy Montgomery, and
Brandon Whitfield.
In grade eight, on the A/B
roll are: Paris Littlejohn, and
Amber Weinrich.


240 Animals Adopted


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Volunteers and Humane
Society Board members
found homes for some 240
animals in 2005.
In related matters, Shelter
Operations Director Tina
Ames said that during the
course of the year, 181 ca-
nines came through the shel-
ter.
Of those, 127 were adopted,
50 were euthanized either due
to severe illness, aggression
or overcrowding, five were
claimed by their owners, and
three were released to other
organizations to find them
homes.
Felines coming through the
shelter last year numbered
165. Of those, 113 were
adopted, 23 were euthanized
either due to severe illness,
being feral and aggressive, or
due to overcrowding, another


113 were humanely released
rather than being euthanized
due to being feral.
They were medicated
spayed/neutered and turned
over to homes for use as barn
cats.


JUDI PERSONS as ClaraBelle, the New Orleans Clown,
entertained the crowd at Mardi Gras Friday night.
(News Photo)


NOW.
Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE.: The Estate of CATHRYN
B. HICKS, Deceased NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION 06-23-PR The
administration of the Estate of
CATHRYN B. HICKS, Deceased is
pending in the Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is:
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida 32344. The
names and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that


LEGALS:,' :,
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIM,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this Notice is
February 22, 2006. Dated this 15th
day of February, 2006. Brain T.
Hayes Fl Bar. I.D. #0034687; P.O.
Box 1275, Monticello, FL 32305,
850-997-2065. Attorney of
Co-Personal Representatives.;
Oliver J. Hicks, as Co-Personal
Representative of Estate of Cathryn
B. Hicks Case No.06-23-PR
2/24, 3/3/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
Number: 06-26-PR; IN RE:
ESTATE OF DOLLIE MAE
MALLOY, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of
DOLLIE MAE MALLOY, deceased
File Number 06-26-PR is pending in
the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Jefferson


LEGALS
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida 32344. The name and
address of the personal
representative and of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
credits of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice on March 3, 2006.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. BUCKINGHAM
BIRD, P.O. Box 247 Monticello, FL
32345, 850-997-3503, FL Bar ID
#006176: Harold Malloy, 5055 N.
Jefferson Street. Monticello, Florida
32344
3/3, 3'10/06, c
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC.
PLAINTIFF VS. VELCIA J.
SMITH, IF LIVING, AND IF


jR\^ AZAcit


&


VIRGINIA G. BLOW
Broker Associate


Kelly and Kelly


850.509.1844 P"ropoer
Aoi ,thre'e ra" ma' .. ,Tb- eywe,
Satisfied 'Buyer avud'eUer
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL LAND
TOP ASSOCIATE PRODUCER PAST FOUR YEARS
$$$$MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR PRODUCER $$$
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


SABOR REALESTATE


H5ea MES--


MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor
SALES ASSOCIATE


850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE YOU DESERVE / PEOPLE You TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT ~ LOTS ~ ACREAGE


WACIHOVIA
Timbre Denmark
Mortgage Consultant
Wachovia Mortgage Corporation
FL1925
1997 Capital Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: 850-320-1094
Fax: 850-920-1089
timbre.denmark@wachovia.com


Our market is active! I have buyers! If you're thinking
of selling, now's a great time. In fact, I'm working
with quite a few qualified buyers, some even have
cash right now. Call me today for a free, no-obligation
market analysis of your acreage or home. May I put
my track record of success to work for you?

Lynette C. Sirmon, Realtor Associate,
R. Winston Connel/, Realtor
850-933-6363, 850-997-4780
or after hours 850-948-5000


Qot

Thinking about buying
specialists at SouthVest Land Group,
service and a friendly, no-pressure atmos


Sellers


- All we do is Il
backseat to houses
use maps and exhibit


Buyers Whether it's a
recreational retreat
perfect property.
Contact us today for a confidential d
Simply call or send us an e-mail me
look forward to hearing from you.


850-906-001
Office


Land?

or selling land? Contact the land
Inc. We can assist you with professional
sphere.
and. Your property doesn't take a
or anything else. We'll take photos and
ts to highlight your property for buyers.

single lot or large acreage, a
or timber tract, we can help you find that

discussion regarding your real estate needs.
message at southvest99@aol.com. We


John A. "Al" Russell, Broker


JLaBmH Grou3p, Ine.


3837 Killearn Court, Suite A. Tallahassee, Florida


32;


350-508-4242
Cell

309


7f_ -


----~-- -~-~---~ ~'- s-~- --~-5~--~-~-~~--~ ~ZZ1~~--~-----~lu~ r ~--s _---~~i~s-,- --- --- ------- r ~L~ ~^V-r-- -


----b-- ~--s~-------t ---~


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2= 11II~lll
HIM I Mll~l.


-, .- I- I. -- ,- .. -,- I J.- ll -. -


morea a a a a a aIC







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006


LEGALS

DEAD, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND
ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST VELICIA J. SMITH;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VELCIA
J. SMITH, IF ANY; UNKNOWN
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS
WHO MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF
ROBERT C. LANGIS, A/K/A
ROBERT CHARLES LANGIS,


LEGALS

DECEASED; 123 LOAN, LLC;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Feb.
27, 2006 entered in Civil Case No.
05-155-CA of the Circuit Court of
the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
JEFFERSON County, St.
Augustine, Florida I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the NORTH DOOR of the
Courthouse at the JEFFERSON
County Courthouse located at
County Courthouse, Monticello, Fl


Your dedication to the road is why millions of Americans have food on their
tables and clothes on their backs.
You deserve the best company and the finest compensation
the industry has to offer.
* Experience rewarded but not required
* Company-paid CDL training for qualified candidates
* $34,500-$57,500 (depending on experience)
* Immediate benefits for experienced drivers
* Sign-on bonus may apply
With Schneider's benefits and your dedication, the sky is the limit. i -" -
Apply Online @ schneiderjobs.com
Or call 1-800-44-PRIDE (1-800-447-7433)
SCH 'EIDER.


LEGALS

in St. Augustine, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on the 23rd day of March, 2006
the following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 2 AND 5
OF NOBLES ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO A
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF
THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT
BOOK B, PAGE 19 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY EXPRESSLY MADE
Dated this 27th day of February,
2006 Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of


LEGALS

the Circuit Court; The Law Office
of David J. Stern, P.A., Attorney
For Plaintiff; 801 S. University
Drive Suite 500; Plantation, FL
33324, 954-233-8000;
0542873(GMAP); In accordance
with the Americans with disabilities
act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation should
contact Court Administration, at
the Jefferson County Courthouse at
850-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
3/3, 3/10/06, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on March 13,


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,-Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


LEGALS
2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce, 420 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at


LEGALS
such meeting or hearing he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made
which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based. For information
contact the Jefferson County
Planning Department at 445 West
Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, Fl
32344, telephone 850-342-0223.
3/3, 3/10/06, c


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.'
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites, <
S family reunions, parties
Events and Types


B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing



Brad McLeod '
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: 510-0346
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: '997-3091
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


o Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


.997-0039 Lic.& Insured


Ca lij s Ssny


Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764
Fax 850-997-8388


Register's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Lawn & Landscaping
.- ----_---- -------
SMention This Ad & receive
S A 10% Discount
---11025 East an ---- 877-4550
11025 East Mahan ~ 877-4550 -


LA CHIUTA



*nimerock
--Clay :
.Sand ...
*Top Soil


Craig
Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337


997-6788


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior ~ Exterior
Lie. & Ins. #4676








Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TaksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D. H. Lie. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


We accept all manufacturer coupons.


1-10 Chevron


Swisher Sweet Sale
Flavor Cigar Tubes .59 each
(Reg.. grape, peach, strawberry)
Honey Kings Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pkg.) $2.49

Flavor Blunts 5pk $1.89
Little Cigars Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. or $8.89 Carton
Cigarillos Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.89
Blunt Cigars Buy One Get One Free
(2-5pks.) $1.99
Kayak $1.1 clan $5.19 tube (5 cans)


9


Three Sisters

MYSTERY CHEF


LINDSAY DAVIS
OF
GREAT ADVENTURE OUTFITTER
MARCH 9, 2006
Certified Angus Beef


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc#1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings


PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711


E ir


Call Andy Rudd For


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consulations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917'
*Residential Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


-E CH.
ress


Appliance Service *Lice
*Licer
Needs @ Resi

997-5648 FREE ES


Since 1977
ised *Bonded *Insured
!ential & Commercial
TIMATES 997-4100


- Ia s '


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-


LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

BIG BEND
COMMUNICATIONS Co

997-4150


Sim-
ply
the




Best! REALTOR


NEED HELP?

GRAB THE LINE
Ne have over 40 years of answers about
neuromuscular disease. Getting help couldn't
?e easier. Our lifeline is toll-free.


1-800-572-1717
Nww.mdausa.org


Muscular Dystrophy Association


MONTICELLO'S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience -
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, Keaton Tire Repair
Sales Service Installation Change Outs CERAMIC TILE CARPET VINYL, "Servce Is Our Business on and off the Road"
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
Residential Commercial LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
54 Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lament, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


B77-7222


1'yrone Davis Very large selection to choose from
Sales Manager A All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
pl t, or rag 6000 (PENT BI (PEiT,
pus fi I t ice
la fve A 1e iT DOMrT MAMR
veryone,


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006 PAGE 13


HELP WANTED SERVICES


The Jefferson County Public
Library is accepting
applications for a Children
Librarian Specialist. This
person creates implements and
presents agency and community
programs for children ages 1-12
years of age and child related
programs for parents,
caregivers and teachers.
Provides reference and reader's
advisory services and interprets
policies and procedures of the
library. Develops and maintains
a reference and circulation
collection for juvenile patrons.
The job requirements include
experience working with
children, an ALA accredited
degree in library science. Any
equivalent combination of
training and experience which
provides the required
knowledge, skill and abilities
may be considered. Hours and
salary are negotiable.
Applications are available at the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, or may be obtained
online at the Jefferson County,
Florida website:
www.Jefferson.lib.fl.us. Position
is open until filled. Mail
applications to Jefferson County
Public Library, 375 South
Water Street, Monticello, FL
32344. Telephone:
850-342-0205. Contact person:
Linda Hamendani, Library
Director.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, c

Wood Worker Wanted: Basic
experience with wood working
Tools Required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
2/22, 24, 3/1. 3, 8, 10, c
Inspector Position: High School
graduate, minimum five years
experience as a Florida State
Registered or Certified
Contractor, or a One and Two
Family Dwelling Certificate.
Must be able to quality for a
Provisional Inspector
Certificate. Applications are
available online or at the
Building Official, Wallace
Bullock at 342-0223 ext. 104. or
visit the Jefferson County
website www.co.jefferson.fl.us
2/22, 24, 3/1. 3, c
Driver Covenant Transport.
Excellent pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers, O/O,
Solos, Teams, & Graduate
Students. Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now Available.
(888)695-7279 x19.
3/3, fcan
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn

SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten (@ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Handyman, Professional home
repair and cleaning. Drywall,
siding, gutter, painting, int./ext.
call 997-3587, 251-4575 cell.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quIL!' responses.
6/22, tfn
Peter Satellite -- Your Satellite
dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and
prompt service. We also offer
Go-Kart, utility trailers and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150
Old Lloyd Road, Monticello,
Fla. 850-997-3377
1/25 tfn, c
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb


the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. lHoodiacol consist of 3 key


ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

FOR SALE
Barnyard Roaming Rhode
Island Red Roosters $10
Purebred Limousin bull, born
7/04 Call 997-0901, leave
message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
pd
Dining Room 'Table Seat 6 &
China Cabinet Made from Red
Cherry wood $600 for both Call
997-8232.
2/24, 3/1. 3, 8, pd
Registered 6 years old dark bay
thoroughbred Philly $2000 Call
Mike 519-6506.
3/3, pd
Steel horse trailer 2 horse,
1960's, new axle, electronic
brakes, controller. Very
functional but needs paint and
fix up. $1200.
14' Tracker Jon Boat with
trailer. No motor. Good
condition. $900
'80s Craftsman 6" jointer
planer with motor and legs.
Heavy duty. Rarely used. $250
Briggs & Stratton 11 hp 4
stroke vertical mount motor. 7
years old. Rarely used $125
Wards PowerKraft 230 Arc
Welder with helmet and
accessories, $200
Simplicity front-tine geared
rotor tiller. Ran ;,. bui not run
in 8 years. As is. $95. All prices
firm 997-1886 before 9:00 p.m.
3/3, pd
Treadmill $500, Gas Grill with
side burner $25 (OBO) Call
997-4253

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980. 11/30,
Furnished downstairs efficiency.
Large bedroom, living room,
bath on 4 acres. Monticello 20
min. to Tally. $400 includes
utilities. 997-2422, 251-1108
3/3, pd(
2 bedrooms, I bath Mobile
home on Ashville Hwy. no pets,
deposit $350, Monthly $350,
850-997-5434
'/3,8 pd
One bedroom on acre. Partially
furnished, no pets, $575 per
month, credit check. 997-6991


REAL ESTATE GARAGE SALE


NEW HOME 1370 square
foot. 4 bedroom, 2 bath for
under $475/ month payments.
University Homes
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of
room! Buy for under $550 a
month. 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If
you have enough money for a
deposit on an apartment you
can probably own your own
home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS -
Only 2 homes left, must go! Save
$$$$ Call today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn

GARAGE SALE
Monticello Saturday 9 a.m.
until, 295 East Palmer Mill
Road, INSIDE. Collectibles,
China, Cookware, Antiques,
Furniture, Trunks, Artwork,
Sporting Goods. Follow Signs.
3/3, c


-V.


Saturday March 4, 8-4, 2421
West Capps, Monticello, corner
of 27 & 259. Look for signs.

WANTED
Quest's End, 1988 D/W on
small lot, 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
porches, garage/workshop, price
reflects a few needed repairs,
$39,900 "As Is" N of Greenville,
R. Winston Connell, Realtor,
850-997-4780 or 850-933-6363
or after hours 850-948-5000.
A LITOMOTIVE
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tire, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book.
997-6806 Wilson Auto, LLC.

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


VIRGINIA G BLOW


L,,- Broker Associate
Aprl2,2006 850.509.1844
SPRING FRENZY SEASON...
GREAT TIME TO LIST YOUR IKUriK I T!
$115,000 3/2 Modular/3 AC, extras, Lloyd Acres
$129,900 3/2 HOME/lot, in town, like new, Martin
$129,900 2/2 HOME/2. SAC,wood floors & walls
$129,900 3/2 HOME/lot, hardwood floors, York
$163,000 3/2 HOME/1 AC, historic fixer upper
$295,000 Profitable 7 apartments, Hagan
$500,000 10,000 SF Bldg.,16 AC'S, Hwy. 90 E.
$622,000 9,470 SF COMMERCIAL BLDG
WILL LEASE
COLDWELL BANKER KELLY AND KELLYPROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding,
Read welding symbols and measuring. Standard AWS
Welding Test in Flat Position.

Applications available
Georgia Department of Labor
Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


Dental Coverage
Retirement
Disability Insurance
Educational Assistance


Uniforms

BENEFITS THA/TST7;BILIZE )YOUR FUTURE

Equal Opportunity Employer
Mail: PO Box 7750 Thomasville, GA. 31758-7750
.Phone: (229) 228-9780 Fax: (229) 226-2718


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that the School Board of J.efferson County, Florida, located at
1490 West Washington Street, Monticello, Florida 32344 will receive bids for the sale of
the following described property owned by the School Board of Jefferson County,
Florida: '.

OLD ADULT EDUCATION SCHOOL
700 EAST DOGWOOD STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA

PROPERTY APPRAISER PARCEL ID NUMBER
00-00-00-0370-0000-0101

This property is being sold- "as is" and no representations are made or implied as to
zoning, access, or its suitability for any intended or specific purpose. The parcel iy
situated in the City of Monticello in Jefferson County, Florida.

Bids will be publicly opened at 2:00 p.m. on March 7, 2006 in the board room of the
district office. No bid will be opened if received after 2:00 p.m. Please mark on'the
envelope, "Old Adult School Sale Bid Opening 2:00 p.m. March 7, 2006."

The School Board of Jefferson County reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
By:
Fred Shofncr, Chairman
Jefferson County School Board

Phil Barker, Superintendent
Jefferson County School Board


(VOwn Your Own Piece of Monticello
6.12 Acres Secluded lugh tad dry properly
, I t I' I iv on Barnes Rd Small pond, mruxed w~iod &
pasture $ 85,680
S:: Large StMocked Pond- Pretty 6.42 acres on i'
Walus/tigtonlSt Dirt Driv, Deep well septic
,,....x). wd r pole $ 89,880
Perry Lotcatlon Hunter Ridge Subdivision 7 40 acres
SBeaitifid lugh & dry, vervprivale Pasture,
pecaI groves. 2 Lots Available
11.68 Acres on 19N- Greal location, zoned
S mixed use busuiessreesidential. Small poild t
back mzd septic lank $ 233,600
t 16.501 Ac. Lake Miccosukee Beamilfid wa-
Serfronl property $ 24 7,500


S Oa~uracrrrf~~o flo ~u~un es O O


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house w/
bath, big shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100
pecan trees and a nice pool a real dream for
a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 /acre.

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000


Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


I_





?AGE 14. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 3, 2006


....--- -- ------


RESEN.- 'iNtG.
PRESEI ING...


Our Welcome Mat to Your Family!


9. A0M' jULAL4 m R..mL U
You will Receive Employee Pricing

on ALL New Ford Vehicles

No oGaskises. N-.' G.10".sae KO
+9


All Vehicles Will Be Clearly Marked with Our New Pricing!


V6, AC, PS, AM/FM/CD, 4 Dr
.0,925.00 Original Price

-1,000.00 Rebates
PPlus.., I TPa~mnct FREE
-14,995 from rceC


ToIv Saee...


Stklf# 26()i1271'


.27,870.00
-1,515.65


-"3,000.00 Rebates
823,354.35 Pls...
You Salve... s


Stk# 260054J
1" PPayment FREE
from F\MCC
S.51,5.65


All prices plus tax, title & state fee. Plus Dealer fees.
Rebutes apply where applicable Not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures fit illustlation onlv.


Offer v 1od7 Thi ,.E d of i rch 2,0.06
'1liis Sale Excl\udIcs Only Harley Davidson F150 Models
SHOP ONLINE AT WWW.TIMBERLANDFORDCOM
850-584-6178 *t 800-768-4589
24'4 1South ir mH Butler Padirway Pcivry, IL


U


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Original Price


mirl.ilanmd Fmnily Discount


$.5v930.