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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00103
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 3, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00103
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text








Progress
Made In
Cancer Fight

Editorial, Page 4


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA '1SSTORT
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GA?'ES'l"IT.E, FL. 3?1IU


Nursing Home
Resident Mars
100th Bfrthdai

Story, Photo, Page 6
I


Step Up Florida
Event
Set in County

Story, Page 7


Computers
Donated To
Junior Leaders

Story, Photo, Page 12
I I


[ Friday Morning


Monticello


Published Wed0esdays & Fridays


1 RTH YEAR NO.10. 50 CENTS


ews

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2006


.100 ALAr


Social Problems



Spark Several



Local Solutions


WINNERS of the 111th Continental Field Trials at Dixie Plantation, plantation staf
and members of the gallery pose, with the dogs during a brief ceremony at the man
sion Sunday afternoon. The dog on left is High Noon Drifter, the top winner. Handle
Ricky Furney stands behind. Dogon the right is Rester's Perfect Storm, the runne
up. Handler Robin Gates stands just behind. (News Photo)


111th Continental FielC


Trials Conclude Sunday


L AZ lRO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The 11lth Continental Field
Trials at Dixie Plantation
ended noon Sunday, with a
brief ceremony on the mansion
steps to honor the winners.
The top dog in the All-Age
Championship was High Noon
Drifter, a pointer owned by
John Milton and 'handled by
Ricky Fiumey.
Interestingly, High Noon
Drifter is a Dixie Plantation
raised dog, sired by Laws High
Noon, a national champion.
High Noon Drifter was also
named the top qualifying dog,
earning Furney a total of
$9,000 in price money.
The runner-up was Rester's


Perfect Storm, a point owned,
b_\ .ft-Hagr and. lhandled by
Robin G4tes, who received
$4,000.

More Than
$12,000 Given
In Prize Money
To 2 Winners
A total of 109 dogs com-
peted in the all-age. That's
slightly down from last year,
when 114 dogs competed in
the event.
The competition, including
the derby (for dogs under age
two) began Jan. 16, with the
derby concluding Jan. 20.
The winner of the derby was
Prairie Lord Pride, owned by
Dr. Bob Cook and handled by


Randy Anderson.
The derby runner-up \as
Poison, owned and handled by
Tommy Davis. Fifty-three
dogs competed in the derby,
down from 60 the year before.
Judges score the dogs on a
host of attributes, 'including
how well they run, how many
birds they find, how well they
respond to their handlers, and
how much "heart" they show
when the going gets tough.
Dogs that score well in the
qualifying heats go on to com-
pete in the more arduous
finals, which are usually lim-
ited to 10 or 12 dogs.
Typically, Dixie Plantation
runs seven braces a day. A
brace consists of two dogs.
Dixie Plantation is generally
recognized in the field trial
(See Continental Page 2)


LAZARO ALENIAN
SSenior Staff Writer
f
On average -- based on 2004.
r statistics -- an infant born in
r -Jefferson County is twice as
.likely to die'before the age of
one as an infant born in an-
I other partn of the state.
And if the infnt is black, its
.chances of ding before age
Sone are .four times greater than
the state average.
That translates into an infant
tnortalih rate of 12.4 per
S1,000 l:or the county, versus
7.0 per 1,000 tor tle siate.
For black infants, the
county's infant death rate is
29.4 per 1,000.
Likewise, for children ages
one to four. In Jefferson
County, the death rate for such
children is triple the state rate.
These are some of the statis-
tics coming from Healthy
Start, which in October held a
series of meetings with multi-
ple other local agencies that
provide services to children,
families and senior citizens.
"As an offshoot of the meet-
ings, we decided to look at the
spectrum of health and social
indicators from prenatal care
to mental health in adults," ex-
plains George Hinchliffe, ex-
ecutive director of Jefferson


and Madison HeahhN Start.
According to Hinchliffe. the
statistical\ intensive re\ie\\
in\ol\ed about 35 people, in-

cluding members of the City
Council, the County Commis-
sion, the School Board, and the
faith-based and business com-
munities.


issues category.
The statistic sho\\ [hait .he
counr',. compared \\ith the
srate a\erages, consisrentl,
differed for the v.irsir i all
categories.
Tlius. the counr had 26.9
percent out-of-school suspen-
sions in the 2002-03 school
year, compared with 8.3 per-
cent for the state; and teen
pregnancy (girls age 15-17)
were double the state average,
or 45 per 1,000, versus 21 per


County, Versus State Averages


Infant Mortality


Double


School Suspensions Triple
Elementary Special Ed Double


Teen Pregnancy



"At the end of the meeting,
the group decided that we
couldn't stop there, with just a
review of the data," Hinchliffe
says. "The group decided it
wanted to look deeper into the
causes of the problems."
Upon further analysis,
Hinchliffe divided the prob-
lems into resource related and
socio-cultural issues.
. He classified infant mortality,
along with accidental child
deaths, school suspensions,
low birth weight and teen
pregnancy in the socio-cultural


Double



1,000 for the state.
For children ages one
through four, the county's
death rate was 6.9, or three
times the state's rate of 1.9;
and newborns' weights were
below the state average for 16
of the last 20 years.
The group found that auto
accidents accounted for the
majority of accidental deaths
involving children ages one
through four. Disproportion-
ately, the deaths were African-
American children, Hinchliffe
(See Social Problem Page 2)


Relay For Life Kickoff Draws

More Than 70 Residents


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The American Cancer Soci-
ety Relay For Life Kickoff,
held on Jan. 26, drew more
than 70 concerned citizens
who have vowed to join the
battle against cancer.
The 2006 Jefferson County
Relay For Life is an 18-hour
event which will be held at the
high school track beginning at
6 p.m. on Friday, April 21 and
ending at noon on Saturday,
April 22.
Following a meal of home-
made chicken and rice pre-
pared by members of the
Elizabeth Baptist Church,
which raised $490, local vol-
unteers were introduced to the
"Around The World In 18-
Hours" Relay theme for 2006.
The Opera House was fes-
tively decorated for the Kick-
off by the First United Meth-
odist Church team members.
There are 21 countries, in ad-
dition to the United States, that
holds Relays, and the Jefferson
Relay teams are encouraged to
select one of these countries
for their team theme and
campsite.
The Relay kickoff event pro-


vides an opportunity to recog-
nize cancer survivors in our
community and to highlight lo-
cal patient services available
from the American Cancer So-
ciety.
Survivor speakers were
Doug Wainwright, Honorary
Chairman of the 2006 Jeffer-
son Relay For Life, and Linda
Daughtrey.


Other highlights of the eve-
ning included a presentation
on smoking and related cancer
statistics, presented by Mari-
anne Goehrig of the Jefferson
County Health Department and
a program on the Relay Lumi-
naria Ceremony presented by
Joyce and Mike Steele.
Community members are en-
(See Relay Page 2)


Church Group Mississippi

Bound On Relief Mission


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Between 15 and 20 people
from Christ Episcopal Church
will be traveling to Mississippi
in mid March to help with hur-
ricane disaster relief.
Church member George
Hinchliffe says the planned
week-long trip is part of a mis-
sion by the Episcopal Diocese
of Florida and the Lutheran
Diocese to help Gulf Coast
hurricane victims.
The local team, he says, is
going to Long Beach, a small
Mississippi community near
the Louisiana border that was


devastated by last year's Hurri-
cane Katrina.
Hinchliffe says the team of
volunteers from Christ Episco-
pal Church will help run the
emergency relief center that
the two dioceses have estab-
lished in Long Beach.
Team members will work in
the commissary, which dis-
penses everything from food to
sleeping bags. Team members
also will join in the work to
help clean up and restore the
area to a semblance of nor-
malcy.
Hinchliffe says the latter
work will consist of carpentry,
cleanup efforts and roof re-
(See Relief Page 2)


t


** I'
-':*- '*-

~. i


MEMBERS of the Elizabeth Baptist Church Relay For Life team help kick off event
with a dinner at the Opera House. From left, Michelle Holbrook, Gary Spears and Jo
Morris. (News Photo)

Fire Damages Wooden House


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County Fire Res-
cue were called out at 12:17
p.m., Tuesday to respond to a
fire at 1445 North Jefferson
Street, to a residence rented
by Benny Waldorf.
Chief Mark Matthews said
that upon arrival, there was


light smoke coming out of the
1800's structure.
He added that Waldorf was
working in the nearby shop,
and no one was in the house
at the time.
"The fire was contained to a
back bedroom on the first
floor," said Matthews.
"Luckily, the doors to the
.room were shut, containing
the fire so it did not spread.
"It looks like it may been


an electrical fire and may
have started around the night
table," said Matthews.
The night table, mattress,
and some clothes in a comer
received the worst fire dam-
age.
There was no estimate
available of the damage, but
Matthews said that most
likely everything in the room
was a total loss, because of
the heat and smoke damage.


Socio-Cultural Factors

Contribute To Problem


I









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006


I i
iis ;


WINNER of the Derby Competition at Dixie Plantation was Prairie Lord Pride, owned
by Dr. Bob Cook and handled by Randy Anderson. The runner-up was Poison, owned
and handled by Tommy Davis. The derby is for dogs two years and younger. 'This
year, 53 dogs competed in the derby. (News Photo)




Social Problem Sparks


(Continued From Page 1)
says, and the leading cause
was the lack of seat belt use.
One solution to this problem,
which the Heath Department
and other groups are pursuing,
is to educate parents on.the im-
portance of seat belt use and to
distribute child-restraint seats
free or at minimal cost.

As for the solution to the
high number of school suspen-
sions, "I don't know that we
have an answer at this point,"
Hinchliffe says.
But he ventures that the prob-
lem undoubtedly is tied to the
significant number of children
in special education programs
here because of emotional and
other problems.
He offers the anecdote of the
school nurse who keeps food
in her office to distribute to
children who come to her com-
plaining of stomach cramps.
Once the children ingest the
food, they generally feel better
and are able to return to class,.,
Hinchliffe relates.

Although hunger doesn't ex-
plain the disciplinary
problems, it no doubt contrib-
utes to the situation, Hinchliffe
says.


SHinchliffe relates that the
Health Department is in the
process of purchasing and
equipping a mobile unit that
would be capable of taking
health services to remote areas
of the county.
"At least, on the horizon,
there is some relief in sight,"
Hinchliffe says. "Like an on-
ion, we're peeling back the lay-
ers. We think we -may get a
handle on the prenatal prob-
lems."
Teen pregnancy is the one is-
sue in the socio-cultural cate-
gory that remains to be
addressed. Although the
Health Department touches on
the subject in its women's
health presentations, no one
specific program is dedicated
to the problem at present.
The Health Department re-
quested a grant to teach absti-
nence, but that funding '..a.,
denied for this year.
The group continues to :ico4.
into possible solutions to the
problems.' .


In the area of infant
mortality, the group found that
the problem is largely related
to a lack of prenatal care, with
black mothers disproportion-
ately represented in this group.

Why, if the resources are
available, aren't people taking
advantage of the service,
Hinchliffe says the group
wanted to know.
The answer, he said, is that
Jefferson County is unique in
that more than 40 percent of
African-American women who
have babies live outside the
city, as opposed to Perry and
Madison, were 90 percent of
childbearing African-
American women live within
those cities.

"Transportation is a signifi-
cant issue," Hinchliffe says.
"Even though the services are
available, they're not accessi-
ble. We have a significant
population of African-
Ar Amerfids living in rural
areas. They can't get the shut-
t" i a&2go" to the Health De-
partment."

A solution to this situation
may be in the wings, however.


Relay For Life Kicks Off


(Continued From Page 1)
courage to drop off photos of
their loved ones who lost their
battle to cancer to Joyce at the
Health Department for inclu-
sion in the video being pre-
pared for this year's ceremony.
Supporters will also be able
to personalize their luminaria
bags.
Relay For Life is an over-
night team fundraising event to
fight cancer.
Teams commit to having one
person walking the track at all


times in honor of the fact that
cancer never sleeps.
Relay For Life allows par-
ticipants from all backgrounds,
including patients, medical
support staff, corporations,
civic organizations, churches,
and community volunteers to
come together for a worthy
cause and fight a deadly dis-
ease.
For more information on
signing up a team, contact
Team Development Chair El-
len Cline at 997-2798.


Continental
(Continued From Page 1)
world as the premier wild-
game venue in the country, an
honor the C. M. Livingston
Foundation takes seriously and
strives to maintain.
The foundation manages the
8,000-plus acre plantation and
seek, among other things, to'
preserve and perpetuate the
sport of field trials.
Dixie Plantation has been
hosting the Continental since
1937.


Relief Mission
(Continued From Page 1)
pairs; among other activities.
Unlike in Tampa and other
storm-struck areas where
-FEMA created massive, cen-
tralized mobile home parks for
hurricane victims, Hinchliffe
says FEMA is trying a differ-
ent approach in Mississippi.
Meaning that FEMA is al-
lowing hurricane victims to
place the government donated
mobile homes on their proper-
ties while they work on their.'
damaged homes.
The Christ Episcopal
,Church group is planning its
Strip for the week of March 19 -
25.
"We're going to try and not
only send a team, but carry as
many commodities as
possible," Hinchliffe says.
That means the group is ac-
cepting donations from the
public, preferably in the form
Sof nonperishable foods and gift
,cards that can be distributed
among the hurricane victims.
Hinchliffe says the gift cards
should be in denominations of
* $25 and they preferably should
be from st~ori such as Wal-'
Sgreens, WalMart, Lowes, and
Home Depot.
For more information about
the mission or to make dona-
lions, call 997-4116; visit the
church office at 425 N. Cherry
Street; or log on to
www.campcoastcare:com.',


Good Neighbor.
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KEEP THE GREEN LIGHT SHINING
Thanks to MDA research, the future
looks brighter than ever.

1-800-572-1717


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"I usually vote

Republican but I'm

registered as a

Democrat so I can

vote in local elections"

How many times have you heard that
one? Or more importantly.... how
many times have you said it? Well,
there's no longer a reason for anyone
in Florida to ever say it again.
It used to be a very real trap. If there
were no Republicans running in a
County race, the entire election was
decided in the Democratic primary.
We never even got a chance to vote
for the Democrat we thought was the
best candidate. So a lot of good
Republicans registered as Democrats.
But a recent change in the election
law allows Republicans to vote in
the Democratic primary when only
Democrats are in the race. Problem
Solved.
So... for all you Republicans in
Democrat clothing, The Republican
Party of Jefferson County has a
message for you. In fact, our entire
two party system has a message for
you.
Come home...we've missed you!



Are you sure YouFre

1H not a Republican P
g Why not make it official?
u'ii ~Just call us at 228-4400 and...
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006 PAGE 3


Country Resident Hood


Recognized For Leadership


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Guy M. Hood, President, and-
CEO, of the Florida Credit Un-
ion League, and a resident of
Jefferson County, has been
recognized-along with two
other credit union league ex-
ecutives, for his leadership in
helping credit unions in Mis-
sissippi and Louisiana recover
from the effects of Hurricane
Katrina.
Hood, along with Mississippi
Credit Union Associate
President/CEO Charles Elliot
and Lousisana Credit Union
League President Anne Co-
chrane, will receive the 2006
Anchor Awards, presented by
the National Credit Union
Foundation.

The Anchor Awards were
established in 1998 by the Na-'
tional Credit Union Founda-
tion (NCUF) to honor long-
time supporters of the credit
union movement who have
contributed to the grow th of
credit unions and the promo-
tion of affordable financial


services to consumers.
In announcing the recipient's
of this year's Anchor Award,
NCUF Chairman Mary Cun-
ningham stated, "To scores of
credit unions, !thousands of-
credit union employees, and
hundreds of thousands of
credit union members, .you
have truly served as an anchor
holding the Gulf Coast credit
union systems together."
Cunningham added: "I real-
ize that no words can fully ex-
press the tragedies the Gulf
Coast credit unions and their
members have faced. But I
hope that this award in some
small way will bring you com-
fort in recognizing all the chal-
lenges you have overcome and
all the people you have in-
spired."
Hood was recognized for the
effort he and the Florida Credit
Union League made in organ-
izing relief and assistance, to
the devastated region's credit
unions
He'helped organize fundrais-
ers and other relief efforts to
help the credit unions in Nlis-
sisippi and Louisiana Let back
on their feet in the weeks and
months follow ing the s:onn.


The fundraising efforts led to
the issuance of monetary relief.
in the form of. grants to storm
,victims who were either .ano
employee or volunteer of the
credit unions affected.
S'n all, the nine FCUL em-
ployees who worked on -re-
ceiving, reviewing, 'and
finalizing these grant applida-
tions spent approximately 370
hours trying to help those in
need.
Hood said that he would ac-.
cept the award on behalf of!the HOOD
entire FCUL.
"Since they could not iden- l
tify our .entire staff for Ithis, .,Brad Cooley
award, I am selected to repre- '||ulpture
sent our organization. Sculp
"The effort beerone in- Unveiling Set
volved, but especially in the
aftermath of Hurricane Thestatue ofRayCharie
Katrina, is what led folks to. sculpted by Brad Cooley an(
recognize Florida as contribut- Brad Cooley, Jr. in Bronz
b Coolei Studio in- Lamon
ing in a material way to the re- b Coole Studo inLamon
lief efws."ill be unveiled i
!ief efforts.i' i -- ;, ,,


'Hood and others will receive
their award at the Foundation's
18th Annual Herb Wegner,
Memorial Awards Dinrer on
Sunday\ night. Feb. 26 at the
Hilton Washington Towers in
\Washington, D.C.


es
d


n


Greenville. U0 a.m., Saturaay.
: The Ray Charles Memorial
dedication ceremony v.ill be
* held at the Haffye Hayes Park
on US-90.
Following the un\ eling of
the memorial, a reception will
be held for all present.
i-

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GROUNDBREAKING for the Bide-A-Wee subdivision on Pe'arlStreet, took place
Wednesday morning. From left, Katrina Walton, realtor; Luther Pickles, CPA; Travis
Smith, owner/builder; Julie Conley, mayor; Bob McElroy, representative of FMB,
David Frisby, police chief. (News Photo)


-'Contracted General Agency for
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Monticello
News


Monticello, FL 850-997-2561




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Bide-A-Wee Subdivision

Groundbreaking Held


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Groundbreaking for Bide-A--
Wee, a new 11-home subdivi-
sion on Pearl Street was held
on Wednesday afternoon with
city officials and residents in
attendance.
Bide-A-Wee, which means
"stay a while," has 11 lots and,
four new construction models.
The architectural style will
be Bungalow/Cottage, and will
blend in with the Southern
Charm of Pearl Street.
These models will feature
three bedrooms, 2.5 baths, plus
a loft. The Baylee model con-


tains 1728 sq. feet.,
The home offers hardiboard
siding, hardwood floors, and
an appliance package, in addi-
tion to other amenities.
Houses feature names such
as the Baylee, Cynthia, Lacie,
and Meredith.
They all are a. total of ap-
proximately 2012 sq. ft. under
roof and prices start at
$229,900.
For information concerning
Bide-A-Wee, contact Katrina
Walton, at 850-510-9512, or
Barry Kelly at 850-510-4220,
with Coldwell Banker Kelly &
Kelly Properties.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
| Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

tE RON CICHON
Publisher

SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor

T: @ LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Progress Made


in Cancer Fight


Opinion & Comment


The year 1946 saw a number
of new beginnings. The United
Nations held its first meeting.
Cannes, France held its first
film festival. The University of
Pennsylvania fired up ENIAC,
the first general-purpose elec-
tronic computer. for the first
time.
Also in 1946, the American
Cancer Society (ACS)
launched its research program
with $1,000,000 raised by sup-
porter Mary Lasker of New
York.
SWith this money, the Society
awarded its first competitive,
peer-reviewed research grants,
h.Ii dr.1n n it 133 grants to re-
searchers at 47 institutions.
Sixty years and about $3 bil-
lion later, research funded by
the American Cancer Society
has played a leading role in the
Remarkable progress made
against cancer.
Research done or supported
by the Society has played a
part in virtually every major
advancement in cancer over
the past half century and has
helped save or improve the
lives of million of Americans.
Here's a brief look at how
things have changed since
!946.
Then: Only one in three
Americans diagnosed with
cancer could expect to live five
years. Little was known about
cancer and its causes, how to
prevent it, and the vest ways to
treat the disease.
In 1946, Drs. Wendell Stan-
ley and Herman Muller be-
came the first
Society-supported researchers
to receive the Nobel Prize.
A year later, ACS-funded
Sidney Farber achieved remis-
,sion in childhood leukemia,
the first successful use of che-
,motherapy against cancer.
Chemotherapy soon began to
save thousands of lives each
year.
Now: The death rate for all
Cancers combined is dropping


about 1.1 percent per year,
while the rate of new cancers
is holding steady.
The drop in cancer death
rates from 1991 to 2002 alone
prevented an estimated
321,000 deaths during that 11-
year period.
Survival rates for all cancers
combined have nearly doubled
since 1946, so that two out of
three people diagnosed with
cancer can now be expected to
live five years later or longer.
During 2006, the American
Cancer Society will celebrate
the 60th anniversary of its re-
search program, now the larg-
est private, not-for-profit
source of funds in the US for
scientists studying all types of
cancer.
ACS-funded research has led
to groundbreaking treatments
that not only save lives but
keep cancer under control with
reduced or few side effects.
In its 60 years, the American
Cancer Society's research pro-
gram has funded 38 Nobel
Laureates, most of them early
in their careers when funding
is particularly difficult to get.
The Society today funds
some of the most promising ar-
eas of cancer research: genet-
ics, chemo prevention, targeted
therapies, monoclonal antibod-
ies, and vaccines.
The advances in research,
along with gains in diagnosis
and treatment, have also
helped to change attitudes.
In 1946, according to a Gal-
lup Poll, one in five Americans
thought cancer was contagious
and two out of three called
cancer the most dreaded dis-
ease.
Today, over 10 million
Americans are alive who have
been diagnosed with cancer in
their lifetimes.
A powerful voice in Wash-
ington, cancer survivors push
for legislation to protect their
rights and call for research to
fight the disease. (NAPS)


TV Programming

:Mirrors Our Culture


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Concerned families have
complained for years about
media indecency. They've de-
cried television programming
trends toward ever more sex
scenes, steamier content, and
more frequent placement of
such content in both family
hours and primetime. Now
,these families have some sta-
tistical data to back them up.
In a study released in No-
,vember. 2005 the Kaiser Fam-
ily Foundation reported find-
ings from a sampling of more
than 1.000 hours of program-
ming firm all kinds of genres
and from eleven of the ,,lost
.watched channels.
Some 70 percent of all the


shows contain sexual content,
up from 56 percent in 1998.
During the same period, the
number of sex scenes per hour
increased from 3.2 to 5.0.
During primetime, sex is
portrayed in 77 percent of
programming, averaging 5.9
sex scenes per hour. In teen
programming the number of
sex scenes per hours jumps to
6.7 per hour.
The usual television industry
comment is that parents, not
broadcasting companies, are
responsible for children's
viewing. And they say that
parents can use V-chip tech-
nology to screen objectionable
programming. Industry leaders
also say thal parental control is
far better than government
controls.
(See Culture Page 5)


R Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

Walking is a favorite Frisby
family past time. Over the
years I have tried a variety of
walking aids; different shoes,
different routes and the like.
Several years ago it became
popular to wear stereo headsets
and let the music be your
walking pacesetter.
My hubby bought me a set
and 1 headed out before dawn
one day. I was really getting a
workout to some thumping
rock music, as I passed a
wooded area.
Then from the woods some-
one yelled "Whooaw." The
voice was so loud and so emo-
tional, it almost sounded like a
cougar. I got really scared. All
my law enforcement training
kicked in. Run! Dodge! Yell!
Do not waste time looking
back'


If you are brought down,
tuck and ,roll and come up
punching and kicking. I yelled
at a neighbor and I started to
run across his field. "Mr. Wag-
ner!"
Then, out of the other side of
my headset I heard "I feel
good da,da.da,da,da." I had
been running from James
Brown! Mr. Wagner still
thinks I am a nut.
I-lubby and I also hike in the
mountains of North Carolina,
but there you can easily get
lost and be in real trouble. We
always get the trail guides and
study the trail markers. We
check in with the rangers and
take supplies with us.
Several years ago we were
hiking in the Pisgah Mountains
and were some ways back in
the woods. We heard sniffling
and sobbing. We found a fam-
ily; mother and father and two
small bare footed children.


The kids were about 2 and 4.
Their little feet were sore and
the whole family was very
scared. They had been picnick-
ing at a roadside park and de-
cided to take a stroll in the
mountain woods. They were
hopelessly lost.
We gave them some water,
the kids some raisins. David
carried the larger of the chil-
dren on his shoulders and the
father carried the other child.
We told them that we knew
how to get them back to the
paved road, but it was several
miles.
The mother sobbed and ex-
pressed her gratitude and
relief. A very short time later
we saw a trail marker and then
she said to the father "you
"(@8*^$+**" what made you
think you .could get us out of
the woods... blah, rack-a-
fracure, blah blah!
David and I giggled but tried


to control it. The dad just hung
his head and marched on. She.
stopped the tirade for a bit but
when we got them to the paved
road we heard them walk
away. "You ** -^##" and she
started in on him again.

Recently hubby and I walked
the new Monticello bike rail-
to-trails path. It is smooth,
level pavement and quite a de-
lightful walk. It seemed to be:
about 2-3 miles but I did not
measure. Congratulations to all
involved in this venture.
However there are several
places where half-fallen down
buildings, old abandoned cars
and trash, need some attention.
I hope the city will think about
code enforcement and some
clean up in the area. There are
even a few places that have
some James Brown potential
and if I hear "Whooaw" while
walking there, I might run
again.


Species Act Is Bad Law


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

The Endangered Species Act
(ESA) is the worst, most de-
structive, and most powerful
law ever to come out of Con-
gress(with the possible excep-
tion of the federal income tax
law)
For thirty two years the ESA
has robbed property owners of
their land; killed jobs; de-
stroyed whole industries, and
created a government tyranny
that would have had our
founding fathers in the
trenches, locked and loaded.
Americans have clearly seen,
through the recent Supreme
Court ruling in Kelo Vs New
London that local governments
can now take private property
for any scheme they can
devise. However, the prece-
dent for such cavalier disre-
gard for property rights comes
directly from the ESA.


Since it's enactment in 1973,
the ESA has penalized land-
owners for their stewardship of
their property. Farmers,
ranchers, tree farmers, home-
owners and other landowners
who harbor endangered spe-
cies on their property or
merely have wildlife habitat
are subjected to severe land-
use restrictions that often lead
to economic ruin.
In much of rural America the
ESA has turned landowners
and endangered species into
mortal enemies.
To keep their property from
falling under ESA's severely
punitive land use controls, des-
perate landowners have
learned to preemptively steril-
ize their land, making it inhos-
pitable to the species the ESA
us supposed to protect. The
practice is known as "shoot,
shovel, and shut up.:
Incredible as it may sound,
to the average American, in
the 32 years the ESA has been


on the books, just 34 of the
nearly 1,300 U.S. species
given special protection have
made their way off the "endan-
gered" or "threatened" lists.
Of this number, nine species
are now extinct, fourteen ap-
pear to have been improperly
listed in the first place, and just
nine (.9 percent of all species
listed) have recovered suffi-
ciently to be de-listed. A less
than 1 percent recovery rate is-
n't good especially consider-
ing the human suffering and
devastation caused in the
process. The end result is that
the ESA does nothing to pro-
tect endangered species it
just makes the federal govern-
ment more powerfid.
These are the reason why
property rights advocates have
been trying for years to get
some type of reform (if not
outright appeal) of the ESA in
order to provide property own-
ers with some relief.
These Americans need lan-


guage that would respect prop-
erty rights, provide real com-
pensation for land taken and
bring the ESA into compliance
with the United States Consti-
tution. Yet, the radical envi-
ronmental movement simply
won't agree to change even a
single comma in a law they
consider to be their holy grail.
Now comes Congressman
Richard Pombo, chairman of
the U.S. House Resources
Committee and self-
proclaimed property rights ad-
vocate.
With great fanfare earlier
this year, Pombo announced
that, in this Congress he was
going to introduce new legisla-
tion to fix the ESA and get the
landowners the relief they
need.
Early in June, Pombo's staff
began circulating a draft of the
bill he intends to introduce, en-
titled, "The Threatened and
Endangered Species Recovery

(See Species Page 5)


Fuel Gasoline Knowledge


Whether you drive an econ-
omy car, SUV or a sports car,
chances are your vehicle repre-
sents one of the largest pur-
chases you will make in your
lifetime. Yet many drivers
don't give a second thought to
the type of gasoline they put
into their tanks, even though
iusng the right type of fuel is
an important aspect of overall


car care.
To help you make an in-
formed decision the next time
you pull up to the pump, take
the following quiz to help
separate fuel fact from fuel fic-
tion.
1. Fact or Fiction? It doesn't
matter what brand of gasoline
you use in your vehicle, be-
cause all gasoline is about the


same.
2. Fact or Fiction? All gaso-
line contains additives, but that
may not be enough to keep an
engine clean and working
properly.
3 Fact or Fiction? The only
cars that benefit from premium
gasoline are high-performance
and luxury vehicles.
4. Fact or Fiction? Your


driving habits and where you
live can have an impact on the
grade of gasoline you should
use in your vehicle.
Answers:
1. FICTION- All gasolines
arc not the same. Gasoline is
composed of two primary
components the base fuel and
the additive.
(Sec Fuel Page 5)








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006 PAGE 5


Culture
(Continued From Page 4)
Of course, they are correct.
Parents are and should be re-
sponsible for teaching their
children appropriate moral dis-
cernment regarding entertain-
ment choices. It's also true that
while government can "legis-
late morality" by restraining
some kinds of evil, govem-
ment cannot make people
choose correctly or wisely.
The interesting question is
what this sex trend says about
our culture and about us. Free
enterprise follows the money;
it gives people what they want.
The television industry bears
some responsibility, but to be
fair it must be shared, for the
industry would not film sex
content if Americans didn't
watch it.
Illicit sexuality must first be
challenged in our hearts and
homes. Until it is, television
programming will remain a
mirror of our souls.


PREPARING for the Relay for Life Kickoff Dinner program are Bill Bassett, left and
Juanice Hagan, co-chair. (News Photo)



Species Act Bad Law


Call LG. Wentworth's W.
Annuity Purchase Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNUrrY PURCHASE PROGRAM


"You Can't Be Without It"

Monticello News


(Continued From Page 4) Worse, Pombo's TESRA in-


Act" (TESRA).
It was with great disappoint-
ment and pain that, in reading
the draft, property rights advo-
cates found that TESRA fails
to live up to Pombo's promise
in two very specific ways.

First, the bill calls for com-
.pensation of taken property
only after a full 50 percent has
been taken. Many small land-
owners can't afford a '25 per-
cent loss of their farmlands,
homes, ranches, and invest-
ment property, much less 49.9
percent. And even those who
hit the magic 50 percent trig-
ger many never see any
money, as property owners
would still be required to jump.
through costly and time-
consuming bureaucratic hoops
fl-f n,_ MA1--A 4 im"Accil1p fn


cludes a provision that would
create regulation of so called
"invasive species" under the
ESA for the very first time.
Under an Executive Order
signed by former President Bill
Clinton, invasive species are
defined as "any species, in-
cluding seeds, eggs, spores, or
other biological material capa-
ble of propagating that species,
that is not native to the ecosys-
tem."
By this definition, almost
any living thing could be con-
sidered and invasive species,
thereby giving federal regula-
tors broad new powers to regu-
late human activity where we
live where we live, what we
plant in our yards and where
and how we vacation.
Specifically, invasive species
can be interpreted to mean the


htat cani make~ it impossible to ,
fle a cli. Kentucky Blue Grass used in


most yards; the pear tree
planted in the back yard; the
family dog; or cattle grazing in
the fields all regulated under
the power of the Endangered
Species Act.
It is difficult to go on the of-
fensive against people who
have been considered friends,
such as Congressman Richard
Pombo. Certainly property
rights advocates have few
friends in Congress.
However, Congressman
Pombo's version of the Endan-
gered Species Act is no friend
to property owners. Indeed it's
a greater threat than the cur-
rent ESA law.
The "Threatened and Endan-
gered Species Recovery Act"
will give the federal govern-
ment even greater power to
,take private property and
should be renamed Kelo 2.


Fuel Gasoline Knowledge


(Continued From Page 4)
Whole on a regional basis
the base fuel may be similar
between two or more brands,
the additive typically is differ-
ent. According to several auto-
makers, additives with more'
sophisticated and higher levels
of cleaning agents, help protect
vehicle engines from the harm-
ful carbon deposits that are
known to decrease engine per-
formance.
2. FACT While all gaso-
lines should contain enough
detergency to meet minimum
government standards, not all
automakers believe the mini-
mum detergency standard is
adequate.
To raise the bar on fuel qual-
ity and help vehicle engines
achieve optimal performance
and reduced emissions, BMW,
Honda, General Motors and
Toyota recommended filling
up with a gasoline that meets
the TOP Tier Detergent Gaso-
line standard.
This new standard requires
added detergency above the
minimum government stan-
dards.
3. FICTION- While the
stereotype of high-
performance engines requiring
premium gasoline is generally
true, there are many
exceptions.
Different cars may require
different levels of octane,
which is the measurement of a
gasoline's ability to resist en-
gine knock- a rattling or ping-
ing sound that results from un-
controlled combustion in the
engine.
Whether you drive a luxury
sedan or an old truck, the right
level of octane should help
prevent engine knock and help
ensure optimal performance.
It may even help compensate


for minor mechanical issues
that are temporarily raising the
octane requirement of an en-
gine.
To determine the appropriate
octane level or grade of gaso-
line for your vehicle, be sure to
check your owner's manual for
the manufacturer's recommen-
dation.
4. FACT According to the
American Petroleum Institute,
several factors can have an ef-
fect on how gasoline performs
in your engine, including driv-
ing habits, the amount of miles


on the vehicle's odometer, cli-
mate and geography.
For example, if your engine
slightly knocks during every-
day driving but now you're
hauling heavy loads, you may
want to choose a higher octane
grade of gasoline.
In addition, octane require-
ments are generally lower in
higher altitudes. So if you live
in a mountainous region, the
octane level of the gasoline
you purchase in your area has
been adjusted to compensate
for the altitude differences.


The Jefferson County Recvclina Proaram


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry, detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they.may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


You Can Count
On The

Monticello

News


ki [$],,I a kkhv & 4 to ILI lei drel Q goili by.,VA


.
















PAC G E MONTICRT,O. (FI, NEWS. FRI.. FEBRUARY 3. 2006


Lifestyle


Nursing Center

Resident Honored

On 100th Birthday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Miner Bellamy, resident of
Jefferson Nursing Center, was
presented with a Certificate of
Recognition by Keith Hunter,
a representative of the US
Railroad Retirement Board, re-
cently.
"The members of the Rail-
road Retirement Board take
pleasure in extending our best
wishes to you on the occasion
of your 100th birthday," said
Board Members Michael S.
Schwartz, V.M. Speakman, Jr.,
and Jerome F. Kever, in a let-
ter accompanying the Certifi-
cate.
"Our records indicate that
you were 100 years old on De-
cember 2, 2005. To attain such


a landmark age is a most nota-
ble achievement and greatly
deserves recognition.
"We trust that you have been
well served by the Board over
the years.
"Again, please accept our
congratulations and warmest
wishes on your special day,"
they conclude.
Bellamy was accompanied
by her niece and namesake,
Miner Brookins along with
Nursing Center personell.
Activity Director Voncell
Edwards says the certificate
will be framed and hung on the
wall in her room at the Center.
She was bor in Jefferson
County to Virginia and Johnny
Williams, and raised in the
area until her marriage to
L.R. Bellamy.


Homes Of Mourning


Wilbert Barrington
Deacon Wilbert Barrington
81, died Wednesday January
25, 2006, at his home. The
service will be at 11:00 a.m.
EST Saturday, February 4,
2006 at St. Rilla Missionary
Baptist Church in Monticello,
with tlirial at Springfield
Cemete y. !-amily v.ill receive
friends -or 6 to 7 m.n-. Friday
February 5, at the ,nurmin. fill-
man's Funeral Home (850
997-5553) 620 York Street
will be handling arrangements.

He was born on April 19,
1924 in Jefferson County. He
\\a. the son of the late Jesse
Barrington, Sr. and Scilla Wil-
liams Barrington. He' lived in
Monticello most of his life. He
was a entrepreneur, a loving
father, husband and grandfa-
ther. He was a longtime mem-
ber of the St. Rilla Missionary
Baptist Church where he
served as chairman of the
Board of Deacons and Super-
intendent of the Sunday
School.

Those left to cherish his
memories and to treasure his
love include: his wife of 55
years, Sarah; Children: Letitia
(Robert) Baker., South Bend,
Indiana, Deborah (Peter), Wil-
bertine (Bobby) Scott, Cleve-
land Tennessee, Leander
(Linda), Bernard, Nazareth
'Mickey' (Lettie), Priscilla
(Carl), Theodore (Dorothy)
Rich, Ft. Lauderdale, Willie
Lee (Carolyn), Albany, Ga.
Ozie (Virginia), Madison,
Phillip (Nora), Mae Eva
(Cain), 30 grandchildren and
10 great-grandchildren, two
brothers Eddie (Dorothy) and
William Barrington, one aunt
Maggie Barrington, Brother-
in-laws, Willie (Flora) Wil-
liams. Ralph (Martha)
Williams, Wauchula, FL.,
sister-in-law Alberta Leonard,
and Christine Barrington, Or-
lando. Daughter-in-law Debra
Murray Barrington, and a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins,
and sorrowing friends. (He
was preceded in death by his
sister Rosebud Wilson, broth-
ers Jesse, II, Whifield, and
James.)
Naturally our hearts are
filled with sorrow, and the
tears will flow for we have lost
our dear loved one, but we will
still the grief long enough to
think what this homegoing
means to our loved one. In-
stead of being cast down in
sorrow, we are rejoicing and
thanking God for a life which
leaves behind it a radiance of
purity, goodness and peace.
We, the family, express our
most sincere appreciation to
each of you for your many acts
of kindness shown and your
prayers expressed during our
time of sorrow. Special thanks
is extended to Pastor James,


I. '





.. .. .-
.. .










KEITH HUNTER, left, presents a certificate of recognition to Miner Bellamy, from the
US Railroad Board, extending best wishes on her 100th birthday. (News Photo)



Education Club Learns


About Medicare Part D
KET UN Elft rsnt eriiae frcgnto t ie Bla y fo h
US Ralroa Boa dI,- etn ingbs i se on her lOthbirthay (ewsPhto
Educatio Clubl;'l: Learns.-

AboutMediare art


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Home and
Community Education Club
met at the Jefferson County
Extension Office for an edu-
cational program about Medi-
care Part D.

Angel Williams, a VISTAS
representative, arranged for a


Mother Mack and the St. Rilla
Family and to Mr Al Hall and
the staff at Tillman's Funeral
Home for their outstanding
services provided to our loved
one. We pray God's richest
blessing upon each of you.

Walter Ellis Boatwright
Mr. Walter Boatwright age
71, a retired Correctional Offi-
cer with the State of Florida,
died Tuesday January 31, 2006
in Tallahassee, Florida.

Funeral Services will be at
2:.00 p.m. Friday February 3,
2006 at First Baptist Church,
Mlonurcello, FloAdai ihternent
i. folio" at Betel Page
C meterr' in Jet eriorr Cobnty.
The family will receive friends
at Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel from 6:00 p.m. to
8:00 p.m. Thursday February
2, 2006. In lieu of flowers me-
morial contributions can be
made to Big Bend Hospice:
1723 Mahan Center, Tallhas-
see, Florida 32308-5428 or
First Baptist Church: W.
Washington St. Monticello,
Florida 32344.
Mr. Boatwright was a native
of Waukeenah, Florida. A for-
mer resident of Lake Butler
and Lake City, Florida. Mov-
ing back to Monticello in
1988. He was a Lt. in the re-
serve unit of the Jefferson
County Sheriffs Office for
four years. Walter was a mem-
ber of First Baptist Church
Monticello, Florida. He was
also a member of Kyle Hill's
Sunday school class. Walter
served as the Sunday School
Director' at First Baptist
Church from 2004-2005 and
also at O!ivu Baptist Church.
He also served in the Choir and
on the building Committee at
Olive Baptist Church in Monti-
cello. He loved coaching Little
League and T-Ball baseball
here in Monticello.
He is survived by his wife
Diane Boatwright of Monti-
(See Homes Page 7)


Open 7 days
2329 Apalachee Pkwy. "Try Our Sunday Brunch"


presenter from the North Flor-
ida Social Security Admin-
istration, Reshad Mujahid,
public affairs specialist, to
speak.
Spokesperson Heidi Cope-
land said that Mujahid pro-
vided exceptional information
to the participants on Medi-
care's new coverage for pre-
scription drugs.
"The participants were
given handouts with pertinent


facts abut Medicare Part D,"
said Copeland. "Especially
helpful was the information
about Form 1020B, the in-
come declaration form that
must be filled out in order to
qualify for additional assis-
tance.
"Mr. Mujahid stated that
less than one fourth of the
elderly who are eligible are
taking advantage of the extra
help program," said
Copeland.
Among the points Mujahid
stressed are:
1. Read the handbook sent
to the Social Security recipi-
ents, "Medicare and You
2006".
2. If you can, ,use a com-
puter, it makes it a lot easier
to compare plans.
3. Don't be intimidated by
all of the information.
4. Don't make a hasty deci-
sion.
5. Make a list of all of the
drugs you use, including dos-
age.
Copeland concluded that
there are agencies that will
help people decipher all of
their information and walk
them through the process.
Some helpful numbers in-
clude SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders),
1-800-963-5337, or Florida
Department of Elder Affairs,
1-850-414-2000.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


,4-H members are eligible for
a $1,000 scholarship, if they
qualify.
The scholarship is presented
annually to students majoring
in agriculture at a Florida Insti-
tute of higher learning and can
be extended for four years.
To be eligible for the schol-
arship, a nominee must be a
graduated high school senior
from a county that annually
places a county agricultural
exhibit in the North Florida
Fair, and one who:
*Has indicated through 4-H,
FFA, or related activities a sin-

cere interest and potential abil-


CARD OF THANKS
The daughters of Doris
Groover Herring would like to
express their deepest apprecia-
tion to all thewonderful family
and friends of Doris Groover
Herring in Monticello and Jef-
ferson County, and the congre-
gations of Mt. Pleasant AME
Church, Philadelphia AME
Church, Elizabeth MB Church
and New Oak Grove MB
Church.
Sincere appreciation also
goes out to all of the
Monticello/Jefferson County
community for the many ex-
pressions of condolences, sym-
pathy, food, flowers, cards,


4-Hers May Qualify For

$1,000 Scholarship


ity in the fields of agriculture.
*Plans to enter an institution
of higher learning in the State
of Florida to study some phase
of agriculture.
*Has achieved an acceptable
senior placement test score and
acceptable grade point average
in high school and maintains
acceptable academic standing
at the institution attended, to
continue receiving the stipend.
The recipient must maintain
continuous enrollment with
summer off between two con-
secutive terms for more than
one semester.
For additional information
about this scholarship contact
Jefferson County 4-H Coordi-
nator John Lilly at the 4-H Ex-
tension Office 342-0187.


gifts, and donations in memory
of our mother.
It is with deep gratitude and
humble acknowledgment that
we let our community know
how each special act of kind-
ness touched our hearts.
Thank you for your support
and continuing prayers.
May God bless all the mem-
bers of this close community.
With our eternal gratitude,
Sonja Herring Vaughan
Ann. L. Herring

if It Happens In
Jerrerson Counits.
You'll Read II In The
Monticello News


Doers Club To
Meet Thursday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Health
Department will host the
monthly Doers Diabetes Sup-
port Group, 12:15-1:45 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 9, at the
Health Department.
Spokesperson Bonnie
Mathis said participants are
welcome to bring their own
lunches.
The topics covered will in-
clude grocery shopping tips
and ideas, and participants
will each receive a free copy
of "Pocket Supermarket
Guide".
p


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
Lord your God
with all your
heart and with all
your soul and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5

S FLoRI0A

HEU I 1 l

Show your support
for Florida's
manatees!
Purchase a manatee
license plate and support
the recovery of Florida's
endangered manatees.
Call your local auto tag office
or visit.the Florida Fish and
Wildlife, Conservation
..: Commission web site
'- *' myfwc.org/psm


Miss Mary's Family

Restaurant
(Located at BP Truckstop in Lloyd)

Best Seafood In The Area


Friday & Saturday

AYCE Boiled or Fried Shrimp
$11.99

We Specialize in Fresh Seafood,
BBQ & Steak (Angus Beef)

997-1202


S lV Roses & Flowers
SIV Chocolates & Candy V
F A i Stuffed Animals
FLORAL DESIGNS
VSINCE 1934 V Greeting Cards
9 IV Gourmet Baskets
# "Flowers always make people better, V Blooming Plants
happier, more helpful; they are sunshine,
Food and medicine for the soul.
Luther Burbank



S190 E Dogwood Street V Monticello V 850.997.2015 V www.gellincTsflowers.corn

V VV VV VV lVIV v vv vv v vvvv v v v v v


Named one of Florida's Best Restaurants
by Florida Trend Magazine

Catering Available

656-3392


Great Mexican Cuisine!
Great Mexican Beer & Margaritas!



S- 4
Lc'00


Lrruu v) Irlvltr-u~--l--~ \- II) -- --? -------I -------- -I -


*]


I~a';~"~~ ~?











Step Up Florida

Events Set Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coordinators are in need of
walkers, runners, bikers and
people of all ages to help
move the fitness flag across
the community, 8:15 a.m.
Feb. 18 for the third annual
Step Up Florida On Our Way
To Healthy Living.
The relay event will take
place across all 67 Florida
counties and began Feb. 1.
Each County Health Depart-
ment, in conjunction with
community partners, will de-
termine specific local routes
and physical activity opportu-
nities that will be highlighted
throughout their community.
Several Step Up Florida
events have already been
slated in Jefferson County, in-
cluding a walk in Wacissa,
bike rides, a run down town
with local high school
athletes, a Family Field Day
at the Recreation Park, in
partnership with the Boys and
Girls Club of the Big Bend,
and a walk with Mayor Julie
Conley on the new Ike Ander-
son Bike Trail.


KIZZIE


There are four routes in
different regions of the state
which will make their way to
meet in Duval County as part
-of the campaign.
This year, the Florida De-
partment of Health has
adopted a new slogan for Step
Up Florida, "60 A Day-The
Florida Way."
"This will help participants
to implement the United
States Department of Agricul-
ture dietary guidelines that
suggest that 60 minutes of
physical activity a day will
help manage body weight and
prevent gradual weight gain,"
explained event spokesperson
Rebecca Fortson.
The event also promotes
physical activity and healthy
lifestyles to Floridians of all
ages and abilities.
Relay race participants will
pass the fitness flag from one
county to another, until all
four flags reach Duval
County, Feb. 28 for the grand
finale celebration.
For further information
about local events, contact
Marianne Goehrig at 342-
0170 ext. 206.


'Kizzie' is

Pet Of Week
The Humane Society has
named Kizzie as its adoptable
canine Pet of the Week.
Kizzie is a female black lab
mix. Her date of birth is Oct.,
2004.
She is spayed and all vacci-
nations are up to date.
SKizzie is an indoor/outdoor
animal, and is housebroken.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista describes her as be-
ing cuddly, lovable, affection-
ate and playful.
To adopt Kizzie or any of
the other many animals at the
shelter, call-342-0244., -


Homes Of Mourning


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006 PAGE 7

FSU Hoopsters Visit

Boys, Girls Club


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Eight members of the Florida -
State University Women's
Basketball Team made an un-
expected visit to the
Monticello/Jefferson Boys and
Girls Club, and spent time
playing ball and group games
with the students.
The FSU athletes were in
town promoting the free bas-
ketball clinic they will be host-
ing for boys and girls in the
first through eighth grades.
The clinic will be held
2-3:30 p.m. on'Saturday, Feb.
4 at the Basketball Training
Center located next to the
Donald L. Tucker Center.
This is an opportunity to
come out and learn to play
basketball, develop skills, and


MARSHALL CONNELL AND DEMONICA GILL



Demonica Gill Will

Marry Jackson Connell


Wendy Allender, of Monti--
cello, announces the engjge-
ment of her daughter,
Demonica Cheyenne Gill, to
Marshall Jackson Connell.
He is the son of Wade and
Jacquie Connell, and the.
grandson of Edgar and Donna
Connell, of Wacissa.
She is the granddaughter of
Marcia Lott, of Monticello.
She is employed by the De-
partment of Health, and he is
with C&M landscaping.
The couple graduated from
Florida High School, and were
high school sweethearts.
They are planning to be mar-
ried 6 p.m., March 11, 2006, at
Cody Pentecostal Church on
Tram Road.
n'"'A in% jiiaon is e .tended to
Sall'fridnds aridfamily to join in
the celebration.
The reception will follow at


Buddy and Cheryl Simon's
house on Limestone Road,
near Wacissa.


Brynwood Sets
Chill Cookoff
Brynwood Center will hold
its first Chili Cook-off Contest
noon, Friday,.Feb. 10, in the
courtyard.
Anyone wishing to partici-
pate should contact Brenda
Thompson or Toni Flavien at
997-1800 for more informa-
tion and to sign up.
Attendees will sample the
chilis and help decide the win-
ners. The center will also
serve grilled cheese sand-
wiches.
."-Judges will'"iiclude Sheriff
David -I-obbs, Sch6ol Superin-
tendent Phil Barker; Tax'Col-
lector Lois Howell-Hunter,
and Dr. Jacquelyn Davis.


have fun with present and past
Seminole athletes.
This clinic is open to all skill
levels.
- Each participant will receive
three free tickets to the
Women's Basketball Game vs.
NC State 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb.
.5.
Contact Nadia Flaim at 644-
6959 to reserve a spot.




NOW AVAILABLE!
New Pool Tables
Balls Cues
Other Supplies

850-668-7665
1698 Village Square Blvd. Tallahassee
Open Noon 'l 2 am 7 Dys aWeld


ZG
tree with park admission
Ice Skating Toboggan Runs
Snow Balls a More!


(Continued From Page 6)
cello, five sons Walter Ellis
(Sonny) Boatwright Jr. of
Clermont, FL, Bobby Boat-
wright of Jennings, FL, Don
Boatwright of Valdosta, GA.,
John Boatwright of Pinetta,
FL., Billy Boatwright of Lake
Park, GA., two brothers Dale
Boatwright (wife Margaret)
and Jerry Boatwright (wife
Henry Etta) both of
Monticello, three sisters Marie
Woods (husband Gary) of
Dacula, Ga., Caroline Wright
(husband George), Shirley
Rudd (husband Andy) both of
Monticello, eleven grandchil-
dren and one great grandchild.
Lee Ethel Britt Hodge
Lee Ethel Hodge age 95 a
homemaker died Wednesday
January 25, 2006 in
Greenville.
The service will be at 2:00
p.m. on Sunday February 5;
2006 at New Hope Primitive
Baptist Church in Greenville,


with burial at Wigginsville
Cemetery. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from
2:00 to 7:30 p.m. on Friday
February 3, 2006 and on Satur-
day from noon to 6 p.m. at
Tillmans Funeral Home.
A native of Marianna, Mrs.
Hodge was a longtime resident
of the Sirmans Community of
Madison County. She was a
member of the Church of
Christ.
Mrs. Hodge leaves her hus-
band Henry Hodge of Green-
ville to cherish her memories.
Other survivors include her
nieces Ethel Ford, Macclenny,
FL, Virginia Wilcox, Mac-
clenny, Emma Wilson of
Starke, and Aline Stephens of
Lake Mary, and Paula Jones of
Greenville, her nephews Jo-
seph Jennings of Greenville,
Matthew Reid of Kissimee,
Henry Reed of MacClenny,
and James Reed of Starke, and
her sister-in-law Louisa Jen-
nings of Greenville.


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'49








PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006
--- ----- ------ -- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- --


Real EateC


&


.WACHOVIA
Timbre Denmark
Mortgage Consultant,
Wachovia Mortgage Corporation
FL1925
. 1997 Capital Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: 850-320-1094
Fax: 850-920-1089
timbre.denmark@wachovia.com


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MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor
SALES ASSOCIATE


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p o r t s MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006 PAGE 9


SMood Swings Win


4 Of 6 Matches
Team #6, Jennifer Ellis and
IS FRAN HUNT substitute Roslyn Bass, won
Stlc ll l .i .Staff Writer the sets, 6-0 and 6-1.
montIC61 0, ipo


FRAN HUNT
staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity girl's
basketball team squeaked by
Maclay 38-37, in the NFC
District 5-2A- semifinal
tournament.
Coach Bill Brumfield drove
his five starters to
Tallahassee, in his
automobile, when the school
bus failed to arrive on time.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello Christian
Academy boy's basketball
team dropped its last six
games and stands 0-7 on the
season.
Pastor John Dobson said the
Chargers are doing very well
for their first year df play
"We have a bunch of kids
smaller than those at other
schools, which are playing
mainly juniors and seniors,"
Dobson said.
The Chargers lost to Cor-
inth, 56-28; lost to West
Meadows, 47-31; lost a sec-
ond game to West Meadows,
39-30; and MCA fell to Vic-
tory, 64-34.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity boy's basketball
team was downed by Bran-
ford 63-34. Warriors now
stand 11-10 on the season.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said
the Warriors had played Bran-
ford on two prior occasions
and lost both times.
"We didn't play well at all,"
said Nennstiel. "I don't know
if we are that bad, or their de-
fense is that good."
He theorized that with the
coming of the baseball
season, some of the Warriors
may have already shifted their
mind set towards baseball
rather than basketball.
Leading the score for f the
Warriors was Ben Grantham
with 13 points, one assist, six
rebounds, one steal.
Casey Gunnels, five points,
1 assist two steals, three re-
bounds; Stewart Williams
four points, one steal, three
rebounds; and Stephen
Griffin, five points, one assist,
one steal, one block and two
rebounds.


At the beginning of the
game, the Lady Tigers fell be-
hind Maclay, by seven points,
but the Lady Tigers were able
to close the Marauders lead to
five, 13-8 at the end of the
first period.
The Lady Tigers came back
in the second period to score
19 .points, against Maclay's
13.
In the third period, JCHS
outscored Maclay, 5-7, and in
the fourth, Maclay scored six
to the Lady Tigers four.


The Chargers fell to Taber-
nacle Christian, 48-31.
Leading the score for MCA
was Phillip Payne with 11
points; and Luke Lingo, with
12 points.
When the Chargers squared
off against Grace Baptist
Academy, they fell for an 82-
61 loss.
Leading the score for MCA
was Payne with 29 points;
followed by Lingo, with 21
points.
Four :raems are slated for the
remainder of the season,
including: Corinth, 4:30
p.m., Thursday, here; Creek-
side, 3:30 p.m., Feb. 7, here;
Tabernacle, 4:30 p.m., Feb.
10, there;, and Grace, 6 p.m.,
Feb. 14, here.


Luke Sadler, two points, one
block, four rebounds; Wade
Scarberry, four points, one
steal, three rebounds; and
Reggie Walker, one point,
two steals and two rebounds.
The Warriors face off
against Bell, Thursday, there
and Atlantis Friday, here, for
the last two games of the
regular season.
Both games are at 6 p.m.
"If we play well, we have a
good chance to win," said
Nennstiel.
The Warriors will begin dis-
trict play next week.


4-H Judging
Contest Set
The Florida State Fair will
host a 4-H Livestock Judging
Contest on Saturday, Feb. 11
at the Lykes indoor arena.
Check-in will begin at 8
a.m., the contest will begin at 9
a.m. and awards will be an-
nounced at 4 p.m.
For more information con-
tact Jefferson County 4-H Co-
ordinator John Lilly at
342-0187.


"We've gone through some
adversity this season, so I
knew the girls could still do
this if they believed in them-
selves and worked hard," said
Brumfield. "And that's just
what they did. It was a physi-
cal girl's basketball show-
down."
Leading the score for the
Lady Tigers was Shaumese
Massey with 11 points and 15
rebounds for a double-double,
three assists, one steal and
four blocks.
Keandra Seabrooks, six
points; Donna Ransom, six
points four rebounds, one as-
sist, four steals, four blocked
shots.
Deidra Arnold, five points,
two rebounds, one assist;
Nakidra Thompson, four
points, two rebounds; Candice
Griffin, two points, three re-
bounds, one steal; India Wy-
che, one rebound; and Sha-
nit ; Brook,., one -red'id'.I
onet sial. wl
The Ljaj Tigers will par-
ticipate in the District Chain-
pionship against NFC, 7 p.m.,
Saturday, there.
Brumfield said that if the


Lady Tigers do not win they
will still play in the second
round for the District Tittle,
for the first time in eight
years.
He estimates that the second
game would probably be
against Mayo.


Branford

Squeaks By
ACA JV Girls

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Branford squeaked by JV
Lady Warriors 43-44, last
week, bringing the ladies to
12-12 on the season.

Coach Daryl Adams said
the Lady Warriors had four
opportunities to score in the
last few seconds of the game.

"We were' missing free-
throws and uncovered
lay-ups," said Adams. He
added that on the prior occa-
sion, ACA won over Branford
by eight points.
Leading the score for the
Lady Warriors was Bethany
Saunders with 18 points, four
rebounds, three assists and
four steals.

Mallory Plaines had 11
points and 17 rebounds for a
double-double, two assists,
one steal and one block.
Brittany Hobbs one point,
two rebounds one assist; and
Caitlin Murphy, seven points,
six rebounds, one assist and
one steal.

Lindsey Day, four points,
five rebounds, two assists,
one steal, two blocked shots;
Corie Smith, two points, one
rebound, three steals; Rikki
Roccanti, one rebounds, one
steal; and Stephanie Dobson,
one steal.


t, 111~8sarmarrssl~p~.r~,, ~-~a~i~i~~-
i


g
r, -- P~ r:


Ip.i eba

P, :
~I i.
L


:I 18s~p~


wnen me Ivlood wings
went up against the Swinging
Volleys last week, team #1,
lost the matches, 3-6 and 4-6.
Team #2, lost the matches
5-7 and 4-6, and team #3,
with new permanent player


Kelly Hetherington, lost the
matches, 0-6 and 3-6.
Team #4, won the first
match, 6-2, lost the second,
6-7 and came back to win the
tiebreaker, 6-0.
Team #5, lost the matches,
6-7 and 4-6.
Team #6, lost the first match,
2-6, won the second, 6-3 and
won the tiebreaker, 6-4.
The Mood Swings will play
the Capital City Deuces, 9:30
a.m., Thursday, at the Capital-
City Country Club.


, The Monticello Mood-
Swings, the women's A-
league tennis team won four
of six matches when they
went up against the Killearn
Lucky Stars.
The ladies won two of six
matches when they played
against the Swinging Volleys.
| Against the Killear Lucky
Stars, team #1, Katie Brock
and Lisa Jackson, lost the
sets, 5-7 and 4-6.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
substitute Marilyn Tartaglia,
won the sets, 6-0 and 6-1.
Team #3, Cindy Wainright
and Lorei Salie, won the sets,
6-4 and 6-3.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff
and Angle Delvecchio, won
the sets, 6-0 and 6-2.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Trisha Wirick, lost the
matches, 6-7 and 3-6.



air purifier
ii: ;iTIpi Look.forthe
ENERGY STAR to reduce
,i:our linie nerg u:'
To I railr, a'ore, ao' i
energystar gov.

r~-


MOOD SWINGS ladies' tennis team include back L-R: Cindy Wainright, Patty Hardy,
Angie Delvecchio, Katie Brock, Susan Goodwin, Roslyn Bass and Linsey Taylor.
Front: L-R: Laura Kirchhoff, Maxie Miller, Jennifer Ellis, Lisa Jackson. Lorei Salie
and Trish Wirick are not pictured.


Lady Tigers Squeak

By Maclay 38-37


SSALE ON:


40%OFFJ
Walls Camo and Winter Jackets

40%- 75% OFF
inter and Summer Clothing

20% OFF
Beautiful Woolrich Blankets


10% OFF
Timex Watches

20% OFF
Select Chaco's Sandals

10% 50% OFF,
Georgia Boots


GREAT ADVENTURE OUTFITTERS
225 N. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344


MCA Chargers Are

0-7 On The Season


Branford Downs


Warriors 63-34


!
I


I

,I


Altrusa of Monticello


ure


SALE


Saturday



February 4, 2006



8 a.m. -1 p.m.


MONTICELLO OPERA HOUSE


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- PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006


SLEGAL- G]N^aE^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 06-08-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF JESSE
BARRINGTON, Decease. NOTICE
OF ACTION TO: To All Unknown
Heirs of Jesse Barrington Addresses
Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Summary
Administration of the estate of
JESSE BARRINGTON, deceased,
has been filed and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any ,to it, on MICHAEL
A. REICHMAN, petitioner's
attorney, whose address is P.O. Box
41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before March 16, 2006 and file the
original with the clerk of this said
court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition. Dated on
January 24, 2006 CARL D.
BOATWRIGHT, As Clerk of the
Court.
1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STHE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR


LEGALS -;K :
JEFFERSON, FLORIDA FILE NO.
05-114-PR Probate Division IN RE:
ESTATE OF MARNITA
HATCHETT TAYLOR, Decease
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: The
administration of the estate of
Marnite Hatchett Taylor, deceased,
whose date of death was August 5,
2005. and whose Social Security
Number is 261-42-9062, as pending
in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate division,
the address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello, FL
32344. The names and addresses of
the personal representatives are set
forth below. All other creditors of
the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be served
must title their claim before the
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claim with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF


FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date
of publication of this notice is
February 3, 2006. The name and
addresses of the personal
representatives is: Tara J.
McLanahan, 1539 Escadrille Drive,
Tallahassee, Florida 32308. The
attorney representing the personal
representatives of the estate and his
address is: D. Christine Thurman,
ESQ. FLA. BAR NO. 0785571 Law
Offices of Cheryl L. Gentry 217 N
Franklin Blvd. Tallahassee, Florida
32311, 850-222-0052, 850-222-4259
fax. Attorney for the Estate
2/3, 2/10, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE
DIVISION CASE NO. 05-120-PR
IN RE: The Estate of: JOSH SIMP-
KINS Deceased. NOTICE OF AC-
TION TO: PEARLIE MAE
SIMPKINS MILLS, JESSIE L.
BROWN, PAULINE BROWN,
JIMMY LEONARD, WILLIE T.


LEGfS
LEONARD, GEORGIA MAE L.
GREEN, WYNELL GALLON,
GRIFFIN L. MACK, MARION J.
ANDERSON, JEROME
SIMPKINS, PATRICIA S. MAR-
SHALL. TERRANCE SIMPKINS,
JESSIE SIMPKINS, SHARON
SIMPKINS, WILLIAM SIMPKINS,
WILLIE MAE SIMPKINS,
CREOLA SIMPKINS BROWN
LEE, ROBIN L. MITCHELL.
DAVID MITCHELL, and any un-
known heirs at law, assigns,
devisees, grantees, and any other
parties claiming any interest by or
through aforesaid parties, YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition
For Determination of Heirs and
Beneficiaries has been filed in the
above entitled estate relative to your
interest in the following described
real property located in Jefferson
County, Florida: The North Half of
the North half of the Southwest
Quarter (N1/2 of N1/2 of the SW1/4)
of Section One (1) Township One (1)
North, Range Four (4) East, con-
taining Forty (40) acres, more or
less, and being a portion of the lands
conveyed to said parties of the first
part by Preston B. Bird, Sr. by deed
dated July llth 1929 and of record
in the Office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Jefferson County,
Florida in Deed Book "UU," page


457 and to which reference is
hereby made. You are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any on the Petitioner's at-
torney, Harold M. Knowles,
Esquire, whose address is 3065
Highland Terrace, Tallahassee,
Florida 32301 on or before the 28th
day of February 2006, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.:
05-134-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN THOMAS SCHLEIFER,
Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of
JOHN THOMAS SCHLEIFER
deceased, File Number 05-134-PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson Count y Courthouse,
Room 10 Monticello, FL 32344. The
names and address of the personal
representative and the personal'


LEGALS:: : '' i?
representative's attorney are set
forth below. All interested persons
are required to file with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the Will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the Court. ALL
CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. Publication of this Notice
has begun on January 27, 2006
JOAN HEYSER SCHLEIFER
Petitioner; MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN Post Office Box 41
Monticello, Florida, 32345 (850)
997-5100 FL. BAR NO: 183518
1/27, 2/3, c
The Annual Report of Healthways
Inc. for the year ending December
31, 2004 is available at its principle
office, 555 N. Jefferson Street in
Monticello, FL for Inspection
during regular business hours
within 180 days from today.
2/1, 2/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN .g

Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's Mini-Storage' B R B R ER N
850-509-1465 cell 0 Trimming 0 Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home 0 Mowing 0 AerialDevice-----------
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance I A 10% Discount

Events and Types 997-0039 Li. &Insured 997-11025 East Mahan 877-4550,


B & M Tra ctor Service CARROLL HILLAUTO ELECTRIC, INC. LA I U A Craig
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, _Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and FPncing
"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
Richbourg Nursery, Inc. ome Loyd,FL32337
y^ i 4-*'imerock
Brd Mc Lod 9 Richbourg.Road <
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod Mnil F 997-788
Home: (0) 997-1451 Home: (850) 9973091 3244 Thomasvile Road 115 Albany Rd. Snd 9976788
i0534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on Carroll Hill)229-226-0717 1Top Soil
Fax 850-997-8388

We accept all manufacturer coupons. Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547
Your Local Professional Painters....

Interior Exterior 1-10 t Chevron YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC. -
ic. &W Ins. #4676 WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
Kodiak $4.41 can +tax CUSTOM HOMES
Copenhagen $4.29 can 997-6500
W HEN YOUINEED ToSOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
PaintingSe'rvic Cougar $2.99 can xeomimercidUnd:Ag~eult^tgued4gs WJ^Nd
--... Cougar $2.99 can :C', nnrcibida:. '" u-l-- -. BSAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
J -H [t : Timberwolf $1.99 can *Diagnosis *Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consutations
Grizzly $1.79 can PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383 'Ttorials emovalof Viruses, Adware,Spyware
Longhorn $1.29 can
Septic Tank & Land Clearing Kayak $1.11 can
Colete Setic Service & Reair rices Good Thru Feb., 2006 JEFJFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS H
Complete Septic Service & Repair 1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
1468 S. WAUKEEN AH STLFFICE 300 .....
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing MONTICELO, FL 32344 Call for quality work
Support Our Troops Magnet, 1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED Years In Te Tra
Thomas B. Scott, Sr. God Bless America Magnet $2.00 + tax CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-71 45 Years In The Trade
Rt 1 Box 137 Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Lamont, FL 32366 Rubber Bracelets .93 + tax 850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620 Sports sayings, Inspirational, Religious, ResidentialCommercial interiorr ~ Exteror
Patriotic sayings and more.

*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt Sim-Call Andy Rudd Fo
*Limerock *Gravel Ply Call Andy Rudd For
Billy Simmons, Owner A liance Service Since 1977
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TaiksContractor & Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Excavation Contractor
PhExcavaion Contrctor Needs @ Residential & Commercial
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465 Best! REALTOR 997-5648 FREE ESTIMATES 997-4100
Insured D.O.H. Lie. #SR0971265 R9
Visa & Mastercard Accepted! M,.


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-



LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESSoCONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

BIG BEND
COMMUNICATIONS Co

997-4150


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE COULD

BE YOUR FOR

$10 PER WEEK


Pam Bowling.
Broker AssQciate


;: r : : 1997-4789
S. 1-888-701-2205
;:.":'" ."..-. ^ ,,.pam bi' ,nettally.com .


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL, Keaton Tire Repair
Sales ~ Service ~ Installation Change Outs Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"
S. LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
Residential Commercial
342-9922 HOME EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop

Family Owned 7 Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
Lie. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home
1


one Davis
s Manager


Trade
ush, Pull, r Dr
it Itr
rVew $ave A Vehl
',VeryOt


C T E s i

happe


- Ultimate

I age Auto


877-7222
Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold
'ag 00 (PEDT, BAD (EDiT,


Te iT DOESNT MATTER


I













To Plae Your Ad





997-3568


S Your Com fnit j gho- i -
3n2-~ Yr~~2I~ __ -- ~


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006 PAGE 11


C:,LALSSIFIED ADVERTISING; 1 -
3'Lines,"Two (ditiqns Wednesday and iFida.
-":":.-:"i: :aii iofitonal Line...$1:00
EADLINES: 'Nlonda Noon foW AVednesd A
: -Weldnesday Noon.for Eiday .
S-allOir ClassfiedDeparamertat: .--
997-3568


LEGALS' :
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
05-115-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLARA NEARLY, Deceased.
NOTICE OF ACTION TO: To All
Unknown Heirs of Clara Nealy
Address Unknown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that a petition for
summary Administration has been
filed and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN, petitioner's attorney,
whose address is P.O. Box 41,
Monticello, FL 32345 on or before
March 16, 2006, and file the original
with the clerk of this said court
either before service on petitioner's
attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the petition. Dated on January
24, 2006. CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
As Clerk of the Court.
1/27,2/3,2/10,17, c

HELP WANTED
Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568
tfn
Applications are currently being
accepted for prospective
AmeriCorps Volunteers to begin
immediately in Leon, Jefferson,
Gadsden, and Wakulla counties.
Applicants must be US citizens,
at least 18 years of age possess a
high school diploma, GED, or
willing to obtain a GED, free of
criminal convictions and arrests
and drug free. Those selected
will perform services for the
elderly providing in home or
facility-based respite for
approximately 20-35 hours per
week. Members will receive
training, a biweekly living
allowance, travel
reimbursement, and an
educational award with the
completion of one year's
consecutive service. For more
information about AmericCorps
please visit www.americorp.org
or contact Bill Wertman;
AmeriCorps Program Director,
at 850-386-2778.
2/1, 3, 8, c
skills, team player attitude
along with a Class B CDL
license, with 'an air brake
endorsement and have the
ability t- obtain a hazmat &
tanker endorsement Clean
driving record a must. Excellent
starting salary with competitive
benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE.
Apply by Fax 850-997-2808 or
in person @ 500 South Jefferson
St. Monticello, FL.
1/18, tfn,c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
Drillers helper, excellent pay
and benefits. High school
diploma required, valid Florida
drivers license, CDL a plus.
Drug free work place. Travel
required. Please call
1-800-487-9665.
1/25, tfn, c
Office Assistant wanted at
North Florida Community
College. Monday Friday 8:00
to 4:30. Partial Duties include:
Thorough knowledge and
experience in Microsoft Office
including Outlook, Word, Excel,
and Access (must be able to
create and maintain
spreadsheets and databases);
Updating and maintaining
computerized Board Policy
Manual and Procedures
Manual; Coordinating
schedules/meeting; Maintain
budget information;
Record/transcribe minutes (The
ability to take Shorthand
dictation a plus). Full job
description on website.
Qualifications: AA/AAS degree
(Preferred) plus two (2) years
related experience. Send
application & resume to NFCC,
Human Resources, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison,
FL 32340. Application must be
received by 1/31/2006.
Application can be downloaded
at www.nfcc.edu. EOE.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, c


Servers: Must be 18 years old.
Call Brian for interview
284-7899.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, c
Huddle House now hiring
experience waitresses and cooks.
We offer above average wages


HELP WANTED


and health insurance with
2-weeks paid vacation per year.
Please come in and file an
application or call 342-3284 and
ask for Jack.
2/1, 3, 8, 10,15, 17, c
Hiring FT/PT Infant, Toddlers
Teachers Minimum
requirements: HS
Diploma/GED, Childcare
experience, CDA preferred.
Contact Phyllis or Angela
850-997-4736, Sandra
850-414-9800.
2/3, c
Operations & Accounting
Specialist Kids Incorporated of
the Big Bend 1170 Capital
Circle NE Tallahassee, FL
32301-3519 phone: (850)
414-9800 ext. 108, Fax:
850-488-0475, Cell:
850-694-3192
2/3, c
Taking Applications. Our
business is striping, seal coating,
asphalt repair, etc. Ideal
candidate can take on anything
and do it right %irthoul
supervision. EOE. Druggies
need not apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Leading national propane
marketer Southeast Propane
has immediate opening for an
energetic route sales driver for
their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must
possess strong customer service
850-545-7112.
2/3, c
Mattress- New Full Set still in
plastic with warranty, $99
850-222-9879.
2/3, c
LEATHER sofa and loveseat.
Brand new, still wrapped can
deliver $795. 850-222-2113.
2/3, c

GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale W. Washington
Street on side of Johnson's Meat
Market. 50%' to 60% off
everything. Jeans, hats, boots,
leather goods and apparel.
hunting jackets and cover alls,
winter coats. PAINT $2 gallon.
342-3288, 997-5814.
Moving Sale Fri. & Sat. 8-2
Furniture, Clothes newborn to
plus. A little of everything. 355
Hill St. behind New hope church
of God.
2/1, 3, pd
Moving Sale Saturday, Feb. 4, 8
until. Lots of household items.
525 Sunset Dr.
2/3, pd
Multi Family yard sale
Saturday, February 4, 9 a.m. 2
p.m. no early bird please.
Bedroom set, treadmill, misc.
household items. 460 Willow
Street, turn @ Sage Restaurant.
2/3, pd
SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn


Peter Satellite -- Your Satellite
dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and
prompt service. We also offer
Go-Kart, utility tailors and lawn
mowers. Located at: 1150 Old
Lloyd Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


*SERNWICJ; %&M ______


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Dog Obedience classes, 8 sessions,
starting Feb. 7 & 10. Call 997-6599
or 997-2542
2/3, 8, c
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Are you concerned about the
high cost of college? Would you
like to learn how to pay for
college? Attend a 3 hour
seminar Saturday, February 4th
Register at
www.earncollegecash.com
AUTOMOTIVE
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3500 CASH. Clean, new tires.
Call 997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
'89 Astro 18ft. with trailer good
condition
'89 Mariner 135 HP. Excellentf
condition Twin Fish Finters
12/24v trolling motor. $3,800
Firm! Home: 997-4081, Cell
339-2406
2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd
1995 Ford Crown Vic. New
Tires, Looks & Drives Like
New. $3,800 Priced 3500 below.
NADABook
89 Accura Legend SR 6
cylinder, PNADA Book is $2,400
Selling Price $1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible-
Red, New tip, new tires, 6 cyl.
$4,200; 997-6066, 997-6806
Wilson Auto, LLC.
tfn, c

FOR SALE
6 piece bedroom set. New in
boxes, must sell $550. Caq
deliver, 850-222-2113
2/3, c
BED "A queen double pillow
top mattress set. New in plastic
SwithI warranty Sacrifice $149
c.an deliver 850-222-7783. I
2/3,c
Bed- New King 3 piece pillow
top mattress set with warranty,
still in plastic, can deliver-
$295. 850-545-7112
2/3,c
BEDROOM SET New sleigh
bed, dresser, mirror, chest, 2
nightstands. All wood, retail
$5,200 Sacrifice $!650.
850-222-9879
2/3, c
Couch and Loveseat. Brand
New, never used. $500.
850-222-2113.
2/3, c
Cherry Sleigh Bed Never used,
still in box, Retail $600, sacrifice
$275. 850-222-7783.
2/3, c


Dining Room Set, formal table,
chairs, hutch/buffet. All new, in
boxes, sacrifice $850.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT

--


Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


Rhode Island Red Roosters -
$10 each. Beautiful Purebred
Limousine bull, 15 months old.
Call 997-0901, leave message or
997-3568 ask for Debbie.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Mattress/Box bed Set: pillow
plush double sided pillow top
mattress/box set, 4 inch pillow
top. List $989.00, sell for $248.
850-528-1422
1/20, 25, 27, 2/1, 3, pd

FREE
"Free Firewood" you cut, you
haul all. 586 Old Lloyd Rd.
997-4350, 519-3940 cell.
2/3, 8, pd

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980. 11/30,
tfn, c
One bedroom on acre. Partially
furnished, no pets, $575 per
month, credit check. 997-6991
1 bedroom, clean, cozy; on 1
acre, no pets, $600 per month,
credit check. 997-6911
1/20, 27, pd
Country Living 1 bedroom, 1
bath, $500 997-6653.
2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd

REAL ESTATE
NEW HOME 1370 square'
foot. 4 bedroom, 2 bath for
under $475/ month payments.
University Homes
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of
room! Buy for under $550 a
month. 850-576-2105.
1l/11,tfn
In-town LOT $22,000 SE of
Square, 88'x79' 345-7116 or
222-5658 Summer's Realty of
Tallahassee, Inc.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
"Fixer Upper" $22,000. 4
bedroom, 13'. baths -2nd. .St; E'
345-7119.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
FIRST TIME home buyers. If
you have enough money for a
deposit on an apartment you
can probably own your own
home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS
Only 2 homes left, must go! Save
$$$$ Call today! 850-576-2105.


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers,. Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loins,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


TABLES
Coffee & Tvo End
3pe. Sortn


aw-


Sss-
THE




The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE




Housing Vouchers

S We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep..

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


LLand In Monfcelto
KELLY & KELLY Call For More Info.
PROPERTIES 997-5516

2 Lots Available Prime business/residential location withfront-
age on Hwy-19 North, old platted subdivision. 5 91,000
* New Listing 2.88 Acres E Washington St excellent location,
close to town with Hwy 90 frontage. Beautiful trees, excellent
home site. 5 55,000
a 5 Acres Spectacular property, comer lot. Somewoodsgand some
pasture. Quiet county lane leads to property. 5 95,000
* 3 Lots Available Waukeenah Hwy. 5.64 acres. High ridge with
planted pines. Convenient to Tallahassee. $ 95,880
* Whitehouse Rd. 6 Acres with great location. Convenient to Talla-
hassee and Monticello. Gorgeous with mixed older pines and hard-
woods. Up to 14 acres available. S 111,000


Simply the Best!


Country Living 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US.19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, nice family room
$87,500:

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom. 3bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/'
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price Contract Pending 5
wooded acres on Blue Lake Road only
$22,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profitfrom both appreciating land and
growing'pine $12,000 /acre.

Home Site-Under Contract close to town
on West Grooverville Road only $14,500
Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


. I deS.I1


I y






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 3, 2006


Blake's
2=


Blake's Blake's Blake's Blake's Blake's


DIANE FREEMAN, Junior Leadership Coordinator, accepts five rebuilt computers do-
nated by Police Chief David Frisby. The computers are earmarked for the students
who don't already have computers. (News Photo)


Papa Jim's Pizza & Calzon
N. Cherry Str. Monticello, FL
850-997-3133
New Hours: Lunch: Mon-Friday 11am till 3pm
**Dinner: Thurs- Saturday 5pm till 9pm**
Saturday Breakfast 9am till 2pm
**Breakfast served All Day Saturday till 2pm**
Plate Lunch Special Monday thru Friday
11am till 2pm
Along with a Full menu for You to choose from
**Blake's The Rare Door: Serving Thurs.-Sat. 5pm till 9pm**
Specializing in Hand Cut Steaks
&
Fresh Seafood


Papa Jim's Pizza & Calzon
850-997-3133
Hand Tossed Dough & Thin crust Pizza's
One size Pizza's large 16"
Available Pizza By The Slice, Also Lunch Special's
***Open Monday Saturday 11am till 3pm and 5pm till 9pm***


**Delivery available ask for Details**
Driver's Carry NO CASH


2

Blake's,


Blake's Blake's Blake's Blake's Blake's Blake's 2


SUNO RUNNING
Neuromuscular disease can say no running,
Swalking- even breathing. Help MDA help people.

Muscular Dystrophy Association 1-800-572-1717


DON'T WIIT!
A GREAT CAREER CAN
BE YOURS IN LESS TIME
THAN YOU THINK!


PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN

MEDICAL ASSISTING

Earn your Associate or Bachelor Degree in:
SBusiness Legal Medical


* Computer


* Culinary


Call Today!

KEISER


* Financial aid available
to those who qualify.
* Choose day, evening
or online classes.
* Job placement assistance
available for graduates.


COLLE
TA LLAHAS


GE.
SEE


1.888.232.4852
1700 Halstead Blvd.
Admissions Hours:
Monday-Thursday 9 am-8 pm, Friday 9 am-5 pm, Saturday 9 am-1 pm
www.keisercollege.edu


Blake's


Blake's The Rare Door


NORTH FLORIDA'S
LARGEST AC
HEATING & COOLING CONTRACTOR FOR THE
PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED
P HOUSING
lordid< MY
-Mobile Home
Supply, Inc.
FIBERGAs 576-5113 'yNLS6lRT
S Year CKS Toll Free 1-800-633-2356 GTreY "
:ear Lnited I :\ e .Tan- -
Warranty 200 AMP d \ *a '.
POWER POLE
Door Canopies Call For Installment :Doors & Windows (All Sizes)
Roof Coating (Aluminum & White) Plumbig Fixtures, Fittings & Pipe


Open: Monday --Friday 7-5 .Closed Saturday & Sunday
732 Blountstown Hwy., Tallahassee (Betwden Pensacola. St. & H'wy. 90W on Blountstown Hwy.)
Fla. Lic. #C050446, #RA0035243, Ga. Lic. #CN003927, L.P. Lic. #2406, ES-0000151


Al


-I I II I


I