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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00108
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 22, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00108
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text


404 LI ?ARY WEST
UiIVhSIY 0? OF FLORIDA


Officers'
Deaths Decline
In 2005

Editorial, Page 4


Scenes From
Bless The Beast
Fundraiser

Photos, Page 7


Florists Busier
Than Usual
Valentine's Day


Story, Page 10


Coalition
Focuses On
Parenting Skills

Story, Page 12
II


Q Wednesday Morning )






Monticello


138TH YEAR NO.15 n riCr'NTe


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22,2006


Cooleys Score Another Hit


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Musical legend Ray Charles
returned to his hometown of
Greenville on Saturday, if only
in spirit.
More than 500 people -- in-
cluding family, childhood
friends and music lovers -- at-
tended the morning celebration
at Haffye Hayes Park, which
centered on the unveiling of a
400 lb. bronze statute by La-
mont father-and-son artists
Bradley Cooley and Brad
Cooley Jr.
The life-size statute, which
took the Cooleys a year to
complete, captures the exuber-
ance of Charles' singing and
piano playing: head thrown
back, wide open grin, and one
leg kicking out.
"This is not the end, there is
more to come," Greenville
Mayor Elesta Pritchett prom-
ised at the unveiling, adding
later that the "more to come"
could include an annual festi-
val honoring the late singer/
pianist/composer.
Pritchett is one of several
Greenville residents who claim
to have known Charles when
he was a boy in the small rural
community of 850.
For years, Pritchett said she
tried to get Charles to return to
the town, writing him letters,
approaching him backstage at
concerts, and making the re-
quest via various intermediar-
ies. But to no avail, she said.
When Charles died in June


2004 at age 73, Pritchett fig-
ured all hope for a visit was
lost.
Then it occurred to her and
others in the community that if
Charles couldn't return in per-
son, his memory deserved
honoring. Moreover, the story
of his triumph over blindness,


Ray Charles Comes

Home To Greenville


poverty and other adversities
deserved immortalizing, if
only to serve an example for
today's youth.


BRAD COOLEY JR., left, and his dad, Bradley Cooley
Sr. stand besides the sculpture of Ray Charles, now on
permanent display in the late singer's hometown of


That's how the idea for the
memorial was born and ulti-
mately commissioned, thanks
to some $40,000 in state and


federal funding and the gener-
osity of the Cooleys, who
waived their customary
$35,000 fee.
Lucile Day, a Greenville na-
tive and retired educator, re-
called that Charles used to
play the piano at the Red Wing
Cafe as a boy. Many times,


Greenville. The unveiling of the statute on Saturday
was an occasion for celebration, with several of Char-
les' relatives attending the ceremony. (News Photo)


Day said, Charles would play
in 'the small establishment and
the kids would dance.
Ray Charles, in his autobiog-
raphy, credits Wylie Pitman,
owner of the cafe; with teach-
ing him the rudiments of piano
playing and encouraging him
to play when he was a boy.
Day said that for a while af-
ter Charles went away in the
mid 1930s, he would return to
Greenville periodically and
give impromptu concerts, be-
fore fame claimed him.
. Sheila Raye Charles, one of
Ray Charles' four children who
attended the ceremony (He had
six boys and six girls alto-
gether), said she couldn't re-
member her father ever talking
about Greenville when she was
growing up.
She said she thought that
part of his life had been pain-
ful for him. But later, when the
film about his life was being
made, he opened up about that
part of his life, she said.
The other Charles' children
who attended Saturday's cere-
mony were Evlyn Robinson,
Raenee Robinson McClellan,
and Corey Robinson.
All received a warm welcome
from the community. Indeed,
Ray Charles' family members
were surrounded by autograph
and photograph seekers during
their entire visit.
Born Ray Charles Robinson
on Sept. 23, 1930, Greenville
residents say they simply
called him "RC" in his boy-
(See Cooleys Score Page 2)


Bless Beast Fundraiser


Brings In $12,000 Plus


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Bless the Beast Humane So-
ciety fundraiser held Saturday
at the Opera House raised
more than $12,000.
Organizers had hoped to
raise some $10,000, and
President Caroline Carswell
said: "I'd be shocked if we
didn't raise at least $12,000 or
$13,000."
She added that the final
talley has not yet been com-
pleted.
Available tickets for the
event numbered 250, with
243 tickets sold before the
event.
"We had a lot of people

V,. ba
J' .v ...


who showed up at the door,
and about 225 people present,
because some bought tickets
as donations," Carswell said.
Two cash bars were in op-
erations, grossing some
$1,100.

Organization
Exceeds Goal

DJ Nick Baglione, and Scott
Carsweii, Jr. provided enter-
tainment.
Auctioneers Ron Cox and
Col. Jacobs, with the help of
Tina Ames and Caroline Car-
well, kept things moving along
briskly.
Many bid on a wide variety
of silent auction items, which

g .i. 1


included everything from
handmade jewelry, books, ar-
tistic prints, tools, quilts, tum-
blers and the like.
Winners of the horse raffles
included Susan King of La-
mont winning'Bella, a Chest-
nut 15-hand Quarter horse
mare, and Brenda Wilfong of
Monticello won Bo, a Chest-
nut 17-hand Quarter horse
gelding, which was donated
by Mercer and Katie Faring-
ton.
"We so greatly appreciate
the help and support of all of
the community and donors,"
said Carswell. "The event
wouldn't have been a success
without them."
(See Bless The Beast Page 2)


ACA GIRLS in the cross country team carried the fitness flag on Saturday. From left,
Elizabeth Shirley, Taylor Baez-Pridgeon, Rikki Roccanti, and Aiex Searcy. (News
Photo)


RON COX, the auctioneer at the Humane Society's Bless the Beast fundraiser, calls
out items while Tina Ames, background, holds up the appropriate display. The fund-
raiser exceeded the organization's goal. (News Photo)
(See Additional Photos Pg. 7)


Lady Warriors Run Step Up

Florida Fitness Flag To Park


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In her remarks about Step Up
Florida, at the Recreation
Park, Saturday, Mayor Julie
Conley said:
"You might wonder why I,
or any other City official
would be excited about the
event. Let me tell you why:
"There is an important link
between healthy men and
women and children, and the


smart growth of our town and
our economy.
"At the City level, we're en-
couraging all to make healthy
choices by building the new
Ike Anderson bike and walk-
ing path, which is almost fin-
ished, by extending the
sidewalk to the Health De-
partment, and by beginning to
require developers to connect
their new neighborhoods to
town using bike paths and
sidewalks, in addition to
roads."


Activities began in Wacissa
with a walk led by the DOers
Club, diabetes support group,
and continued with a bike ride
from Wacissa, through Capps,
and ending at the Winn Dixie
shopping center parking lot.
From the parking lot, four
members of the Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy girl's cross
county team with Assistant
Coach Richard Roccanti, ran
the flag to the Recreation
Park.
(See Step Up Florida Page 2)


OU -IN 1










PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006



STiger Times School Paper


i Resumes Publication


MEMBERS of Ray Charles' family pose with the Cooleys
and friends. From left, front row: Corey Robinson, Rae-
nee Robinson McClellan and Brad Cooley Jr. Back row:
Joe Reams III (his great grandfather helped get Charles
into the St. Augustine school, his daughter (name un-
known), Sheila Raye Charles and Bradley Cooley Sr.
(News Photo)


Cooleys Score


(Continued From Page 1)
hood.
His stay in Greenville was
short and marred by tragedy,
however. Charles lost his
younger brother to drowning
when he was five and he lost
his sight to glaucoma two
years later.
At that point, his mother --
with the help of white friends
in the town -- got Charles into
the School for the Deaf and
Blind in St. Augustine, FL,
where he developed his musi-
cal talent.
Charles returned to Green-
ville summers and holidays
until age 15, when his mother
died, leaving him alone in the
world.
He stayed with friends in
Jacksonville for about a year
after that, playing vwithf bands
whenever and wherever he
could. He subsequently moved
to Orlando and then Tampa
and finally Seattle, according
to his autobiography.
In 1959, Ray Charles' musi-
cal career took off with the re-
lease of "What'd I Say ( Part
1)", one of the first rhythm and
blues songs to successfully
cross over into the pop rock


charts.
He followed that with "Geor-
gia On My Mind" in 1960,
which became one of his sig-
nature tunes and which the
state of Georgia eventually
adopted as its official state
song.
In 1961 Charles recorded
"Hit The Road, Jack", a No. 1
pop hit that won the Grammy
Award for rhythm and blues
recording that year.
Another of his hits was Un-
chain My Heart in 1962.
Ray: The Movie, starring Ja-
mie Fox, appeared in theaters
in 2004.
The Cooleys are known for
their meticulous attention to
detail in the creation of their
bronze sculptures, which are
displayed nationally and inter-
nationally. The father-and-son
-team specializes in monumen-
tal works and tend to focus on
wildlife and Native American
themes. They have, however,
on occasion sculpted several
golfing legends and also legen-
dary singer Otis Redding, of
"Sitting on the Dock of a Bay"
fame.
The Cooleys' studio, Bronze
by Cooley, is located on their
100-plus acre property just
south of Lamont.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

For the first time in three
years, the Tiger Times is back
in production at Jefferson
County High School.
Overseeing the revived
school newspaper is Major
Eugene McKinney and work-
ing as writers for the publica-
tion full time are: Jairamy
Goode, Adrienne Hamilton
and part time, Jessika West-
brook.
"I like to write," said Goode,
16. "I began exploring jour-
nalism in class and it's pretty
good, if you can get good sto-
ries."
He said that some of the
topics covered thus far in the
Tigers Times includes a lot of
materials on the FCAT, the
JROTC Military Ball, upcom-
ing sporting events and game
results, features, student art
work and stories about the,
new JCHS Psychology class,
to name a few.
"I really enjoy it," said
Goode. "We work on it every
day during sixth period and
we put the paper out once per
month, usually about the first,
and the paper is approxi-
mately 10 pages long."
He added that he has had an
interest in journalism for the
past several years, but hadn't
had the opportunity until now
to pursue it.
"I'm thinking about pursu-
ing a journalism career while
I'm in the military," he con-
cluded.
Westbrook, 17 said she has
always. been interested in
writing. "I like working on
the paper and I enjoy all kinds
of writing," she said. "We
don't have particular beats
that we work on, we all do a.: ,
little bit of everything.


She added that it makes it
easy not to step on each oth-
ers toes by inadvertently pur-
suing the same stories
because the threesome are
close friends and talk often.
"Most of the time we work
individually on stories, but
there are occasions where we
may pair up on one," she said.
The paper has been in pro-
duction since the beginning of
the school year and thus far,
the three have released three
to four issues.
"Sometimes, it's really hard
to get stories," said West-
brook. "Like January is al-
ways pretty slim because
nothing is really happening,
but February is so busy it's al-
most like a mad house.
She concluded that for the
publication, students also do
their own photography and
developing for the paper.
Hamilton was not available
for comment.


Freedom of

the Press ls

Everybody's

Freedom!!


NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP

The Jefferson County Utility Develop-
ment Committee will participate in a
public workshop with the Jefferson
County Planning Commission, at which
time the JCUDC will make a presenta-
tion on Urban Service Area. The meeting
will be:

Thursday, February 23, 2006 7:00 p.m.
at the County Courthouse

Dick Bailar, Chairman
JCUDC
Bruce Ballister, Consultant
ARPC


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Bless The Beast


(Continued From Page 1)
Items which were not bid
on, are still available and all
proceeds will go toward the
shelter.
Volunteers for the event in-
cluded Julie Carswell of the
Moon in Tallahassee, who do-
nated water, linens, extra
chairs and who did all of the
decorations; Cheryl Bautista,
Brenda Earle, Stacey Comeli-
ous and Ericka Imbrunone,
who all donated their services
and tips for bar tending;
members of the JCHS Key
Club, for acting as servers;
Leroy Milligan of Shell Oys-
ter Bar, who donated all of
the fried shrimp, oysters,
grouper and labor preparing
the items; Joseph Bautista,
who served as kitchen man-
ager; Hilltop, for donating the


egg salad and chicken salad
sandwiches; Al Jerauld, who
grilled the pork tenderloin and
chicken wings; and Kevin
Kelly, Cheryl Bautista and
Caroline Carswell for prepar-
ing the remainder of the food
provided.
Working the ticket booths
were Carol Austin and Kandy
Crowe. Angela Henderson
worked the silent auction.
Assisting with the silent and
live auctions were Paige
Thurman and Woody Vollert-
sen.
Stewart Wheeler of Stewart's
BP donated ice and Sammy
Gray of Big Bend Pest Con-
trol, also donated ice.
The list of donors was not
complete at press time, but
will be forthcoming when
completed.


Step Up Florida
(Continued From Page 1)The Health Department
The team ran South Jeffer- staff and volunteers offered
son Street and cut over to util- water and balloons to the
ize the new Ike Anderson walkers.
Bike Trail. Participants received T-
The fitness flag was then shirts to wear during the ac-
passed to a second bicycling tivities.
team, which transported the Signup forms were distrib-
flag to the Jefferson/Madison uted by Hagan, an experi-
county line where the flag enced exercise instructor,
was passed to the Madison offering to provide free train-
team. ing and support for group
At the Recreation Park, Te- leaders.
quila Hagan led a warm-up
and stretch session, after Training classes are planned
which Conley and County in Physical Activity and
Commission Chair Danny Walking. The first class meets
Monroe led spectators around 11 a.m., Saturday, south of
the walking path at the park town, and 6:30 p.m.
veering down the Ike Ander- Thursday, Mach 3, near the
son Bike Trail to US-90. center of town.






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006 PAGE 3


DISTRICT Office, Employee of the Year nominee, Gwen Halpin, was presented a
plaque at a recent School Board meeting. From left, Asst. Superintendent Dr. Kelvin-
Norton, Halpin, Judy Surles, of Teacher's Credit Union, and Jerry Boatwright, of FMB.


ACCEPTING a plaque of recognition from Principal Chalmus Thomas, left, is Stepha-
nie Roberts Judy Surles, and Jerry Boatwright.


-Q- fl i ll ICIB /
MAE ALICE HOWARD, was recognized as Transportation, Food Service Employee of JORETHA SLOAN was honored with a plaque of recognition as Employee of the Year
Year Nominee. Left to right, Supervisor Willie Carr, Howard, Judy Surles, Jerry Boat- nominee of Jefferson Elementary School. From left, Principal Kay Collins, Sloan,
wright. Jerry Boatwright, Judy Surles. (News Photos)


N'


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Warehouse, LLc
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006
............................. ..... ........


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Officers' Deaths


Decline In 2005


_ Opinion & Comment


Fewer law enforcement offi-
cers died in the line of duty in
2005 than in previous years
because of improvements in
body armor, better training and
less-lethal weapons.
A recent report indicates that
153 law enforcement officers
across the nation died in the
line of duty, marking a contin-
ued downward trend over the
past 30 years.
During the 1970's, more than
220 officers were killed each
year, making it the deadliest
decade in law enforcement his-
tory. But with the exception
of 2001 and the high numbers
of officers killed in the 9/11 at-
tacks, the officer fatality rate
has declined to 160 per year.
California, which lost 17 of-
ficers over the past year, had
-he:,'hation's most line-of-duty
fatalities, followed by Texas,
with 14, and Georgia, with 10.
These figures were released
by the National Law Enforce-
ment Officers Memorial Fund
(NLEOMF) and the Concerns
of Police Survivors (COPS),
two nonprofit organizations.
While deaths have declined,
further safety measures are
called for.
The fact remains that an offi-
cer dies nearly every other
day, and 'we need to stay fo-
cused on the measures that will
protect their lives, "said na-
tional Law Enforcement Offi-
cers Memorial Fund Chairman
Craig W. Floyd.
The NLEOMF and its part-


ner organization, the Interna-
tional Association of Chiefs
(IACP), noted the importance
of body armor.
According to the IACP Du-
pont Kevlar Survivors' Club,
which tracks incidents in
which the armor has, saved of-
ficers' lives, nearly 3,000 offi-
cers have been protected from
potentially fatal injuries since
1975. Because this is the sec-
ond consecutive year in which
traffic-related accidents either
equaled or topped gunfire as
the leading cause, of death, the
NLEOMF and COPS are call-
ing for better driver training
for officers, safer automobiles,
and a driving public that is
more attentive to officer safety
when approaching accident
scenes and traffic stops.
Every officer who dies in the
line of duty during 2005 will
be honored at a Candlelight
Vigil on May 13, 2006, during
National Police Week.
"When law enforcement offi-
cers die in the line of duty,
their families need strong sup-
port. Concerns of Police Sur-
vivors will be there for the.
families who lost an officer in
2005, "said COPS National
President Shirley Gibson,
who's son, Police Master Pa-
trol Officer Brian T. Gibson,
was killed in 1997.
NLEOMF operates the Na-
tional Law Enforcement Offi-
cers Memorial in Washington
D.C. To learn more, visit
www.nleomf.com


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 21, 1996
After a thorough search, City
Police have decided that a
bomb threat contained in a
note found at Movie Gallery
on Sunday was a hoax.
Jefferson County High
School 'Math Teacher, Kelvin
Norton has been nominated by
district administrators for the
Ida S. Baker Distinguished Mi-
nority Educator Recognition
Award.
The county currently owed
$200,000 in fees for ambu-
lance service and the collection
rate traditionally running low,
county fathers are looking to
the possibility of hiring a Pro-
fessional collection agency to
bring in the money.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 19, 1986
Commissioner John Ward
wants to impose a four to six
cents local gas tax to fix roads.
The State of Florida allows
counties to impose the local
tax as long as the money is
used for roads.
The School Board and
County Commission have
agreed on a districting plan
with identical district bounda-
ries. T. Buckingham Bird, who
is attorney for both the School
Board and the County Com-


mission, has drawn up a pro-
posed final judgment for the
judge's signature. The order
has not been signed yet. Under
the new plan, at-large elections
are out, and elected officials
will be chosen by voters who
live within each of the five
specific districts.
The Chamber of Commerce
Board of Directors" passed a
resolution last week supporting
the county-wide fire plan.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 19, 1976
The Monticello News which
had been published by John
and Jane Janinda for the past
15 months has been sold to
Ron and Lonna Cichon.
In just 10 days, John Parker,
city superintendent, will leave
has post to take a similar posi-
tion at Pelhan, Ga.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 18, 1966
Miss Connie Anderson,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
C. Anderson of Monticello,
was named Valentine Sweet-
heart at North Florida Junior
College.
Donna Blow received the
Florida State Fair award for
her outstanding accomplish-
ments in 4-H work.
Mrs. Gloria Yaun was
crowned sweetheart at the Beta
Sigma Phi Sweetheart banquet.


GOP Unity Shows Strains


Never mind, that President
Bush's job approval rating is
39 percent, if you really want
to know how he's faring, listen
to his fellow Republicans.
Democrats are expected to
be critical of Bush because dif-
ferences in governing philoso-
phy, not so with his fellow Re-
publicans.
He's under fire across the
board from his handling of the
economy, environment, for-
eign policy, Hurricane Katrina,
wire tapping and the Iraq war.
When the wire tapping story
broke, a Republican friend of
mine, mused that Ted Kenned,
would have had a field day
with this story.
In reality it was Republican
Sen. Arlen Specter who called
for hearings because he was
"gravely concerned about ille-
gal wire taps."
The issue isn't whether or not
the Administration should pur-
sue electronic surveillance in
the interest of national
security. The issue is to do it
within the law and if the law is
inadequate for the task, ask
Congress to pass new legisla-
tion.
This week, it was Republi-
cans in the House who at-
tacked Bush's foreign policy
when Secretary of State Con-


Publisher's

Notebook


I -A~


w aM-~~eca~r l~


Ron Cc iAon


doleeza Rice testified.
The charge was led by Con-
gressman Henry Hyde, a con-
eci'. ,t, es conservative.
Nebraska's Republican Sena-
tor Chuck Hagel has taken on
. \'ce President Cheney over
ihe war in Iraq. -
Cheney claims we're win-
ning and Hagel says more GI's
dying, a spike in bombings,
and the threat of civil war
doesrit't look like winning to
him.
It was Republican Senator
.John McCain who forced the
SPresident to back down on the
torture issue. Bush finally
compromised and agreed to
McCain's bill.
Scathing indictments on the
handling of Hurricane Katrina
came from the Republican


House.
Bush should have been more
engaged early on, the report
said.
The Senate is now conduct-
ing hearings on the failed re-
sponse to Katrina and
Homeland ,Security,,Secretary.
Michael Chertoff is under fire.
Republican .Senator Susan
Collins told. Chertoff point
blank he should resign.

The spiraling federal deficit
under Bush's watch has fiscal
converatives scratching their
heads.
Anger is building amongst
the. fiscal conservatives be-
cause the President has yet to
veto a spending bill.
Then there was the nomina-
tion of Harriet Miers to the Su-
preme Court. The right wing


of the Republican party went
bonkers and she was forced to
withdraw.
Former Georgia Republican
Congressman Bob Barr at-
tacked the Patriot Act from
the get go because it ham-
strung civil liberties.
And, handful of Republican
Senators were key to holding
renewal of the Patriot Act hos-
tage until changes were made.
The President's budget pro-
posed cuts in Medicaid, school
lunches and other programs
that help the most needy and
these are drawing fire from
Republican members of Con-
gress.
After all, one said, we have
to go.hback to our districts and
explain these cuts to voters
while touting tax breaks for the
wealthy.
And, I haven't even men-
tioned the Administration's
plan to lease out port security
to an Arab firm. Republicans
are incensed over that one too.
The problem for the White
House now is the standard
Karl Rove approach of sliming
those who question administra-
tion policies won't work be-
cause the questions and
criticisms are coming from fel-
low Republicans.


Muffy doesn't Love Me?


DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Nothing caused more discus-
sion or raised more emotions
among my students than
breaking the news to them that
their beloved pets did not have
feelings. I don't mean feeling
hot or cold or pain, but the hu-
man ability to formulate emo-
tional feelings such as love,
hate and thoughtfulness.
Humans have a highly devel-
oped cerebral cortex (that is
the 1/4 inch of your brain's
outer surface that provides us
with the unique ability to exer-
cise abstract reasoning and for-
mulate complex thoughts.)
This is where we as humans
are able to contemplate things
like love and hate. The rest of
our brain functions, like those
of other higher orders of ani-


mals, is devoted to rudimen-
tary functions for such things
as seeing, hearing and balance.
Our brain stem controls the
most fundamental of body
functions, heart beat and. respi-
ration.
People desperately want to
believe that little Fluffy is
more than just an intellectually
"dumb" animal. "Certainly,
old Spot must love me, I can
tell just by the way he runs to
greet me and gets so excited
when I come in the door."

Unfortunately, old Spot's re-
actions are not a display of
love or deep thoughtfulness,
but a learned behavior and in-
stinctive response to your arri-
val. After all, you are the ma-
gician who mystically can
make the .food appear or let
him out to pee.
You could be a serial killer


just returning home from some
dastardly deed and old Spot's
response won't change a lick.
Spot doesn't have the ability
to reason, comprehend, or "fig-
ure things out" like a human
can.
Science has a term for when
people strive to transfer human
traits and qualities to animals.
It is Anthropomorphism In
ancient times, people beli. ', d
in Seders, human top and a
hoofed animal from the waist
down. Native Americans
firmly believed in the "spiri-
tual" nature of wild animals
with humanistic qualities.
Not so long go, people be-
lieved in the existence of
Wolfman Thos,- unfortunate
humans who were transformed
into vicious wolves during a
full moon.
Today, many people still


come by these human to ani-
mal transferences quite hon-
estly. Starting with childhood,
our favorite books were filled
with furry little creatures all
dressed up in pants and
dresses, living in tiny grass
cottages deep in the forest.
Even as we got older, char-
acters like Bugs Bunny and the
Ninja Turtles seemed quite
normal. As adults, things
haven't changed much. Today
we have the hke; of Spider
Man and the X-Mien, although
now we are intel!g'rt enough
to 'realized this human to ani-
mal transference does not
really exist.
Despite all their best logic
and common sense, some of
the most intelligent people I
know still want to believe that

(See Muffy Page 5)


Parent Trap: Depression


BY JILL ELISH
Florida State University

A study by Florida State
University professor Robin Si-
mon and Vanderbilt Univer-
sity's Ranae Evenson 'found
that parents have significantly
higher levels of depression
than adults who do not have


children. Even more surprising
the symptom of depression do
not go away when the kids
grow up and move out of the
house.
Empty nest parents, as Si-
mon and Evenson call them,
are no less depressed than non-
parents. The researchers, who
analyzed data from the Na-
tional Survey of Families and


Households, theorize that par-
ents are still involved in their
adult children's lives and con-
tinued to be concerned about
them. That has an emotional
cost.
"Parent have more to worry
about than other people do-
that's the bottom line," Simon
said. "And that worry does not
diminish over time. Parents


worry about their kid's emo-
tional, social, physical and
economic well-being. We
worry about how they're get-
ting along in the world."
One of the most interesting
findings of the study, which
was published in the American
Sociological Association's
Journal of Health and Social
(See Parent Trap Page 5)


From Our Photo File
















'a' ,, .'. ,

1V






THEN Gov. Bob Martinez toured Jefferson Correctional Institutional, In Aug. 1990.
Left to right: Donna Wells, member of the Governor's party, Martinez, Mary Jane Mar-
tinez, and Superintendent Paul Colburn. (News File Photo)


- I


- -


-I I la







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006 PAGE 5


JCHS JROTC Color Guard leads the Step Up Florida group Saturday. (News Photo)


Parent Trap


(Continued From Page 4)
Behavior, is that there is no
type of parent that reports less
depression than non-parents,
Simon said. That is significant
because other major adult roles
in the United States, such as,
being married and employed,
are associated with enhanced
emotional well-being.
They also found that certain
types of parents have higher
levels of depression than other
parents. Parents of adult chil-
dren, whether they live at
home, or not, and parents who
do not have custody of their
minor children have more
symptoms of depression.
This means that parents liv-
ing with their minor children,
whether they are biological,
adopted or stepchildren, have
the least symptoms of depres-
sion a finding that contradicts
the assumption that these par-
ents have the mostdistress.
"Young children in some
ways are emotionally easier,"


Simon said. "Little kids, little
problems. Big kids, big prob-
lems."
Parents who are married also
have fewer symptoms of de-
pression than those who are
unmarried, a finding that sur-
prised neither researcher. But
they were surprised shocked,
actually to find that the effects
of parenthood on depression
were the same for men and
women. These findings are in-
consistent with some earlier
studies and with the assump-
tion that parenthood is more
consequential for the emo-
tional well-being of women,
Simon said.
The findings do not mean
that parents don't find any
pleasure in their roles; it's just
that the emotional costs can
outweigh the psychological
benefits. That's because, as the
saying goes, it takes a village
to raise a child, but in the
United States, parents don't
necessarily have community


support or help from extended
family.
"It's how we do parenting in
this society," Simon said. "We
do it in a very isolated way and
the onus is on us as individuals
to get it right. Our successes
are our own, but so are our
failures. It's emotionally drain-
ing."
The value of a study like this
is that .it presents a realistic
view of the difficulties associ-
ated with parenthood and en-
courages, parents to seek
greater social support, Simon
said.
"Parents should know they
are not alone; other people are
feeling this way, too,"' she
said. "This is a really difficult
role, but we romanticize it in
American culture. Parenthood
is not the way it is in TV com-
mercials."
Fl Fi da r
KidCare
Free or Low
Cost Health
insurance
for Kids


... .7. ., -_ ... .' .




ida Saturday, i are L-R: County Commission Chair Dann
Monroe, Mayor Julie Conley, and Tome Conley. (News

ENROUTE to Ike Anderson Bike Trail for Step Up F
ida Saturday, .are L-R: County Commission-Chair Danny
Monroe, Mayor Julie Conley, and Tome Conley. (News.
Photos)


When was

the last

time you

made an

investment

that saved

lives?


Muffy
(Continued From Page 4)
Muffy can experience love and
have it's "feelings" hurt.
Think about it, if animal's
brains were even remotely ca-
pable of such complex reason-
ing, it would be quite logical to
expect that after all of these
thousands of years living with
humans, they would be able to
speak a few words or do sim-
ple math!
While you may think that
such reasoning is stupid, then
ask yourself about your com-
mon sense when you believe
animal's brains have developed
sufficiently to have abstract
thoughts and emotions. You
can't have it both ways.

P.S. Don't ask your Veteri-
narian! For some of them,
your belief in the humanoid
qualities of your pet is their
bread and butter.


B LIFE
SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier.kids, more iactivi
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong com077n7unity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE
MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO



AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA AMENDING
ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR JURISDICTION; ADOPTING AN
AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP
TO INCLUDE A FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR A CERTAIN
RECENTLY ANNEXED PARCEL CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 85.01
ACRES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2005-17. The future land use map proposed designation is RLD
Residential Low Density for a parcel located on U.S. 90 West (West Washington Street)
and identified on the map below. A public hearing on the ordinance will be conducted by
the Monticello City Council on March 7, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City --all, 245
S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, FL 32344. Interested persons may appear at the meeting
and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. The entire text of the ordinance
may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.


If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The

MONTICELLO NEWS
You Can't Be Without It
_-__


i i i I















PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006


Lifestyle


.. M


11,964 Boxes
Of Girls Scout
Cookies Arrive

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Girl Scout cookies--11,964
boxes--arrived Monday, and
scouts will be out in force sell-
ing and distributing the cook-
ies.
On Monday afternoon Kathy
Bueschel, the designated
cookie counter for the Jeffer-
son County troops met with
the driver at the Eagles Nest
Scout Hut to accept the truck
load of cookies.
Girl Scouts will have booths
set up in front of the Movie
Gallery on South Jefferson
Street the next few Friday eve-
nings, and also on Saturdays at
the Winn Dixie -
Cookies sell for $3 a box.


,*


KATHY BUESCHEL helps unload 11,964 cases of Girl Scout Cookies
man Andrew Ritter, at Eagles' Nest Scout Hut, last week. (News Photo)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

December 2005 Youth of the
Month for the Monticello/Jef-
ferson Boys and Girls Club is
Janee N. Jones.
She is six years old and at-
tends Jefferson Elementary
School.
Jones has been a member of
the Club for two years, and has
two younger brothers that at-


with delivery


tend the Club with her.
Her favorite activities at the
Club include manning the
Welcome Station; working on
the computers in the computer
lab; and the enrichment and
recreation programs.
In her spare time she loves
riding her bike and playing
ball with her brothers.
Her parents are also active
participants in the programs at
the Club.


Melva Saunders Honored

For Superior Performance
mainll I \ -o


Melva C. Saunders, formerly
of Monticello, and residing in
San Antonio, TX, was nomi-
nated by her supervisor Mat-
thew Parker, and won the
Superior Performer of the
Quarter Award for Sept. 1
through Dec. 31, at her Unit,
the Air Force Center for Envi-
ronmental Excellence, Brooks
City-Base, TX.
Parker also submitted an an-
nual award package that went
before the unit's board, and
Saunders won the Superior
Performer of the Year Award
for 2005.
She received two plaques,
monetary awards, and time off
awards for her honors from the
commander.
Saunders is married to
Wayne G. Saunders, retired
CW3, US Army.
They have two children
Kimberly Saunders, a student


SAUNDERS


at FAMU, and Wayne G.
Saunders II, a sixth grade stu-
dent.
She is the oldest daughter of
Abraham and Josephine Kea-
ton, and daughter-in-law of
Emily Mae Branham, all of
Monticello.


Chili Lunch Benefit


The Jefferson County Health
Department Relay For Life
team will hold a Chili Lunch
benefit from 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23.
A team event to fight cancer.
The meal will include a bowl
of chili, cornbread, a soft
drink, and dessert for $5.


To place an order, call 342-
0170, or just stop by the
Health Department at 1255
West Washington Street.

According to a recent gallop
poll surveys, Americans feel
cancer is the single most dev-
astating disease today.


JANEE JONES was named Boys and Girls Club Student
of the month.



Douglas Cooksey, Jr.

Appointed To West Point


Douglas "Ashton" Cooksey,
Jr, 18, of Tallahassee, has been
appointed to the US Military
Academy at West Point for the
fall of 2006.
He was appointed by Con-
gressman Allen Boyd and
Senator Mel Martinez.
His parents are Doug and
Barbie Cooksey, and sister to
Jennifer Cooksey, Dance
Teacher at ACA.
Grandparents are Trudy
Cooksey, in Tallahassee; the
late Doug and Marian
Cooksey; and the late Glenn
and Emilie Robinson.
His great uncle and aunts in
the area include: Mable
Boykin, Etta Maude Cooksey,
Helen Davis and Mr. and Mrs.
C. A. Cooksey.
He is a senior at Chiles High
School in Tallahassee, where
he was coached in football by
Head Coach Jodie Sprenkle of
Monticello.
As a linebacker/strong
safety, he helped the Timber-
wolves to their best ever win-
ning 6-4 season.
He was 'named Scholar Ath-
lete of the Year for Chiles
Football and received the cov-

Newborn

Classes
Free Newborn Care classes
will be offered at the Jefferson
County Health Department
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 27.
Topics to be discussed in-
clude: newborn appearance,
bathing, diapering, well baby
checkups, immunizations,
breast feeding and positioning,
bottle feeding, taking care of
yourself after childbirth, child
safety, and umbilical cord
care.
Joyce Steele, LPN/Healthy
Start Care coordinator and
classroom instructor can be
reached at 342-0170, ext. 107


COOKSEY


eted 2005 Career Scholar Ath-
lete Scholarship.
He signed under Head Coach
Bobby Ross to play for the US
Military Academy Division 1
Black Nights for "America's
Team," the Army.
He is also involved at Chiles
on the track team, National
Honor Society, Mock Trial
Debate Team and ESE (Spe-
cial Needs) Basketball Head
Coach.


Mignonette Circle Plans

Upcoming Activities

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Mignonette Garden Cir-
cle members and their friends
met at the Lamont home of
Shirley Widd, recently for
lunch and a discussion of the
STour of Homes.
They enjoyed a luncheon of
Cream Chicken and Noodles
prepared by their hostesses
Ethel Strickland, Dottie
Jenkins, and Widd.
"And, Shirley served the
most delicious strawberry
shortcake for dessert," relates
Jan Wadsworth.
Members discussed helping
with the preparations and
decorations of some of the
houses that will be in the Tour
of Homes set for March 25 and
26.
Also discussed was the com-
ing General Meeting, April 20,
at the Christ Episcopal Church
Fellowship Hall, and the Dish
Garden program that will be
presented then.
Wadsworth is scheduled to
instruct the program. She will
ask everyone to bring an 8
inch container to work with.
The Dish Garden creations
will then be taken home by
their creators.
Members also discussed
the upkeep and beautification
of the 'Welcome to Monti-
cello' signs located at the en-
trances to the City on U.S. 19
and U.S. 90.


N:.i


NORTON
CONRAD NORTON, SR.
April 3, 1914-Feb. 21, 2005
It has been a year since you
left us, and there has not been
a day during the year when we
have not thought of you and
missed you.
Although you are gone, we
will never forget you. We will
always love and miss you.
Love always,
Your wife Nettie,
Children Joseph, Gloria,
Conrad, Jr., Pauline, John,
Jerome and "Little Girl"
(Your dog Crystal)


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Janee Jones Named

Club Youth Of Month


Flower Power
LET HAPPINESS BLOOM
Forty years after the poet Alien Ginsberg coined
b the term flower power((1965), research proves that
blossoms actually do spread the happiness and joy the
hippies once believed. The Journal of Evolutionary
Psychology published "An Environmental Approach to
FORAL DESIN Positive Emotion: Flowers." The article describes
FLORAL DESIGNS research studies conducted by Jeannette Haviland-
SINCE 1934 Jones, Ph.D. "Flowers have immediate and long-term
positive effects on emotional reactions, mood, social'
behaviors and even memory for both males and females," Jones said. Jones found that the presence
of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and positively affects social
behavior far beyond what is normally believed. Upon receiving a gift of flowers, the participants of
this study, responded with true smiles and reported positive moods that lasted for days. WomeO and
men were spontaneously given a flower while riding alone in an elevator. Both the women and men
who received flowers demonstrated Increased eye contact in conversation, stood in closer proximity
to the researchers, and produced more and truer smiles than those who did not receive flowers.
"When it comes to receiving flowers, men and women are on the same playing field," said Jones. "It
seems that we all express extraordinary delight and Increase our social behavior."
190 E Dogwood Street ~-Monticello~ 850.997.2015 www.cellingsflowers.corn


I_ ,


Mir -7 M 7 7 w K- ML -


I


v







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006 PAGE 7


Scenes From Bless The Beast Evening


TINA AMES, left, displays the horse print and Auctioneer Joe Cox encourages the DAVID WARD shares a story with Gale Carmoney during the Bless the Beast Humane
bidding at the Bless the Beast fundraiser, Saturday. Society Fundraiser at the Opera House, Saturday.


e;r0A


COL. JACOBS was one of the two auctioneers at the
Bless the Beast Fundraiser. Ron Cox was the second.


DEBBIE SNAPP places her bid in Silent Auction at the POLICE CHIEF David Frisby and his grandson David
Bless the Beast Fundraiser. Moore pose for our camera.


/, ~


FRED GOLDEN places a bid at the silent auction at the
Humane Society fundraiser.



S -l Happy 19th
.. Birthday
Joey
.. =: Feb. 23, 2006



Hope you have a wonderful day..
We are very proud of the changesO
you've made in your life! Keep It Up.
Love Mom & Dad
s I want to let you know you're a special person
and you're my world! I hope you have a
wonderful B-day !
"I Love You Babie"
SLove Jessica S.
"lei//1/ee///'eeY.YeY,/e////


BIDDING on bunny prints
year old Katie Ackles.


at the silent auction is eight


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TINA AMES displays this "furry friends" bouquet do-
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are interspersed among the flowers. (News Photos)







1 rec \Walk-ln Pret cnnc l 'c stilng
Birth Curoil S ci Icc N&formlli
lesting flor .cSex all
I'rain.sim itted 1nfectiorns (S ''.s )
C ol fid nti: ( m I) iN ll:lt
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006

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S o r t MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006 PAGE
I' I


JCHS Boosters

Schedule

Fundraisers

FRAN HUNT
staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School Athletics Boosters will
conduct a bake sale and car
wash 8 a.m. until noon, Satur-
day, at the Post Office.
The bake sale will feature a
variety of sweets from cakes,
cookies, brownies, and the
like .

The car wash was will take
place at the former Northside
Service Statuion next door to--
the Post Office.
Car washes are $5 for a car
and $10 for SUV's and
pickup trucks.
All proceeds will go to
benefit the JCHS athletic de-
partment.


Seminoles To

Plan Banquet,

Tournament

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Semi-
nole Club will meet 6 p.m.,
Thursday at the library to plan
the Annual Golf Tournament
and Banquet.
Many volunteers are needed
in different areas of the event.
These include: collecting door
prizes, obtaining silent auc-
tion items, banquet setup, and
sign-ups, putting contest en-
trants, and sponsorships for
the golf tournament, as well a
someone to serve in public re-
lations for the event.
For further information con-
tact Dean Jerger at 997-1653
or Susan Taylor at 997-3112.



NO Field

For MCA

Ball Teams

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Christian Acad-
emy Pastor Mike Burke re-
vealed last week that the
Chargers will not have base-
ball and softball teams this
year.
"We don't have a field here,
and I thought that we would
be permitted to play our home
games at the Recreation
Park," said Burke.
"When I checked into it, I
was told that we could not
play our home games at the
park because of insurance is-
sues and liabilities for both
our players and those on other
teams."
He concluded that once
MCA constructs their own
fields, the Chargers would be-
gin playing the sports.



ACA JV

BOys Roster

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
announces the roster for the
2006 junior varsity baseball
team.
Coaching the Warriors this
year is Bill Buckhalt.
There are 16 boys on the
team this year. They include;
Casey Anderson, Casey
Wheeler, Luke Whitmer,


Marcus Roberts, Ryan
Pritcher, Brandon Dunbar,
Buddy Vollertsen, Wilson
Lewis and Jacob Newberry.
Also, John Stephens, Kent
Jones, Lane Fraleigh, Brian
Scholte, Joe Mizell, Cody
Kelly and Mason Shriver.


* ^* *f::s ';1 A
all


Lady Warriors Post

Softball Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy.
posts the roster for the varsity
softball team.
Coaching the Lady Warriors
this year is Roslyn Bass as-
sisted by Bill Saunders and
Ginni Joyner.
The Lady Warriors include
senior Keri Brasington, out-
field; and juniors, Brittany
Hobbs, pitcher/infield; Jenni-


..













ACA SOFTBALL TEAM and coaches include: Back, L-R: Roslyn Bass, Bill Saunders,
Ginni Joyner, Keri Brasington, Jennifer Tuten, Hannah Sorensen, Joanna Cobb
Melissa Martin, Lindsey Day. Front: Shaye Eason, Bethany Saunders, Nicole Mathis,
Tristan Sorensen, Paige Thurman, Brittany Hobbs, Chelsea Kinsey.


fer Tuten, infield; Joanna
Cobb, catcher/infield; Melissa
Martin, outfield; and Shaye
Eason, outfield.
Also sophomores Bethany
Saunders,pitcher/infield, and
catcher; Chelsey Kinsey, in-
field; Tristan Sorensen, out-
field; Paige Thurman,
pitcher/outfield; Lindsey Day,
infield; Hannah Sorensen,
-outfield; and Nicole Mathis,
infield.
Serving as team captains are
Brasington and Hobbs.


JROTC Rifle Team


Wins Competition


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High-
School JROTC Rifle Team
won the North Florida
JROTC Rifle Team Champi-
onship Wednesday, at Taylor
County High School in Perry.
The JCHS shooters were
able to beat teams from Co-
lumbia, Lecanto, Liberty
County and Taylor Counties
to win the Championship.
Major Eugene McKinney
said the JCHS team finished
fourth in the league standings
during the competition.
"Most of our team members
are new shooters this year,'
said McKinney. "But the


team practiced and improved
each match during the regular
season.
"We were seeded fourth in
the championship, so no one
gave us much of a chance to
win," said McKinney. "But
our shooters went into the
match with a great mental at-
titude and determination."
He added that he was ex-
tremely proud of the JCHS
young men for what they had
accomplished through much
practice and hard work.
Brenden Curtis won a tro-
phy for second highest
shooter at the match.
JROTC Rifle Team mem-
bers participating in the match
included Curtis, Jacob Con-
nell, Rueal Connell, Demet-
rius Felix and Jeremy Shiver.


Warrior JV Baseball


JCHS JROTC Rifle Team includes: Front, from left: Brenden Curtius, Rueal Connell.
Back, from left, Demetrius Felix, Jeremy Shiver, Jacob Connell.



Lady Warriors Lose District


Tournament To FAMU 66-13


FRAN HUNT
3taff Writer

ACA varsity girl's basket-
ball team wrapped up the sea-
son on a 13-14 overall record,
12-12 on the regular season,
after losing games during the
district and regional tourna-
ments.
The Lady Warriors lost the
district championship to
FAMU, 66-13.
Coach Daryl Adams said
that FAMU is one of the top
ranked teams in the state and
they are good enough that
they will probably be in the
state finals this year.
Mallory Plaines scored four
points; Brittany Hobbs, Cait-
lin Murphy, Lindsey Day, and
Nicole Mathis each scored
two points; and Bethany
Saunders scored one point.
Even though the Lady War-
riors lost the game, they did
come in second place during
the district playoffs, and ven-
tured on to play against
Shekinah of Jacksonville in
the regional competition and
lost 77-15.
Leading the charge for the
Lady Warriors was Plaines
with six points, two rebounds,
one assist, one steal and one
block.
Murphy, one points; Day,
four points, six rebounds, one


steal; and Corie Smith, two
points, three rebounds.
Rikki Roccanti, two points;
Saunders, two rebounds, one


Team Falls
The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JV baseball team lost the
season opener against NFC in
a close 4-3 game last week.
Coach.Bill Buckhalt said
that he saw some very prom-
ising performances from the
Warriors.
Pitcher Casey Anderson
pitched a no-hitter until the
fifth inning, which was phe-


TO NFC
nomenal for a young athlete,
and he only allowed one hit
during the game after that.
Although the Warriors had
six hits, Buckhalt said that too
many little mistakes is what
cost the Warriors the win.
Anderson scored one run;
Casey Wheeler went two for
three; and Luke Whitmer and
Mason Shiver each scored
one run.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006


Valentine's Day Busier Than


Usual For Local Florists


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Local florists describe hec-
tic events on Valentine's Day.
Monticello Florist and Gifts
owner Edye Corley said this
year's Valentine's Day was
much busier than normal,
with four people working to
fill and deliver orders.


County Farm Service Agency
Director Mark Demott reports
that USDA will begin notify-
ing agricultural producers with
Conservation Reserve Program
(CRP) contracts expiring in
2007, that they may extend or
re-enroll their contracts.
Agriculture Secretary Mike
Johanns said: "Approximately
16 million acres subject to
CRP contracts expire in 2007.
"Fulfilling President Bush's
directive to allow eligible
farmers and ranchers to re-
enroll or extend their CPR


NO
Payments,
Interest or
Down
Payment
for
1 FULL
YEAR"


Corley said that all day their
previous Saturday and Sun-
day, they worked and pre-
pared orders which were al-
ready placed.
Once the shop opened and
the first delivery was ready to
go out things became hectic.
"We made deliveries from
early morning until 7:30 that
night," said Corley.
Flowers were the biggest


contracts helps ensure that the
quality of soil, water, air, and
wildlife benefits of CPR con-
tinue across the nation for
years to come."
Farm service Agency (FSA)
county officers will begin noti-
fying CPR participants by mail
with expiring contracts in
2007, if they are eligible for
re-enrollment, or two to five
year extensions. .
Participants eligible for re-
enrollment will be offered a 10
or 15 year contract, provided
they are restored wetlands on


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seller, even though orders
were placed for candy, bal-
loons, gift baskets, stuffed
animals and the like.
Most of the last minute
customers were men, Corley
said.
Gelling's Florist owner Er-
icka Imbrunone said her shop
was hectic throughout the
day.


original land enrolled in the
contract.
Fifteen year contracts expir-
ing Sept. 30, 2007, are not eli-
gible for extension.
Before approving a re-
enrollment contract, or an ex-
tended contract, Farm Service
Agency will review the con-
tract to ensure that the required
cover is maintained and there
is compliance with other con-
tract provisions.
In addition, to be eligible,
participants must be able to
show that they meet eligibility
requirements for the new en-
rollment period.
In the case of re-enrollments,
updated rental rates will apply.
Offers for general sign-up
will be evaluated based on vie
environmental factors: (wild-
life, water, soil, air, and endur-
ing benefits) and cost.
For additional information,
contact the local FSA office at
997-2072.

'Bart' Named

Pet Of Week
"Bart" has been named fe-
line Pet of the Week by the
Humane Society.
Bart is a four month-old,
male Siamese mix.
He has been neutered and all
vaccinations are current. '
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista describes him as be-
ing a somewhat shy animal at
first, until he gets to know
someone.
After he gets used to some-
one being around, he does en-
joy a periodic throat rub or
scuff nuzzle.
To adopt Bart or any of the
other many loving pets at the
shelter call 342-0244.


"I had five designers, 15
people working in the shop
and five delivery vehicles on
the road," said Imbrunone.
"We had the orders that
came in early ready for deliv-
ery at 7 a.m. on Valentine's
Day. A lot were set up on
Monday, but Valentine's Day,
there were a large number of
last-minute walk-ins. The fi-
nal delivery of the day was
made at 8:30 p.m.
She said most of those wait-
ing until the last minute were
men. "We need to educate
them," Imbrunone quipped.
"Planning early is every-
thing, but even though a num-
ber waited until the last
minute, everything worked
out beautifully."
At about 4 p.m., Imbrunone
sent several of her workers to
the courthouse circle to possi-
ble catch those who may have
forgotten that it was Valen-
tine's Day.
They were armed with roses,
Teddy bears and balloons.
They were also armed with
colorful signs stating, "Oh
No! You Forgot Valentines?"
"When they came back* at
dark, they had sold all but one
deflated balloon, one Teddy
bear and one headless rose,"
said Imbrunone.
She added that on an aver-
age day, she may make 5-20
deliveries, on Valentines Day,
"We made hundreds," she
said.
Red roses were the most
popular flowers ordered.
"Red roses mean love and
Valentine's is love," said Im-
bnrunone. "We're back to
business as usual now, serv-
ing the community, I feel like
now I can actually take a
breather and recuperate."
Both shop owners agree that
they had an exceptional holi-
day and they thank the mem-
bers of the community for
their support during the Val-
entine's Day holiday.


LEGALS
NOTICE APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 289 Year
of Issuance 2002. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" A parcel of
land in Section 13, Township 1
South, Range 3 East, commence at
the Northeast corner of Desota
Drive and the South boundary of
Old St. Augustine Road; thence run
East 1266 feet along the south


boundary of the Old St. Augustine
Road to a concrete monument to a
Point of Beginning (said concrete
monument is 570.8 feet West from
the corner of Old St. Augustine
Road and Armstrong Road); from
the Point of Beginning run South 33
degrees 3 minutes 30 seconds East
300 feet; thence run West 200 feet,
thence run North 33 degrees 3 min-
utes 30 seconds West 300 feet; then
run East 200 feet to the Point of
Beginning, containing 1.5 acres,
more or less. Name in which
assessed Ollie L. Evans, Jr. All of
said property being in the County of
Jefferson, State of Florida. Unless
such certificate or certificates shall
be redeemed according to law the
property described in such certifi-
cate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house
door on the 22nd day of March,
2006, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th
day of February, 2006. Dale Boat-
wright, Clerk of Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida.
2/15, 2/22, 3/1, 3/8, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 719 Year
of Issuance 2001. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" Commence at
the Southeast corner of the South-
west quarter of the Southeast quar-
ter of section 17, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, Jefferson County,
Florida and run S. 0 degrees 16
minutes 15 seconds W. 346.3 feet to
a point on the Northerly right-of-
way line of the S.C.L. Railroad,
thence N. 76 degrees 51 minutes 24
seconds W. 2133.19 feet along said
right-of-way line to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence continue N. 76
degrees 51 minutes 24 seconds W.
165.11 feet along said right-of-way
line to a point, thence leaving said
right-of-way line run N. 7 degrees
28 minutes 18 seconds E. 534.17 feet
to a point, thence S. 77 degrees 16
minutes E. 165.0 feet to a point,
thence S. 7 degrees 28 minutes 18
seconds W. 535.36 feet to the point
of beginning.'Containing 2.02 acres,
more or less, and being a part of the
Southeast quarter of the Southwest
quarter of section 17, Township 1
North, Range 6 East, Jefferson
County, Florida. Name in which
assessed Willie and Sammie Lou
Baldwin. All of said property being
in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property
described in such certificate or cer-
tificates will be sold to the highest
bidder at the court house door on
the 22nd day of March, 2006 at
11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of
February, 2006. Dale Boatwright.
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida.
2/15, 2/22, 3/1, 3/8, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that John E. Hawkins the
holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follow: Certificate No. 717. Year


of Issuance 2001. Description or
Property Exhibit "A" A certain lot
in Town of Aucilla, Florida, and
beginning at the NW corner of the
E.R. Kinsey Store lot and running
W. 20 feet, thence running S. 30
feet, thence running E. 20 feet, and
thence running N. 30 feet and to the
point of beginning. Name in which
assessed Ray Deal & James Sparks.
All of said property being in the
County of Jefferson, State of Flor-
ida. Unless such certificate or cer-
tificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property
described in such certificate or cer-
tificates will be sold to the highest
bidder at the court house door on
the 22nd day of March, 2006, at
11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of
February, 2006. Dale Boatwright,
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida.
2/15, 2/22, 3/1, 3/8, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE.: The Estate of CATHRYN
B. HICKS, Deceased NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION The
administration of the Estate of
CATHRYN B. HICKS, Deceased is
pending in the Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is:
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida 32344. The
names and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIM,
DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this Notice is
February 22, 2006. Dated this 15th
day of February, 2006. Brain T.
Hayes Fl Bar. I.D. #0034687; P.O.
Box 1275, Monticello, FL 32305,
850-997-2065. Attorney of
Co-Personal Representatives.;
Oliver J. Hicks, as Co-Personal
Representative of Estate of Cathryn
B. Hicks
2/22, 3/1, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006 PAGE 11


W 7 : -

CS -_
.Y ou- ---m-_- z-. S- -_ --
^y ^m....^^


CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION CITICORP TRUST
BANK, FSB, F/K/A TRAVELERS
BANK & TRUST, FSB, CASE no.
02-399-CA Plaintiff, vs DONALD
GRAHAM; JANE DOE GRAHAM,
THE UNKNOWN WIFE OF
DONALD GRAHAM; BRENDA
STUBBINS GRAHAM; JOHN DOE
GRAHAM, THE UNKNOWN
HUSBAND OF BRENDA
STUBBINS GRAHAM; IF LIVING
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS; JOHN
DOE, UNKNOWN TENANT;
JANE DOE UNKNOWN TENANT,
Defendants) NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in
the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson County,
Florida I will sell the property
situate in Jefferson County, Florida
described as: A PORTION OF
THAT PROPERTY DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
170. PAGE 552 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED BY RECENT
SURVEY AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 3
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA
AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES
45' 32" EAST 296.58 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 32'
59" WEST 331.20 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 687.25
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 31 DEGREES 59' 15"
EAST 90.0 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD; THENCE SOUTH 58
DEGREES 00' 45" WEST 160.0
FEET TO AN IRON ROD;
THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES
59' 15" EAST 135.05 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD ON THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
OF COUNTY ROAD 149a;
THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES
59' 38" WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE 105.67
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH
89 DEGREES 45' 32" WEST 577.98
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND
TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT
EASEMENT, SAID EASEMENT
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 5
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 296.58
FEET TO AN IRON ROD;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES
32' 59" WEST 331.20 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 45' 32" EAST 651.97
FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES
45' 32" EAST 35.28 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE SOUTH 31
DEGREES 59' 15" EAST 225.0
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 149A; THENCE
SOUTH 57 DEGREES 59' 38"
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 30.0 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE NORTH 31
DEGREES 59' 15" WEST 243.57
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. A/K/A RURAL
ROUTE 2 BOX 89B
MONTICELLO FLORIDA 32344
at public sale to the highest and best
bidder, for cash at the North Door
of the Jefferson County o'lrthouse,
Monticello, Florida at 1' 00 a.m. on
the 16th day of March, 2006. THIS
INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
3204 King Palm Drive Tampa,
Florida 33619-1328 Attorneys for
Plaintiff. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending the


notice not later than seven days
prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. If
hearing impaired (TDD)
1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770
(voice) via Florida Relay Service."
2/22, 3/1, c


Inspector Position: High School
graduate, minimum five years
experience as a Florida State
Registered or certified Contrac-
tor, or a One and Two Family
Dwelling Certificate. Must be
able to qualify for a Provisional
Inspector Certificate. Applica-
tions are available online or at
the Building Inspector's Office
at 445 W. Palmer Mill Rd.,
Monticello. For more informa-
tion please call The Building Of-
ficial, Wallace Bullock at
342-0223 ext 104 or visit the Jef-
ferson County website
www.co.jefferson.fl.us
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, c
Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Wood Worker Wanted Basic
experience with wood working
tools required. Must be self
motivated and have good phone
skills. Call 997-4913 or
567-4664.
2/22, 24,3/1,3, 8, 10, c
Loving Caregivers Needed
Friendly, cheerful, dependable.
Elderly with non-medical.
Companionship and home care.
Very rewarding work. Flexible
day, evening, and weekend
schedules. Home Instead Senior
Care Call 915-9961
Electricians/Apprentices Needed
House wiring experience and
driver's license required.
Benefit Package Tallahassee
Area. Call 850-562-1817,
DFWP/EC13003044
2/15, 17, 22, c
The Jefferson County Public
Library is accepting
applications for a Children's
Librarian Specialist. This
person creates implements and
presents agency and community
programs for children ages
1- 12 years of age and child
related programs for parents,
caregivers and teachers.
Providers reference and
reader's advisory services and
interprets policies and
procedures of the library.
Develops and maintains a
reference and circulation
collection for juvenile patrons.
The job requirements include
experience working with
children, an ALA accredited
degree in library science. Any
equivalent combination of
training and experience which
provides the required
knowledge, skill and abilities
may be considered. Hours and
salary are negotiable.
Applications are available at the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, or may be obtained
online at the Jefferson County,
Florida website:
wwwJefferson.lib.fl.us. Position
is open online at the Jefferson
County Florida Jefferson
County Public Library, 375
South Water Street, Monticello,
FL 32344. Telephone:
850-342-0205. Contact person:
Linda Hamedani, Library
Director.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, c
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Prior
experience working with
children who have emotional
issues required. Some local
travel required. License
required. Shift: Monday-Friday
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
Masters Level Therapist #2267:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness.
Substances abuse knowledge
preferred. Some local travel
required. License preferred


shift: 8am 5pm M-F.
Clinical Supervision Specialist
(1451): Masters Degree with
from an accredited university of
college with a major in the field
of counseling, social work,


psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services, healthcare, or
management field. Shift 8 am 5
pm M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2266c:
Masters .Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the fields of
counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. License
required. Some local travel
required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift:
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
Clinical Supervision Specialist
1451 Masters degree from an
accredited University or College
with a Major in the field of
counseling, social work,
psychology, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services, healthcare, or
management field. Shift: 8 a.m.
- 5 p.m. Monday Friday
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
2/22, c
My business is parking lot and
roadway striping, asphalt repair
and other parking lot
maintenance. I am seeking an
employee who is emotionally
mature, physically fit, drug-free
and has the moral character to
lead. If you are just looking for
a job to get a paycheck, please
don't call. If you believe you
have the qualifications I am
seeking, call me @ 545-1776. No
calls taken after 7 pm and on
Sunday.
2/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 3/1, 3, c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c

SERVICES

Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Handyman- Professional job
home repair and cleaning,
Drywall, siding, gutter,
painting, int./ext/ 997-3587, cell
251-4575.
2/22, 24, 3/1, 3, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn
N n INU I mNi


Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
Peters Satellite Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.
tfn, 1/25
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn


Black Pug "Sam" Male/ injury?
20 lbs. Hit by car on Hwy 59
(Gamble Rd) Ran into
Hiawatha Farms in Lloyd
Contact Sally, 1174 Gamble
Rd.; 997-5868, 509-8913

FQORSALE' :
Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Purebred Limousine Bull,
born 7/4 $1,000. Call 997-0901
leave message or 997-3568, ask
for Debbie
Juicer Juicemar Jr. used once.
$20 (OBO) Treadmill $500,
Gas Grill with side burner $25
(OBO). Call 997-4253.
tfn
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
2/8-2/27, pd

FOR RENT
Country Living 1 bed, 1 bath,
$500, 997-6653
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22,
24, pd
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.

REAL ESTATE
Timber and land tracts of 1,000
acres or more wanted for
immediate acquisition. All cask
buyers contact Mark Allender,
broker phone 352-281-3767
tfn, c

AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2,tfn
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3500 CASH. Clean, new tires.
Call 997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
2001 F350, diesel 7.3 litters.
Cure Cap Duly $20,000 Call
519-6506
2/15-2/27, pd
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. $4,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500 below NADA
Book.
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson
Auto, LLC.
tfn, c
'89 Astro 18ft with trailer. Good
condition
89' Mariner 135 HP Excellent
Condition.
'Twin Fish Finders 12/24v
Trolling Motor $3,800 FIRM!.
Home: 997-4081 Cell 339-2406.
2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24 pd
'1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3500 CASH. Clean New tires.
Call 997-2646. M-Th 9-5.
tfn,c

SATELLITE
INSTALLERS
$33K $36K First
Year! Will Train!!
Advancement
Opportunities!
visit
www.hrmcacclaim.com/
apply/drscareer
Lm
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Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
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# Giving Back To Our Community



tlg PROPERTIES
Friday, Feb. 24h
W 6:30pm- ll:30pm
At the Opera House
With Live Entertainment By: 19 South
S tTickets are $25 Per Person sW
Price of tickets includes: entertainment, dnnks, food & door prizes
Topurchase tickets stop by our office or call 997-5516


-J0JJ9


Simply the Best!


(850) 997-4340
Country Livinq Under Contract 2000 dou-
ble wide 3 bedroom 2 baths, screened porch
on a very pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres
$74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, nice family room
$87,500

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house w/
bath, big shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100
pecan trees and a nice pool a real dream for
a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Choice Property 29 acres of beautiful forest
and fields near the edge of town $290,000

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Groover-
ville Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000


Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 22, 2006


Barnhart Earns GED Under


Sheriffs' Grant Program


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Corey Barnhart was the
28th graduate of the Adult
School this year
He earned his GED while an
inmate at the County Jail.
.Sheriff David Hobbs said
he fully supports the GED
program and congratulated


SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS, left, and Adult School Principal Artis Johnson, congratulate-
Corey Barnhart upon earning his GED. (News Photo)




County Coalition FOcus On


Improving Parenting Skills


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Jefferson County Com-
munity Coalition met in Janu-
*ary to focus on the issues
which were related to 'societal
and cultural norms' as contrib-
uting factors to local statistics.
Some of these include acci-
dental child deaths, (Jefferson
County is triple the state aver-
age,) school suspensions,
(again Jefferson is triple the
state average,) infant mortality,
(double the state,) and low
birth weight babies, (Jefferson
has not met the state average
16 out of the last 20 years.)
George Hinchliffe began the
presentation by discussing
child death rates, adding the
number one cause of death in
African American children,
ages 1-14, in the county were
automobile accidents with no
seat belts.
He gave a detailed illustra-
tion of the remaining issues,
each unrelated to funding and
encouraged the members pre-


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council last week -
conditionally approved the site
plan for the installation of an
industrial sized ice-vending
machine at 845 East Washing-
ton Street.
Among the conditions the
council imposed on applicant
George Koller, he must install
a six-foot opaque fence along
the southern boundary of the
property to obstruct the ma-
chine from the view of adja-
cent residences; and he must
comply with all applicable
state and local permitting re-
quirements.
Considered to be a "package
ice plant" by the Department
of Agriculture, which permits
and regulates the units, stand-
alone ice-vending machines re-
portedly represent the latest
trend in the self-service indus-
try.
The giant coin-operated ma-
chines require no full-time
service personnel to dispense
ice, either in bags or in bulk. A


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sent to strategize on ways to
affect the societal norms that
are having such a devastating
effect on the county's
-statistics.
The group focused on lack of
parenting or inadequate par-
enting throughout the county
and the indirect result of "F"
schools.
Ed Vollertsen represented
the school district by adding
that the general public only
sees the negative view of the
county school system; he
noted a need for advocacy for
the schools.
For instance, County seniors
received 13 Bright Future
Scholarships last year and has
had three graduates from the
same class further their educa-
tion at West Point.
He added that it is the lack of
parenting that presents obsta-
cles to overturning the stigma
of the "F" rating.
Many members of the faith
based community echoed his
concerns, citing firsthand ex-
periences of lack of parenting
in the community.


typical unit is described as be-
ing 24 feet long and eight feet
tall.
The units reportedly are
more popular in coastal com-
munities, where many people
boat and have need of great
quantities of ice.
Cost of the unit is reportedly
in the $100,000-plus price
range.


All members present agreed-
how this ties into the overall
problem of school suspensions
presented earlier;
Lack of parenting in early
childhood presents a child who
is not ready to enter school,
who is not equipped with the
desire to learn, and is unpre-
pared socially.
This, in turn, presents obsta-
cles for the teachers who have
too wide a gap between the
children who are school-ready
and those who are not ready to
enter the system.
It was clear from the discus-
sions that the central focus of
the group and the long term
strategies for the county
should include an infrastruc-
ture that encourages positive,
interactive parenting with liter-
acy components.
Members also agreed that the
new Mentoring Program in the
county would be a step in the
direction of developing some
support structure through the
school system.
The Focus on Achievement
mentoring program is a part-
nership between the Florida
League of Cities and the Flor-
ida mentoring Partnership.
Interested parties are encour-
aged to contact Mayor Julie
Conley at 997-6559, or Edna
Henry, coordinator at 342-
0115.
The regular monthly meet-
ings of the Community Coali-
tion Shared Services are to
begin with the Feb. 28
meeting. With the stage set to
tackle the lack of parenting is-
sue, the guest speaker will en-
hance the memberships knowl-
edge of the limited resources
available to deal with the
growing problem.


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Barnhart on reaching his goal
and said that all involved
were rooting for him to have a
better life.

Adult School Principal
Artis Johnson explained that
the program is made possible
by a grant through Jefferson,
Wakulla and Franklin County
Sheriffs offices, to provide
inmates in the correctional


Sen. Campbell Speaks

To Local Democrats


Jefferson County Democrats
met their candidate for Attor-
..ney General, Senator "Skip"
Campbell, Tuesday at a meet-
ing of the party.
A crowd of more than 50
people welcomed Campbell on
his first visit to Jefferson
County, in this campaign.
A Broward County attorney
and State Senator for 10 years,
Campbell emphasized that he
will be the people's lawyer,
fighting for citizens and state
against fraud, price gouging,
and the like.
S He spent six years in semi-
nary and said: "God is impor-
tant to all of us. We believe in
family values, God and coun-
try."
Campbell said that our coun-
try was founded on a system of
checks and balances, and that


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we need a strong two party
system.
"Any extreme does not work
for most of us," he said. One
important job of the Attorney
General of Florida is to sit on
the Board of Education along
with the Governor, Agriculture
Commissioner, and Chief Fi-
nancial Officer, currently held
by Republicans.
As a Cabinet member,
Campbell pledged to "work to-
gether to get things done."
Among topics discussed
were: FCAT, Perkins Bill, out-
sourcing, and Medicaid
reform.
Campbell serves as Chair of
the Children and Families
Committee in the Senate.


institutions the opportunity to
obtain their GED.
"It is felt that inmates need
-this program in order to turn
their lives around, through
basic education and improved
literacy skills," said Johnson.
"This project seeks to fulfill
the purpose of the Federal
Programs general Provisions
Act (GEPA) to create a
partnership among the federal
government, states and
localities to provide equitable
access, on a voluntary basis,
for adult education and
literacy services to the inmate
population in the three-county
area."
S He added that the Jefferson
County School Board ap-
pointed two teachers for the
program, LaGrande Aikens
and Sherry Boland, now in
their third year in the grant, as
GED Jail Teachers.
Instruction is provided four
days per week for the inmates
the Jefferson County Jail.
"The jail has approximately
12 students currently partici-
pating in the program, includ-
ing a class of juveniles," said
Johnson.
"Three inmates have cur-
rently obtained their diploma
this year, with several more
passing most sections of the
GED."


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Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT


SLB
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* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
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* Plant species right
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A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


City Approves Giant

Ice Vending Machine