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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00102
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 1, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00102
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text
,I3RjARY OF FLOPlDA
,1C4 IBjaARY 'iEST
STTY FLORIDA.
T!L FL 3L11.


Weighing New
Prescription
Plan

Editorial, Page 4
I--II-e


Historical

Association Plans
Dinner Meeting

Story, Page 7

mm mmlw


Sipworth
Natural Tiger
Hoopster

Story, Page 9


Local Hospice
Seeking
Volunteers

Story, Page 12


Q Wednesday Morning )






Monticello


1 8THI VFAR NO.09 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 1. 2006 ,


County Ranked Among


Worst On


Health


Issues


State Treating County

Differently, Per Group,


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Statistics compiled by the
Healthy Start Coalition show
that Jefferson County is being
treated differently from other
counties in the state, with the
result that infants are dying,
children are going hungry, and
the community is losing $2.6
million annually in economic
activity.
Indeed, the county is ranked
one of 17 "least resilient"
counties in the state, in terms
of having high health risks and
few resources to combat the
risks.
Meaning that, compared with
the state average, infant mor-
tality here is double the rate;
child poverty is 25 percent
greater; school suspensions are
three times higher; elementary
special education is twice as
likely; mental illness among
adults is three times more
prevalent; the child death rate


(age 1-4) is triple; teen preg-
nancy is double; and birth
weights have been below the


state average for 16 of the last
20 years.
Consider: The United States
is ranked in the bottom 33 per-
cent of developed nations, in
term of the services it provides
its children. Florida is ranked
in the bottom 33 percent of the


50 states, in term of the same
services. And Jefferson --
along with Madison and Tay-
lor -- is ranked in the bottom
33 percent of Florida counties.
Bottom line, the infant death
rate here is 10 times the rate in
Cuba, with an evident disparity


*~id
~P


--- -- '-"--~ *.


4~


GEORGE HINCHLIFFE, left, di-
rector of Jefferson and Madison
Healthy Start, discusses his
group's findings with County
Commissioner Gene Hall.


between white and black infant
deaths.
These are startling statistics
that should concern every
county resident whether they
care about social or economic
issues, according to George
Hinchliffe, executive director
of the Jefferson and Madison
Healthy Start.
In recent weeks, Hinchliffe
has been presenting the coali-
tion's findings to community
and political leaders in the
hope that the situation can be
remedied.
The problem,. Hinchliffe re-
peatedly states at these meet-
ings, is that the budgetary
decisions that in great part are
producing the dismal statistics
are not universal or even pol-
icy decisions.
Rather, they are administra-
tive decisions undertaken by
the Department of Children
and Families (DCF) specific to
Jefferson and other small rural
-counties.
"These are administrative de-
cisions made in a cavalier
fashion and they are hurting
people in Jefferson County,"
Hinchliffe told commissioners
at a recent meeting. "These are


not policy decisions that the
Legislature can make. These
are executive branch
decisions."
He points specifically to last
year's closing of the local DCF
office, which action he says
contributes directly to the dis-
mal statistics.
Asked why he thought the
DCF signaled Jefferson
County for the differential
treatment, Hinchliffe response
was quite to the point.
' "My personal opinion is that
we're small and they thought
we wouldn't scream very loud
and would let it happen," he
said.
In response to Hinchcliffe's
appeal, the County Commis-
sion has agreed to forward a
resolution to the governor ask-
ing that the DCF cease apply-
ing its differential treatment to
the county.
Hinchliffe also has spoken to
legislators about the problem
and is in the process of setting
up a meeting with Lt. Gov.
Toni Jennings to discuss the
findings.
The coalition, meanwhile,
continues holding monthly
(See Health Risks Page 2)


Citizens Challenge 2


Comp Plan Changes


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Not every government action
triggers a citizens reaction, but
it has in the case of two Com-
prehensive Plan amendments
approved by county commis-
sioners recently.
At least two citizens have
filed paperwork with the De-
partment of Community Af-
fairs (DCA) challenging the
commissioners' decisions to
one degree or another.
A citizens group, moreover,
has come together to address
growth management issues in
the wake of the Comprehen-
sive Plan amendments.


Fred Goodrich, a community
planner with the DCA who.
handles Jefferson County's
Comprehensive Plan amend-
ments, confirmed Monday that
his agency has received at least
two requests from citizens
relative to the recent Comp
Plan amendments.
Susan Anderson, whose
property on US 19 South is
near the 73-acre parcel slated
for rezoning from agricultural
to residential, is asking the
DCA to review the county's
decision.
Goodrich said such reviews
entail a host of considerations,
including a development's po-
tential impact on environmen-
tally sensitive areas, its contri-


bution to traffic congestion,
and whether it constitutes spot
zoning.
He explained that such re-
views are standard for certain
developments, depending on
their size, density and environ-
mental impact, among other
things. Sometimes, however, a
development may not warrant
such a review, he said. But
when an affected citizen re-
quests it, a review is always
done, he said.
Goodrich said depending on
the DCA's determination once
the review is completed, a citi-
zen can ask for an administra-
tive hearing. That opportunity,
however, comes much later in
the process, he said.
Goodrich confirmed that an-
other citizen, Santa Hokanson,
has filed a challenge to the
Comprehensive Plan amend-
ment allowing "special excep-
tions" in agricultural zones.
Goodrich could not say if an
administrative hearing had
been scheduled at this time,
and Hokanson declined to dis-
cuss the issue with the News.
The Comp Plan amendment
Hokanson is challenging stems
from commissioners' approval
of the Go-Kart Racetrack off
Big Joe Road.
County officials argued at the
time that the Development
Code specifically permitted
such uses in agricultural zones,
although the Comprehensive
Plan was silent on the issue.
Following the lawsuit filed
by opponents of the racetrack
(that suit is scheduled for a
Feb. 14 court hearing), county
(See Comp Plan Page 2)


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SIGN OF THE SEASON: Rolls of
hay dot fields across the county
at this time of year. This particu-


lar field is off the Ashville High-
way in the northeast part of the
county. (News Photo)


Preparations Ongoing For


Downtown Mardis Gras


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As plans for next month's
Home Town Get Down con-
tinue to finalize, "Bourbon
Street" is the promised feel
for Monticello's own "Mardi
Gras".
The event is slated for 5-9
p.m., Feb. 24.
Spokesperson Ericka Im-
brunone said the event will
host Louisiana and New Or-
leans music, cuisine and gala.
Some of the food items will
include red beans and rice,
Gumbo and Jumbalia.
She added that Dogwood
street as well as local shops,


will be decorated to fit the
festivities.
To keep things moving in
her special way, Judi Persons
will dress like a Jester and
serve as the MC for the event.

Event's Set
For Feb. 24
"It's been set, we've se-
cured a jazz and blues band
called 'Blind Dillon and the
Willon", said Imbrunone.
"I've heard their music and
they are really good."
She added that there will
also be a stationary float in
the middle of Dogwood
Street, where the traditional


Mardi Gras beads will be
thrown into the crowds.
There is also going to be a
Mardi Gras mask contest, for
anyone who has a mask and
beads and would like to par-
ticipate. Winners will receive
prizes. Imbrunone said the
contest categories haven't yet
been set in stone, coordinators
don't know if the category
would be the most extrava-
gant or if their would be a va-
riety of different categories.
"As it gets a little closer,
we'll know for sure," she
said.
"Just for the fun of it, we're
getting fortune tellers, too,"
said Imbrunone. "Nothing
(See Downtown Page 2)


Hinchliffe wants the state to stop
treating Jefferson County differ-
ently from other counties.'(News
Photo)


CITIZENS concerned about some of the zoning
decisions being made by county officials have
organized into a group that plans to develop
strategies and address growth management is-
sues in future. (News Photo)


J,









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006


Comp Plan Amendments


-- I









.
^ ;. ". .... ., .- ....

''-



Boys and Girls Club members mine Addison and Amalee Addi-
enjoy a day of fun outdoors in the son. (News Photo)



County Officials want


Slave Canal Unchanged


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

If commissioners have their
way, the narrow manmade wa-
terway connecting the southern
part of the county to the Gulf
will continue to be called the
Slave Canal.
Commissioners voted to keep
the name after hearing Com-
missioner Gene Hall's passion-
ate plea for retention of the
name.
"By leaving the name as it is,
it gives credence to the fact
that slaves made a contribution
to this country," Hall said.
He decried that many
African-American youths to-
day did not know the history
or contributions of their race.
By keeping the name, Hall ar-
gued, the community honored
the slaves and their contribu-
tions.
k'Commissioner Jerry Sutphin.
agreed '
"Slaves helped build the na-
tion," Sutphin said. "What they
did was a contribution, even if
it wasn't done in the right way.
But we can't shut our eyes and
make history go away."
A proposal before the US
Board on Geographic Names,


which by law is responsible for
the standardization of names
for use by the federal govern-
ment, is seeking to change the
name of the waterway to the
Cotton Run Canal.
Besides, he said, people were
going to continue to call it the
Slave Canal regardless of any
name change.
The name change was sub-
mitted by the Florida Depart-
ment of State, Division of
Historic Resources, in keeping
with a new .Florida law that
seeks to purge all names "con-


Downtown
(Continued From Page 1)
real serious, just for fun." she
said that there would be no
"doom and gloom predictions
made during the event.
Imbrunone added that there
would also be a raffle for
pri:-. ;ippr'..imnatel., $1,000
ha' e h-eln dornted already, so
there will be many winners on
hand during Marti Gras. As
usual, the festivities will fea-
ture vendors of everything
from food to collectibles, art,
clothing and jewelry, along
with the sale of beer and
wine.


sidered offensive or deroga-
tory to any of our citizens."
The'US Board on Geographic
Names solicited the commis-
sion's opinion on the proposed
name change as part of its
regular proceeding. It is not
known, however, what effect
the commissioners' opinion
will have.
The three-mile long Slave
Canal was dug by slaves in the
1850s as part of an effort by
local planters to have an outlet
to the Gulf for the shipment of
their cotton.



Mardi Gras
Also on hand, will be mem-
bers of the Humane Society
with an adoption booth, and
selling of Humane Society T-
shirts and note cards.
To donate prizes or volun-
Stear with the.'event, call Im-
Sbrunone at 997-2015.


(Continued From Page 1)
officials decided to do some
housekeeping and amended the
Comprehensive Plan specifi-
cally to allow such uses as the
racetrack in agricultural zones.
Administrative hearings are
held by a third party other than
the DCA, which renders a de-
cision based on the presenta-
tion of facts from both sides in
the conflict.
Meantime, a group calling it-
self Jefferson County Citizens
for a Sustainable Future held
an organizational meeting Jan.
17.
Among the issues the group
is proposing to tackle: the im-
portance of integrity and serv-
ice in government; what


Health Risks
(Continued From Page 1)
workshops to delve deeper into
the problem and hopefully
cobble together some local so-
lutions.
The coalition's next meeting
is scheduled for 9 a.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 28, at the public li-
brary.
In the coming weeks, the
News will focus on the issue
with a series of articles high-
lighting the different problems
and the possible solutions.


PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH
*A10ow~biI,, Th,,kG A. MovoicYcle AocI ,nlo.
*Defp &Fipemoducls -Medical N..ilgenceHrvlpier Vice
., lp &L Faii Promises lobiiirV Numng Home Negiigonce)


constitutes good responsible
planning for growth; and the
protection of natural and cul-
tural resources.
Anderson is a member of this
group.
"We are concerned about the
manner in which development
is occurring in the county and
how it will impact basic serv-
ices and how it will impact on
the continuity of this county
long-term," Anderson said.
She said too many people
tended to view development
incrementally and lost sight of
the wider implications of such
projects, in terms of the social
and environmental impacts.
"We look at the Comprehen-
sive Plan as our insurance pol-
icy for the future," Anderson


said. "And these decisions are
undermining that policy."
She distinguished between
steady, maturing growth,
which she said was inevitable
and desirable, and the type the
county is presently encounter-
ing, which she called "cancer-
ous growth".
Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.

+

American
Red Cross


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The District School Board Of Jefferson County
Announces A Workshop To Which
The Public Is Invited

Date: February 6, 2006
Time: 3:00 p.m.
Place: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

Subject: Facility Use Project Update


Caminez, Brown



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lan Bror n
Carn .. "Bo" Hardee, III
Nakia D. Purdie-Laason
Hal Rkichnund. of Counsel


(850) 997-8181
1307 S. Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida 32344

.. i.


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(850) 875-9992
S .. .'.."Quliney
S227 E. Jefferson Street
SQuincy, Florida 32351


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(850) 997-8500
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 PAGE 3

Rural Development Grant


To Promote Tourism


JCHS observed Arbor Day Friday,
with the planting of a Chinquapin
Oak. Present at the ceremony
were Forester Mike Humphrey,


Arbor Day Celebrated


At Jeffer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Jefferson County High--
School observed Arbor Day
Friday, with the planting of a
tree donated by County For-
esters.
Among those attending the
observance were: County For-
ester Mike Humphrey, 4-H
Director John Lilly and 4-
H'ers, Jefferson County High
School Principal Chalmus
Thomas and Assistant Princi-
pal Harry Jacobs.
Humphrey gave a brief his-
tory of Arbor Day aimed spe-
cifically at the 4-Hers.
He said that the idea for
Arbor Day originated in
1800s, in Nebraska, once a
treeless plain.
"Among the pioneers mov-
ing into the Nebraska territory
in 1854 was J. Sterling Mor-
ton from Detroit. He and his
wife were lovers of nature,
and the home'they established
in Nebraska was quickly
planted with trees, shrubs and
flowers," Humphrey said.
"Morton was a journalist
and soon became editor of
Nebraska's first newspaper.
Given that forum, he spread
agricultural information and
his enthusiasm for trees to an
equally enthusiastic audience.
"His fellow pioneers missed
their trees. But, more impor-
tantly, trees were needed as
windbreaks to keep soil in
place, for fuel and building
materials, and for shade from
the hot sun.
"Morton not only advocated
tree planting by individuals in
his articles and editorials, but
he also encouraged civic
groups to join in. His promi-
nence in the area increased,
and he became Secretary of
the Nebraska territory, which
provided another opportunity
to stress the value of trees.
"On January 4, 1872, Mor-
ton first proposed a tree plant-
ing holiday to be called,
Arbor Day at a meeting of the
State Board of Agriculture.
The date was set for April 10,
1872.


'son Higi
"Prizes were offered to
counties and individuals for
planting properly the largest
number of trees on that day.
It was estimated that more
than one million trees were
planted in Nebraska on the
first Arbor Day.
"Arbor Day was named a
legal holiday in Nebraska in
1885, and Morton's birthday,
April 22, was selected for the
date of its permanent obser-
vance.
"Today, the most common
date for the state observances
is the jast Friday in April, and
several US presidents have
proclaimed a national Arbor
Day on that date.
"But a number of state Ar-
bor Days are at other times to


1 Friday
coincide with the best tree
planting weather, from Janu-
ary and February in the
South, to May in the far
North," Humphrey explained.
Arbor Day is now observed
in many countries, he said.
Humphrey instructed the
audience on the best way to
plant a tree.
"The idea is to plant slightly
shallower than the pot," said
Humphrey. "The top of the
soil in the pot should be about
three inches above the
ground. If you plant the tree
too deep, it won't grow as
well."
The group then planted a
Chinquapin Oak, after they
wrestled the oak from its 30
gallon container.


Aucilla SHARE Sets


Registration,

Distribution


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Registration for .Aucilla
SHARE has been scheduled
10 a.m. 12 p.m. the Saturdays
of Feb. 4 and Feb. 11, at Cen-
tral Baptist Church, on Tindell
Road in Aucilla, and at the li-
brary.
Pick up and Distribution is
scheduled for 9 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 25 at Central
Baptist Church only.
The Basic Food Package for
February is a guaranteed retail
value of $36 or more, for only
$18.
This month's package in-
cludes: 3.66 lbs. chicken leg
quarters, 1 lb. center cut bone-
less pork chops, 13 oz. fully
cooked. mesquite chicken
breast filets, 8 oz. fully cooked
Italian style meatballs, 26 oz.
Blake vegetables and chicken
pot pies, 14 oz. Silver Springs
sandwich steaks, plus a selec-
tion of fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles.
A Pasta Lover's Package can


be purchased separately for
$14. It will include: 18 oz.
stuffed manicotti, 18 oz.
stuffed shells, 13 oz. cheese
ravioli, 16 oz. tri-color tortel-
lini, 13 oz. Monterey jack and
Swiss pierogies, 13 oz. potato
and cheddar pierogie bites, and
12 oz. sundried tomato stuffed
rigatoni.
Only cash, food stamps, or
EBT is accepted.
No orders can be accepted
for the February food package
after Feb. 11.
Registration copy and volun-
teer service reports are needed
on Distribution Day, when
food packages are picked up.
Volunteer service is anything
you do for someone other than
family that you afe not paid
for.
There is no food storage fa-
cility available. If food pack-
ages are not picked up, they
will be forfeited as well the
money paid, and the packages
will be sold to someone else.
For questions and more in-
formation contact Lucy
Mckown at 997-2220 or Elaine
Holden at 997-2631.


* Gov. Jeb Bush recently
Awarded a $35,000 Regional
Rural Development Grant to
the Original Florida, Inc., a re-
gional tourism marketing com-
pany.
The grant will assist Jeffer-
son County, as well as Colum-
bia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Su-
wannee, Taylor, and Union
Counties.
In 2003, Bush declared this
rural, north central region as
one of Florida's three Rural
Areas of Critical Economic
Concern.
"The Original Florida, Inc.
has achieved remarkable suc-
cess in promoting tourism, and
recreation in the region," said
Bush.
"The expansion of nature-
based and heritage tourism is
an important component of the
region's strategic economic
plan, and this grant will serve
as a strategic tool to help them
meet their goals."


' F.'' FLORIDA,! '"

/HEU 5611.
[ _._. JI
Show your support
for Florida's
manatees!
Purchase a manatee
license plate ana support
the recovery of Florida's
endangered manatees.
Call your local auto tag office
or visit the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission web site
S-"myfwc.org/psm


-L
i- --_..


'. i'1

!.=.- .


Since 1998, The Original
Florida, Inc. has served as a re-
gional tourism development
organization, developing and
promoting tourism opportuni-
ties throughout the 12 county
rural region.
The initiative highlights the
region's pristine lakes, creek,
and rivers, forest and wildlife,
as well as many heritage
events, small towns and land-
marks.
"The Original Florida is ex-
tremely proud to have been
awarded this staffing grants,"
said Harvey Campbell, mar-
keting director of The Original
Florida.
"It will greatly assist our ru-
ral region in new tourism mar-
keting initiatives as an
economic development tool.
"We are especially grateful
to Gov. Bush and the Legisla-
ture for recognizing the chal-
lenges facing rural counties to
create jobs, and participate in
the economic prosperity cur-


rently being' enjoyed in
Florida."
Rural economic development
initiatives, including the Re-
gional Rural Development
Grant Program, are overseen
by the Governor's Office of
Tourism, Trade, and Economic
Development.
Since 1999, Gov. Bush has
worked to enhance the econo-
mies and overall competitive-
ness of rural Florida.
Among his many rural-based
initiatives, Bush established
the "Rural Areas of Critical
Economic Concern" program,
providing designated rural ar-
eas with greater access to the
, state's economic incentive pro-
gram.


'Tigger' Is

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
-Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Hu---
mane Society has named Tig-
ger as the adoptable feline of
the week.
Tigger is a male, black and
white domestic short haired
cat, born Oct. 11, 2005.
He has been neutered and all
vaccinations are up to date.
He is described as quite the
character, loving to play,
pounce, box, wrestle and bat
toys around.
"He's really lovable and
cuddly," said Shelter Care-
taker Cheryl Bautista. "He
also thoroughly enjoys being
around other cats close to his
age."
To adopt Tigger .or any of
the other many animals avail-
able at the shelter call 342-
0244.


The c6h certified primary


stroke center in the region.

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare is the only certified stroke center in the Big Bend. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Orgonizatii,
(JCAHO) has awarded TMH their Gold Seal of Approval" for stroke care by designating Tallahassee Memorial with Primary Stroke Center Certificati:

This means that TMH demonstrated that its stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcome: i:
stroke patients.


Stroke is a medical emergency. Know these warning signs of stroke and teach them to others. Call 911 immediately if you or a
loved one is having a stroke. Every second counts!
* Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
* Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
* Sudden, severe headache with no known cause -LENAI
Soure: Americon Heorn Assodatian Stroke Neuroloaist and Med


JL
"ir
Tallahassee Memorial
NeuroScience Center


For more information, log onto www.tmh.org or
call (850) 431-CARE (2273).


RD DASILVA, M.D.
ical Director of .


Tallahassee Memorial Stroke Cente'


..... ".... ,
NATIONAL RLSLAKCH I ".


Principal Chalmus Thomas, Vice-
Principal Harry Jacobs, 4-H Co-
ordinator John Lilly, and 4-H
members. (News Photo)


"PLEASE take me home. I'm a good kitty, and-a
real good mouser. I don't eat much and I prom-
ise I won't make a mess."


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING bON
COMCAST CABLE TELEVISION

The Monticello City Council will hold a public hear-
ing on Comcast Cable rates and services. The public
hearing on Comcast Cable rates and services. The
public hearing will be held at the regular City Coun-
cil meeting scheduled for February 7, 2006 at 7:00
p.m. at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida. For more information, please contact
City Clerk Emily Anderson at
342-0153


FACTORYOUTLET
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OF GEORGIAEst1968
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stroke

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~: r~
~-;;;. :;.~ u







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

R RON CICHON
APublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

0CIT# LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Weighing New


Prescription Plan

Policymakers and the media If their current plan provides
are measuring the success of drug benefits that are at least
Medicare's new prescription as good as Medicare, they
drug benefit on the number of won't risk a penalty if they join
people who sign up. a Medicare plan later.
Consumers may see polls 15 percent of seniors are
that indicate more than a third eligible for both Medicare and
of seniors don't plan to join Medicaid. These "dual
leading them to reconsider eligible" will not need to sign
whether or not they should up because they will be auto-
sign up. matically enrolled by the gov-
Experts caution seniors not emrnment.
to be misled by these reports 12 percent of seniors are
or think that others must know already signed up with a Medi-
something that they don't. care HMO, also called a Medi-
Although the new benefit care Advantage Plan. Many of
may not be for everyone, for these plans provide drug bene-
many, it may offer much- fits.
needed assistance with the These plans now include
costs of prescription medica- new Medicare drug benefits
tions. along with other services, in-
Those who are eligible for cluding medical care.
Medicare should weigh their 11 percent of seniors have
prescription drug coverage op- low incomes but do not qualify
Stions in order to choose cover- for Medicaid. This means that
age that best meets.their needs.. the, lilI not automatically be .
Here are some guidelines to enrolled in Medicare prescrip-
consider in deciding whether tion drug coverage.
or not to sign up: For these seniors and dis-
32 percent of seniors al- abled individuals, applying for
ready have adequate prescrip- "extra help" through the Social
tion drug coverage and will not Security Administration can
need the new benefit, espe- assist with premiums and de-
cially if they receive more help ductibles associated with the
with premiums and co-pays new benefit.
than Medicare will provide. ,Seniors must carefully weigh
These people should keep all of their options in choosing
their coverage if possible. whether or not to enroll in a
Some have retiree or union new. Medicare drug plan.
coverage and others may be Helpful information can be
covered through programs found at 1-800-MEDICARE
such as TRI-CARE. (NAPS).




From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
January 31, 1996
Blood samples taken from
the pickup truck of accused
murderer Booby Cooks Jr. will
be allowed as evidence at the
trial of the 20-year-old county
native.
A representative of the De-
partment of Transportation
who appeared before the
County Commission recently
to hear local officials' concerns
regarding state roads got an
earful.
The Muscular Dystrophy As-
sociation this week released a
list of the "Most Wanted" in
the county. MDA Coordinator
Scotty Wilson explained that
these are fundraisers willing to
donate their time and service
to help MDA raise much
needed money for local MDA
clinics and to. fund MDA's
summer camp program for
children.
A proposed Strategic Re-
gional Policy Plan developed
by the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council that would
have severely restricted live-
stock agriculture in this area
was dropped recently, County
Administrator John Durst re-
ported Friday.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
January 29, 1986
The new Jefferson County
Public Library is one step
closer to reality with the final


meeting between the library
officials, the librarian and ar-
chitects scheduled for today.
The toys for needy children
program, sponsored by the
Shriners Club before Christ-
mas served 81 families and-
256 children.
The City of Monticello has
been notified that it will be
awarded additional funding
under Florida's Small Cities
Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) Program
in the amount of $339,664 to
make the full amount of the
grant to reach $500,000.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 29, 1976
In a meeting held on
Wednesday, January 21, the
Jefferson County Commission
decided that it will stay with its
district-by-district road priority
system.
Barbara Townsend, an em-
ployee of the Farmers and
Merchants Bank since April
1972, has been elected Assis-
tant Cashier of the bank.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 28, 1966
Jesse C. Waldron, one of the
best known vocational agricul-
ture teachers in Florida is retir-
ing on February 1st after 34
years of teaching.
B.W. Johnson and son an-
nounced the Charles Jackson
as pharmacist.


From Our Photo File


CAB of Rodney Howard's log
truck was shattered between his
cargo of logs, and the Seaboard
Coast line engine the truck hit


Opinion & Comment


Debate Policy, Support


I rarely get too excited
about a column, whatever the
writer's political persuasion,
but Joel Stein's column in the
Tallahassee Democrat this
week had me breathing fire.
He boldly declared he did
not support our troops because
he did not approve of the war
in Iraq.
"And being against the war
and saying you support the
troops is one of the wussiest
positions the pacifists have
ever taken...," Stein wrote.
I don't know what this guy is
on but he's a jerk.
More than half of the coun-
try questions the war in Iraq
and that does not mean they
are "pacifists."
Most important of all, we
can question an Administration
policy that sent troops to war
but we support, and pray for
those in harm's way.
Besides being outraged
about his cockeyed notion
about not supporting our
troops, it's clear Stein and I
come from different places.
He says he grew up with


Publisher's

Note ook
mm.,- .. 31.


RoaI Cicf/on


money, I did not. He says he
spent a lot of time in school, I
worked days and went to col-
lege nights to get an education.
He says he has not served his
country in any way not even
on jury duty, I'm an e,-GI.
It is also clear Stein has no
understanding about a soldier
following orders and chain of
command.
He suggests blaming the
President for the Iraq war is a
little too easy. "The truth is
that people who pull triggers
are ultimately responsible,
whether they're following or-
ders or not," Stein writes.


Stein is confused. He must
think the military is some kind
of debating society. It is not.
He demeans the yellow rib-
bons in support of our troops
that we have affixed to our ve-
hicles; Stewi claims slln is'just
a v,:, o ease' our guilt' for
sending troops to war. '"..
Admittedly there is a lot to
debate about the Iraq war. We
went in there with faulty ra-
tional, were dead wrong about
how we would be received af-
ter the fighting, and made lots
of mistakes along the way.
Rosy predictions from the
Bush Administration have re-


System Needs Upgrade


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I was going to make a com--
ment about the term "Criminal
Justice System" being a con-
flict of terms, but then I real-
ized it is a "justice" system for
criminals.
The emphasis in our country
changed from a focus on insur-
ing justice for the victim, to
one that bends over backwards
to guarantee every suspected
criminal receives the utmost in
judicial fairness.
The necessity (indeed the
right) for victims of a crime to
receive their due recompense
for unjust injuries perpetrated
by others, seems to have
nearly disappeared from our
judicial system.


S Somewhere along the line,
our complacent society al-
lowed the appointment of
judges who lost sight of ad-
-ministering the people's justice
from the bench in favor of pro-
moting their own agenda and
often radical social beliefs.
Take the recent case in Ver-
mont. A 34 year old man
(Mark Hulett) admitted to re-
peatedly raping a girl for four
straight years until she was ten
years old. Judge Edward Cash-
man sentenced the man to an
unbelievable 60 days in jail,
citing that there were no psy-
chological treatment services
Available for Hulett in prison if
She gave him a harsher
sentence. Banish any thought
Sof administering "justice" for
the victim!! To make matters
worse, The Vermont media is


sympathetic to Judge
Cashman.
Additionally, the former
head of one of Vermont's legal
associations appeared on tele-
vision justifying and defending
Judge Cashman's "right" as a
judge to administer justice by
sheer virtue of his position.
Such radical circumstances
in our criminal justice system
are just the "tip of the iceberg."
While we slept, a more liberal
philosophy of judicial activism
infiltrated America's justice
system. Some of the name
changes alone reflect this
philosophical judicial restruc-
turing: What were once "pris-
ons" intended to "penalize"
society's wrongdoers have be-
come "correctional facilities."
Instead of punishing crimi-
nals to convince them that be-


Troops
peatedly been contradicted by
events on the ground.
Still, as one of my friends
said recently, if we wind up
with a stable democracy in
Iraq that is a strong ally, we
will have accomplished some-
thing tremendously significant.
He also said if the country
erupts in civil war or aligns it-
self with Iran, then going to
Iraq and committing blood and
treasure was a terrible mistake.'
I think that pretty well sums
up the situation. At this time
we simply don't know how this
is all going to work out.
Debate over the Iraq war is a
healthy thing. No one deserves
to be called unpatriotic or
weak 'ohdefens' for raising
questions about ourlpolicy.
There is no debate, as far as
I'm concerned, about support-
ing our troops in harm's way.
Whether a policy is mis-
guided or not, they are putting
their lives on the line for their
country and there is no higher
commitment.
For this, we honor them!


ing sentenced to prison life is
not something they dare to re-
peat, the liberal concept is to
offer them an opportunity to
"correct" their misbehavior.
Our prisons are full of repeat
offenders, representative of the
woeful failure of this "feel
good" character improvement
and behavior modification
concept.
Why the multitude of repeat
offenders? That isn't hard to
figure out. Prison life today is
progressively more like an all
paid resort vacation. Many
prisons allow laptop
computers, televisions, elec-
tronic games and telephones in
individual cells. If that were
not enough, conjugal visits to
relieve sexual tensions are also
permitted.
(See System Page 10)


Plan Offsets Price Hikes


BY KATHIE DICKENSON
Radford (VA.) University

When fuel prices go up, so
does the price of almost every-
thing else. It costs more to
transport merchandise to
-stores, more to heat homes and
public spaces, even more to'
deliver the mail. In short, ris-
ing energy prices bring on
general inflation, says Radford
University finance professor
Clarence Rose.
The individual impact varies
widely depending on factors
such as the distance of your
daily commute, what kind of


car you drive, how you heat
your home and, high on the
list, how well you have
planned for financial stress.
For many individuals and
families, rising energy prices
as a result of the Gulf Coast
hurricanes were the economic
crisis of the year for 2005, says
Rose, but it could be some-
thing else next year.
The potential for financial
.crisis, whether created at the
national or personal level, is
;-always present. With the infla-
tion rate hovering at around
ti c percent and the possibility
of energy costs skyrocketing,
says Rose, people must err on


the side of caution in their fi-
nancial decision making.
That doesn't mean hiding
money in a mattress. It means
building a solid financial foun-
dation and an intelligent in-
vestment portfolio. Rose ex-
plains the basic steps.
Live within your means an
old saying that still holds wis-
dom. Create a budget based on
your income and stick with it.
Avoid high-interest debt such
as credit card purchases and
don't be tempted by expensive,
potentially disastrous bailouts,
such as cash-till-payday loans.
Create an emergency fund.
Set aside money to be easily


accessible in case of a personal
crisis, such as a job loss, an ill-
ness or an unexpected major
expense. During your working
years, aim at enough money to
sustain you for at least four to
six months. If you're retired,
plan on enough for at least six
months to a year.
"Every individual and family
experiences financial emergen-
cies over time," says Rose,
"Not being prepared magnifies
the problems." He says money
set aside for an emergency
fund should be placed in short-
term investments such as cer-
tificates of deposit, money
(See Plan Offsets Page 10)


when the brakes went out in
Lloyd, in Aug. 1983. (News File
Photo)


- I I,


r ~ I= '


I ~- Ir


i I L-e







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Writer Responds To


Earlier Letter In News


Dear Editor:
I wasn't surprised to see the
letter from Gerald Bussell in
the paper on Jan. 13.
We know you are right, Mr.
Bussell.
The majority of the County
Commissioners do not stand
for what they believe. They
believe in throwing the current
Comprehensive Land Use Plan


out the window, so the county
can become overcrowded and
over developed, like the rest of
Florida.
They believe in rezoning ag-
ricultural land to Residential
One for anyone who applies
for it, so that larger, higher
density subdivisions may be
built.
When you and most of the
commissioners live in' that


congested sprawl, don't blame
us.
Follow your own advice and
dreams, and use your own land
for your "best economic inter-
ests."
Go to the Planning and
County Commissions and ap-
ply to get your ranch rezoned-
to R-l. They'll probably ap-
prove it for you; they have for


The alternative is to exercise_
the right of eminent domain in
the name of providing for the
common good. The property
owner must be compensated
from public funds.
The land must be maintained
at public expense without
yielding a tax revenue to offset
these costs. Could this be justi-
fied as being in the common
good, or would it just be in the
interest of a few nearby land
owners?
Mr. Searcy, I am not the one
trying to deny the others the
liberties I enjoy with regard to
the use of private property.
I have not claimed to be
smarter tharr anyone, insinu-
ated that they were from an-
other planet, nor attempted to
force my decisions on others.
I have not indicated that the
size of the property a person
owns has anything to do with
his/her worth.
What I did say is "those who
want to control land which
does not belong to them, nor
do they pay taxes, they are
greedy," and I will not apolo-
gize for that.
Our commissioners are do-
ing a good job ofprotectiiiii in-
dividual property rights and
providing for "the common
good, and they deserve our re-
spect.
Sincerely,
Gerald Bussell


to our constitution, he has that
right.
Individual liberty means that
the farmer and the buyer of his
property have the sole right to
agree on the price. There is no
exchange unless each party
agrees on the terms.
Thus each is satisfied with
his choice. Where is the greed
in that? There is no cost to any
other persons.
These are the same choices
that have been made through-
out our history. Denial of this
choice to the private property
owner or to the prospective
buyer is a denial of liberty and
equal protection of laws to
these citizens.
The purchase of a home and
land, however much that may
be, by a person in an earlier
time does not give them the
right to deny the same choice
to others at a later time.
Land used for purposes other
than homesteads paid for the
services enjoyed by the first
homeowners.
Should they now be able to
deny further development be-
cause the cost to them for their
services is no longer being
paid for by non homestead
land?
Zoning of land can result in.
a devaluation of a person's pri-
vate property, with respect to
the value he could get in a pri-
vate treaty.


Dear Editor:
Our relationship with one an-
other is governed by a social
contract, our Constitution.
The goals of this contract are
stated in the Preamble: estab-
lish justice, ensure domestic
tranquility, provide for the
common defense, promote the
general Welfare, and secure
the blessings of Liberty to our-
selves and our posterity.
Three of these goals enter
into the conflict resulting in
something less than domestic
tranquility.
First, no one is being denied
freedom of speech as spelled
out in the first amendment, al-
though I do not believe it was
intended by the founding fa-
thers to ensure the right of
character assignation.
The fifth amendment is tme
key to this conflict and I quote
in part: "No person shall be
deprived of life, liberty, or
property, without due process
of the law; nor shall private
property be taken for public
use without just compensation.
The 14th amendment re-
stricts the-states: "nor shall any
state deprive any -person of
life, liberty, or property, with-
out due process of the law; nor
deny to any person within its
jurisdiction the equal protec-
tion of the laws.
Liberty means freedom to
choose, and life is about
choices. If a person who has
farmed all his life now decides
to retire and use his land for
retirement income, according


4fnloy mcles, pamcs. rood '
and so much moRscl

andus cims -.


9am 4 pm
Admission half price
pRoduced by the
City or QCnmcvie(
CucunRa AhgamI


Two magical weekends at the Alacbha County FafuRgounbs
352.334.ARTS www.gvlculturalaffairs.org


oggetowne efflesievaf fare

Tanimar 2S -29 jfbrnilarp 3-5

Visr hce CDR p(ans cc c Saturdays & Sundays
UwhCRC duRitsans sc(t heiR mRcs. .& 10 am 6 pm
CheeR Ba dmn9 g nighrs. $1 Adults $5 Ages 5-17
SwulOd- ihtCRS. W. Advanced ticict S&atc
bSORd c. r.nd ..at Omni Boohstone
cc ada, Febar 3rdnd
Tcs. Friday, February 3rd


Help Florida's
marine animals
survive!
Keep litter out of our
waterways. Recycle
plastics and fishing line.
Boat safely.
myfwc.org/psm


everyone else who has applied.
Then you can sell one acre
plots, make a lot of money,
and build plenty of houses in
Commissioner Junior Tuten's
backyard, since y'all live near
each other.
Maybe after you do that, Mr.
Tuten will realize the impor-
tance of responsible managed
growth.
It seems you want to boast
that people with less land than
you are an inconvenience to
you and the county.
Your position does not sur-
prise me, but you should be
concerned about your own na-
ivet6.
I offer you a challenge, Mr.
Bussell. Go live in Tallahassee
for two years. Then come back
and tell me you want Jefferson
County to become like it.
Write a letter to the editor
with your decision, and I'll
look in the paper the week of
Jan. 13, 2008 to see what you
determined.
Wayne Searcy


VR State Plan Public Forums

Come share your thoughts on the proposed 2007 State
Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation services in Florida.

February 9
11AM- 1PM (CST)
Chipola College Continuing Education
Conference Center, Room 123
3158 College Street
SMarianna, Florida

February 9
5 7PM (ES)- ,
Florida Department Tra~ atP
Burns Buildi
605 Suwan
Tallahassee, Flori
If you i would I~Re to send us your comment
Lvrlan(Svr fldoe ora or call 1-86
PFr I I.nr Ii T Inan r,. :. Adl'rla D ill- Oe i
Lan ga PrI inlej t ers A- 1. VO L=5


"You Can't Be Without It"

Monticello News


The Jefferson County Recvclina Proaram


accepts


the following items for recycling:
~the following items for recycling: ....


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size)., milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
iiaundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
,contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste,html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Citizen Clarifies Points


Of His Earlier Letter


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 L ife s ty le


Shanna Turner To

Marry Josh Collier


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Marta and Allen Turner, of-
Murfreesboro, TN., announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter Shanna Lynn Turner to
Joshua "Rudy" Walter Collier
son of Sharon and Walter Col-
lier, of Sebring; FL.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Middle Tennessee
State University.


She is currently employed by
VA Tennessee Valley Health-
care Systems in Murfreesboro.
The groom-elect is a 1998
graduate of Jefferson County
High School.
He is a foreman for KDL
Underground, Inc. in Sebring.
They plan to wed at Maclay
Gardens, in Tallahassee, 5
p.m. Saturday, June 17, 2006.
After a honeymoon in the
Virgin Islands, the couple
_plan to live in Sebring.


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
Si dba
7 iTU a4FUman/ Fuera4l Hoe/
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Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
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Program Designed


JOSHUA COLLIER AND SHANNA TURNER



Coalition Set


Meeting Dates


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tentative dates have been set
for the 2006 Jefferson County
Community Coalition monthly
meetings.
Meetings will be held 9:30
a.m. at the Library on the
fourth Tuesday of each month,
unless otherwise stated on the
notices issued each month.
Contract Manager Donna
Hagan can be reached at 948-
2741 for more information
about the Coalition and about a
particular month's speaker. .
Also, anyone wishing to be
placed on the program sched-
ule to speak on a particular
subject, may contact Hagan.
This Healthy Start Coalition
provides a forum for social


service providers that serve
pregnant women, children,
families, and the aging adults,'
The purpose of the meetings
is to network, share informa-
tion, and facilitate referrals.
Information regarding up-
coming events, new services,
and how to access services are
shared.
The group uses this forum to
solve client-related issues,
match appropriate resources to
the client's need, and identify
barriers to care for the identi-
fied population.
: The forum is also used to de-
velop strategies and action
steps to address identified
community issues that, impact
services to pregnant women,
children, families, and the ag-
ing adult.


Hospice Support Group

Meets Wednesdays


Covenant Hospice supports
residents who are grieving the-
loss of a loved one.
This free grief support group
is led by Elizabeth Robinson,
MSW, bereavement specialist,
and meets 6 to 7 p.m every
Wednesday Feb. 1 through
March 1, at Brynwood Center.


Homes Of
Mary Louisa Willis
Mrs. Mary Louisa Willis,
age 82, died on Saturday,
January 28, 2006 in Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Funeral Service was held
Tuesday, January 31, 2006 at
2:00 p.m., at Olive Baptist
Church, Monticello, Florida.
Interment was at Olive Ceme-
tery. The family received
friends on Monday January 30,
2006 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. at
Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel.
In lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made to
Big Bend Hospice: 1723 Ma-
han Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
Florida.
She was born in Monticello,
Florida, January 23, 1924, the
daughter of the late William C.
Barrett and Floria Anderson
Barrett. She lived most her life
in Monticello, Florida. She
was a Seamstress at Artistic for
32 years, a homemaker and a
loving mother and grand-
mother. She was a long time
member of the Olive Baptist
Church Monticello, Florida.
Mrs. Willis is survived by
three sons George Willis, Jr.
and wife Emma, Rodney Wil-
lis and wife Jean and Curtis
Willis and wife Regina, all of
Monticello, Florida, and three
daughters Pat W. Surles and
husband Sam, Mary E. Wright


Grief support provides a
compassionate, safe, and car-
ing environment for individu-
als to share and explore their
feelings of loss and grief, gain-
ing valuable support and edu-
cation.
To register, contact Robin-
son at 1-800-374-9733.


Mourning
of Tallahassee, Florida and
Lynda Wilson of Havana,
Florida; two brothers Franklin
Barrett of Monticello, Florida,
and Alfred Barrett of Craw-
fordville, Florida; two sisters
Myrtle Herndon of Monticello,
Florida, and Margie Mills of
Whigham, Georgia, thirteen
grandchildren and fourteen
great-grandchildren.


Catch It Here At The
Monticello
News


For Schoo

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A Parent-Child Home Pro-_
gram, coordinated by Jana
Grubbs is underway in the.
county.
The purpose of the program
is to help parents prepare their
very young children for school
success.
Parents and children are vis-
ited twice.a week, in the home,
by a trained Home Visitor.
She will bring gifts of books
and toys as program materials
and will demonstrate ways for
parents to use them for the
educational benefit of their
children.
Home visits will be arranged


I Success
at the convenience of the par-
Sticipant.
If the child was two years
old by Sept. 1, 2005, he or she
-may be eligible for this pro-
Sgram.
There is no cost for partici-
pation in this program.
Information and referral
Sforms are obtainable by con-
4 acting Grubbs at 997-2644.
: After receiving a completed
referral form, Grubbs will con-
Ktact the parents to discuss
Whether this program is the
-right one for them and the
Child.
Grubbs will discuss the pro-
gram in detail at the Jefferson
SCounty Community Coalition
Meeting scheduled for
STuesday, Feb. 28.


Imbrunone Attends

Florists' Meeting


FRAN HUNT- ':: 212
Staff Writer

Erica Imbrunone, owner of -
Gelling's Florists, attended
the Florida State Florist Asso-
ciation meeting, at the Opera
House, over the weekend.
Imbrunone said it was the
first quarter meeting,;'n which
attendees learned about
flower designs, and enjoyed
lunches and dinners.
"There were flowers every-


CARD OF THANKS
The family of Jimmy Sloan
would like to thank you for
your prayers and other acts of
kindness shown to us during
the unexpected passing of our
beloved Jimmy.
Your expression of love and
sympathy have been a source
of consolation and strength
during this most difficult time.
While we mourn our loss, we
are comforted in knowing that
we have friends like you.
We pray that God will for-
ever keep you in His loving
care.
Minister Joretha Sloan,
Minister "OJ" Sloan,
Kaye Sloan,
"JR" Sloan,
Cassandra Kiser,
Stephanie Johnson,
Beatrice Sloan,
Bailey Sloan,
Beverly Sloan


where," said Imbrunone. "It
was, beautiful."
She added that the many
center pieces created for the
-event, were donated and she
later delivered them to both
Brynwood Nursing Center
and Jefferson Nursing Center.
"There were roses, Gerber's
and buttons, so I brought
them to the centers where the
residents could enjoy them,"
said Imbrunone." It was
thoughtful of the donors to
make this gesture," she said.


Business Community
Prayer Breakfast
The Business Community
Prayer Breakfast takes place 7
a.m. Thursday at the United
Methodist Church.
Guest Speaker is Fred Thom-
son.
All are encouraged to attend
and to bring a friend.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 PAGE 7


Historical Association


Plans Dinner Meeting
Lloyd. quested that the Society be al-
DEBBIE SNAPP Mary Connell, Mary Helen lowed the use of a vacant,
Staff Writer Andrews, and Melva Walker room, thereby giving the pub-
presented a program on the lic greater access to these im-
The Jefferson County Histori-- history of Waukeenah and the portant and valuable records,
cal Association will hold a din- Waukeenah United Methodist as well as providing a safer
ner meeting 6:30 p.m. Mon- Church. place for the records of the
day, Feb. 20 at the Wirick- A Country Dinner was held, Keystone Genealogical Soci-
Simmons House. and the Board held Gumbo ety.


A program on Aucilla River
artifacts is planned but has not
yet been confirmed.
Plans are to continue the pro-
grams on the "history of the
communities, with Dee
Counts" as her schedule per-
mits.
The Membership Drive, that
began Jan. 1, has drawn
31 new members, with more
than $1,500 in dues collected.
In reviewing the accomplish-
ments in the 2005 year, Dr.
Rhea Miller gave a personal
and community history of


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Xi Lambda Upsilon-
Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi So-
rority met at the Chamber of
Commerce Tuesday, Jan. 24 to
hear the program "I am proud
to be an American" given by
Mary Ann Van Kleunen.
Highlights of the program
included:
What is it that motivates the
soldiers to respond and con-
tribute wherever, and when-
ever, called upon to do so?
The answer is, values and a
deep commitment to God and
country.
The proud legacy of our
military and our country is
grounded in values such as
loyalty, duty, respect, honor,






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STHE VOICE
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dinners and catered lunches for
the Easter week services to
fund its annual cleanup.
The Wirick-Simmons House
was opened during the first
Downtown Get-Down of the
year; and was rented and.used
at various other times.
At the most recent meeting,
it was voted to move the Jef-
ferson County Genealogical
Society records to the new Li-
brary location.
A group appeared before the
County Commission and re--


integrity, and personal cour-
age.
President Connie Boland
called the meeting to order
followed by reports from the
Service, Sunshine, and
Social/Membership Commit-
tees.
Dee Counts won the eve-
ning's raffle, for which mem-
bers purchased tickets,
proceeds of which go to Hos-
pice.
A new member, Katrina
Guerry, was introduced into
the Chapter, who will begin
her Pledge Training this
Spring.
Members discussed the
Chapter's Relay For Life fund-
raiser, a Covered Dish Dinner
and Auction, set for 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, Feb. 14 at Christ
Episcopal Church.
George Wright will be the-


The Christian Bless House,
badly in need of repairs, will
be sold to fund a new heat/air
system for the Wirick-
Simmons House, as well as
other projects.
The Tour of Homes is
planned for the weekend of
March 24 and 25, and mem-
bers are requested to volunteer
for the event.
Membership and Volunteer
Notice forms can be obtained
by contacting Eleanor Hawk-
ins at 997-2863 or President '
Beulah Brinson at 997-2465.


Auctioneer for the event.
Husbands and guests are in-
vited, and auction items are to'
be brought at that time.
Recipes for the Jefferson
Senior Citizen Center cook-
book were collected and will
be delivered to the Center.
The cookbook titled 'What's -
Cookin' In Monticello' will be
sold after it's competition to
raise funds for projects for the
Center.
Hostesses Van Kleunen and
Carolyn Hayse served "Million
Dollar Brownie" cake and ice
cream with soft drinks.
In attendance at the meeting
were: Boland, Carolyn Chesh-
ire, Counts, Ann Coxetter,
Peggy Day, Linda Demott, Eli-
nor Garner, Guerry, Hayse,
Betty Messer, Sander, Van
Kleunen, Emily Walker, Ve-
linda Williams, and C'ar-:,in
\i eightt : I


GLORIA STARLING, left, checks ery oversees the transaction.
out a book on tape at the library, (News Photo)
as employee Stefanie Montgom-


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HOUSE 2 (PG13)
Fri. 5:30 7:50 10:15 Sat.
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006


JCHS JROTC female squad drill members, L-R: Tabitha Smith, PERFORMING "eyes right" under inn Pitts, Eli Kersey, and
team judged during the recent Ireshia Denson, Jemaria Cuyler, the watchful eye of the judge, are Spencer Ehinger.
drill meet include: Commander Shanka Farmer, Ashley Mitchell Color Guard members, L-R: Shal-
Santana Mitchell, aligning squad and Kiarra Powell.


Consumer Agent Explains


Need To Take Folic Acid


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sci-..-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland recently provided in-
formation on the importance of
the intake of folic acid on a
daily basis.
Copeland said that everyone
needs folic acid throughput
their lifetime for optimal
health, and folic acid has been
shown to reduce the risk for
serious birth defects, and pos-
sibly some chronic diseases.
"All woman of childbearing
age should get 400 micro-
grams of folic acid every day,
regardless of pregnancy inten-
tions," said Copeland.
She added that half of all
pregnancies are unplanned, so
it's ,, -very important that
woman get folic acid every
day.


Folic acid is a.B-vitamin
necessary for proper cell
growth and the necessity of
taking folic acid daily during
pregnancy is especially im-
portant because it has been
shown to reduce the risk for
serious birth defects of the
brain and spine, called neural
tube defects.
Since 1998, the Food and
Drug Administration has re-
quired the addition of folic
acid to enriched cereal grain
products such as breads, cere-
als,' flours, pastas, rice and
other grain products.
According to the Center For
Disease Control and Preven-
tion, fortification has helped
reduce the rates of neutral tu-
bal defects by approximately
26 percent.
Adriane Griffin, chair of the
national folic acid council,
said research shows that folic
acid also may reduce the risk
of other birth defects, such as


heart defects, cleft lip, cleft
palate, and may also reduce
the risk of cardiovascular dis-
ease, Alzheimer's disease,
and colon and breast cancer.
"Both men and women
may benefit from taking folic
acid for reducing 'risks of
some chronic diseases," said
Griffin.
To get enough folic acid
every day, men and women
should taker a daily multivita-
min and include fortified
grains as a part of a healthy
diet that includes folate-rich
foods such as orange juice,
dark green leafy vegetables,
strawberries, and legumes,
such as peanuts, and kidney
beans.
"Taking a multivitamin
every day is such a simple
thing to do, yet can return
huge benefits with regard to
the health of a mother and her
children," said Copeland.


U- ;'*
1 'ai
.* ~


A-An."
:.:: :.-i-;::,,l~".:,~0 1~a~W~ agt~ 7-24~


JCHS JROTC Platoon Drill Team,
commanded by Tabitha Smith,
salutes during a drill meet:.iat i
FA1MU, recently. "L.-R: Charles
'.:Pitts, Santana Mitchell,
Lashanda Miller, Kiarra Powell.


Second row: Alan Kent, Ireshia
Denson, Shauntavia Clinton,
Shanka Farmer, Third row: Eli
Kersey, Shalinr Pitts, Ashley J ;:
Mitchell and Jemaria Cuyler..


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p .or t s MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 PAGE 9
ion I P


His Height Makes Tiger


Skipworth Natural Hoopster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

James Skipworth, at six feet,--
six inches, is not only the tall-
est player on the Tiger Bas-
ketball Team, but is also
determined and strong willed.
He is the 17 year-old son of
Dwanda Skipworth of Monti-
cello.
Skipworth came to Jeffer-
son from Syracuse NY, where
he attended a couple of bas-
ketball camps after develop-
ing an interest in the game.
He has also attended the
five-star camps in the area.
Skipworth began playing on
the varsity basketball team in
NY as a seventh grader and
when he came here as a ninth
grader, he played for the var-
sity Tigers.
He said that he has no spe-
cial philosophy onr the court.
He just goes out there to do
what it takes for his team to


win.
Skipworth believes that his
strength on the court lies in-
doing whatever the coach tells
him to do.
"I love. the game and you
have to work hard and play
the best you can because you
love the game," said Skip-
worth.
"I know that when I'm
playing against a tough team
that if you play hard and play
your assignments, no one can
beat you on the court. You
only beat yourself," he added.
"I only have one job on the
court, to shut down the man-
in front of me," he said.
During the season, when he
was on the floor, Skipworth
has consistently put points on
the board and pulled down a
number of rebounds for the
Tigers.
In the Tip-off Tournament
against Suwannee County, he
scored six points.


At Lincoln, eight points,
five rebounds; FAMU, ten
points, nine rebounds; Wa-
kulla, three points; and Su-
wannee County, ten points,
eight rebounds and he went
four for five from the free-
throw line.
In the Elks Tournament
against Lincoln, he scored ten
points and four points against
NFC.
And in the Reebok Holiday
Hoopfest, he scored three
points against Thomasville
High, ten points against Val-
dosta High and six points
against Pelham.
Florida High, two points,
nine rebounds; NFC, 11
points, six rebounds;
Wakulla, four points, seven
rebounds, one steal; Mayo,
two points, five rebounds,
two steals; and Maclay, six
points, four rebounds, one
steal.
Skipworth has also been
listed as a Big Bend Leader


SKIPWORTH


ACA JVS Lose

TO Westwood

-FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JV boy's basketball team
lost to Westwood 34-19, last
week. '
Leading the score for the
Warriors was Daniel Greene
with five points, four steals
and one rebound.
A. J. Connell, three points,
four rebounds; Elliott Lewis,
three points, six rebounds,
one steal; Kyle Barnwell, two
points, three rebounds, one
assist; and Stephen Dollar,
three points, one rebound, one
assist and one steal.
Luke Whitmer, one point,
one -rebound and one steal;
Prateen Patel, two points, two
rebounds; Casey Anderson,
one rebound, one assist; and
Rob Searcy, two steals.


You don't

pay tax
P on a

Roth

I R A


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy-
varsity boy's basketball team
stand 8-6 on the season after
two recent losses.
Facing John Paul, ACA
lost 67-26.
"John Paul is a good team,"
said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
"They're ranked number nine
in the state. They haves good,.
perimeter shooting, and they
have height.
"John Paul has two guys
that are six feet, eight inches
tall and that makes it much
more difficult for opponents
to score," he added. .
ACA scored four to John
Paul's 25 in the first period;
seven to John Paul's 14 in the
second; 12 to John Paul's 18


in the third; and three to John
Paul's ten in the fourth.
Stephen Griffin led the
score for the Warriors with 12
Points, two three-pointer
buckets; Wade Scarberry,
seven points; Ben Grantham,
-five points, five rebounds;
and Stewart Williams, two
points.
Casey Gunnels has two as-
sists and two steals.
Facing Apalachicola, ACA
Sell 78-36. ..
"Apalachicola is the' fifth
ranked team in the state," said
Nennstiel. "But we played
OK at times, and not so OK at
others."
He said there were two
Warrior highlights during the
game. "We were down by 19,
had a nice run and got it to
ten," said Nennstiel.


"The play of the day was
made by Casey Gunnels. On
the Apalachicola team, they
have a player who flies and
their fans cheer for him to
slam-dunk all the time.
"Casey was able to run fast
enough that he was able to
prevent the dunk," said Nenn-
stiel.
ACA was 11 in the first to
Apalachicola's 25; 12 to Apa-
lachicola's 25 in the second;
_seven to Apalachicola's 17 in
the third; and six to Apalachi-
cola's ten in the fourth.
Leading the score for the
Warriors was Griffin with 11
points and two blocked shots.
Grantham, ten points, six
rebounds; Scarberry, ten
points; Reggie Walker, three
points; Williams, two points,
three steals; and. Gunnels,
three assists.


Mallory Plaines, ACA


Freshman, Strong Player


ACA, JCHS Players


Named Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Male and Female athelets -
from Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy and Jefferson County
High School, have been
named Big Bend Leaders, Fri-
day.
In boy's basketball, De-
mario Rivers (JCHS) is #1 in
scoring with 448 points.
Stephen Griffin (ACA) is
#24 with 217 points; and Ben
Grantham (ACA) is also # 24
with 198 points:
In rebounds, Grantham
ranks # ten with 99; Rivers
#15 with 139; and Griffin
#16 with 146 rebounds.
James Skipworth (JCHS)
ranks # 24 with 110; and Ji-
tavin Bennett (JCHS) #28
with 91 rebounds.
In steals, Rivers ranks #3
with 79; Casey Gunnels
(ACA) #7 with 31; Tim Cru-


mity (JCHS) #8., with 53;
Griffin also #8 with 32; and
Grantham #9 with 46 steals.
Lamarkus Bennett (JCHS)
ranks #11 with 44; and Lu-
cius Wade (JCHS) #15 with
18 steals.
In assists, Rivers ranks # 7
with 82; Crumity #8 with 79;
Bennett #14 with 55; Griffin
#18 with 53; and Gunnels #21
with 45.
In girl's basketball, scoring,
Mallory Plaines (ACA) ranks
at #21 with 2,83 points ; and
Shaumese Massey #26 wotj
156 points.
In rebounds, Massey ranks
#9 with 150; Plaines #10
with 228; Lindsey. Day
(ACA) #14 with 189; Donna
Ransom (JCHS) #16 with 88;
and Keandra Seabrooks
(JCHS) #23 with 84 re-
bounds.
In assists, Massey ranks #11
with 56; and in steals, Seab-
rooks ranks #6 with 49.


Lady Tigers Fall


TO Taylor
The Jefferson County High
School varsity girl's basket-
ball team lost to Taylor
County 46-30. The team now
stand 10-5 on the season.
"Taylor County is a very
big school with a very strong
.team," said Brumfield. He
added that the Lady Tigers
were playing without one
starter.
"As a matter of fact, we've
had at least one, and as many
as three, starters out in the
past five games," said Brum-
field...
"We had;a lot of foul trou-
ble in,.the beginning and the
first half ended 27-24," said
Brumfield.


County
Leading the Lady Tigers
charge was Deidra Arnold
with nine points, two re-
bounds and two steals.

Candice Griffin, three
points, seven rebounds; Kean--
dra Seabrooks, four points,
eight rebounds, one steal; and
Shanice Brooks, four points,
one rebound, one steal.

Shaumese Massey, three
points, ten rebounds, three
steals, two blocked shots; Ke-
neshia Coates, one point, one
rebound; India Wyche, two
points, one steal; and Donna_
Ransom, seven rebounds, two
assists, one steal.


[JCKC Poker Room


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

One of the strongest players
for the Lady Warriors basket-
ball team this season has been
freshman Mallory' Plaines, re-
lates Coach Daryl Adams.
She is the daughter of
Bobby and Marsha Plaines
Monticello.
Adams said that her strong-
est attribute is her aggressive-
ness on the court as well as
her raw talent for the sport.
"It's not rare to see a fresh-
man on the varsity team. It is,
however, big for one of the
strongest players on the team
to be a freshman," said Ad-
ams.
"She has a raw talent and a
strong desire to be in control
on the court. That's what al-
lows her to be in her position.
It's unique for a freshman to
be heading the team."
He added that once Plaines
becomes a senor, "She will
more than likely be a scholar-
ship athlete. There are a lot of
teams already looking at her
for her athletic ability, and
she is the first one in some
time from ACA to be in that
position.
Plaines has proven to be
very strong in scoring points
and in rebounding. "Her
height allows her to score a
rebound a lot," said Adams.
She scored more than 283
points, 228 rebounds and 46
steals for the season. '
In pre season action, Plaines


scored six points against
Chiles, went six for six from
the free-throw line, nine re-
bounds and three steals.
Games in which she scored
over the season include: Bell,
23 points; Maclay, six points,
ten rebounds, two steals; Car-
rabelle, 18 points; Munroe, 23
points and went six for eight
from the free- throw line;
Brookwood, 12 points; Bran-
ford, 16 points; Westwood,
22 points and 134 rebounds
for a double-double, eight
steals, two blocks; and Apala-
chicola, 16 points, eight re-
bounds and five steals.
FAMU, three points, nine
rebounds, one steal, one
block; Bell, 16 points and 23
rebounds for a double-double,
three steals; Westwood, eight
points, seven rebounds; Ma-
clay, 14 points including one
three-point bucket, eight re-
bounds, five assists, two
steals; and John Paul, 12
points and 11 rebounds for a
double-double, six steals, one
block; and Apalachicola,
where Adams did a lot of ro-
tation, four points, six re-
bounds, and one assist.
In the Holiday Classic Tour-
nament against Mount Dora
Christian, ten points, five re-
bounds, two assist, one block;
North Side Christian, two
points, three rebounds, two
assists, two steals; and Shores
Christian, 15 points and ten
rebounds for a double-double,
and six steals.
FAMU, eight points, four
rebounds, two assists; Carra-


belle, 16 points and ten re-
bounds for a double-double,
two assists, two steals and
two drawn charges; and John
Paul, who concentrated on
keeping her cornered, two
points, 12 rebounds, one as-
sist, three steals.
Brookwood, nine points,
eight rebounds, three steals;
and Munroe, 23 points, nine
rebounds, three steals.
Plaines has also been on the
list of Big Bend Leaders on
several occasions.
The first week, she was at
number 23 in points with 233,
and she was number seven in
rebounds with 216.
During the second week,
Plaines was at number eight
in scoring, and she was num-
ber five in rebounds.
During the third week, she
was number 19 in scoring,
and number six in rebounds.
During the fourth week,
Plaines was number 21 in
scoring, and was number ten
in rebounds.


Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not
natural. Help keep
our wildlife safe.


This is the big attraction of
a Roth IRA--you don't pay tax
when you make a qualified
withdrawal, not even on the
earnings and gaihs that build up.
You must follow certain rules,
such as holding the Roth IRA
for 5 years and reaching age 591',.
What's more, you can convert
many traditional IRA accounts
to a Roth IRA. And you can
contribute to a Roth IRA after
the age of 70'2.
-You need to meet the guide-
lines, compare, and examine
which choice is best for you..
Other IRA options also offer
tax advantages. For example,
you can withdraw up to
510,000 from most IRA
accounts without paying early-
withdrawal tax, if you use the
funds to buy a first home or pay
for higher education.
For all the facts on Roth and
other IRA benefits, see your
1999 tax booklet. Or check our
Web site: www.irs.gov
. ,wwm m


Warriors Lose Two Games;


Stand 8-6 On The Season


I~ I I r


k"s I PI I II







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006


Plan Offsets Hike


(Continued From Page 4)

market accounts or U.S. Sav-
ings bonds so that they earn
more interest than a basic sav-
ings account but can be liqui-
dated quickly.
Carry appropriate insurance
coverage. Protect yourself and
your family with insurance for
health care expenses and for
replacement of your income in
case of disability or death. In-
sure your home, automobile
and other assets, and purchase
liability protection.
You're in charge of your fi-
nances. At one time, says
Rose, people could count on
their employer to plan and pro-
.vide for their retirement. Not
so now, he says. What hap-
pened to the retirees and em-
ployees of Enron is a sad ex-
ample of dependence on em-
ployers, he says, and "nobody
wants to be 65 and totally de-
pendent on Social Security. In-
dividuals must take responsi-
bility for their own finances."
Young workers should start
saving and investing as soon as
possible and older workers
who haven't started should



System
(Continued From Page 4)
Many "correctional
facilities" today are contractu-
ally operated by private firms.
The last thing that they want,,
and the thing they fear most, is
trouble in their facilities. Ac-
cordingly, the success of outra-
geous prisoner demands has
sky rocketed. No juicy steak
and baked potato on Wednes-
day, I smell a riot!
All in all, if it weren't for that
pesky confinement thing,
prison can be quite a good
deal. The taxpayer gives you a
warm (or air conditioned)
room, a decent place to sleep,
three good meals a day with
dessert, television, a work out
facility (so you can improve
your ability to overpower cops
or punch out your ife when i
you get out), a library, and free:
medical and dental treatment.
Why, you can even take col-
lege courses and get a degree
at taxpayer expense.
So where is the incentive not
to return? Why get out of
prison and bust your tail work-
ing eight hours a day for mini-
mum wage and not being able
to make ends meet or struggle
to afford anything decent in
your life?
Now if prison life meant se-
rious physical labor like eight
hours of busting rocks every-
day and adequate nutrition in
the form of community stew,
and if there were no
televisions, computers, recrea-
tion facilities or "social" visits
by members of the opposite
sex, just maybe that minimum
wage job or the incentive to
master a skill wouldn't look so
bad after all.


start now.
Take advantage of tax-
sheltered and tax-deferred in-
vestment opportunities.
Tax-sheltered opportunities in-
clude 401(k) plans, 403(b)
plans, profit sharing plans, tra-
ditional IRAs and Section 529
education saving plans.
The Roth IRA is a tax-
deferred opportunity. Rose
says employees should take
advantage of these opportuni-
ties to the fullest extent possi-
ble, but any amount invested is
better than nothing and will be
valuable when needed.

Build an aggressive, intelli-
gent stock portfolio. For most
people, the best way to invest
to create wealth is through mu-
tual funds rather than buying
individual stocks, says Rose,
and the best performing mu-
tual funds are usually indexed
to the stock market.

Choose a fund carefully, he
says. Of approximately 17,500
mutual funds, 80 percent per-
form lower than the stock mar-
ket's average performance, but
indexed funds are designed to
closely match the market. In-
dexed funds charge an average
fee of approximately 0.3 per-
cent, whereas the average mu-
tual fund charges 1.42 percent.
"A one percent difference in
your average annual return
makes a big difference in the
value of your investments over
time," says Rose.

Stay in it for the long term.
Wise investment in the stock
market is not about quick turn-
arounds or get-rich-quick tips.
It is about regular ,investing
and holding on to investments -
for the long term.


"The stock market will
bounce up and down in the
short run, but create the great-
est wealth in the long run,"
says Rose. Holding on to
stocks for a minimum of 10-15
years should give you a good-
return on your investment de-
spite slow periods. .

Invest with confidence.
Since 1926, says Rose, the av-
erage rate of return on stocks
has been 10.4 percent. "You
must include stocks in your in-
vestment portfolio when trying
to create wealth," he says. "It's
the best game in town."
I


Buying a home is still a good
investment. Rose reminds us
that even as interest rates rise,
being a homeowner offers nu-
merous financial advantages.

Year-of-purchase tax deduc-
tions, qualified residence inter-
est deductions, property tax
deductions, home equity inter-
est deductions, the availability
of funds through home equity
lines, and home resale value i
are among the many reasons
buying remains a good invest-
ment idea.


I


` .... ...




The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Clas.s A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiabte OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


Youth Soccer

Draws Good

Attendance

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Recreation Department_
Youth Soccer Program has
seen high attendance from
both the young athletes and
spectators.
Spectators filled the stands
cheering on the children, par-
ticularly the younger children,
Coach Phil Barker relates.
"We made a change in the
way things are done for the .;
small kids," said Barker.
"There is an average of 22
kids on the field at a time,
with the two groups, on each
team rotating every four min-
utes, making for a very
crowded field.
"So we spliftthe K-5 and first
grade teams into three groups
each, playing for three min-
utes before rotation,' said
Barker.
"Now the kids are allowed
more opportunities for kicks,
dribbles, kicking on the goal
and most of all, each child
gets more individualized at-
tention on the field," he ex-
plained.
Before each game, the chil-
dren worked on heading the
ball, dribbling, passing skills,
shooting on the goal, trapping
the ball and the proper tech-
nique for throw-ins.
Play continues Saturday, with
teams five and six at 9 a.m.,
teams one and two, 10 a.m.,
teams three and four, 11 a.m:
and teams seven and eight at
noon.
Barker concluded that par-
ents need to remember to
bring water or sports drinks
for the children to drink dur-
ing breaks.

"They play hard and some-
times come out panting, and
it's important to stay
hydrated," he explained.


The Annual Report of Healthways,
Inc. for the year ending December
31, 2004 is available at its principle
office, 5556 N. Jefferson Street in
Monticello, FL for inspection
during regular business hours
within 180 days from today.
2/1,3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO: 05-320-CA
NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE
CO., PLAINTIFF, vs KENNETH J.
MCCOY, ET AL., DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO:
KENNETH ^ J. MCCOY;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KENNETH J. MCCOY whose
residence is unknown if he/she/they
be living: and if he/she/they be dead,
the unknown defendants who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, and all parties claiming an
interest by, through under or
against the Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, and all
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property: LOT BLOCK
"A" OF LLOYD ACRES UNIT 117,
AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS.
COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT
11 BLOCK "B" OF LLOYD
ACRES UNIT NO 1, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK "8", PAGE 31 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 09
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF
SAID BLOCK "B" A DISTANCE
OF 1701.73 FEET, THENCE RUN
EAST 156.76 FEET TO THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE
60.0 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
HERON ROAD, THENCE RUN
THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 16
MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST
65.27 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST
467.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT

YORHM; A ASETIEA
1161GFN Iq 4FSSACR


OF BEGINNING CONTINUE
EAST 150.00 FEET THENCE RUN
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST
299.72 FEET TO A POINT ON A
50 FOOT RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC,
THENCE RUN
NORTHWESTERLY ALONG
SAID CUL-DE-SAC 157.12 FEET
(CHORD BEARS SOUTH 24
DEGREES 14 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST 100.0 FEET)
THENCE RUN
SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG A
CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING
RADIUS OF 245.52 FEET FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 140.47 FEET
(CHORD BEARS SOUTH 00
DEGREES 16 SECONDS WEST
42.96 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 65 DEGREES 20
MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST
261.07 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 30 DEGREES 57
MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST
241.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH
A DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME SERIAL NUMBER
GAFL375A74567CY21 AND
GAFL375B74567CY21 has been
-filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any to it on
DAVID J. STERN ESQ. Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 801 S.
University Drive #500, Plantation,
FL. 33324 on or before January 25,
2006 (no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this
notice of action) and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition filed
herein. WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court at JEFFERSON
County, Florida this 19 day of
January 2006. CLERK OF THE
CIRC ITY COURT. LAW
OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 801
S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE SUITE
500 PLANTATION, FL 33324; IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, persons with
disabilities -needing a special
accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the JEFFERSON County
Courthouse at 850-997-3595,
1-800-955-8770 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay
Services.
1/25, 2/1, c


" 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR.GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


Business
naua aitr an.












Directory :




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u Family Owneda Since- 1902 Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
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MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY
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850-997-5132 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Sales Service Installation Change Outs

90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES 1/4 Mile off US 19 South Needs Residential*Commercial
CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER 997-2535 997-5648 Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
SLic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903


requested. This supplement will
outline the information to be used
by the board of directors in the
selection of a design/build firm.
Questions regarding the request can
be answered by Bobbie Krebs at
(850) 342-0242
2/1, 3, 8, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE
NO.: 04-240-ca BANK ONE,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE, Plaintiff vs. JAMES
JOHNSON; CLERK OF THE
COURT, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA; JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BY AND
THROUGH THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY SHIP PROGRAM;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES
JOHNSON; JOHN DOE; JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S)
IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Motion and
Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale
Dated dated the 24th day of
January, 2006, and entered in Case
no. 04 240-ca, of the Circuit Court
of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and
for Jefferson County, Florida
wherein BANK ONE, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE is
the Plaintiff and JAMES
JOHNSON; CLERK OF THE
COURT, JEFFERSON COUNTY
FLORIDA; JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BY AND
THROUGHOUT THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY SHIP
PROGRAM; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JAMES JOHNSON; HON
DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the
NORTH DOOR OF
COURTHOUSE at, the Jefferson
County Courthouse, in
MONTICELLO, Florida. at 11:00
a.m. on the 23rd day of February,
2006, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit: In accordance
with the Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA) because of their
disabilities disabled persons who,
need the ADA Coordinator at Room
10, Monticello, FL 32344 or
Telephone (850) 342-0218 prior to
such proceeding special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
Dated this 25th day of January
2006. Eleanor B. Hawkins, Clerk of
the Circuit Court.; Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365,
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052.
2/1,2/8, 8. .: :
'he Jefferson County Planning'
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on February:
6, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the
Monticello Chamber.of Commerce,
420 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344. The meeting
may be continued as .necessary.
From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of


Invitation to provide Design/Build
Services The Jefferson Senior
Citizen Center, Inc. of Jefferson
County will receive proposals for
design/build services for an
expansion of the facility located at
1155 North Jefferson St. unit
Februairl; 1tth^,b200: The stop^ of
work includedd is civil : design,
architectural design and
construction of an addition of
containing approximately 6000
square feet. Interested parties
should send a letter of interest to the
Jefferson County Senior Citizens
Center, Inc. to the attention of
Bobbie Krebs at 1155 North
Jefferson St. Monticello Florida
32344 prior to February 10th 2006.
A Design/Build Qualification
Supplement form will be mailed out
on February 13th 2006 to all
interested parties who have










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006 PAGE 11


o lace ourAd.


.- 9. 93-


997-3568


CLAS.SIlIE


Your Community Shopping :Cetor:


LASSIFIEDAD VERT[ISING RATES-.
M3Y. ines; .-wo.editions WednesdaV and Friday...$7.,00'
SEach. AdditionalLine....$1.00 -
SDEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday ." -
:: ... Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classiried Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS

meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based. For additional information
contact the Jefferson County
Planning Department at 445 West
Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL
37344, telephone 850-342-0223.
2/1, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.
2004-325-CA PROVIDENT BANK
Plaintiff, vs. AISHA CONNER, et
al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated January 23, 2006
and entered in Case No.
2004-325-CA of the Circuit Court of
the SECOND Judicial Circuit in
and for JEFFERSON County,
Florida wherein PROVIDENT
BANK, is the Plaintiff and AISHA
CONNER; JEFFERSON COUNTY;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
NORTH DOOR OF THE
COURTHOUSE LOBBY IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA at
ll:00a.m., on the 2nd day of
February, 2006 the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment: LOT 62M
NOBLES ADDITION. A PER MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK B,
PAGE 19, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1220
Georgia Avenue, Monticello, FL
32344 WITNESS MAY HAND and
the seal of this Court on January
24th, 2006 Dale Boatwright, ClerkR'"
of the Circuit Court.
2/1 2/8, c

HELP WANTED


Leading national propane
marketer Southeast Propane
has immediate opening for an
energetic route sales driver for
their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must
possess strong customer service
skills, team player attitude
along with a Class B CDL
license with an air brake
endorsement and .have the
ability to obtain a hazmat &
tanker endorsement.. Clean
driving record a must. Excellent
starting salary with competitive
benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE.
Apply by Fax 850-997-2808 or
in person @ 500 South Jefferson
St. Monticello, Fl.
1/18, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25. tfn, c
Drillers helper, excellent pay
and benefits. High School
diploma required, valid FL.
driver license, CDL a plus. Drug
free work place. Travel
required. Please call
1-800-487-9665.
tfn, 2/i, c
Servers Must be 18 years old.
Call for interview. Brian
284-7899.
2'l, 3, c


Hiring FT/PT Infant/Toddler
Teachers Minimum .
Requirements: HS
Diploma/GED, Childcare
experience, CDA .preferred.
Contact Phyllis or Angela
850-997-4736 Sandra
850-414-9800
Applications are currently being
accepted for prospective
AmeriCorps Volunteers to begin
immediately in Leon, Jefferson,
Gadsden, and Wakulla counties.
Applicants must be US citizens,
at least 18 years of age possess a
high school diploma, GED, or
willing to obtain a GED, free of
criminal convictions and arrests
and drug free. Those selected
will perform services for the
elderly providing in home or
facility-based respite for
approximately 20-35 hours per
week. Members will receive
training, a biweekly living
allowance, travel
reimbursement, and an
educational award with the
completion of one year's

consecutive service. For more


HELP WANTED
information about AmericCorps
please visit www.americorp.org
or contact Bill Wertman;
AmeriCorps Program Director,
at 850-386-2778.
2/1, 3, 8, c
Operations & Accounting
Specialist Kids Incorporated of
the Big Bend 1170 Capital
Circle NE Tallahassee, FL
32301-3519 Phone: (850)
414-9800 ext. 108, Fax: (850)
488-0475, Cell: (850) 694-3192
2/1, 3, c
Huddle House now hiring expe-
rienced waitresses and cooks.
We offer above average wages
and health insurance with 2-
weeks paid vacation per year.
Please come in and file an appli-
cation or call 342-3284 and ask
for Jack.
Come join our growing team. If
you want to be challenged in a
busy newspaper office and want
above average earnings and
have the drive to be a positive
team player, we'd like to talk to
you. No slackers, dunderheads,
dopers, drama queens, please.
Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568
Licensed Therapist #2266c:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Prior
experience working with
children who have emotional
issues required. Some local
travel required. License
required. Shift: Monday-Friday
/ Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
Masters Level Therapist #2267:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of
counseling, social work,
psychology,.or a rld.ted human
services field and two..years of ,
professional experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness.
Substances abuse knowledge
preferred. Some local travel
required. License preferred
shift: 8am 5pm M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the fields of
counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. License
required. Some local travel
required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift:
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
2/1, c


GARAGE SALE


Mm ing Sale: Fri & Sat. 8-2
Furniture, Clothes Newborn to
Plus. A little of everything. 355
Hill St. behind New Hope
Church of God.


SERVICES -,


Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn
Are you concerned about the '
high cost of college? Would you
like to learn how to pay for-
college? Attend a 3 hour
seminar Saturday, February 4th
Register at
www.earncollegecash.com.
2/1, 3, c
We're a church that values
tradition, but we're not
fundamentalists. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
2/1, c

Peters Satellite -- Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.
tfn, 1/25
Dog Obedience Classes, 8
sessions, starting Feb. 7 & 10
Call 997-6599 or 997-2542
2/1, 3, 8, 10, c
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
laste. In addition to ",eight loss,,
Sou ma\ see benefits -for thie-
hair, skin and- nails from-the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.




ww.SfriP b~udain~r


FOR SALE :I


Rhode Island Red Roosters -
$10 each. Purebred Limousin
bull, 15 months old. Call
997-0901 leave message or
997-3568, ask for Debbie. 1/11,
13, 18,20,25,27,pd
Pillow Plush Double Sided
Pillow Top Mattress/Box Set 4
inch pillow top, List $989.00 sell
for $248. 850-528-1422.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, pd


AUTOMOTIVE


No (-redit Check s Just Loo
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3500 CASH. Clean, new tires.
Ca;i 997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
93 Ford F250 New tires, brakes,
tune up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6
cylinder, NADA Book is $2,400
Selling Price $1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible-
Red, New tip, new tires, 6 cyl.
$4,200; 997-6066, 997-6806
Wilson Auto, LLC.
tfn, c
'89 Astro 18ft with trailer. Good
condition
89' Mariner 135 HP Excellent
Condition.
Twin Fish Finters 12/24V
Trolling Motor $3,800 FIRM!
Home: 997-4081, Cell 339-2406
2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24 pd


1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3500 CASH. Clean New tires.
Call 997-2646. M-Th 9-5.
tfn,c

FOR RENT
County Li'ing I bed, I bath,
$500, 997-6653
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, ,' 10, 15, 17, 22,
24, pd
Prime downtown office space
:now available in Cherry Street
Commons, Jack Carswell,
o-'-1980. .11/30,
tfn, c
''i *; i ___ ___


REAL ESTATE


'In to%%n LOT $22,000 SE of
Square 88' x 79' 345-7116,
'222-5658 Summer's Realty of
Tallahassee, Inc.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
"Fixer Upper" $22,000 4
bedroom, 1 baths 2nd St.
345-7116
1/25, 27, 2,13, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd

WANTED
Dog Oner Needs Home:
Responsible 51 year old male
looking for small home to rent
with outside space for dogs. Will
provide nonrefundable pet
deposit. Local references
available. William @
850-212-8337.


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
S2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

E 575- 571

E. u=a Vr V/Vv


The sky's the limit
for our growth and your opportunities.
Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
Digital Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
$33,000-$36,000
for our TALLAHASSEE locations. We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits,i advancement potential and more!
Experience preferred but NOT REQUIRED. WE OFFER PAID TRAINING! For more detailed information, please visit:
www hrmcacclaim com/apply/drscareers
*** WE OFFER A FAST PATH FOR ADVANCEMENT AND CARTER GROWTH! ***
All of our field management staff were promoted from field technicians. Most promotions occur after 6 continuous months
with the company.
DRS Satellite Installation Techs are provided with
* paid training
* a company owned truck
Stools
* a variety of shifts
Benefits (medical/dental insurance, life insurance, tuition reimbursement, 401K plan with matching funds, bonuses, paid vacations,
holidays, and sick time)
For more detailed information, please visit: E DIGITAL
h- ...Irittiil. 1,im idpvusde


www. irmcadrlaim.lrmal pplV/u rscareeOrs
or call: 1-877-351-4473.
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.


... RECEPTION
.y" SERVICES, INC.


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jeferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5516


a .20 acres on the Sopchoppy River for great
week-end getaways. $70,000
* 2 acres on N. Jefferson prime Bus/Res with
frontage on Hwy 19 N. adjacent .60 acre
available, & must be purchased together.
* Kylee Dr. 5 acres with beautiful pecan trees.
High & dry. $ 95,000
a 6 acres great location on WhitehouseRd.
mixed pines/hardwoods. $ 111,000
S6.42 acres Pretty acreage with Ig. stocked
pond. $ 89,880
a 9.25 acres Lots of privacy on Gamble Rd.
Convenient to Tallahassee. $ 155,000
* Beautiful waterfront property 16.50 acres
with frontage on Lake Mic cosukee. Mostly
wooded, with small creek. $ 247,500


Simply the Best!


Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, nice family room
$87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared ,and-,ready to build onr,, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price Contract Pending 5
wooded acres on Blue Lake Road only
$22,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profitfrom both appreciating land and
rowing pine $12,000 /acre.

Home Site-Under Contract close to town
on West Grooverville Road only $14,500
Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


I Is ______________________ -m', k


EMPM


---------------------------------------------------------------- ---


S
1



i

I,


-------------------------------rl-------------------


r


ri~










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 1, 2006


County Hospice


Seeks Volunteers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Marilyn Nations, volunteer-
coordinator for Jefferson
County Hospice, reports that
Big Bend Hospice is in need
for more trained volunteers.
Big Bend Hospice has been
in operation here since 1983.
After growing for 23 years,
the average daily census is
now usually greater than 280.
In 1986, hospice services be-
came a Medicare reimbursable
benefit.
When this became effective,
the federal government man-
dated that volunteers provide
five percent of all hands on pa-
tient care.
Jefferson County is blessed
to have nine very active volun-
teers.
These volunteers are well
known throughout the county
and are also active in many
community events.
As the requests for volunteers
in Jefferson County continue
to grow, so does the need for
trained volunteers.
The volunteers in Jefferson
County help to make up the
heart and soul of Big Bend
Hospice.
The pool of volunteers at Big
Bend Hospice ranges in age
from 18-80 something!
They are college students
who were originally looking
for a few volunteer hours and
end up staying active through-
out their entire college career.
They are stay at home moms
looking for something reward-
ing to do with free hours and
business persons who manage
to volunteer in their already
cramped schedules.
They are retirees looking to
enrich their retirement years
and give back to their commu-
nity.


They are men and women
from all walks of life who are
willing to get out of bed in the
middle of the night to sit with
- a patient that is imminently dy-
ing.
They are people who cheer-
fully sit out in 90 degree
weather at various fairs and
festivals to get the word out
about the Hospice organization
and the services it provides.
Volunteers give unselfishly
of their time and always say
"yes," when asked to take on
another assignment.
Each volunteer has special
stories to share.
One volunteer reported that
as she entered the room of her
patient, she could see that the
lady was in extreme pain.
When the patient realized her
volunteer was there with her,
she raised her arms and told
her that she was the sunshine
in the morning!
This affected the volunteer
more than anything else a pa-
tient had ever told her.
Volunteers say they receive a
lot more than they give.
Big Bend Hospice provides
the training needed to be a
hospice volunteer.
To become a volunteer, con-
tact.Nations at 878-5310 ext.
274 or 997-2827 from 8 a.m. -
5 p.m. daily.


air purifier
Its simple Lool for the
ErIERGY STARS to reduce
your horne energy use

To learn rors, go to
energystar.gov.


Mu a i-,


'Saur~L Vday, Feriuary r a ip10 a.m .o uu


rruperty I1 ou at;.
Beautiful 2000 sq. ft.
home. Perfect for horses,
fenced and crossed
fenced. Barn has RV pull
through hook up, metal
building, plus much,
much more.


Property #2
Beautiful home in
Pinetta with 6+
acres to be divided.
Great place for
homesites.


ro up ty 1;- uur
1/4 mile
Withlacoochee
River frontage,
beautiful high
bluffs, planted
pines and hard-
woods.


Personal Property Ford 1310 Tractor, 4 ft FMC sidewinder mower, 5 ft
crape blade, Air Compressor, Yardman riding mower, Cow panels.
Gravely heavy duty mower Plus Much Morelllll


Terms: 10% buyers premium oh all sales. 20% down day of auction, balance due in 30
days at closing.
Personal Property Terms: 10% buyers premium added to all sales. Cash, Check or good
Company Check. Sales tax added where applicable.
Directions: Property #1 (Sale Site for all properties) 8277 Dusty Miller Rd. FromPinetta
take CR 150 East to Co. Rd. 255 (Dusty Miller Rd). Go Southapprox. 1/2 mi. Look for
signs. Property #2 9390 Hwy 145N. From Madison take Valdosta Hwy (SR145) North to
Pinetta. Look for signs. Property #3- From Madison SR145 to Pinetta take Co. Rd 150
East to NE 134th, North to NE 214 Ave, East to NE 163rd St. Look for signs.
For More Information or Free Color Brochure
1-800-448-2074 or (229) 263-9202
\ email: margieburton@burtonrealtyandauction.com
r' BURTO on line brochure: www.burtonrealtyandauction.com
At.as 1.i-- Stephen F. Burton *Offeredin parcels corn-
ALTYADAUCTON.N Lic RE Broker/Auctioneer
R-.-rA 1548 AB 587 AU649 AL #1337 SC3580R binations and as a whole.
1 _/GA 1548 AB 587 AU649 AL #1337 SC35B0R


OLDEST living member of Monticello First Bap-
tist Church is Fate Jones, 92, visiting Pastor
Thermon Moore at. a recent Triple L Club meet-
ing. (News Photo)


Climbed Everest. Blind.


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program
866-FUND-549.


Pass It On.


J.G.WENTWORTH.
ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


THE FOUNDATION FOR A BETTER LIFE
www.forhetierlife.org


RELAY
FOR LIFE








AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
2006 RELAY FOR LIFE JEFFERSON COUNTY
APRIL 21 AND 22, 2006

Would you like to be involved???
We need all the help we can get..;.
Here are the ways you can be a part!!




1 in 3 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay
:For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against
:cancer. Relay always raises awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and patient
support (including transportation to treatment, peer support group programs, and resources for
practical assistance). Relay brings people together from all walks of life with the common goal of
eliminating cancer. Relay honors cancer survivors and their caregivers. There's a place for you at
Relay. Please join us today!!


Be a part of the committee! Committee members are now being recruited for Team Recruitment;
Corporate Sponsorships; Logistics/Facility; Entertainment; Survivorship; Public Relations; Onsite
*Volunteers; Onsite Survivor Activities, and Food.

Form a Relay For Life team! Gather together 8-15 of your favorite people who love making a
difference and having fun.
* a































Volunteer at the event! We need volunteers who will-help with the needs at the site itself on the days
of April 21-22, 2006.





YES! I want to participate in Relay.
* a




































I Learn more about forming a team
2 Information on survivor activities
3 Volunteer to help with the event
*
* a
* a




































4 Learn more about becoming a sponsor


Address
E-Mail
Phone
(Please mail to Relay For Life, 710 W. Washington St.,
Monticello, Florida 32344)





The American Cancer Society Relay For Life represents the hope that those lost to cancer will never
* a
* a
* a
* a












































be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day cancer will be
eliminated.
, VorLunteer atghe evenryone Wthe needpvoluniteersy whowight hea p wih t e needsfahe sinthe its .the dayns













..............n ....... ..........*
* oute ohlpwt h vn
*** *** ** **ar**** **ore*** ** ab*out ***bec **ming** ***a**sponsor** *** **