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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00110
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 1, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00110
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text

SLBRARY OF FLORIDA HIST'D:Y
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611



Firms New Comp

Helps With Classes
Taxes Set At Libl

Editorial, Page 4 Story, Photos, P


uter


rary

Page 6


Rotary y oIf
Tournament;
March 6

Story, Page 8


Audience

Enjoys
Orlando Opera

Story, Page 12
II


Wednesday Morning J






Monticel lo


138TH YEAR N017 50 CENTS


ewSs

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


N Mardi Gras Gets





I 'Largest Turnout


ERLINDA BLAKE sports one of the
downtown Mardi Gras. (News Photo)


many masks and beads on display at Friday's


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

, Color, beads, feathers, boas.
music. food and good old
fashionedd family fun were
plentifill during Frida, night's
'Home To\\n Gel Dow n Mardi
Gras.
SOfficials report the largest
(umber of participants in the
Home Tov.n Get Do\\n, to
date, estimating some 800 to
1,000 people in attendance.
King Rex, Dan Schall and
his queen, Alana Chambers
were announced at 6 p.m..
though the event began at 5
p.m.
When Schall proclaimed the
official opening of the Mardi
Gras, beads and other NMardi
'Gras items were tossed from
'the ztationarn float to \ounr
,and old alike, as they called
out with outstretched hands.
Throughout the evening,
children were dancing in the
street with each other and
with their parents to the sound
of Blind Dillon and the \\il-
Ion.
The aroma of Cajun food
permeated the air as the many
attendees strolled from shop
to shop and checked out
events along the way.


Plenty Of

Beads, Boas
The atmosphere was
festive, as attendees were
adorned with beads, feathers,
boas and a plethora of color-
ful and creative masks.
Serving as the judge for the
mask contest was Gretchen
Avera, colorfully adorned in
her own Mardi Gras attire,
chose Debra Padgett, of La-
mont, the winner for her
fancy homemade mask.
She won a Mardi Gras gift
basket which contained such
items as King cake mix,
Mardi Gras items, Zateran's
red beans and rice mix, Cajun
seasonings and the like.
Items donors and winners
included; John Hawkins,
camping chairs, donated by
State Farm Insurance; Gloria
(last name not available), gift
certificate to Sage; Tom
Kline, gift certificate to John-
son's Meat locker; cowboy
hats from Waukeenah Fertil-
izer went to Beth Kinsey and
Kenneth Aman; Jeanette Na-
tivo, a gift certificate to Mi-
lady's; and Chuck Chambers
and Nancy Stover each won a
gift certificate to Great Ad-


venture Outfitters.
Also, Beth Kinsey and
Brenda Bautista each won a
gift certificate to Courtyard
Cafe; Roger Stadin, Jeanette
Sanders and Beulah Brinson
each won rentals from Movie
Gallery; "K" won a gift cer-
tificate to Rancho Grande.
Ulmer Miller won a gift, cer-
tificate to Southern Friends;
Andrea Hereth won a refin-
ishing provided by .Image An-
tiques; Tom Kline won a gift
certificate to Coffee Break;
and Colleen Campbell won a
gift certificate for Decorator's
Warehouse.
Also, Angie Hurtado won a
gift certificate to Bush Baby;
Nancy Stover won tanning for
a month at Town Square Tan-
ning; Dorothy Shepherd won
a planter; Larry Casey and
LoupeW,,,eac.,won .a vase;
and B."J. Babb won01 a golf
plaque, each provided by
Jackson's Drugs.
Also, (first name not avail-
able) Fountain won a gift bas-
ket from Monticello Florists
and Gifts; Fran Hunt won a
bird feeder from Edenfield's
Hardware; Bruce Leinback
won a cordless drill from
Badcoc; Mary Ann (last
name not available) won an
(See Mardi Gras Page 2)


Small Dustup May Reveal


Larger Underlying Issues


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Itaff Writer

The expressed desire of a
commissioner to replace his
appointee on the Planning
Commission sparked a some-
what lively discussion in an
otherwise ho-hum recent com-
mission meeting.
The discussion, in fact, may


lead to the board changing the
way it appoints Planning Com-
mission members. Or not.
At the least, the discussion
prompted commissioners to
schedule an April 20 workshop
to reevaluate the appointment
process.
Commissioner Gene Hall
triggered the discussion when
he expressed a desire to re-
place one of two volunteers


who serve on the Planning
Commission for District 2. All
told, the Planning Commission
is composed of 10 members,
two each from each district.
The way the code reads,
planning commissioners serve
two-year terms at the pleasure
of their respective county com-
missioners.
In actuality, however, plan-
ning commissioners, generally
serve until they tire of the re-
sponsibility, move away, or
run for office (at least four in
recent memory have used the
Planning Commission as a
springboard to elective office).
Rarely has a planner been re-
placed because his or her term
has expired or because the in-
dividual has run afoul of the
appointing commissioner's
views (only two examples,
come to mind during the last
15 or so years).
Inertia (an object in motion
tends to stay in motion, scien-
tifically speaking; or more pro-
saically, the old 'why fix it if it
ain't broke' syndrome) ac-
counts in large part for the lon-
gevity of planning commis-
sioners' terms.
Underlying and partly ex-
plaining that inertia, of course,
is the alleged difficulty that
county commissioner say they
have in finding volunteers to
serve in the position.
So the reality is that many
county commissioners have in-
herited the appointees of their
predecessors and have gener-
ally stuck with them.


* Case in point: Bill Tellefsen,
who has been on the Planning
Commission since 1987 and
has weathered three commis-
sioners. Well, going on three
commissioners, let's say.
Tellefsen is one of District 2's
appointees, along with Wendy
Moss. Tellefsen is also the in-
dividual that Hall supposedly
had in mind to replace, al-
though Hall has since report-
edly indicated that he will not
proceed with the action.
That, however, is not the
way Hall left the matter at the
Feb. 16 commission meeting.
At that meeting, Hall prom-
ised to take into consideration
his fellow commissioners' ex-
pressed concerns about his
proposal to replace one of his
two appointees. But he also
made it clear that he reserved
his right to decide independ-
ently of the commission what
he would do.
The way the commission dis-
cussion went, commissioners
Skeet Joyner and Junior Tuten
expressed concern about the
idea of replacing a Planning
Commission member without
the review 9f the board. At the
least, Joyner said, the board
should review all the planners'
terms, so that it could make a
more informed decision.
Joyner even went so far as to
suggest that in the future, ap-
pointments should perhaps
have to carry board consensus,
given that a planning commis-
sioner's decision had implica-
(See Small Dustup Page 2)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Twynetta Howard, of Jeffer-
son Elementary School was
named District Teacher of the
Year, Friday.
She was surprised in her
classroom by Superintendent
Phil Barker and representatives
from the District Office, and
presented with a plaque pf rec-
ognition, balloons and a bou-
quet of flowers.
Howard has taught at total
of 18 years, five of them at
Jefferson Elementary School,
where she is currently teaching
second grade.
She holds a bachelor's de-
gree in Education, with a ma-
jor in Early Childhood
Education.
Howard is certified to teach
primary and elementary educa-


HOWARD
tion.
Howard is known for her ex-
pertise in the classroom and
her ability to relate to her stu-
dents.
She considers her greatest
accomplishment to be: "My
students are eager to come to
school, and they express how
fun and exciting learning is in
my classroom.


THE HISTORIC City Hall building will be getting a new
coat of paint and have other restorative work done in
the near future. (News Photo)


City Hall May Go For

Painted Lady Look


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Don't be surprised if the his-
toric City Hall building fore-
goes its bland white coloring
and takes on a more colorful
look in the future.-- something
along the lines of one of those
Victorian homes known as
Painted Ladies.
City Clerk Emily Anderson
informed the City Council re-
cently that she has been pro-
ceeding with research on the
painting of the building, long a
council goal.
Anderson said she first


sought the advice of the Color
Doctor, who suggested a cer-
tain palette of colors following
his review of the building's
history and architectural style.
Subsequently, Anderson
sought the opinion of an expert
with the Department of State,
Bureau of Historic Preserva-
tion, who independently
"picked the same colors that
the Color Doctor picked, right
down to the exact shades."
Anderson said the individual
at the Department of State sug-
gested that the city hire an ar-
chitect to oversee the painting
project. Although the hiring of
(See City Hall Page 2)


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Twynetta Howard Is

Dist. Teacher Of Year


I


II










PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006


,iP
N.


More Money Found


To Extend Bike Trail


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


-. ~-..
-i- .. 'ad ^.;.'. -_ ---- -- --.-- -

THE PAVED PORTION of the bicycle trail currently ends at the Chase Street
The new addition is expected to, push the paving to Martin Street. (News Photo)


Small Dustup May Reveal


(Continued From Page 1)
tions for the entire county.
This, in fact, would be a
new wrinkle in the process. In
the past, county commission-
ers have appointed Planning
Commission members without
the need for board affirmation.
The only time that appoint-
ments have required board in-
put has been when a particular
commissioner wanted to ap-
point a person outside his dis-
trict.

County Attorney Buck Bird
made the point that while it
was true that planning com-
missioners served at the pleas-
ure of commissioners, it still
behooved commissioners to re-
appoint or dismiss planners at
the conclusion of the latter's
two-year term, not arbitrarily.
Under normal circumstances,
Hall's wanting to make his
own appointments to the Plan-
ning Commission would not
have warranted much discus-
sion.

As citizen Dick Bailar
pointed out -- weighing into
the discussion -- if commis-
sioners' appointments were to
require board approval, it
would dilute the democratic
process.
Elected officials, Bailar said,
presumably carried the voters'
mandate into office, and
hence, their appointments re-_
flected that mandate. Ham-
stringing commissioners with


Mardi Gras
(Continued From Page 1)
emergency roadside kit from
Capital City Bank; artwork
wihh mats provided by South-
ern Friends were won by
David Taylor, Dan Morris,
Gloria Barwell and Marga-
ret Boatwright.
Nell Bellamy won a pocket
calculator from Monticello
Printers; B. J. Babb won an
oil change from A-Tech; the
two 30-minute fly-overs of
Jefferson County for two pro-
vided by Armis Penton, were


the need for board approval
would in effect thwart voters
wishes, Bailar said.
With respect to Tellefsen and
Hall, recent events may have
put the two out of step. Tellef-
sen, for one, has found himself
in the minority on several re-
cent high-profile issues involv-
ing Comprehensive Plan
amendments.
Specifically, Tellefsen has ar-
gued against amending the
plan to allow high-density uses
in traditionally agricultural ar-
eas, especially when more suit-
able high-density areas already
exist.
Tellefsen, moreover, .has
taken his arguments before the
County Commission when the
Planning Commission has rec-
ommended approval of such
amendments. Speaking as a
citizen, Tellefsen has argued
against the recommendation of
the very board he chairs.

Ironically, Tellefsen is possi-
bly the only Planning Com-
mission member with a bona-
fide planning background.
Even so, his views more and
more have been in the
minority.
True, these views have made
him popular with those citi-
zens who are opposed to what
they allege to be unmitigated
development. Conversely, the
same views have made him
unpopular with those who see
growth as a positive develop-


Turnout L
won by Fran Hunt and Sandy
Swords; Mike Henry won a
wooden bowl, stand and tongs
donated by Long Branch
Cabinets; Jennifer Foskey
won a Mardi Gras flower ar-
rangement and red Antherium
plant from Gelling's Florist;
Tracy Jackson won a gift bas-
ket from Snapdragon; "K"
won a turkey fryer from
Southeast Propane; and Lee
Terzis, Danny Lee and Den-
nis Byrd, each won a Satsuma
tree from Abbott's Nursery.


~-.r t
..i -
I-


'"
h.-,
in:

i -r-_
.1
*rs~Si':-i~i ~'
s


ment.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin,
for one, has publicly decried
the fact that Tellefsen would
speak out against the Planning
Commission's recommenda-
tion.
Certainly, Tellefsen's views
have put him at odds with
Hall, who has consistently
voted for approval of the
Comp Plan amendments, stat-
ing that development is needed
to bring back jobs that ceased
to be when former agricultural
industries here stopped being
viable.
It used to be that Planning
Commission meetings were
low-key and poorly attended
affairs in the 80s and early 90s.
when the group was formulat-
ing the Comprehensive Plan.
Then came the long and pro-
tracted fight over Texaco and
Colonial's Pipeline, Company
proposal to place a fuel termi-
nal in Lloyd and run a petro-
leum line across the county.
That controversy, in fact,
brought the Planning Commis-
sion into high profile, a situa-
tion that has only increased as
zoning and land-use issues be-
come ever-more controversial.
This latest dustup, while in-
significant on the surface, is
part of a greater struggle tak-
ing place between opponents
and proponents of growth.
On the one level, it's politics
as usual. On another, it's a
symptom of the county's grow-
ing pains.


largest
Coordinator Ericka Imbru-
none expresses appreciation
to Farmers and Merchants
Bank, Danny Lee of Danny's
Collision, Gail Joubert, Steve
Walker, and all donors, coor-
dinators, volunteers and resi-
dents who came to the event.
"A special thanks goes to all
involved for making this a
huge success," said Imbru-
none. "We are going to have
Mardi Gras again next year
and it will be bigger, better
and more spectacular event."


Red Cross Warns Of Tornadoes


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Chris Floyd, emergency
services director, Capital Area
Chapter of the American Red
Cross warns that March
brings tornadoes to North
Florida and that now is the
time to prepare for such
storms.
A tornado is defines as a
violently rotating column of
air extending from a thunder-
storm to the ground.
Tornados may occur any-
where at any time of the year.
A Tornado Watch occurs
when tornadoes are possible
in the area, and residents are
encouraged to remain alert
for approaching storms.
A Tornado warning occurs
when a tornado has been
sighted or indicated by
weather radar. In these cases
residents should move to their
preselected place of safety.
Stay informed of local
weather conditions by tuning
into local radio and television
stations or by listening to
NOAA Weather Radio for the
latest tornado watches and
warnings.
If a warning is issued, or if


threatening weather ap-
proaches. If in a home or
building, move to a pre-
designated shelter, such as a
basement.
If an underground shelter is
not available, move to an inte-
rior room or hallway on the
lowest floor and get under a
sturdy piece of furniture and
stay away from windows.
Also, get out of


automobiles. Do not try to
outrun a tornado in your car,
but leave it immediately. If
caught outside or in a vehicle,
lie flat in a nearby ditch or de-
pression.
For additional information
on preparing for as tornado or
to become a Disaster Resis-
tant Neighborhood call the
Red Cross in Monticello at
342-0211.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP


The Jefferson County Utility Development
Committee will conduct a public workshop
on Urban Services Areas.
The public is encouraged to attend this
meet on:

Thursday, March 2, 2006
at 6:30 p.m.

at the Lloyd Truck Stop
Conference Room

Dick Bailar, Chairman JCUDC


Bicycling and walking en-
thusiasts will be glad to hear
that the Ike Anderson Bicycle
Trail is being extended.
At least, the paved portion of
the trail is being extended.
Joe Miller, of George and
Hutcheson Engineering Inc. --
which is overseeing the multi-
million project -- reported to
the City Council recently that
$50,000 in uncommitted fund-
ing yet remained.
Miller said the money would
allow for the paving of an ad-
ditional quarter mile or less of
trail, bringing the paved por-
tion,as far south as Martin
Street.
Originally, the idea was to
pave the trail from Rocky
Branch Road on the north to
Nacoosa Road on the south, a
distance of about two miles.
But the rising costs of materi-
als, brought on by rising fuel
prices, forced officials to
downscale the project.
Miller said that besides the
paved extension, the $50,000
will allow for additional speed
bumps, signage and other
amenities to the trail.


PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH
*Adcr1 ,.rIolle Mcl.'.lr:I-.S A:: ,n?
&: Fal l Ear' Pro-.:i, LEat N N.'. 'r..ll, H.-... Ne."l 14 .


(850) 386-7553
Tallahassee
1882 Capital Circle, NE, Suite 103
Tallahassee. Florida 32308


The extension is supposed to
add another 45 days to the pro-
ject, so that the completion
date is now expected to be in
the middle Of May.
The City Council approved
the action with minimum dis-
cussion.
The bike trail is named after
former longtime Mayor Ike
Anderson, a colorful local
character who used to ride his
bicycle around town.
Department of Transportation
(DOT) rails-to-trails grants are
paying for the construction of
the trail, which has been more
than six years in the works.
The total cost of project, in-
cluding the design and engi-
neering phase, exceeds
$700,000.
The trail follows the path of


the old railroad. Initially, the
plan called for extension of the
trail to Drifton -- an idea that
some city officials haven't for-
saken completely.


City Hall
(Continued From Page 1)
the architect would add $4,000
to $5,000 to the cost of the
project, she said it was impor-
tant to preserve the building's
historic integrity.
Anderson said the project
would entail the removal of the
building's old paint and the re-
pair of a number of windows,
among other things.
The council gave Anderson
the okay to proceed with the
project, including the hiring of
the architect.


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(850) 997-8181
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O o



















Monticello Carquest, Inc


535 South Jefferson St.


Monticello, FL 32344

(850) 997-5207




To Our Valued Customers:



We plan to host a Grand Opening on Thursday,

March 2, 2006 for our new store. You and your staff

are invited to visit and tour our store. We will be

serving free hamburgers and hotdogs from 11:00 AM

to 2 PM. We will also be giving away door prizes.

Please mark your calendar and make plans to attend

this event. We are looking forward to serving Jeffer-

son County.


Thanks for your support,

Monty andH -iCdia Morgan


Bruce Ballister, Consultant ARPC


Park.
Park.









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006 PAGE 3


Bless The Beast Fundraiser


Grosses $15,000; Nets $12,000


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


NORMAN THAYER (Jack Williams) and Ethel Thayer
(Jan Rickey) portray the couple married 48 years in
"On Golden Pond," opening Friday at the Opera House.
Show dates are March 3, 4, 10, and 11, with a matinee
March 5.


'On Golden Pond'

Opens Friday Eve


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The curtain rises 8 p.m.
Friday on the Opera House
Stage Company's production
of "On Golden Pond."
The show continues Satur-
day and March 10 and 11.
Dinner is available, 7 p.m.,
before the Friday and Saturday
performances, but reservations
are required and should be
made now.
Prices are $25 for members
and $30 for others for dinner
and the show.
Show only tickets are $12
for members and $15 for oth-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) as part of its
Intelligence Transportation
Separation (ITS) project, has
installed devices along
city/county lines on US 19
South and US 19 North.
The device, standing ap-
proximately 10-12 feet tall,
have a camera on top, and
compression cables across the
roads.


ers.
Reserve now at 997-4242.
The menu includes a green
salad, Yankee pot roast,
mashed potatoes, with toll
house cookies and strawberry
shortcake for dessert.
A matinee is set 3 p.m. Sun-
day, March 5. Tickets are $8
for members, students, and
seniors, and $10 for others.
"On Golden Pond" is poign-
ant, yet comical, as the 48 year
long love story of Ethel and
Norman Thayer.
Throughout the evening the
couple delights in all the small
things which have enriched
their married lives.


DOT District Public Infor-
mation Director Tommy
Speights, explains that the
ITS devices are a part of the
DOT program being con-
ducted in Tallahassee and
surrounding areas, to accu-
mulate a variety of informa-
tion.
That information ranges from
calculated travel times
through particular areas to li-
cense plates.
Speights said that the de-
vices are not used to detect
speeders.


Join Sage Saturday


i Evenings For Our


Outstanding


s Wood-Grilled Filet


Mignon With All

The Trimmings ::



Every Saturday Night "O

S997-2341 "

1305 West Washington St.




IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


The highlight of the Hu-
mane Society meeting, Mon-
day, came when member
George Carswell reported that
the gross take of the Bless the
Beast fundraiser was $15,574.
He explained that after ex-
penses, the Society will have
raised between $11,000 and
$12,000 to be used towads
shelter operation costs.
President Caroline Carswell
added, "We so greatly appre-
ciate the help and support of
all of the community, those
who purchased tickets, and
donors," said Carswell. "The
event wouldn't have been a
success without them."
On another note, Caroline
Carswell suggested that mem-
bers check into grants for pos-
sible help in operation the
shelter and covering costs.


Topic Is

Internet

Dangers

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
has arranged with Sheriffs
Office Investigator Sally
Cole, to come and lead a class
on Internet safety on March 1.
"We feel strongly that our
students need to be well in-
formed of the many dangers
involved in Internet usage,"
said Principal Richard Finlay-
son.
"We have also asked Miss
Cole to also lead a parent
meeting on Thursday night, 7
p.m., March 2 in the audito-
rium.
He said that Cole will pro-
vide all interested parents
with the information neces-
sary to help keep their chil-
dren safe when online.


air purifier
It's simple. Look for the
ENERGY STAR" to reduce
your home energy use.
To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.

.( .

-' L -' -- --




NEED HEE
N E m 0 II E


George Carswell suggested
hosting dinner sales of
chicken, ribs and assorted
other menu items, eight times
per year on Thursday in the
FMB drive through after the
bank closes.
"We could charge $7-$8 for
a full meal and I can see us
selling 400-500 each time we
host the event," said Carswell.
Members agreed that it was
a very good idea, and also
suggested the possibility of


selling dinners during local
sporting events.
Carswell said he would
check further into the matter.
Shelter Operations Director
Tina Ames suggested hosting
a local authentic artifacts
show and fundraiser.
"I've seen hundreds of peo-
ple go through one hosted at
the Elk's Lodge in
Tallahassee, in just a few
hours time," she said. "Peo-
ple will drive for several


hours to attend such an event.
Caroline Carswell advised
Ames to get a plan together,
at which time, the Board
would vote on the matter.
Ames said she would do so
before next month's meeting.
In related news, adoption
booths are scheduled during
the Home Town Get Down,
Friday, and at Pestmart in
Tallahassee, March 5, and 19.
Ames stressed the need for
volunteers to man the bh;oths.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

"Each year following the
holidays we see an increase in
_caregiver breakdown," says
Catherine Arnold, Jefferson
County community relations
agent for Big Bend Hospice.
To shoulder the burden of
caregiver, it is critical to re-
member to take care of your-
self.
"As a caregiver, you must
never lose focus of what you
need to do for yourself to stay
healthy.
"Reach out. Don't be afraid
to ask for help," says Kim
Ryan, family support coun-
selor for Big Bend Hospice in
Jefferson County.
Caregiving can takes its toll.
Statistics show that of those
who provide 21 hours of care a
week for a family member, 61
percent have suffered from de-
pression.
"While caregivers are dedi-
cated to taking care of others,
they must not forget to take
care of themselves," cautions
Ryan.
The burnout of caregivers
has been called "'Second Pa-
tient Syndrome." This can be
dangerous, because if steps are
not taken, the caregiver may
develop a need for care as
much as the sick person.
Research identifies health
risks facing caregivers 'as: de-
pression, anxiety, substance
abuse, severe anger, cardiovas-
cular disease, cancer, and risk
of infectious diseases.
To protect themselves, care-
givers should follow these rec-
ommendations:
*Reward yourself with res-
pite breaks often. There are re-
sources to help provide you
time away from caregiving.


GRAB THE LINE
We have over 40 years of answers about
neuromuscular disease. Getting help couldn't
be easier. Our lifeline is toll-free.


1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


Trained volunteers are avail-
able to help Big Bend Hospice
patient caregivers, and family
support counselors can help ar-
range for respite breaks.
*Get professional help for
signs of depression. If you or
your friends notice signs of de-
pression, seek medical help
and support.
There is strength and relief
in knowing you're not alone.
Senior centers often offer care-
giver support groups.
*Accept offered help; seek
help when it is not. That in-
cludes being specific about the
kind of help you need. Many
want to help, they just need to
know what to do.
*Educate yourself about your
loved one's condition so you
can have educated conversa-
tions with doctors.


Rainfall in the county for
January was at 3.79 inches,
above the Jan. 2005 level of
1.28 inches.
Jefferson and Taylor Coun-
ties received the most rain in
January, of the 14 counties in
the Suwanne River Water
Management District, and are
above the district average of
3.29 inches.
Counties comprising the
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District include: Ala-


Know what to expect and
learn how to meet the chang-
ing needs of your loved one. If
the patient is in hospice care,
your care team can help you
learn about the disease
process, medications, and
comfort measures.
*Trust your instincts. They
are most often right. Don't feel
guilty for saying no or that you
have had enough. Listen to
your body. Know and honor
your limits.
*Protect yourself. Exercise,
sleep, eat right, and make time
for yourself. Be sensible. Care-
givers often do a lot of lifting,
pushing and pulling, protect
your back.
For more information on
hospice care, contact Arnold at
878-5310.


chua, Baker, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette,
Levy, Madison, Suwannee,
and Taylor.
Cumulative rainfall for the
past 12 months is 61.10
inches, compared to the
longterm average annual Dis-
trict rainfall of 55.5 inches.
At the Aucilla River in La-
mont, the level was 48.92
inches, versus 51.03 inches of
the average Janaury.


.5>;


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION
of the Big Bend
Serving Persons with Epi
Community Educatic
Diagnosis and Treatn


lepsy


)n
nei


! .2 .


\


V
*It



i[

f
-
., ,_ --.__.


: __ ^ "J,, t


Case Management
-Support,Groups


1108-B EPst-Park Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777
FXLXRDA DErARTMENT OF
EALT


Muscular Dystrophy Association


The Opera House Stage Company Presents


On Golden Pond

By Ernest Thompson

Friday and Saturday,

March 3, 4, 10 & 11

Dinner 6: 30 P.M -- Show 8:00 P.M.

Sunday, March 5 3:00 pcm.

/ / MDiner a nd Show


$25.0 members, $30.00 others
Show Only
2.00 embers, $15.00 others

va r ed for dinner. Call 997-4242 <
^ .i-/


Hospice Caregivers e


To Care For Themselve


January Rainfall e I4

2nd Highest In Bt 5


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DOTP Devices Set To

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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Firms Help


With Taxes


With the start of the New
Year also comes the start of a
new tax season.
And for many who owe back
taxes to the IRS or state, this
time of year can be specially
troubling and frustrating.-
However, when it comes to
unpaid taxes, there are times
when a "compromising situa-
tion" can actually benefit a
taxpayer.
In certain situations, the IRS
will accept what's known as an
Offer in Compromise, or OIC.
This is when it is unlikely
that a tax liability can be col-
lected in full and the amount
offered to the IRS by the tax-
payer reasonably reflects what
the IRS hopes to collect.
Typically, the person pursu-
ing this process is someone
who hasn't paid federal or
state income tax for several
years and may be facing an
immediate crisis involving
wage or bank account, garnish-
ments, foreclosures, levies or
liens.
Part of the IRS willingness to
accept a settlement offer is
based on an analysis of a per-
son's financial standing. It is a
complicated process that can
take up to 24 months or more
to resolve and involves a debt-
to-asset formula devised by the
IRS.
As part of the process, the
taxpayer must present current
versions covering the last three
months of the following:
Bank Statements,


Pay stubs
Life insurance statements,
Utility and phone bills,
Mortgage statements,
Car insurance,
Monthly auto payments,
Court-ordered payments
such as child support, and
The person's last filed tax re-
turn.
In fact, to be eligible, a per-
son must be current on all of
his or her tax returns.
Once an OIC is accepted by
the IRS, either installment or
lump sum payments are ar-
ranged.
Once the agreement is in
place, the taxpayer must keep
current on all payments.
Whole an OIC does offer
hope for those who qualify, it
can be a complicated process.
That's why many people turn
to professionals assistance
when filing and negotiating
such an offer.
The nation's tax resolution
firm's veteran ex-IRS agents,
CPA's, attorneys and Enrolled
Agents professionals who
specialize in tax issues and are
licensed to represent taxpayers
before the IRS.
There is a fee for what the
company refers to as its resolu-
tion or representation services.
Additional fees are charged
for tax preparation, audit rep-
resentation, use of the com-
pany's emergency team and
use of the Special Assistance
Group, which handles larger
and more complex cases.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 28, 1996
City Street Superintendent
Bobby Cardwell was charge
with assault and released on
his own recognizance Friday
for his alleged threat to County
Commissioner Clifford Brown
on Feb. 19.

The planned restoration of
Building A remains in limb.
That's the word from Building
Committee Coordinator Rev.
Carl Hanks.
Deloris Greene has pre-
qualified for election to the Of-
fice of Jefferson County Su-
pervisor of Elections.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 26, 1986
County and city officials are
becoming concerned about the
number of accidents that are
occurring near Jefferson Shop-
ping Center.

City dog and cat owners will
have until April 1 to have their
pets vaccinated and licensed.
That's the day the new animal
control ordinance becomes ef-
fective and the new law re-
quires vaccination of both
dogs and cats.
A health insurance plan for
all city workers is under study
by County Commissioners.


THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 26, 1976
Members of the Howard
Middle School Band partici-
pated in the Florida Band As-
sociation's annual solo and en-
semble contest Saturday at
Godby High School in Talla-
hassee.
The first meeting of the Jef-
ferson High School Principal's
Committee was held at 7:30
p.m. Thursday at the teacher's
lounge. Kelly Kilpatrick, prin-
cipal, pointed out some of the
difficulties the school faces in
trying to carry out the commu-
nity's wishes and philosophates
in just one area such has disci-
pline.
The Kindergarten Pod at Jef-
ferson Elementary School is
doing a unit on transportation
and communication.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 25, 1966
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wilder re-
ceived word this week that
their son Cadet Fred N. Wilder
was on the Commandant of
Cadet's List for the Fall Se-
mester at the Coastal Guard
Academy in New London,
Conn.
The baby boy was born to
Mt. and Mrs. Joe Markley at
Archbold Hospital on February
22. The newcomer has been
named Charles Cochran.


From Our Photo File





.





















THEN Fire Chief Larry Bates, Sr. demonstrated in Aug, 1990 to District school bus
drivers, how to extinguish a diesel fuel fire. (News File Photo)
drivers, how to extingiiish a diesel fuel fire. (News File Photo)


s9'-----~p I .m ___ ____r--~bb-' -


-- -Opinion & Comment


Lester Has Aging insights


Every now and then my
friend, Lester Ancient, calls to
grouse about getting older. He
fills me in on his latest aches
and pains and frets about what
won't be working next.
You may not know Lester,
but you know somebody like
him.
To get Lester juiced all you
have to do is ask him, "How
are you, Lester?" Then for the
next 30 minutes he will tell
you more than you want to
know.
My relationship with Lester
certainly has an up side be-
cause he frequently lets loose
with witticisms about the aging
process. I carefully note them
and now have a pretty fair col-
lection.
Here's what aging is all
about according to Lester.
*You get winded playing
chess.
*You begin to outlive en-
thusiasm.
*You look forward to a dull


Publisher's

Notebook


-Ron Cic/lan


evening.
*You join a health club and
don't go.
*Dialing long distance wears
vou out.
*Your back goes out more
than you do.
"Your knees buckle and your
belt won't.
*A fortune teller offers to
read your face.
*Your children start to look
middle aged.
*You just can't stand people
who are intolerant.


*You can't get your roc
chair going.
*Your mind makes con
your body can't meet.
*You regret all those
you resisted temptation.
*You sink your teeth
steak and they stay there.
*Your little black bool
tains names of doctors.
*The best part of the
over when the alarm goes
*You are not startled
somebody addresses y
"old timer."


S *Your favorite part of the
S newspaper istr30 years ago."
S *You feel like the morning
after but you haven't been
anywhere.
*You. remember that yester-
:,,. day was your wedding anni-
"') versary.
*You turn out the lights for
economy reasons not for ro-
Smantic reasons.
S *The little-gray-haired per-
__. son you help across the street
is your spouse.
kig *You walk with your head
high trying to get used to your
tracts new bifocals.
*You're 17 around the neck,
times 42 around the waist, and 100
around the golf course.
into a *You finally get to the top of
the ladder and find it's leaning
k con- against the wrong wall.
*You think about the hereaf-
day is ter a lot. For example, you go
off. out to the garage and wonder,
when "What am I hereafter?"
ou as Thank you, Lester for today's
column.


Hospice Services Available


BY CATHRINE ARNOLD
Big Bend Hospice

A woman called the other
day. She explained that they
live way out in the country on
the land where her family had
lived for generations. Her fam-
ily had the tradition of always
caring for their own at home,
in fact, most of her kinfolks
were buried right there. Her
some time, losing weight and
strength. She said that herl
other hardly ate or drank
enough to keep a bird alive.
Recently her mother had to be
taken the hospital 29 miles
away.
While nothing could be iden-
tified, the doctors there sug-
gested that the family should
look into hospice; care for her
mother. This had never crossed
her mind because her mother
was not terminally ill. The
doctors said there was no ill-
ness her mother just wasn't
thriving.


Like many, the called
thought hospice was only for
patients with illnesses like can-
cer and heart disease. She was
concerned that Medicare was
the only medical insurance her
mother had and the caller was
worried they could not afford
hospice care. She also wanted
her mother to be able to stay at
home.
1 explained to her that since
the early 1970s when hospice
care started in the United
States the criteria for hospice
admission have expanded. In
addition to accepting those
who are terminally ill, now pa-
tients with other types of con-
ditions that cannot be cured
geared to help patients stay in
their home if that is what they
chose and that if more help-
offered the Hospice House for
short-term critical care or res-
pite help.
To be eligible for hospice
care, the patient's physician
must certify that the patient is


terminal and has a life expec-
tancy of six months or less, if
the condition progresses on a
normal course.
However, Medicare recog-
nizes that it is sometimes diffi-
cult to make this projection
when the patient is clearly de-
clining but has no specific dis-
ease For this reason, Medi-
care created the diagnosis of
"Adult Failure to Thrive
Syndrome/Debility Ulnspeci-
fled" that allows for Medicare-
cover hospice care.
Medicare beneficiaries can
choose hospice as a benefit un-
der Part A (hospital insurance).
This provides medical and
support care directed toward
comfort, not cure. during the
last stages of life.
When hospice care is se-
lected, the patient and family
receive services from a team of
experienced professionals and
volunteers. Each patient is as-
signed a Big Bend Hospice
team that includes nurses,
home health aides. family sup-


port counselors, and if they
choose certified music thera-
pists, chaplains and trained pa-
tient volunteers.
The team under the direction
of the hospice medical director
and their personal physician
work to meet the patient's
needs. Patients or family mem-
bers can call Big Bend Hos-
pice anytime for guidance and
support.

Treating elderly in decline is
difficult. There is no identifi-
able cause for the
deterioration, especially for
those who don't have acute ill-
ness or severe chronic disease.
The patient ultimately looses
the will to eat and drink.
Physicians recognize the
"failure to thrive" diagnosis as
a significant point in the care
of the elderly that calls for
conversation with the family
about end-of-life-care alterna-
tives that can avoid treatments
that might only prolong suffer-
ing.
(See Hospice Page 5)


Tax Dollars Given Freely


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Freely throwing money
(your and my tax dollars) in
the direction of a national trag-
edy or disaster has become the
standard response from our
legislators in Washington. Not
all disasters, mind you, only
those that are of a high enough
profile to garnish a personal
and political benefit.
Following the attacks of


9/11. senators and congres-
sional members of both parties
fell all over themselves to raid
the U.S. Treasury (our money)
to make millionaires out of all
the surviving civilian families
of that tragedy. Yes. million-
aires!
Where is it written in the
Constitution that victims of a
national disaster are entitled to
receive millions of dollars of
other American citizens
monlev?
I don't want to sound harsh


but I grew up witnessing lots
of disasters in this country.
tornadoes. floods.
earthquakes, forest fires and
hurricanes, have always ruined
peoples lives and property.
Some were declared national
disasters so that low interest
loans could be made available
to assist victims in rebuilding
their property and lives. Not
government giveaways, but re-
payable loans.
I ver\ month \when I make
m11 house payment, it includes


a sizable amount of1 money to
cover the cost of insurance
should a disaster damage or
destroy my house. When I
lived in an apartment, I paid
for "renter's insurance" to
cover the loss of personal
property should anything hap-
pen to my apartment complex.
These are the actions of rea-
sonable and responsible
people.
Desperate to remain in
office, our national legislators
(having set the precedent on
(See Tax Dollars Page 5)


- ~L----Ls-l--------- --~---e~-----3~LCI"~"*a~189Fb"---- -


~~----~- I----as3b


~Plsap~s~a~E~rs~FR1S~~~&~E+lss~P~B~HP~


-------- --~-C------ ---~II----C~PC


All"













Letters...


Writer Laments Two More


Comp Plan Amendments


Dear Editor:
Just when you thought it was
over, here we go again with
more Comprehensive Plan
Amendments for the re-
zonings of agricultural land to
higher densities.
Two more applications will
be coming before the Planning
Commission on March 9th.
One application contains
two parcels totaling 48 acres
located on Ashville Highway.
The other application is a par-
cel of 160 acres located on Old
Tung Grove Road.
One of the owners involved
in these properties is John
Lewis. You might recognize
his name from the business
section of the Tallahassee
Democrat this past week.

He sold his (23) Super Lube
franchises and (5) Auto Super.
Service Centers for 19.2 mil-
lion dollars. He is also in-
volved with seven other part-
ners in real estate land devel-
opments.
We do not begrudge a savvy
business sense, but feel money
should not be made at the
County and taxpayers expense.


These land use changes will
allow the applicant to increase
the number of lots on the par-
cel. Seems the only winner
here is the developer, who will
make more money by selling
an increased number of lots on
the same amount of acreage.
The future problems will be
left for the County to solve.
The burdens occurred by this
type of unwarranted growth
will be placed upon the people.
It will affect everyone. You
can soon say good-bye to the
hometown atmosphere.
This is not an issue of prop-
erty rights. Anyone can use his
or her property as it is cur-
rently zoned on the Future
Land Use Map.
Anyone can develop his/her
property by following the
guidelines of the Comp Plan
and Land Development Code.
It is an issue of need and
purpose. It is an issue of not
abiding by the laws of our
Comp Plan, Land Develop-
ment Code, and Future Land
Use Map.
It is an issue of the Commis-
sioners lack of visioning to
properly manage County
growth.


We'd like to make sure that.
everyone understands that we
are not against development. It
is inevitable.
What we are against is the
re-zoning of lands to pacify,
developers in adding more
money to their pockets. We are
against unplanned and unman-
aged growth.
Last year the County Com-
missioners approved two
Comp Plan Amendments for
re-zonings. One located on
US 19 South and one located
in Waukeenah. The Commis-
sioners made a statement at the
meeting that these re-zoning
amendments would not set
precedence.
And yet here we are, with
two on the agenda and more
forthcoming in the next several
months.
So take the time to look at the
beauty surrounding our
County today. It won't be
long before there are high-
density subdivisions as far as
the eye can see. Pretty, huh?
We hope the Commissioners
enjoy the view!
Sincerely,
Don & Cindy Lee


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006 PAGE 5

Hospice Services Available


(Continued From Page 4)
Medicare hospice benefit
covers physician's services.
nursing care (including 24-
hour n-call), medical supplies
and durable goods related to
1-the end-of-life condition, and
.:outpatient prescriptions for
pain relief and management of
symptoms.
Short-term inpatient care for
acute situations is also covered


for stays at the Big Bend Hos-
pice's Hospice House in Talla-
hassee. Home health aide, so-
Hospice services can be ex-
tended beyond six months with
physician certification. Medi-
care must certify hospice serv-
ices, and a patient who chooses
hospice has the right to change
programs, if desired, once dur-
ing each benefit period. At any


time, a hospice patient has the
right to cancel hospice care
and return to regulate Medi-

care coverage.
Big Bend Hospice, the
hometown hospice for Jeffer-
son County since 1983, pro-
vides services to anyone
without regard to ability to
pay.


75% OFF
On Clearance Rack!


Resident Asks Why Speed,


Noise Laws Not Enforced


Dear Editor:
I presently live within the
city limits of Monticello. In
fact I believe I live as close as
you can get to downtown and
not be in the courthouse.
In the latter years of my life,
I have focused on molding
myself into a non complaining,
easy coping type of person.
That is until I chose to move
here to downtown Monticello

What I have come to realize
is that along with a rebellious
and defiant generation, comes
disrespect, disobedience, and
just pure old unruliness.
This can only come from old
sly foot (the devil) himself.
I am saying all of this be-
cause I sit here at home and


find it a challenge to simply
listen to some good old Gospel
of praise and worship music,
without being disturbed.
Bible study is a must in my
field, and sometimes it is
nearly impossible.
Where are the problems
coming from, will not be a sur-
prise to local citizens. But
whey this problem still exists,
is a big question that needs ad-
dressing.
Cars, trucks, and sometimes
motorcycles zoom up and
down this small city street, like
it is 1-75.
Some of them have exhaust
pipes that sound like the be-
long to Jeff Grodan, or maybe
Dale, Jr., on another competi-
tor of the Nextell Cup circuit.
Yes, the noise is a problem,


Tax Dollars Given Freely


(Continued From Page 4)
9/11) have not only dipped
into your precious tax dollars
to give millions of non-
accountable free bucks to New
Orleans victims of hurricane
Katrina, but even more fright-
ening, are poised to virtually
open the flood gates of tax-
payer cash to "rebuild" that
city! Some people say that it is
the "magnitude" of the disaster
that is uniquely significant and
important here.
Well the magnitude losing
ones home and loved ones in
an Iowa class four tornado, or


being crushed under some
overpass in a California earth-
quake is just as significant" to
those affected as any other
tragedy, including victims of
Katrina.
Does anyone remember the
DC8 crash in Newfoundland
that killed all 258 of our serv-
icemen returning from over-
seas? Their families only re-
ceived whatever insurance
compensation the members
had in force. The same was
true for the families of military
members killed in the Penta-
gon on 9/11.
If anyone deserves a "free"


but speed is my chief concern.
What if I pulled out of my
driveway without looking
three or four times? Why aren't
speed laws enforced?
Then the one that takes the
cake does concern noise. Most
nights after dark, when things
should be quieting down, my
windows begin to rattle like
there is a thunderstorm brew-
ing.
I believe, like me, most
Monticello citizens are tired of
the boom box virus.
Why is it that our lawmakers
spent thousands of tax dollars
to reduce boom box tolerance
from 100 feet to 25 feet, only
to have the problem getting
worse?
Your fellow citizen,
A. R. O'Quin

handout, our military forces
should come first! But don't
hold your breath, there is not
enough "political hay" to gar-
nish much financial support
from our thoughtful
legislators.
What sets New Orleans apart
from most other disasters is
that the victims are not poor
people in a trailer park destroy
,by a tornado in Illinois, but
predominately poor Afiican
Americans.
Our political leaders know
our national debt and treasury
can't withstand billions to "re-
build" a major city. More im-
portantly, it would be
(See Tax Page 6)


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts
the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin' cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles*, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)
r-
**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1 20 6


Lifestyle


Computer Classes


Offered At Library


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Library will offering
free computer classes begin-
ning 10 a.m. March 14.
Instruction to Microsoft
Word 2003-Class #1, will meet
10 a.m. 12 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Wednesdays during the
weeks of March 14 19.
Microsoft Word 2003 intro-
duces participants to all the ba-
sic features they need to create
professional looking reports,
documents, and correspon-
dence..
Topics covered include
Word basics, editing docu-
ments, formatting fonts and
paragraphs, creating basic ta-
bles, working with basic page
layouts, using proofing tools,
and working with Web fea-
tures.
SIntroduction to Microsoft
Excel 2003-Class #2, will meet
10 a.m. 12 p.m. on Thurs-
days and Fridays during the


weeks of March 16 31.
This class is an introductory
class for students who have lit-
tle or no prior experience with
spreadsheets.
Students will learn the anat-
omy of a spreadsheet and the
common usage of a spread-
sheet.
Using hands-on exercises,
students will create a simple
workbook, use the auto sum
feature, and create a simple
chart.
Prerequisites for these
classes are that students should
have a basic understanding of
the Windows operating system
and must be able to use a
mouse, and how to launch an
application, and create and
save files.
These classes are for serious
applicants only.
Space is limited to nine par-
ticipants per class.
Contact Angela at the Li-
brary 342-0205. '
There will be a $10 fee for
supplies.


Sommer Sneed To Marry

Nicholas Husbands


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Dr. and Mrs. Billy Ray
Sneed of Oxford, MS. an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter, Sommer Me-
lodi, to Nicholas Husbands,
son of Chuck and Linda Hus-
bands of Lloyd, FL.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of the University of Missis-
sippi where she received both
her Bachelor and Master of
Arts degree in English.
She is currently employed as
a teacher at Oxford High
School.
The groom-elect graduated
from the University of Missis-


sippi with a Bachelor of Arts
degree in History.
He is currently employed as
a kitchen manager at Ajax in
Oxford, MS., and will be en-
tering the University of Mis-
sissippi School of Law in
September.
The couple will exchange
vows in a garden ceremony at
Cedar Oaks in Oxford on Sat-
urday, May 27, 2006 with a re-
ception following.


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BEGINNING Computer students, L-R: Lee Anderson, Ju-
dith Jones, Mary Ann VanKleunen, Sarah Purvis, Rose
Mary Parker, June Campbell, Eva, Gloria Monroe, Cliff
Miller, Theodore Ball.


MICROSOFT WORD 2003, Class students, '-R:' Mary
Tainter, Ruth Martin, Mary Ellen Hinchliffe, Judith
Davis, Velma Hall, Shirley Rudd, Debra Jones.


Animal Shelter
Homes Of Mourning Anurntine Lited
nuarantine Lifted


L. Tracey Buzbee
L. Tracey Buzbee 65 retired
supervisor from Centel-Sprint
Telephone Co., after 38 years
of service, died Thursday, Feb.
23, 2006 in Tallahassee.
The service was at 2 p.m.
Saturday, February 25, 2006 at
Woodville United Methodist
Church with burial at Wood-
ville Cemetery. Family re-
ceived friends (viewing) from
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Febru-
ary 24, 2006 at Woodville
United Methodist Church.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Big Bend Hospice
1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tal-
lahassee, Fl. 32308 or Wood-
ville United Methodist Church
P.O. Box 687. Woodville, Fl
32362.
Mr. Buzbee was born in
Waukeenah, and was a resi-
dent of Woodville for 25
years. He was a member of the
Woodville United Methodist
Church. He was a heart trans-
plant survivor for over 10
years and was an avid fisher-
man.
Mr. Buzbee is survived his
wife Marie Smith Buzbee of
Woodville and also 3 daugh-
ters: Tracette Buzbee of Talla-
hassee, Tamara Buckhaulter
and husband Keith of Bain-
bridge, GA. Lucy Smith of St.
Petel brother Kennon Buzbee
of Monticello, 1 sister Karen .
Buzbee Walker of Monticello
3 granddaughters Audrey Run-
nells, Lindsey Buckhaulter and
Rebbca Buckhaulter all of Ba-
inbridge, GA, 2 grandsons
Traivs Smith of Woodville and
David Smith of St. Peteb2 great
grandchildren Patrick Smith
and Patricia Smith both of
Woodville.
Benny L. Waldrof
Benny L. Waldrof of Monti-
cello died February 25, 2006 at
his residence.
The service was held at the
chapel of Whiddon Shiver Fu-


neral Home in Thomasville,
GA., Tuesday, February 28,
2006 at 11 a.m. with burial at
Laurel Hill Cemetery in Tho-
masville.
Mr. Waldrof has been a resi-
dent of Thomasville for 35
years. Before retiring he wp-" a
TV Repairman in Monticello
owned and operated Rose City
TV and Repair. He was born
July 17, 1940 in Valdosta, and
later married Minnie Edenfield
Waldrof January 7, 1995 in
Monticello.
Benny Waldrof was of the
Baptist Faith.
He leaves other than his wife
Minnie E. Waldrof; Tracey
and Granville Knowles
(daughter & son-in-law) of
Monticello; Norman and Pam
Waldrof (brother & sister-in-
law) of Monticello; 3 grand-
children Emily, Amber and
Ashley Knowles all of Monti-
cello.
You may send a condolence
to the family at
widdonshiverfuneralhome.com
The family will receive friends
Monday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
at Whiddon Shiver Funeral
Home


v ww wmo-- m -


that the animals will live after
receiving the treatment."
Symptoms of Parvo include
vomiting, diarrhea, and blood
in the stool.



Tax Dollars
(Continued From Page 5)
absolutely insane and totally
irresponsible for the govern-
ment to establish such a prece-
dent for future major disasters.

Unfortunately for the rest of
America, any sensible politi-
cian willing to propose limited
spending on New Orleans and
its residents, runs the risk of
being labeled a "racist" and
committing political suicide in
today's environment.
Once again our politicians
are unafraid to demonstrate
fhlieir total lack of common
sense and ability to do the
right things for America, in fa-
vor of party politics and self
serving actions. Unfortunately,
we stupid citizens will have
amnesia when voting in No-
vember!


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has
lifted the quarantine at the
shelter, that had been placed
three weeks ago, due to a case
of Parvo.
"As of last Wednesday morn-
ing, it was back to business as
usual," said Shelter Caretaker
Cheryl Bautista.
"It takes Parvo about two
weeks to incubate and we ex-
tend our quarantines to three
weeks to be on the safe side,"
said Bautista.
Shelter workers have thor-
oughly cleaned and disin-
fected the area to stop the
disease.
Parvo is extremely conta-
gious, especially in younger
dogs and can be fatal if not
caught in the early stages of
the disease.
Residents are warned to vac-
cinate their animals against
the disease. "The key is vac-
cinating your animals," said
Bautista. "Otherwise the
treatment can be very expen-
sive and there's no guarantee


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research studies conducted by Jeannette Havlland-
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behaviors and even memory for both males and females," Jones salil. Jones found that the presence
of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaalton and positively affects social
behavior far beyond what is normally believed. Upon receiving a gift of flowers, the participants of
this study, responded with true smiles and reported positive moods that lasted for days. Womeg and
men were spontaneously given a flower while riding alone in an elevator. Both the women and men
who received flowers'demonstrated Increased eye contact In conversation, stood in closer proximity
to the researchers, and produced more and truer smiles than those who did not receive flowers.
"When it comes to receiving flowers, men and women are on the same playing field," said Jones. "It
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MONTICELLO. (FL) NEWS. WED.. MARCH 1, 2006 PAGE 7






S .i "';:.' .


Woman's Club Welcomes


Nine New Members


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Woman's
Club met for their February
meeting recently and wel-
comed nine new members to
the Club.
President Amanda Ouzts re-
lates that new members are al-
ways welcome.
A brief history of the club
which was organzied in Janu-
ary, 1916, was presented.
Ouzts reports that the Club
will extend its grounds im-
provement program to the
neighboring city park, upon
approval of the City Council.
The plan is designed to
make the park a pleasant and
fun place for families to visit.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

More than 6,492 services or
individual acts of caring by lo-
cal, Jefferson County agencies
have been made possible by
generous gifts through United
way of the Big Bend.
Nan Baughman and Sheriff
David Hobhs. county United
Way co-chairs, announce the
local key campaign contribu-
tors.
These include: Capital City
Bank, the Jefferson Senior
Citizens Center, Progress En-
ergy Services, and Sprint.
The agencies selected to re-
ceive the funds collected in-
cluded: 2-1-1 Big Bend, dial
211, 24-hour crisis, suicide
and HIV/AIDS' hotline;
Ability 1st, 575-9621, assis-
[ance ito iiLd. iduals 'with. d-
abilties;
Area Management Coalition
for School Readiness, 653-
3940, subsidized childcare for
children ages 0-5;
American Red Cross, 878--


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Xi Lambda Upsilon Chapter
of Beta Sigma Phi held an au-
Sution and raised $2,000 for the
County Relay For Life, at their
Feburary meeting, last week.
Meeting for dinner on Valen-
tine's Day, at Christ Episcopal
Fellowship Hall, members
found tables decorated with
bright, colorful camellias and
red candles with red hearts on
white table cloths.
The Invocation.was given by
Emily Walker.
Dinner was served buffet
style with ham, all the trim-


The possibility of the Club
placing benches in the park
area was also discussed.
Program Chair Edith Adams
presented a "Make and Take"
Craft program.
She brought and distributed
material for the making of
Booboo Bunnies.
She distributed instruction
sheets for making gift boxes
and napkin folding designs.
Members followed the pro-
gram with a meal of Chicken
Pot Pie and Cranberry Salad,
prepared and served by host-
esses Lottie Berry and Emily
Taylor.
Centers of the tables were
decorated with a variety of
camellias.
Adams entertained the group
with Valentine's Day Word


6080, disaster, health, safety,
emergency, volunteer, youth,
and military services;
America's Second Harvest
of the Big Bend, 562-3033,
provides surplus food to needy
through non-profit agencies;
Big Bend Cares, 656-2437,
arranges education, support
and compassionate care for
people and communities im-
pacted by HIV/AIDS and other
diseases;
Big Bend Hospice, 878-5310,
patient/family hospice and be-
reavement care;
Big Brothers Big Sisters,
386-6002, role models for
children from single-parent
families;
Boy Scouts of America, Su-
wannee River Area Council,
576-4146, youth leadership de-
velopment and prevention pro-
grams;
:Elder Care Sen ice 921-
5554, comprehensive program
for senior citizens in need,
Fellowship of Christian Ath-
letes, 383-1144, serving stu-
dents in. middle and high
schools with opportunities for
learning positive characteris-


mings, and a festive variety of
desserts with iced tea, coffee,
and lemonade.
President Connie Boland in-
troduced guests Gloria Yaun
and Ruby Kennedy.
Following dinner, the auc-
tion began with auctioneer
George Wright and his assis-
tant Betty Messer.
Members extend their
thanks to the following spon-
sors for contributing items for
the auction:
Capital City Bank, Custom
Framing and Images, Farmers
& Merchants Bank, Southern
Friends, State Farm Insurance,
Yaun Advertising.


Games during the lunch, en-
couraging the ladies to think,
focus, and sharpen their minds.
Red Velvet cake was served
for dessert at this Valentine's
Day celebration meeting.
Five members made an en-
joyable trip to Perry for the
District Meeting on a recent
Saturday.
Betty Bard won a red Second
Place ribbon for her Christmas
Cross Stitch picture in the
Craft Competition.
"We are so happy for her'
win. "here are several catego-
ries in which Club members
elect to participate. Betty won
in the Holiday category,"
Ouzts explained.
The next meeting of the
Woman's Club is 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Mar. 7.


tics;
Girl Scout Council of the
Apalachee Bend, 386-2131,
camps, inner-city program and
other programs to encourage
healthy lifestyles;
Jefferson Senior Citizens
Center, 342-0271, preventative
services and socialization for
seniors;
Kids Incorporated of the Big
Bend, 414-9800, family ori-
ented, early childhood
services;
Legal Services of North
Florida, 385-9007, legal assis-
tance and counsel for low-
income persons;
Refuge House, 681-2111, as-
sistance for victims of domes-
tic and sexual violence
including safe shelter and 24-
hour crisis hotline;
Tri County Foster Parents
Association, 584-7224, sup-
port for.foster parents with fo-
cus on children with medical',
needs including supplies and'
resources, respite care;
We Care, 942-5215, pro-
vides timely access to specialty
medical care for low-income,
medically underserved people.


Also to Shirley Rudd and
Amy Lasseter for oil paintings.
Members present and their
spouses included: Connie and
Jeffery Boland, Judy and Mike
Carney, Carolyn and Ellis
Cheshire, Peggy and Terry
Day, Ann Coxetter, Mary
Frances Drawdy, Elinor Gar-
ner, Jean and Tom Folsom,
Carolyn and Bruce Hayse,
Betty and Jim Messer, Lynn
and John Rhymes, Alice and
Mitchell Sander, Mary Ann
Van Kleunen, Emily and But-
ler Walker, Velinda and Fred
Williams, and Carolyn and
George Wright.


AA


VOLUNTEERS helping to paint at the Boys, Girls Club on Make a Difference Day in-
clude: Cornell Guion, Matt Scanlan, Ellyn Aidman, Gerrold Austin, Maya Johnson,
Siu-Len Quant, Gregg Bishop, Jessie Adala and Tobi Hitchcook.


Volunteers Work Here

To Make A Diffence


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

College student volunteers
visited Monticello/Jefferson
Boys and Girls Club, recently,
to celebrate Make a Difference
Day, a large scale day of serv-
ice, uniting residents and col-
lege students.
The volunteers along with
Club Director Gerrold Austin
and staff spent the morning
painting the inside classroom
walls of the clubhouse.


ine one day, large
event is designed toi


FOUNTAIN


New Arrival

Chase Lee Fountain was born
at 1:04 p.m., Feb. 8, at Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital.
He weighted 6 lbs and 14
oz., and was 19 3/4 inches
long.
Parents are Johnny Fountain,
Jr., and Melinda Foskey, of
Monticello.
Maternal grandparents are
Linda and Warren Nelson of
Cairo, Ga., and Doris and Ray
Foskey of Monticello.
Paternal Grandparents are
Barbara andBill Colson, and
the late Johnny Fountain, Sr.


the community and help neigh-
bors in need by connecting
citizens to the world of volun-
teerism.
Make a Difference Day
kicked off at 8 a.m. on a recent
Saturday in the Grand Ball-
room, on the FAMU campus.

The participants chose from
several local non profit agen-
cies that address community
issues including animal serv-
ices, children and youth, disas-
ter services, elder care
services, and health services.


ge scale Volunteers then spent the
improve morning with the agency of
their choice.
They returned to FAMU for
N lunch and to hear a message
from a special speaker, fol-
lowed by time for reflection.
This provides volunteers the6,
opportunity to share their ex-
periences with the group and
expose others to the opportuni-
ties available.
Reflection also allows volun-
teers to recognize the connec-
tion between their community
services and large scale social
issues.

"Volunteers get a snapshot
of a community issue they are
most passionate about and how
they can help out," explains
leader Heather Skojec.


"Colorectal cancer often has
no symptoms, so please
get rested. I did."
Klit Cournc. ( ot :l-,lner
ElF's NIF aum / Col-irce / Gii r r,
SR ii .l r ", ,'

If you're over 50
talk to your cr/
doctor and ( "l fe
get screened.







National Colorectal Cancer

I ENTERTAINMENT
INDUSTRY FOUNDATION-


County United Way Reports

Key Contributors, Providers


Sorority Auction Raises


$2,000 For Relay For Life


SNI IW HVI d-'D

f~hrrnsv;Ie YOn&'d


"'


hotu by Hil'ar
















PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006


ACA JV Girls Defeat


Taylor in Season Opener


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JV softball team de-
feated Taylor County 22-9 in
the season opener.
Coach Frank Brown said
that not only is scoring 22
runs rare, but the Lady Warri-
ors ran out of time during the
game, so they scored all of
the runs in three innings
rather than the standard five.
Brown said he attributes
such an impressive victory to
his belief and training in be-
ing very aggressive, but also
being aggressive in stealing
the bases.
He said that the Lady War-
riors high score was due to
having many batters on base
and committing many steals
during the game.
Brown added that the first
run of the game set the tone
for the remainder of the game.
"Olivia Sorensen, the fastest
runner on the team, was on
third base and Erin Kelly was


up top bat," said Brown. "I
signaled Erin for the suicide
bunt, also known as the
squeeze bunt, and she laid
down a perfectly executed
bunt.
He added that Sorensen was
at home plate so fast during
the steal, that she almost
knocked Kelly out of the bat-
ter's box on arrival.
"The girls like to steal," said
Brown. "They are seeing that
it really works, when you're
.aggressive, you most often
than not, come out ahead of
the game.
'Stealing is quickly becom-
ing a Warrior trademark,"
Brown added.
Brown said that two Lady
Warriors, Mallory Plaines and
Olivia Sorensen, each had an
in the park home run on Tay-
lor's errors.
Brown said the Lady Warri-
ors were scoring so many
runs, especially in the final in-
ning of the game, that he did-
n't think they would ever get
their third out.


During the course of the
game, ACA had six absolute
steals and there were at least
ten instances when the Lady
Warriors went for the extra
bases.
Olivia Sorensen had three
singles, one double, one walk,
scored four runs and had four
RBI.
Katelyn Levine had one sin-
gle and scored one run; Erin
Kelly had two singles, scored
two runs and had two RBI;
and Mallory Plaines had two
singles, scored two runs and
had three RBI.
Skyler Hanna had three
walks, one strikeout and
scored three runs; Taryn
Copeland had four walks and
scored three runs; Miranda
Wider had three walks and
scored two runs; Nikki
Kisamore had two walks, one
hit-by-pitch and one strikeout;
Michaela Roccanti had two
singles, scored two runs and
had two RBI; and Savannah
Williams had one single, two
walks and scored three runs.


ACA Defeats Maclay 13-8


For Third Win Of Season


BILL BROWN

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity baseball team
notched its third win of the
season against Maclay, Tues-
day, for the 13-8 win.
Neither team played par-
ticularly well. ACA commit-
ting two errors and Maclay,
three.
The Warriors had a 3-0
lead, which tied when Maclay
scored three runs in the bot-
tom of the third.
In the top of the fourth,
ACA scored' five, only to
watch Maclay plate five in the
bottom. Again, a tie.
The outcome was sealed


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JV softball team won
their last three games, to stand
4-0 on the season.
Lady Warriors downed La-
fayette Mayo, 13-3.
Substitute pitcher Paige
Thurman pitched the entire
game, striking out seven bat-
ter, and gave up two walks
and five hits.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat
four times, had two singles,
one walk and two runs.
Mallory Plaines had two
singles, scored one run and
two RBI; Katelyn Levine had
one single, one triple, one
walk, scored one run and one
RBI; Thurman had one single,
one hit by pitch; and two runs
and Skyler Hanna had one
single, one double, one triple,
one strikeout, two runs and
two RBI.
Miranda Wider had one tri-
ple, one strikeout and one run;
Nikki Kisamore scored two
RBI; Erin Kelly had one walk
and one run; Michaela Roc-
canti had one single, one
walk, scored one run and one
RBI; and Savannah Williams
had one single, one walk,
scored two runs and one RBI.
Lady Warriors blanked
Hamilton 12-0
Thurman pitched the game,
striking out 10 batters and
only gave up one walk.
Olivia Sorensen had one
single, one triple, one walk,
scored two runs and three
RBI.
Levine had one single, one
walk, scored one run and two
RBI; had one single, one tri-


when the Warriors scored
three in the top of the sixth
and two in the seventh, while
holding Maclay scoreless.
Casey Gunnels relieved
Chris Tuten on the mound to
start the fifth, and held Mclay
scoreless while giving up no
hits, striking out four, and is-
suing dne base on balls, and
was credited with the win.
In four innings, Tuten gave
up eight runs on eight hits,
and was plagued by two War-
rior errors, lapse of memory
and sloppy plays.
Offensively, bats were ac-
tive, collecting 18 hits off of
two Maclay pitchers.
Stewart Williams supplied
the power with a home run,


ple, two runs and one RBI;
Nikki Kisamore had one sin-
gle, scored one run and one
RBI: and Thurman had one
single, one double and two
runs.
Hanna had two singles, one
walk and three runs; Sunnie
Sorensen went struck out;
Wider had one single, two
walks and two runs; and
Shelby Witmer had one RBI.
Kelly had one single, one
strikeout and one RBI; Lisa
Kisamore had one single and
one RBI; Roccanti had three
singles, scored one run and
had four RBI; Williams had
two singles, one walk and
scored one run and Tori Self
had one single.
Lady Warriors squeaked by
Florida High 16-14.

Olivia Sorensen had three
singles, three runs and one
RBI.
Levine had two singles, one
strikeout and scored two runs;
Hanna had two singles, two
strikeouts, scored one run and
one RBI; and Plaines had
three singles three runs and
two RBI.

Williams had two singles
and three RBI; Lisa Kisamore
had one strikeout; and Wider
had one single, one walk and
two runs.

Keli Dollar had one RBI;
Taryn Copeland had one sin-
gle, two walks, scored two
runs and two RBI; Kelly had
one double, one run and one
RBI; Nikki Kisamore had one
single and one RBI.


double and three RBI.
Other Warriors hitting were
Gunnels, three for five, one
RBI; Tuten, two for five; Josh
Carswell, one for three, two
RBI; Dustin Roberts, one for
five; Colby Waddail, one for
five; Matt Bishop, three for
five; Stephen Dollar, two for
four, double; and A. J. Con-
nell, three for three, three RBI
and two stolen bases.
The next home games are;
Maclay, Feb. 23; Echols
County, Feb. 27; and Lanier
County, Feb. 28.
All games times are at 4
p.m.


--



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. .. .. ... Ia, ; ", ..^'!.l ; "t '
,. .. ","-. ..-
... .*-- B ''^ -^ .... ...



. '. \ .. i,.'- ,, -.



BUS Fails TO Show For Recent Meet

JCHS sprinters compete with each other during practices at Tiger Field. (News
Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello Christian
Academy boy's basketball
team lost to Grace 77-74, to
end the basektball season 0-
11.
Pastor Mike Burke said
MCA has no seniors and
Grace has one, who scored 55
of Grace's 77 points.
"This is the most points the
Chargers have scored all
year" said Burke, and that ex-
plained the reason for the
loss.
"There was four to five sec-
onds remaining in the game,
we were up by four and we
fouled on a Grace player,"
said Burke.
"He was awarded two
shots. He made the first free-


throw, but the second one, he
threw the ball hard, bouncing
it off of the backboard and it
came right back to him.
"He stepped behind the
three-point line and made the
bucket, which tied the score at
69 all at the buzzer," said
Burke.
"The referees admitted that
they did not properly call the
game because according to
the rules, if a ball is deliber-
ately thrown at the backboard
and doesn't hit the rim, it is
supposed to be called a dead
ball, and they didn't call it.
If they had called it, we
would have won by four."


Burke added that Grace is
the number two team in the
league the number one team,
and the first time the Chargers
played against Grace, MCA
lost by 20-25 points,
therefore, the Chargers had
improved significantly during
the season.
Tenth grader Luke Lingle
led the Chargers with 30
points; ninth grader Phillip
Payne scored 22 points; elev-
enth grader Ian Morrow
scored nine points; eighth
grader A. J. Murphy scored
seven points; and eighth
grader Chip Gallon and sixth
grader Jarad Bailey each
scored two points.
Burke said all of the Charg-
ers would be returning to ac-
tion next year, so he was sure
that they would see a very
positive season.


Sheriffs Department Sets

Relay For Life Fundraiser


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Rotary Club
will host the Annual Sandbag-
gers Golf Tournament 1 p.m.,
March 6 at the Country Club.
The entry fee is $50 per per-
son, or $200 per four-person
team, and includes 18 holes of
golf, a cart, the Rotary's fa-
mous 10-ounce rib-eye steak
dinner with all of the trim-
mings, and door prizes.
Though hole sponsorships
have been purchased, many
are still available for $100,
which will put the name of
the sponsor at a particular
hole on the course.


Trophies will be awarded
for low gross, low net and the
coveted last place trophy.
Spokesman James Muchovej
said many local businesses
have donated items to be
warded as door prizes for the
event.
All proceeds will go to
benefit vocational scholar-
ships for local youth.
To sign up, buy a sponsor-
ship, or for further informa-
tion call Muchovej at
997-6508 or go to
ajj muchovej@juno,com.
"Any additional sponsor-
ships have to be purchased
rather quickly, because of the
shortage time," Muchovej con-
cluded.


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DEI.1IVERY CHIARGEI

1 1025 EAST MAHAN

82774550


The Sheriffs Office will
host a horseshoe tournament
10 a.m., Saturday, at the Rec-
reation Park as a Relay for
Life fundraiser.
Registration begins at 9
a.m. and the entry fee is a $20
donation for each two person


''..'' ..'






4 '~~ ''L



FRR go ~-karl caciat at Adventa
FREE rounds of Adventure R~oal
WFREE Mgiqid on Geranimo Skyc
I-REE J~wmps oi Blackbearwd's
nFRE cjinbs on the Climbing 'A


team.
The tournament is limited to
the first 29 men's teams and
the first 29 women's teams to
register.
First and second place
plaques will be awarded in
each category.
For further information, or
to register, call Cricket Ed-
wards at 997-1045.


'I



S .. ,., .



."'-' .' ,.' j"." '




aire Quest Raceway!
f!
coaster!
Bounce!
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FREE COiCERFS
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O MONTICELLO

NEWS

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~IP~~"~P~T== -;=~ ~llB~IIP~O~"P~ld99


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M~onticello Academyrl

Falls Toa Grace 77-74


Rotary Sanldbag Golf

Classic Set March 6


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006 PAGE 9



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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006


Burns toast.


tAg- sQ."F, 0 ufltOO





Brightens futures.


Som Gllte fts ust

L MLo ore Than Others.

Most gifts are pretty unimaginative. A toaster makes toast. A blender
just blends. And there are some gifts that no one knows what they're
Supposed to do.
But give Savings Bonds, and you'll be giving the gift of future
,i possibilities-from a down payment on a car to help with college
Tuition. With eight denominations to choose from, there's a size for
every occasion. You can select the popular Series EE Bond or the
inflation-protected I Bond. They're available through most banks, where
you work, or automatically through the new Savings Bonds EasySaver
Plan at www.easysaver.gov.
Call 1-800-4US BOND for recorded rate information, or write to:
Savlings Bonds Pocket Guide, Parkersbuig, WV 26106-1328.



Creating a -SAVINGS
New Century ns N D I
of Savings D 30D -


For complete information about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at www.savingsbonds.gov.
A public service of this newspaper
.M..n,..... r'iwI. .


LEGALS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION CITICORP TRUST
BANK, FSB, F/K/A TRAVELERS
BANK & TRUST, FSB, CASE no.
02-399-CA Plaintiff, vs DONALD
GRAHAM; JANE DOE GRAHAM,
THE UNKNOWN WIFE OF
DONALD GRAHAM; BRENDA
STUBBINS GRAHAM; JOHN DOE
GRAHAM, THE UNKNOWN
HUSBAND OF BRENDA
STUBBINS GRAHAM; IF LIVING
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES. GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS; JOHN
DOE, UNKNOWN TENANT;
JANE DOE UNKNOWN TENANT,
Defendants) NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in
the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson County,
Florida I will sell the property
situate in Jefferson County, Florida
described as: A PORTION OF
THAT PROPERTY DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
170. PAGE 552 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED BY RECENT
SURVEY AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA
AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES
45' 32" EAST 296.58 FEET TO AN


LEGALS

IRON ROD FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING-
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 32'
59" WEST 331.20 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 687.25
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 31 DEGREES 59' 15"
EAST 90.0 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD; THENCE SOUTH 58
DEGREES 00' 45" WEST 160.0
FEET TO AN IRON ROD;
THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES
59' 15" EAST 135.05 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD ON THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
OF COUNTY ROAD 149a;
THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES
59' 38" WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE 105.67
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH
89 DEGREES 45' 32" WEST 577.98
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND
TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT
EASEMENT, SAID EASEMENT
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 5
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 296.58
FEET TO AN IRON ROD;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES
32' 59" WEST 331.20 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 651.97
FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES
45' 32" EAST 35.28 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE SOUTH 31
DEGREES 59' 15" EAST 225.0
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 149A; THENCE
SOUTH 57 DEGREES 59' 38"


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Or call 1-800-44-PRIDE (1-800-447-7433)
S.'ti


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TRUCKING


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Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


WE TAKE THE
DINTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


LEGALS
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF-
WAY LINE 30.0 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE NORTH 31
DEGREES 59' 15" WEST 243.57
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. A/K/A RURAL
ROUTE 2 BOX 89B
MONTICELLO FLORIDA 32344
at public sale to the highest and best
bidder, for cash at the North Door
of the Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida at 11'00 a.m. on
the 16th day of March, 2006. THIS
INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
3204 King Palm Drive Tampa,
Florida 33619-1328 Attorneys for
Plaintiff. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending the
notice not later than seven days
prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. If
hearing impaired (TDD)
1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770
(voice) via Florida Relay Service."
2/22, 3/1, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed-said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 289 Year
of Issuance 2002. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" A parcel of
land in Section 13, Township 1
South, Range 3 East, commence at
the Northeast corner of Desota
Drive and the South boundary of


Southern Division



WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and
Read welding symbols and
Welding Test in Flat Positio

Application
Georgia Depart
Excellent Fringe


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


LEGALS
Old St. Augustine Road; thence run
East 1266 feet along the south
boundary of the Old St. Augustine
Road to a concrete monument to a
Point of Beginning (said concrete
monument is 570.8 feet West from
the corner of Old St. Augustine
Road and Armstrong Road); from
the Point of Beginning run South 33
degrees 3 minutes 30 seconds East
300 feet; thence run West 200 feet,
thence run North 33 degrees 3 min-
utes 30 seconds West 300 feet; then
run East 200 feet to the Point of
Beginning, containing 1.5. acres,
more or less. Name in which
assessed Ollie L. Evans, Jr. All of
said property being in the County of
Jefferson, State of Florida. Unless
such certificate or certificates shall
be redeemed according to law the
property described in such certifi-
cate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house
door on the 22nd day of March,
2006, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 15th
day of February, 2006. Dale Boat-
wright, Clerk of Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida.
2/15, 2/22, 3/1,3/8, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 719 Year
of Issuance 2001. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" Commence at
the Southeast corner of the South-
west quarter of the Southeast quar-
ter of section 17, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, Jefferson County,


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006 PAGE 11


LEGALS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED FOR RENT


Florida and run S. 0 degrees 16
minutes 15 seconds W. 346.3 feet to
a point on the Northerly right-of-
way line of the S.C.L. Railroad,
thence N. 76 degrees 51 minutes 24
seconds W. 2133.19 feet along said
right-of-way line to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence continue N. 76
degrees 51 minutes 24 seconds W.
165.11 feet along said right-of-way
line to a point, thence leaving said
right-of-way line run N. 7 degrees
28 minutes 18 seconds E. 534.17 feet
to a point, thence S. 77 degrees 16
minutes E. 165.0 feet to a point,
thence S. 7 degrees 28 minutes 18
seconds W. 535.36 feet to the point
of beginning. Containing 2.02 acres,
more or less, and being a part of the
Southeast quarter of the Southwest
quarter of section 17, Township 1
North. Range 6 East, Jefferson
County, Florida. Name in which
assessed Willie and Sammie Lou
Baldwin. All of said property being
in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property
described in such certificate or cer-
tificates will be sold to the highest
bidder at the court house door on
the 22nd day of March, 2006 at
11:00 a.m. Dated this 15th day of
February, 2006. Dale Boatwright.
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida.
2/15, 2/21, i.!8, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follow: Certificate No. 717. Year
of Issuance 2001. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" A certain lot
in Town of Aucilla, Florida, and
beginning at the NW corner of the
E.R. Kinsey Store lot and running
W. 20 feet, thence running S. 30
feet, thence running E. 20 feet, and
thence running N. 30 feet and to the
point of beginning. Name in which
assessed Ray Deal & James Sparks.
All of said property being in the
County of Jefferson, State of Flor-
ida. Unless such certificate or cer-
tificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property
described in such certificate or cer-
tificates will be sold to the highest
bidder at the court house door on
the 22nd day of March, 2006, at
11:00 a.m. Dated this 15th day of
February, 2006. Dale Boatwright,
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida.
2/15.2/122 3'. 3,S.
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular
monthly meeting on March 9, 2006
at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be
held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of US
Highway 19 and Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. Information
concerning the meeting is available
at the Jefferson County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344.
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings and that of such
purpose he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
baser.
3,i/06, c
16 --- -"m
NOTICE
Jefferson County Road Department
will be repairing the bridge that
goes across Cow Creek on Goose
Pasture Road, and that road will be
closed Thursday and Friday, March
2 and 3, 2006.
3/1. 3/3, e

HELP \WANTED
Come join our growing team. It
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Quest's End, 1988 D/W, on
small lot, 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
porches, garage /workshop,


price reflects a few needed
repairs $39,900. "As Is", N. of
Greenville R. Winston Connell,
Realtor, 850-997-4780 or
850-933-6363 or after hours


850-948-5000.
3/1, 3, c
Inspector Position: High School
graduate, minimum five years
experience as a Florida State
Registered or Certified
Contractor, or a One and Two
Family Dwelling Certificate.
Must be able to qualify for a
Provisional Inspector
Certificate. Applications are
available online or at the
Building Inspector's Office at
445 W. Palmer Mill Rd.,
Monticello. For more
information please call The
Building Official, Wallace
Bullock at 342-0223 ext. 104. or
visit the Jefferson County
website w"vw.co.jefferson.fl.us
2/22, 24 3/1,3, c
Wood worker wanted: Basic
Experience with wood working
Tools Required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, 8, 10, c
My business is parking lot and
roadway striping, asphalt repair
and other parking lot
maintenance. I am seeking an
employee who is emotionally
mature, physically fit, drug-free
and has the moral character to
lead. If you are just looking for
a job to get a paycheck, please
don't call. If you believe you
have the qualifications I am
seeking, call me @ 545-1776. No
calls taken after 7 pm and on
Sunday.
2/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 3/1, 3, c
The Jefferson County Public
Library is accepting
applications for a Children's
Librarian Specialist. This
person creates implements and
presents agency and community
programs for children ages 1-12
years of age and child related
programs for parents, caregiver
and teachers. Provides reference
and reader's advisory services
and interprets policies and
procedures of the library.
Develops and maintains a
reference and circulation
collection for juvenile patrons.
The job requirements include
experience working with
children, an ALA accredited
degree in library science. Any
equivalent combination of
training and experience which
provides the required
knowledge, skill, and abilities
may be considered. Hours and
salary are negotiable.
Applications are available at the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello or may be obtained
online at the Jefferson County,
Florida website:
www.jefferson.lib.fl.us. Position
is open until filled. Mail
applications to Jefferson County
Public Library, 375 South
Water Street, Monticello, FL
32344. Telephone:
850-342-0205. Contact person:
Linda Hamedani, Library
Director...
2/22, 24. 3/1, 3, c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Prior
experience working with
children who have emotional
issues required. Some local
travel required. License
required. Shift: Monday-Friday
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
OPS-FEMA Team Leader
(#2264) Masters degree with
from an accredited university or
college with a major in the field
of counseling, social work,
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or as related
human services field with one
(1) year of full time or
equivalent related professional
experience or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited
university or college with a
major in the field of counseling,
social work, psychology,


nursing, rehab. special
education, health education, or
a related professional
experience. Clinical supervision
experience preferred. Shift


variable.
Clinical Supervision Specialist
(#1451) Masters Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in the field of
counseling, social work
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or related
human services health care, or
management field. Shift 8 am 5
PM Monday Friday.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
3/1, c, '

GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale: Saturday March 4,
8-4; 2421 West Capps
Monticello Corner of 27 & 259
Look for signs.

AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn
2001 F350, diesel 7.3 litters.
Cure Cap Duly $20,000 Call
519-6506
2/15-2/27, pd
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500 below NADA
Book.
997-6806 Wilson
Auto, LLC.
tf:, c

FOR SAL E
Barnyard Roaming Rhode
Island Red Roosters $10 each.
Purebred Limousin bull, born
7/04, Call 997-0901 leave
message or 997-3568, ask for
Debbie.
Steel horse trailer. 2 horse
1960's. New axle, electronic
brakes, controller. Very
functional but needs paint and
fix up. $1200
14' Tracker Jon boat w/trailer.
No motor. Good condition $900
'80s Craftsman 6" jointer
planer w/motor and legs. Heavy
duty. Rarely used. $250
Briggs & Stratton 11 hp 4
stroke vertical mount motor. 7
years old. Rarely used $125.
Wards PowerKraft 230 Arc
Welder with helmet and
accessories, $200
Simplicity front-tine geared
rotor tiller. Ran well but not run
in 8 years. As is $95 All prices
firm 997-1886 before 9:00 p.m.
3/1 3, pd
Treadmill $500, Gas Grill with
side burner $25 (OBO). Call
997-1253.
tfn
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
3/1, 3, pd

FOR RENT

I Room Studio Apartment,
furnished with bath room,
utilities included. No deposit no
lease month-to-month, $350
559-3t41l
2/2.1 2/1, c


Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Furnished downstairs efficiency.
Large bedroom, living room,
bath on 4 acres. Monticello. 20
minutes to Tally. $400 inc.
utilities 997-2422 or 251-1108

REAL ESTATE
Our market is active! I have
buyers! If you're thinking of
selling NOW's a great time. IN
fact, I'm working with quite a
few qualified buyers, some even
have cash right now. Call me
today for a free, no-obligation
market analysis of your acreage
or home. May I put my track
record of success to work for
you? Lynette C. Sirmon,
Realtor Associate, R. Winston
Connell, Realtor 850-933-6363,
850-997-4780 or after hours
850-948-5000.
j/1. 3, c

SERVICES

Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn
Combining Faith and Reason,
Tradition and Tolerance. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
ser' ;ce at 10:30 a.m. 997-4116.
?3/, c
Handyman Professional job
home repair and cleaning.
Drywall, siding, gutter,
painting, int./ext. 997-3587, cell
251-4575, 2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, pd

Peters Satellite -- Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.
t'n, 1/25
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses-.


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


F


Your dedication to the road is why millions of Americans have food on their
tables and clothes on their backs.
You deserve the best company and the finest compensation
the industry has to offer.
* Experience rewarded but not required
* Company-paid CDL training for qualified candidates
S$34,500$57,500 (depending on experience)
* Immediate benefits for experienced drivers
* Sign-on bonus may apply
With Schneider's benefits and your dedication, the sky is the limit.
Apply Online @ schneiderjobs.com
Or call 1-800-44-PRIDE (1-800-447-7433)
SCHNEIIRER.


.


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5516
www.cbkk.com
Perry: (850) 223-2370


Discover The Coldwell Difference...
* Back on the market- 10- acres surround this
beautiful 4Br/3.5Ba. Very spacious with lots
of space for the animals! $397,500
" JustReduced- Perfect starter home. 3Br/lBa
on .88 acres. Storage shed and dog pen.
Won't last at only $145,000
* New Construction Southern charm in new
subdivision Bide-A-Wee. 11 lots and 4 new
construction models to choose from. Starting
at $229,900
* NewLiting 4Br/2Ba on 6.5 acres, paved
road with easy access to Tallahassee. Lg. oaks
yard fenced/cross fenced. $155,000
* Cozy Starter 2Br/2Ba with hardwood floors
and knottypinewalls 2.5Ac. $129,000


- r floDO~~ s o0~


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre


Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $87,500

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house w/
bath, big shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100
pecan trees and a nice pool a real dream for
a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $20,000 per acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the High Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre


Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 /acre.

Near Lake Hall 2 wooded acres $26,500


Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000


Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
2/1 house on 4 acres $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Pcairy Sells Real Estate!


- ---C- I


"L -~IIIIII


_ CI~~C_ _


--


-- -- -


--- ----------- -------- ------ --------


~n~n


I









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 1, 2006


Fire Rescue Responds


TO Variety Of Calls


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Jefferson County Fire Rescue
Chief Mark Matthews shares
a sample of the variety of
calls answered by his depart-
ment.
Cell phones are responsible
for a number of accident calls,
he explains.
"Cell phones are a two
edged sword," said Matthews.
"There arc many times people
call and report an accident
which turns out to be a flat
tire, or just a minor spinout.
Many times, when we re-
spond, the involved vehicle is
no longer at the location," he
said.
Feb. 4, a brush fire on I-10
was reported at 4:10 p.m., at
mile marker 228. "There
wasn't much to it," said Mat-
thews. "We got out and
stomped out the fire."


While returning from that
call, a fuel spill on I-10 was
called in. "It wasn't much, we
weren't there long, we just
had to put some oil dry on it,"
said Matthews.
Feb. 7, firefighters were
called to battle a structure
fire.

The call came in at 2:43
p.m., to respond to 5251 Dills
Rd., to an unoccupied mobile
home.
Matthews said the fire ap-
peared to have started in a
front bedroom in the rear of
the room, and when firefight-
ers arrived, the fire was com-
ing through the roof of the
structure.
He added that though the
floor, wall and roof of the
room had burned through,
firefighters were able to
quickly extinguish the flames.
Also responding was Ash-
ville Area Volunteer Fire De-
partment's tanker 10.


At 7:01 p.m., Fire Rescue
responded to an alarm at Jef-
ferson Nursing Center.
"The laundry room was
filled with smoke and acti-
vated the alarm," said Mat-
thews. "The lint vent was
blocked and the clothes in the
dryer were smoldering."
He added that citizens need
to keep in mind to the need to
keep lint traps and vents clear.
Feb. 9, Fire Rescue re-
sponded to an overturned
semi and trailer at the en-
trance ramp off of South US-
19 heading west onto I-10.
Feb. 10, Fire Rescue re-
sponded to an accident call on
I-10 at mile marker 230. Mat-
thews said the accident in-
volved two vehicles, one of
which was on its side, but
there was no fire involved.
Then a call came in on a
brush fire threatening a St.
Augustine Rd. residence.
Matthews said the owner
was burning trees, stumps and


yard debris and the flames got
out of control due' to the wind.
The fire was extinguished
and the structure received no
fire damage. Also responding
were Lloyd and Wacissa vol-
unteers.
Feb. 11, Fire Rescue was
called for a fire at McDon-
ald's at 9:25 a.m.
Matthews said the cause
was electrical arcing under
the fryer, and managers were
advised to turn the unit off
and have it serviced before
they put it in use again.
Feb. 12, an accident call
same in on I-10. Matthews
said there was a single vehicle
on the side of the road. The
driver had gotten out of the
vehicle and walked to a
nearby residence, however,
there was extensive damage
to the vehicle from fire.
Also on Feb. 12, a fire was
called in at 3450 West Wash-
ington Street at 6:30 p.m.
Matthews said that a power
pole transformer had blown,
sparking a blaze which soon
self extinguished,
"We stayed on the scene un-
til Progress Energy got out
there to take care of it," he
added.
Feb. 13, a fire alarm went


off at Brynwood Center at
12:15 a.m.
"Someone didn't turn the
coffee pot off and the coffee
pot burned, setting off the
smoke alarm," said Matthews.
At 5 p.m., on Brock Road a
brush fire was called in.
Matthews said that someone
was working outside and a
small fire had spread, burning
about 35 acres and jumping to
a pile of about 14 large hay
rolls that were huddled to-
gether around a power pole.
The hay and the power pole
were destroyed. Also re-
sponding were Lloyd, Monti-
cello, and Ashville volunteers
as well as the Division of For-
estry with a tractor. It took
approximately two and a half
hours to extinguish the
flames.
During that call, a trash fire
was reported at Jefferson Cor-
rectional Institution.
Matthews said that Ashville
and Monticello volunteers re-
sponded and found scrap lum-
ber in a dumpster between the
two outer security fences was
burning.
Feb. 14, Fire Rescue re-
ceived a call from Monticello
Family Medicine reporting
the odor of gas. Nothing was


Opera Extravaganza Draws


Appreciative Audience


found.
Feb. 15, a brush fire was re-
ported on Hwy. 27. "It was a
controlled burn," said Mat-
thews. "We get a lot of con-
trolled burs called in as
brush fires."
Feb. 16, at 3:17 p.m., a
brush fire was called in on I-
10 at mile marker 225. Mat-
thews said there were two
small fires in the median
which had burned about one
acre of the dry thatch.
"It was probably due to a
blown semi tire," said Mat-
thews. "Those things do get
hot enough when they blow to
cause a fire in dry, grass," he
said.
At 7:14 p.m., a woods fire
was reported on Hartsfield
Road in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows.
Matthews said that it was an
80 acre controlled burn which
had set residents into a panic.
"It's a thickly wooded area,
and people were concerned,
because it was dark and the
smoke does no.t dissipate. The
light from the fire is reflected
in the sky and it looks like the
whole sky is aflame.
"In any case, it is always
best to call us and be safe,"
Matthews said.


4-H Public

Speaking

Workshop Set


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Orlando Opera Touring
Company delighted an appre-
ciative audience, Saturday
with its Opera Extravaganza,
at the Opera House.
The company consists of
March Richardson, soprano;
Elizabeth Ariza, mezzo-
soprano, Robb Asklof, tenor;
Craig Irvin, bass-baritone, and
Julie Tompkins, accompanist.
With a program of duets, so-
los and ensembles, the com-
pany performed to perfection
and never missed a beat.
It would be unthinkable not
to recognize Tompkins at the
Baldwin, who kept the com-
pany moving through the vari-
ous selections, changing keys,
tempo, and interpretations,
with never a hesitation.
By her performance at the
keyboard, Tompkins expertly
directed the company through
the program.
Performers outdid them-
selves in solos, duets, and
every other combination.
As a tenor, Asklof resembled
a young Pavarotti with his in-
terpretation of Verdi's "Questa
o quella."
He was strong, melodic, and
dramatic as required by the
score.
The young tenor was equally
accomplished, in the Lehar
melody: "Dein ist mein ganzez
Herz."
This time his voice brought
back memories of Mario
Lanza, as he performed well
known selection.
Irvin as bass-baritone, per-
formed Rossini's "La
calunnia," with the profundo
expected from the trained
voice in this register.
He was equally adept in the
Mozart piece: "Finch'han dal
vino."
Richardson and Ariza re-
ceived thunderous applause for
their soprano/mezzo soprano
duet of Hoffman's
"Barcarolle."
Not an easy piece to


Library

Friends

To Meet

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Friends of the Library
will hold their monthly meet-
ing 6:30 p.m. Thursday, in the
Media Room at the Library
building on South Water
Street.
Projects for the coming year
will be discussed, including
the upcoming Book Sale.
For more information con-
tact Linda Hamedani at 342-
0205, or Mary Ellen Logan at
210-5149.


perform, with intricate timing,
the ladies gave a flawless ren-
dition.
Ariza demonstrated her ex-
pertise as a mezzo-sporano, in
the Bizet piece, "Seguildilla."
Richardson performed
"Stranger Here Myself," from
"One Touch of Venus," by K.
Weill, with the expertise of a


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The story of a Monticello
slave, Douglas Parrish, is rep-
resented in the recent publica-
tion of "No Man's Yoke On
My Shoulders: Personal Ac-
counts of Slavery in Florida,"
by John F. Blair.
The Alabama native exam-
ines slavery in Florida through
interviews with former slaves.
From 1936 to 1938, the Fed-
eral Writer's Project, a part of
the new Deal's Works Progress
Administration, hired writers,
editors, and researchers to in-
terview as many former slaves
as possible, and to document
their lives during slavery.
From an interview con-
ducted Nov. 10, 1936, in Mon-
ticello, Blair derives the mate-
rial for his narrative titled: "A
Breeder's Son."
Douglas Parrish was born in
Monticello May 7, 1850, the
son of Charles and Fannie Par-
rish, slaves of Jim Parrish.
Fannie had been bought
from a family named Palmer,
as a "breeder" because she was
known for her ability to bear
strong children.


annuities


for cash -


NOW. A


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program
866-FUND-549.


true soprano.
A champagne reception pre-
ceded the event, and guests
mingled with the performers in
the after performance get to-
gether.
Performances by Orlando
Opera Touring Company, are
among the most memorable at
the Opera House.


A breeder always fared bet-
ter than the majority of female
slaves, because strong children
always brought the best prices
at slave markets.
Her son, Douglas, began
picking cotton as his first job.
At 13 he became a stable boy
and learned to care for horses,
and keep the wagons clean.
Because of his knowledge of
horses, he traveled with boss
and other slaves to secure salt
from sea water.
Douglas reported that life
with Parrish was not bad, as he
treated his slaves well and
looked after them when they
were ill, gave them comfort-
able quarters and a moderate
work load.
After the war, when slaves
were freed, Douglas and his
parents remained with his for-
mer owners.
His father was a skilled
bricklayer and carpenter, and
his mother cooked for the Par-
rishes.
Douglas was employed to
make repairs to the property.
Publisher John F. Blair can
be reached at 1406 Plaza
Drive, Winston-Salem, NC.
27104.
His website is:
www.blairpub.com


DEBBIE SNAPP
I. ... s ai{ I~'1 Staff Writer

The Extension Office has
scheduled a public speaking
workshop 3 to 4:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 8.
Included in the workshop
I? .will be tips on public speaking,
to help curb the fear of speak-
.ing in front of an audience.
r" Likewise, pointers will be
SI provided about performing a
.i : demonstration, and/or illus-
I -10iLE. 5,1W treatedd talk.
i i I Parents are welcome to at-
tend.
SENATOR "Skip" Campbell Democratic candidate for For additional information,
Attorney General, greets Steve Cates at the County contact County 4-H Coordina-
Democratic Party event held here last week. tor John Lilly at 342-0187.



Aucilla Jr. High Science

Fair Scheduled Wednesday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
hosts the annual junior high
school science Wednesday.
The annual event is coordi-
nated by Mary Hartsfield and
Bill Buckhalt.
Geared for seventh and
eighth grade students, the
event will be held in the
gymnasium.


The seventh grade portion of
the science fair will run from
8:30-10 a.m. and the eighth
grade portion of the fair will
be 10:30 until noon.
Buckhalt said there are 19
seventh grade students and 24
eighth grade students, partici-
pating in the event, who have
been working on their pro-
jects for two months.
Categories include: Chem-
istry, Biology and Physics.
Awards will be given to


first, second and third place
winners in each category, and
at each grade level.
"This is always a really big
event at Aucilla," said Buck-
halt. "We'll be serving our
local judges lunch and pro-
viding them with evaluation
forms award points to each
project in related categories.
"After which, the scores
will be tallied and the winners
revealed," said Buckhalt.


-. .. ,,,,




Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


J.G.WENTWORTH,,
ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


* Thin dense pine stands.

* Control understory
plant competition.

* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT




sggrJ


IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


* Use prescribed fire.

* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.

* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


New Book Recounts


Story Of Local Slave


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