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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00101
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: December 28, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00101
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text






A I. I'


Monticello

137TH YEAR NO.101, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


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Adva n cement, Develop ment


Characterizes


Year Of 2005


THE FIFTH County Relay for Life raised
$78,391, the most to date. Here, survivors
open events, walking the JCHS track, one of


the signature events of the Relay. (News
Photo)


City & County Realized.

Several Long-term Goals


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Achievement of several long-
sought community goals and the ac-
celeration of residential develop-
1 ments in the city and county charac-
terized 2005.
Among the several long-term
goals that were achieved were the
realization of funding for the court-
house annex renovation; the start of
A construction on the long-awaited
bike trail; the purchase of the head
of the Wacissa River by the Suwan-
nee River Water Management Dis-
trict; and the purchase of the'TMH
,4 building for the Health Department.
As for the acceleration in develop-


ment, the city and the county jointly
rezoned more than 1,500 acres from'
agricultural and other low-density.
uses to residential to make way for a
slew of subdivisions already under-
way or in the planning stages.

City Increases
By 100+ Acres
The city, moreover, increased its
boundaries considerably during the
year by a series of voluntary an-
nexations, the largest being an 85-
acre parcel slated for an upscale
subdivision just west of town.
In other developments, the library
moved to a new location, as did sev-
eral other county offices; the com-


munity public water system initiated
action for an expansion; and a joint
city/county group began exploring
the feasibility of installing a county-
wide sanitary sewer system.
In the area of significant govern-
ment actions, the county finally
adopted a revised Land Develop-
ment Code (after more than three
years of working on the document);
imposed an impact fee for new de-
velopments; and adopted a revised
animal control ordinance, complete
with three certified officers to en-
force it, among other things.
The city, for its part, re-instituted a
public shuttle service, in conjunc-
tion with the Disadvantaged Trans-
portation Board; updated its code
book, after years of discussion; and
raised sewer and water rates.
For a more complete summary of
the year by month, read on.
-(See Year In Review Page 2)


Racetrack Suit Is Set



For February Hearing


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RELAY FOR LIFE Steering Committee pre-
pared a Sundae and Brownie party for News
Staffers, thanking them for their extensive


coverage of the event. L-R: Juanice Hagan,
Lisa Reasoner, Bill Hopkins, and Bill Bas-
sett. (News Photo)


City Council Okays Townhouses

On E. Palmer Mill, Waukeenah St.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

In accordance with the recom-
mendations of two of its review
boards, the City Council earlier this
month approved plans for the con-
struction of two townhouses on E.
Palmer Mill Road.
Miller & Taylor Developers LLC
-- made up of George Miller and
Don Taylor -- is behind the project.
The development consists of two
duplex-type structures with brick
veneers, metal hip roofs and multi-
ple dormers on a vacant lot on the
corner of E. Palmer Mill and Wau-
keenah roads.
At least three members of the His-
toric Design Review Board, which
must certify the appropriateness of
new structures and additions in the
city's historic district, had qualms
with the design of the buildings.
One member expressed concern
that the buildings' design and brick
veneers were not in keeping with the
style of the neighborhood. -


Another suggested that, a gabled
roof would better fit the existing ar-
chitecture in the historic district.
And a third recommended removal
of the dormers and addition of a
front gable to better integrate the
buildings into the surrounding archi-
tecture.

Project's Design
Raises Questions

The developers, however, rejected
the members' suggestions, on the
grounds that a gabled roof would
not provide as much hurricane resis-
tance and would also be more
.costly.
Notwithstanding its expressed
concerns, the Historic Design Re-
view Board voted 3-1 to issue the
certificate of appropriateness.
The Local Planning Agency, for
its part, found that the townhouses
complied with the requirements of'
the special exception uses permitted
by the City Council in B-l districts
effective October.


Councilman Tom Vogelgesang on
the City Council alone expressed
reservations about the project.
"I'm not thrilled with the design,"
Vogelgesang said, noting that the
proposal didn't fit exactly with the
historical character of the neighbor-
hood and that the developers' objec-
tion to the changes suggested by the
Historic Review Design Board
members was "that it would cost
money."
Even so, Vogelgesang voted to ap-
prove the project, along with the
other four council members.

News Office To
Close Monday
The Monticello News Office will
be closed Monday, Jan. 2, in obser-
vance of the New Year holiday.
The office will reopen 8 a.m.,
Tuesday, Jan. 3,
We wish our readers a very
Happy New Year.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

After a long dormancy, the lawsuit
filed by opponents of the go-cart
racetrack being built off Big Joe
Road is finally set for a court hear-
ing on Feb. 14 at 2:30 p.m.
Attorney Scott Shirley, who is
representing the county in the
matter, asked for the hearing last
* week. Shirley wants the court to rule
on the county's motion to dismiss
the lawsuit "for failure to
prosecute."
* Shirley's action follows the re-
quest for additional information
filed by the plaintiffs on Nov. 28.
That plaintiffs' request seeks a slew
of documents from the county, in-
cluding all applications filed by the
developer and all transcripts of offi-
cial meetings related to the project.
The latest two actions are the most
activity the case has seen since No-
vember, 2004, when the Tallahassee
Karting Organization LLC and the
county filed motions to dismiss the


lawsuit, shortly after it was filed.
Since that time, the county has
amended its Comprehensive Plan to
include special exceptions as a per-
mitted use in agricultural zones; the
attorney for the Tallahassee Karting
Organization has withdrawn from
the case, citing "irreconcilable dif-
ference in opinion" with his client;
and the developers have proceeded,
with construction of the racetrack.

Suit Filed More
Than Year Ago

The expectation, in fact, is that the
racetrack will be completed and
ready to open as early as January.
. During all this time, neither side
has pushed for a court hearing, al-
lowing the case to languish in the
system.
According to Shirley, it's the re-
sponsibility of the plaintiffs to move
the case forward, as it's the plaintiffs
who initiate the action and who usu-
ally have the greater interest in see-
ing it resolved.


'**i ** '- .

. ._ ,-

s '" '.. .


MAYOR JULIE CONLEY and Councilman Luther Pickels ex-
change thoughts following a recent City Council meeting.
(News Photo)


In this case, however, for what-
ever reason, the plaintiffs have cho-
sen not to push the issue.
What's more, it's the contention of
George Reeves, the plaintiffs' attorl-
ney, 'that any risks stemming from
the irresolution of the case falls
squarely on the defendants, particu
larly the racetrack owners.
"While the case is pending, they
build at their risk," Reeves said in a
recent interview with the News
adding that the judge could well de.-
cide to make the racetrack owners
change or tear down the facility if it
doesn't comply with the court's find-
ings.
"They're big boys," Reeves said.
"If they want to take that risk, that's
their concern."
The County Commission ap-
proved the go-kart racetrack in
August 2004 and the lawsuit was
filed in September.
The suit argues that the special ex-
ception that county officials granted
the racetrack violates the county's
Comprehensive Plan, which limits
the permitted use's within the 100-
';'Ir floor p.!:in to agriculture and
s:' icUltu'ep.C .ctices.
sic iuit firthlir alleges that county
officials failed to adequately notify
nearby property owners of the hear-
ing, as required by the Development
Code.
Among other concerns, opponents
object to the noise, increased traffic
and a compromised rural lifestyle
that they say will result from the
racetrack.
Commissioners approved the fa-
cility as a special exception on a 98-
acre tract zoned agriculture some
five miles east of town.
Proponents of the development de-
scribe the racetrack as a state-of-the-
art, world-class facility that stands
to attract professional race-car driv-
ers and karting competitions and
pump millions of dollars into the lo-
cal economy.
Juan Pablo Montoya, an Indy 500
winner and current Formula One
driver, designed the track, which
contains 19 turns and a pit row and
is expected to cost an estimated $2
million when completed.


Dam


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005

Year In Review


(Continued From Page 1)
JANUARY
The Library took a $50,000 hit in
state aid, and the cutback was
likely to be reflected in staff and
services.
County Democratic Executive
Committee elected Eleanor Hawk-
ins as chairperson.
The Court of Appeals favored
Madison County in its decision to
bar outside trash from the facility.
Bids opened by the County Com-r
mission for correction of the drain-
age problems at the Industrial Park
turned out to be too high to award a
contract.
Plans were to be revised and new
bids solicited.
The Police Department's pilot
speed enforcement program proved
to be effective and the City Council
decided to continue the program.
The City considered joining the
ranks of Internet Service Providers,
as proponents said benefits of the
system are countless.
The County Legislative Lobbying
Committee raised the county's pro-
file with the movers and shakers in
State Government, in a series of
meetings.
Six newly elected constitutional
officers were sworn in by Judge
Bobby Plaines in the courtroom.
These included David Ward,
property appraiser; Dale Boat-
wright, clerk of court; David
Hobbs, sheriff; Lois Hunter; tax
collector; Phil Barker, superinten-
dent of schools; and Marty Bishop,
supervisor of elections.
County Commission made a mi-
nor stab a revising the Develop-
ment Code and i made a minor
change in the minimum road stan-
dards for subdivisions, concerning
the width of the roads.
Commissioners authorized con-
sultant engineer Frank Darabi to
negotiate with potential contractors
to bring down the cost of the
needed repairs at the Industrial
Park.
City and County officials pre-
pared to work on an Animal Con-
trol law and sqt a meeting at the
courthouse with citizens.
Robert Daniels resigned as Flor-


ida Fish and Wildlife Commission
officer, after an internal investiga-
tion placed him on administrative
leave. Daniels chose to resign
rather than be fired.
County officials committed the
last of $3.6 Million Road Paving
Money borrowed more than 10
years ago.
A $792,830 contract was
awarded to Peavy and Son Con-
struction Company, to pave West
Lake, Watermill, Plantation
Woods, Clark, Casa Bianca, and
Briar Roads.
The Health Department an-
nounced it had an ample supply of
Flu Vaccines.
An application for a 3.87 acre
property on the east side of town,
between Pearl and Washington
Streets came in to the city under its
amnesty program to expand city
limit.
A plan endorsed by the Chamber
of Commerce sought to reconfigure
certain downtown streets in a bid to
make the area more pedestrian and
parking friendly.
This. would create a pedestrian
mall on Dogwood Street and a
greater business circle outside the
existing courthouse circle.
The 25th Annual Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade drew 70 entries,
versus the 50 entries of 2003.
After a meeting with city officials
to fashion a more responsive ani-
mal control ordinance, county offi-
cials decided last week that the
present ordinance works well
enough, when no residents showed
up at the meeting to provide input.
The 110th Continental Field Tri-
als at Dixie Plantation began Jan.
17, and was expected to continue
until Jan. 30, weather permitting.
Loc;,l Legislative Committee
Member 1 im Barnhill, reported
that the group's' meeting with Gov.
Jeb Bush went extremely well and
that Bush appeared to be receptive
to issues affecting the county.
The County Legislative Lobbying
Committee hosted an reception at
the Opera House in honor of law-
makers State Senators Al Lawson


. -


Education Foundation, and Boys
and Girls Club each received
$1,000.
Public input on the proposed
business traffic circle around the
downtown area, raised concerns.
Public reaction was that the idea
needs more work.
Fire Chief Larry Bates offered to
submit his resignation, prompted
by Commissioner's long delay in
approving immediate purchase of
needed ambulance radios.
A Tallahassee woman responsi-
ble for the vehicular deaths of a
Greenville woman and a 13 year
old girl, and injuring three boys,
here, in 2003, was sentenced to
prison for DUI Manslaughter.
FEBRUARY


Small Counties were targeted for
extra money in the proposed State
Budget, legislators reported.


..






HAROLD USSERY of Alabama shows up every two years to
repaint the flag pole at the Post Office. He covers the
southeastern US, including FL, GA, AL, and MS. (News
Photo)


and Nancy Argenziano, and State
House Representatives Will Ken-
drick and Loranne Ausley.
Planners were scheduled to re-
view two major developments, Oak
Hill Farms in Lloyd, and Future
Builders of America Training Cen-
ter.
Major Mike Joyner announced
that he would retire from the Sher-
iffs Department Jan. 31, after 32
years of law enforcement.
. The Health Department planned
to host the second of a series of
workshops that aim to explore
strategies the community needs to
develop to improve the overall
health of its residents.


House's Bee Sting and Game
Maker won first place and runner-
up prizes respectively, in the 110th
Open Derby Championship at
Dixie Plantation.
The Department of Juvenile Jus--
tice has awarded the county a
$65,000 grant for the implementa-
tion of an intervention plan that
aims to keep at risk youths out of
the juvenile justice system.
True to his campaign pledge to
donate $5,000 of his annual salary
to charitable organizations, Com-
missioner Jerry Sutphin did just
that.
Senior Center, Refuge House,
Humane Society, Jefferson County


The County Commission revised
its list of priority project it wants
the Legislature to fund, to include,
upgrading infrastructure at the In-
dustrial Park; conversion of former
JCHS buildings into a courthouse
annex, building an emergency op-
erations center, and building a mul-
tipurpose agricultural center.
The library cut personnel as a re-
sult of a budget shortfall, losing
two part-time helpers and reducing
hours of full time staff, by eight
hours. The cutback in State Aid
was $59,000.
The suit filed by opponents of the
go-cart racetrack appeared to be
going nowhere, with no one re-
questing hearing, Clerk of Court
Dale Boatwright reported.
Dixie Plantation's 110th Conti-
nental Open All-Age Champion-
(See Year In Review Page 3)


I ...


you go if


The Region's First Accredited Chest Pain Center

Why is this designation imIportant? Because heart disease is one of the leading
causes of death in the United States and this year alone, 600,000 people will die from
heart disease, most of those from heart attacks.

Capital Regional Medical Center's Chest Pain Center offers a protocol driven and
systematic approach to patient management and was the first in our community.
Our physicians and Emergency Department staff are specially trained to recognize
symptoms and react more quickly in order to save lives.

Where should you go if you have chest pain? The Chest Pain Center at Capital
Regional Medical Center.


2626 Capital Medical Blvd. Tallahassee, FL 32308 850-325-5000
www.capitalregionalmedicalcenter.com


CAPITAL REGIONAL

MEDICAL CENTER


Farmers

&


Merchants Bank







Will Be Closed

Monday,

January 2nd

And Reopen

Tuesday



Regular Banking Hours

Saturday, December 31


Where wi











Year in Review


(Continued From Page 2)
ship concluded as one of the
longest and most well-attended
field trials in recent memory.
The trial ran 16 days with 174
dogs total. Winner was Super-
shadow with owners John Neely
and David Redish.
The business traffic circle pro-
moted by the Chamber of Com-
merce was in the hands of the
City's Street Committee, expected
to take several meeting to discuss,
with professional input to be
sought.
City Police Speed Enforcement
Program continued to produce
funds, and was likely to be in force
for time to come. Citations in De-
cember produced $1,172.27.
City Council adopted a resolution
to support Step Up Florida, a
Health Department initiative to pro-
mote healthy lifestyles and physical
activity during the month of Febru-
ary.
The radio issue continued to re-
verberate, and Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Bates was not happy with the
Cominissioners' Choice, because of
a mandated change in frequency to
become effective Jan. 1, 2006.
County Commissioners consid-
ered a pavement recycling tech-
nique that is suppose to allow for
the repair of roads at a fraction of
the cost of the traditional method,
The City donated $1,000 to the
Economic Development Council,
and the Legislative Lobbying Com-
mittee.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin pro-
posed that logging operators be-
come accountable for damage they
* cause to county roads, suggesting.
that they post a bond, the return of
which would depend on their op-
eration's impact on county roads.
Marilyn Halsey was named Dis-
*trict Teacher of the Year. She is an
,ESE teacher at Jefferson County
,High School.
Dam repairs were undertaken by
!the Florida Fish and Wildlife Com-
mission at the north end of Lake
Miccosukee, with the project ex-
pected to cost about $1 million.
A 50 year old 84 inch diameter
pipe, which allows for controlled
drainage of-the lake sprung a leak
in recent years.
If not repaired officials said the
leak would continue to enlarge,
eventually causing the dam to col-
lapse, causing an unintended draw
down of the lake.
The Democratic Executive Com-
mittee received pointers from a for-
mer top executive of the party,
about how to become a more effec-
tive organization.
City Council approved an agree-
ment with Big Bend Transit, Inc.
that opens the way for reestablish-
ment of a shuttle service here.
Under the agreement, Big Bend
will prepare the invoices and the
City will reimburse the funds.
Planners OK'd three big develop-
ments and put one project on hold
pending further review.
Recommended for approval were
two subdivisions north and west of
town, and a horse arena in the
south part of the county.
Tabled for further consideration
was a large subdivision just south
of Lloyd.
County officials, department
heads and representatives of the
State Attorney and Public De-
fender's offices toured the former
high school, preparatory to moving
their operations there in the fore-
seeable future.
The Planning Agency smoothed
the way for a small subdivision, on
the north side of town, with an
agreement that allowed the city's
rules to apply.
The majority of those who turned
out for a the Street Committee's
first review of the proposed busi-
ness circle expressed support for
the concept.
The committee said the project
would be a long time affair and a
number of workshops would be
held to explore the issue.


BETTER THAN.

ZERO MOVIE


Bill Bullock, deputy chief with
City Police became the number two
man in the Sheriffs Department
when he was named by Sheriff
David Hobbs to succeed Major
Mike Joyner, who retired.
A deputy's effort to assist an in-
jured man wound up in a drag
down fight.
Deputy Charles Bryan ultimately
arrested Andrew Brinson and cited
him for DUI, resisting arrest with
violence and battery on a law en-
forcement officer.
Requests at the Planning Com-
mission highlighted the recurring
problem of residents petitioning to
place more than one dwelling on
land zoned ag-5 (one dwelling per
five acres.)
No action was taken at the meet-
ing and a proposed solution re-
mained in the hands of County
Commissioners.
The Planning Commission rec-
ommended adoption of a Compre-
hensive Plan Amendment that spe-
cifically allows racetracks in agri-
cultural areas.
The proposed change was trig-
gered by the Go-Kart racetrack,
slated to go on a 98 tract off Big'
Joe Road, five miles east of Monti-
cello.
City officials asked downtown
business owners to access the ef-
fectiveness of the realigned parking
spaces on the east side of N. Jeffer-
son Street, between Dogwood and.
Pearl Streets.
The angle was changed earlier
from 45 to 30 degrees, as part of a.
pilot program.

Jefferson County High School
quarterback Carlton Hill was sus-
pended from school for consensual
sex with a minor and charged with
contributing to the delinquency of a
minor, a misdemeanor.
The. city considered increasing
the price of cemetery sites at the
Oakland Cemetery.
Commissioners planned to sell
three county owned buildings in the
downtown district and use the
money to renovate the newly ac-
quired buildings at the former
JCHS site. '-
Buildings in question include
those occupied by the Tax Collec-
tor, Property Appraiser, and Asst.
State Attorney.
Commissioners changed their
minds about moving the Emer-
gency Management Operation Cen-
ter to the former JCHS site.
It was decided that the Grants Of-
fice would move to the site, as well
as the Building Inspection and Plan-
ning Departments.
Fire Rescue would return to the
fire station on US 19 with a mobile
unit.

MARCH


Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District negotiated the pur-
chase of a 22 acre parcel including
the Head of the Wacissa River.
The State was to make the pur-
chase and the County to manage
the property.
Aggressive local parties benefited
the community as both Republicans
and Democrats embarked on re-
cruiting, fundraising, and promo-
tional activities.
The Road Department worked to
upgrade Hopkins Landing, a little,
known public 'access point to Lake
Miccosukee on the Jefferson
County side.
The City wanted a pause on de-
velopment, with a moratorium
which would allow guidelines to be
drafted. The concern was that the
infrastructure impact of these de-
velopments be considered.
As the rate of developments ac-
celerated in the county, planners
and county officials were forced to
address the issue of gopher tor-
toises, which are listed as threat-
ened, endangered, or a species of
special concern in Florida.
Firefighters burned a historic
house dating from 1880's, on North


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 3


't-%,


MICHAEL BRYAN, Jefferson County High School Principal,
presents Marilyn Halsey with a plaque as District Teacher
of the Year.


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Cherry Street, at the request of de-
veloper Riley Palmer, when the po-
tential buyer, who would move the
house, backed out.
The City's Internet enterprise hit
a possible snag when it was learned
that the Legislature was consider-
ing a bill preventing municipalities
from entering the field.
City Officials were to request
DOT to expand the 30 degree park-
ing, sidewalks downtown, at the re-
quest of the Community Traffic
Safety Team.
The Chamber of Commerce
called upon county officials to con-
tinue pursuing the idea of a Monti-
cello bypass, lest the DOT forget
the project. Authorization of phase
two of the project was sought, esti-
mated to cost between $350,000
and $500,000.
County Commissioners rejected a
proposal to hold loggers account-
able for damage to roads from their
heavy loads.
Grants Office Director Cory Ya-
covone was investigating unauthor-
ized use of a special phone in her
department that was tied to. a grant.
The matter came to light when her
office received a bill for $3,000 dat-
ing from 2002. The in fraction oc-
curred before Yacovone took over
the department.
.County Commission declared
three buildings surplus property,
preparatory to selling them for
funds to begin refurbishing several
buildings at the former JCHS site.
These include the buildings hous-
ing the Tax Collector, Property Ap-
praiser, and Assistant State Attor-
ney.
Road Department Superintendent
David Harvey reported the 'comple-
tion of the West Lake Road Bridge
was 30 days ahead of schedule.
The proposal to do away with the
five lot exemption, which removes
from planners' review those subdi-
visions of five lots or less, caused
controversy between the County
Commission and the Planning
Body.


The issue concerned the fact that
such small subdivisions often have
no standards for roads and the like,
thus putting a burden on the county
to upkeep substandard roads.
The boards planned to meet,
jointly to resolve their differences.
Mayor Julie Conley told the City
Council she was receiving com-
plaints of unreasonable noise from
Allen's Bar.
The issue remained unresolved
when Police Chief David Frisby:
said the Police Department had no
complaints from residents in the
area.
The Police Department received a
FDLE Grant of $990 to help pay
for overtime in the solution of
crimes.
Mayor Julie Conley met with the
female mayors of area counties to
share experiences.
Conley met with Mayors
Ernestine Kinsey of Lee; Myra
Valentine of Madison; Pam Seagle
of Perry, and Nan Brown of Talla-
hassee.
Brad Cooley and Brad Cooley, Jr.
unveiled the first sculpture of a ma-
jor series, honoring the State's In-
dian Cultural Heritage.
The sculpture, title "Movin' On"
stands of the northeast lawn of the
R. A. Gray Building in Tallahassee.
It depicts a Miccosukee family of
the 1930's walking single file along
an imaginary path.
The School Board voted to ap-
prove the terms of a lease of the
former JCHS buildings on Water-
(See Year In Review Page 5)




NOW AVAILABLE!
New Pool Tables
Balls Cues
Other Supplies
Soft Drinks Beer Wine *
850-668-7665
1698 Village Square Blvd. *Tallahassee
Open Noon 'til 2 am 7 Days a Week!


RAYMOND NELSON is awarded a plaque as District Em-
ployee of the Year by Jim Norton, director of Educational
Programs, and Adult and Community Education. (News
Photos)


, ., ,
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL

CANCER CENTER.' "





S2003 Centre' fointa BIvd '
Tallahasiee Fl 32130i ,
Eric C. Rot M.D. & David Cha M.D.
. Board Certified in Oncolig ,,



Phone:850-878-227,3'
S'' Fax: 850-671-59o'0 '


,



Southeast Regional Cancer Center. a rnember of The North Florida Can-
cer NetworIk ,is pleased to bi, rig pi oven. state of the art treatment to the

people of Nortih Flo, id'la. T-,omoTherap\ is a new highly effective form of

treatment delivery and is ideal foci trie treatment of prostate cancer.
Southeast P'egional Can cel C'-nteri was the fourth facility to begin treat-
ment with this new te: -hnolog', anrd we are proud to be pioneers in this

new f,rintie.Dr. Post' hia,- spokl.en aiouind the worcil on the use and bene-
fits of Torniot-heiapv\ fi tanei patients. This technology allows the pa-

tient to re-el\ e the rimost ac:cuiate, non invasive treatment available for
piotat ,:a.n:e i.To,,-,ii:,' e.ip, -.,has prc sidled OLiiI patients with a better
Cqlalit, of life, ith few or no. side effects. Your treatment is done on an

outpatient lasis. v~itl eas., ,:,:essi:,lit:, to ,our physician and nursing
staft. If ,.:u v.'1ul, It e t, f' t -,iind :'uii. more about TomoTherap\ please con-

ta t us r ,,i f' ,-, :r P iIrf, -i -ati nc- .


I


I ERe d L, cf
Isk acto
L:
Ic yc :ct ( ]s







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor

O0^1^' LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Old Year Fading,


What Lies Ahead?


This year is fast slipping away and
it has been a humdinger!
What with war, political squab-
bling, and devastation from hurri-
canes, we've had our share of
anxious moments.
Worst of all this has been a year
when GIs have been killed and
maimed in distant places.
The political debate is hot with
topics ranging from an exploding
federal deficit, how the Iraq war was
, sold to the American people, con-
duct of the war and its cost in blood
and treasure, and what to do with
the millions of illegal immigrants
streaming across our borders.


charm that is Our Town.
Newcomers bring with them dif-
ferent experiences, and different
ideas which complement many of
the fine traditions of the community.
This quiet time between Christmas
and New Years is a good time for all
of us to reflect on what this year was
and what might be in the year ahead.
It's time to dream dreams and
make plans recognizing that every-
thing must begin with an idea.
Looking ahead to a New Year is a
time for hoping for better things. It's
a time of commitment to projects
and goals. It's a time of rebirth and
a time to rekindle the spirit for the
future.


We need a time out.
Let's look forward to the New It's also a time to take stock of
Year with enthusiasm and convic- ourselves and our priorities.
aion that things will get better, prob- The beginning of a New Year af-
em'is wi served, and'voiceswim llfords us opportunities for-it lies be-
| be lowered, fore us, fresh and unspoiled.
As newspaper people, we look Having passed through the Season
I forward to a New Year. That's natu- of Wonders, it's only natural that we
ral since journalists always look would eye the New Year filled with
ahead to the next story, the next optimism for a better community
. photo opportunity. and a better world.
Growth is upon us, like it or not. We hope that the year ahead is the
And, it is our challenge to have or- best for you and that it is rich with
" derly growth while maintaining the His blessings.



IFrom Our Files
TEN YEARS AGO G.U. Miller, Jack Manley, Michae
December 20, 1995 Carney, James Sledge, James Davis
The Drug Task Force, a joint effort Franklin Smith and J.W. Lukens of
% of City Police and the Sheriffs De- Monticello.
" apartment, arrested two Georgia indi- FORTY YEARS AGO
' viduals here Thursday. _. December 17,1965
Jackie Youngblood was named as
'f A leak in the newly installed line Jackie Youngblood was named a
; that carries water to the interstate guard and Robin Hampton as the
5 cue .team when selections were made
t, on a limited basis for about a day- st week.
and-a-half last week. last week.
SGraduates this term from NFJC
The county is trying to position it- are JoAnne Flewellen McCown,
self in a favorable situation, should Norma Leatherman, Arthur Phillips
its bid for a $650,000 state grant for Jr., Jane Vickers Pruitt and Elbert
: restoration of the courthouse be re- Swarn.
.^ ejected. Leroy Seabrooks, the unsuc-
cessful police chief candidate who FIFTY YEARS AGO
filed a suit to overturn the result of December 16, 1955
that race, will get his day in court. Tom Bird Jr., has received an ap-
TWENTY YEARS AGO pointment as assistant doorman of
December 18,1985 the House of Representatives of the
A federal judge has signed. a final Congress of the U.S. by Congress
hich d ,man Bob Sikes.,
judgment which indicates at-large
elections to select County Commis- George Anderson was installed as
sion members are illegal in Jefferson Kiwanis president at the annual La-
County. dies Night.
Foodway officials announced this Beta Sigma Phi organized a loca
Week plans for a $250,000 expan- o e
k f te Mor 00 ewan chapter .and installation of officers
sion of the Monticello Foodway.
in which was held at the home of Mrs
I Jefferson County teachers are no Richard Simpson. Officers name
longer the lowest, paid teachers in were Mrs. Harland Ferguson, presi-
the state, said FTP/NEA research dent; Mrs. Roberts Wilkins, Miss
v specialist Byron Marlowe. The__Eleanor Folsom, Mrs. Cap Shuman
teachers union FTA/NEA represents Mrs. Carolyn Dorsey, Mrs. Nasor
4 local teachers in contract negotia- Revell and Miss Millie Maddox.
x tions.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
THIRTY YEARS AGO December 14, 1945
At the annual Ladies Night of the Jefferson County Teachers have
Monticello Kiwanis Club Gene formed an association with Mrs
Beatty was presented with a plaque Ophelia Wells, county supervisor as
designating him as Kiwanian of the acting chairman. Officers elected
Year of his outstanding contribution were J.C. Waldron Jr., Mrs. Wells,
A to Kiwanis Activities the past year. --Mrs. Miriam Reed, Miss Effie
.-Scurry and Mrs. Eulee Scruggs.
Several Jefferson County farmers
have had their timber land approved. Lt. David L. Reichert is visiting
4 Receiving the certification were: with his parents. He has been in
ZLawrence Crampton of Lamont; Europe on a tour of duty.


4









THESE clients of the Jefferson Senior Cen-
ter enjoyed the Watermelon Festival Kickoff
Dinner, in June, 1990. From left: Retha Sut-


Editor Smacked With Purse


Everyday was something of a
sparring match between the reporter
and her editor.
She would submit her copy, he
would ask questions and the battle
was on. She didn't like him .ques-
tioning her work. He didn't like pub-
lishing stories that were incomplete.
The reporter .fancied herself as a
prolific writer. The editor was, in
fact, an award-winning editor with'
rows of plaques hanging on his wall.
If he had the upper hand in jour,
nalism, she had the upper hand in
longevity in the market. She had
been a reporter on the same beat for
about 25 years while he was rela-:
tively new at his job having moved
herLefrom another gtaile.- *- .'.
Everybody knew her and mnstl
people liked her, overlooking errors
in her reporting.
I suspect the editor had instruc-
tions from the publisher not to fire
the longtime reporter. At the same
time, the editor was responsible for
getting her to improve her work.
Well, there you have the dynamics
at work in this little newsroom
drama from one of my earlier news-
paper assignments.
Now for a report of the typical
sparring session.
Lady reporter would drop her
copy in the editor's in basket with


-. .. .

1'


Ron Ciclion


some flourish and a "whew, glad
that story is written!"
In about 15 minutes the editor
would call her to his desk and start
asking questions .. .,
'She '.1ould dra,' herself up and
glare at him, never saying but cer-
tainly giving the "how dare you ask
me these questions" look.
He would press her for additional
information and clarification. She
couldn't respond because she didn't
have the information she should
have gotten to write the story.
So, she went on the offensive and
demanded to know why he was
picking on her and on one occasion
she even shed a few tears of indig-
nation.
Others in the newsroom calmly
went about their business almost


oblivious to the fracas at hand.
While it was a wrenching experi-
ence for the reporter and, I suspect,
not a whole lot of fun for the editor,
her stories graduallPfimpjafed.''"
The'sad part w'as'the i\ 0 d&'el-
oped a very serious dislike for each
other..
I guess it was natural there would
be one more big fight to end all
fights.
It was a busy Wednesday morning
and things were humming. Reporter
drops her copy in editor's box with
her usual flourish and in a few min-
utes he calls her to his desk as he
had been doing for months.
He started asking questions and
she just glared at him.
For some reason this particular
day she had her big pocketbook on


Help Friends Stay Sober


Holidays can be stressful for all of
us, especially people recovering
from drug and alcohol dependence'.
They face special challenges, in-
Seluding the temptation to indulge at
holiday parties, as well as the chal-
lenge to rekindle relationships and
compassion with family members
t who may not understand their addic-
-tion.
"People in recovery may be left
alone at the holidays," explains Dr.
Leonardo Lado, an addiction psy-
ihtriqt i i Mami-i


Reach out to the recovering per-'
son and let them know they are wel-
come.
Avoid bringing attention to a
friend's recovery or 'treating them
differently.
Be understanding if a recovering
friend declines an invitation to join
your party, where the temptation to
indulge may make them uncomfort-
able. --
Instead, offer to celebrate the
holidays with that person by meet-


If ... ......n... ing for coffee or desserts.
"Sometimes their families don't '. Provide "safe" party alternatives.
want to see them because they; do such as non-alcoholic beverages.
not understand the disease of addic-> "For the recovering person, being
Stion." But family members and:; with family is a reminder of the
-friends can provide needed supports good things to come from getting
during the holiday season. clean and sober," Dr. Lado explains.
Dr. Lado offers this advice foi "They realize they don't have to get
d friends and family members: 1 high to enjoy the holidays."


Holidays Often
During this busy holiday season, gifts after work, pa:
as you nestle snug in your-bed, for- ',waiting until the kid
get the presents yet to be wrapped; wrap the gifts and
and settle your brain for a long win- why many people a
ter's nap. deprived than ever th
Sleep specialists say the best gift "We see more peop
you can give yourself this year is the J ters after the holiday
gift of sleep. .hectic season took
According to a study published in sleep," said Dr. Donr
the September 2005 issue of the specialist for the AAS
journal Sleep, the average sleep du- "You also will not
ration among U.S. adults is only 6.9 days much if you
hours per night, and 39 percent get early, going to bed
less than the 7 to 9 hours recom- stressed out. You cat


mended by the American Academy
g of Sleep Medicine.
n Add to that the extra demands of
the holiday season shopping for


holiday self if you ar
K deprivation."
The AASM offers


rty preparation,
Is are asleep to
it's easy to see
are more sleep-
is time of year.
ple in sleep cen-
ys because the
a toll on their
na Arand, sleep
SM.
enjoy the holi-
are getting up
I late and are
n't be your best
e fighting sleep

s these sugges-


For those whose loved one is still
dependent on drugs or alcohol, Dr.
Lado offers this advice: "The best
holiday gift you can give someone is
to encourage them to seek treatment
and accompany them to a treatment
center."
People dependent on drugs or al-
cohol have new hope due to the de-
velopment of better treatments for
-addiction.
Dr. Lado provides innovative new
medical treatments for alcohol, co-
caine or methamphetamine depend-
ence at The Village South treatment
facility in Miami, FL. Called Pro-
meta, the treatments are designed to
address the neurochemical imbal-
ances in the brain that are caused by
chronic substance abuse, and which
are associated with the craving and
-compulsion that drives addicts to.


Mean Less Sl


day season:
Take time to relax. Even if you
have a lot to do, allow yourself to
stop at a certain point in the
evening. Giving your brain time to
wind down before bed will help you
sleep better.
Keep your sleep pattern on
schedule. Maintain a regular bed-
time and wake-up time. Other regu-
lar rituals, such as a warm bath, a
light snack or a few minutes of read-
ing, also may help.
Plan ahead for holiday chores.
Set aside time earlier in the day to
wrap gifts, decorate the house, plan
your holiday menu and similar


her shoulder while standing by his
desk.
He asked her a question but she'
said nothing. He asked again and6
she remained quiet.
"What is the matter with you?" h6''
shouted.
Apparently that wasn't the thing to
do because, without saying a word,!
she grabbed the strap to her pocket-;
book, twirled it off her shoulder and:i
in his direction and began hitting
him with it. Wham!. Pop! Blam!,
Whop! Wham!
I don't think he- had any courses inl
journalism school that quite pre-,;
pared him for this onslaught.
He put his hands over his head and s
yelled, "Stefdp t!" ro ;..'
She wasn'fabout to stop because':
months of frustration were comining
out. Wham! Whop! Blam! Whop!
Wham!
,He got up from his newsroom q
desk and ran to his private office. 4
She followed. Wham! Whop! Blam!
Whop! Wham!
He managed to get the door be-'
tween him and her so the beating-
stopped. As he locked the door he
shouted, "You're fired!" '
She patted her hair, organized her- :
self, :and'strode smartly from the '
newsroom. ''f
The newsroom staff applauded.

-, C (


use. .
"Addiction is a brain disease," Dr.,i
Lado explained, "but until recently,,,
our medical options for treating the-,
biology of addiction have been lim-
ited. New treatments such as Pro-h;.
meta allow us to target some of the !
underlying medical aspects of the1i
disease." Even with the new treat-
ment, individuals have the best;
chance of achieving sustained re- 1
cover through participation infi
counseling, group therapy, support
groups or similar, ongoing activities
that 'address' the behavioral compo-
nent of addiction. "Importantly, the
treatment also includes nutritional
supplements and provides that pa-
tients enroll in a recovery-oriented
continuing care program, making
Prometa a comprehensive approach
'to managing alcohol, cocaine or
-methamphetamine addiction."



eep
"appointments" in your daily plan-
ner.
Love eggnog? Avoid too much
alcoholic eggnog or coffee at eve-
ning holiday parties. Alcohol and
caffeine can inhibit your normal
sleep pattern.


Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed
and include phone
number of writer


tions for better sleep during the holi-' tasks. To stay on track, write these


ton, Bessie Roberts, Martha
File Photo)


From Our Photo File
^EST^ .--"" I


Opinion & Comment


Publisher's |

Notebook
___umaum e w __ p


,
f


t




s
t


r










Year in R

continued From Page 3)
street, to be offered to the County
commission.
City Council debated charging
On application fee, sufficient to
'over officer's overtime, to oversee
arades.
The issue came up when a grant
at was used previously to cover
le overtime ran out.
$ The Republican Party contrib-
ted $500 to help cover overtime
osts for the Emancipation Parade,
nd the Council decided to revisit,
|e issue at a later date.
The Health Department made
changes to salvage a $50,000 state
contract, resulting in the requested
resignation of two longtime em-
gloyees, Dan MacDonald and Jack
tout. At issue was work not being
none the specifications of the De-
,artment of Environmental Affairs.
Health Department Administrator
.im Barnhill devised a plan for the
county to purchase the TMH
buildingg for her department, by su-
g trust funds, if the Legislature
[proves her request.
Grants Office Director Cory
urke expected to leave her posi-
tion soon. She cited that the job
structure was such that she had litt
le. time.. to write grants, but .was
busy administering housing ,:and-
feeding programs.
An expert hired by the County
completed the impact fee study, at.
a fee of $10,000, but-through mis-.
communication, the release of the
her findings were delayed for one
'week.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin sug-
gested that the Road Department
cease installing culverts in private
driveways, or else charge more for
the service.
'Th e charged was $500 and
the estimated cost of the' work
$1,200. Action was deferred until a
later meeting.
The State dropped two battery
charges against C.P. Miller, and
gave as a reason that the victim re-
fuses to press: charges and states the
incident did not happen.,
The County approved the lease
offered by the School Board, for
the use of the former "JOGHSbui'ld- -
ings;.on-,Wa'ter Street. The first or-
der of priority was to relocate 'the
county library to the Media Center.
Letchworth Mounds hold key to
past, with the mound unique in
height and architectural detail.
The mounds continued to draw
attention from archaeologists, ar-
chaeology eiiiiusiais.t and the gen-
eral public. ..
The typical court docket reflected
a drop in crime, 'both in the type of
crime and the number of cases,
Asst. State Attorney Michael Bauer,
reported.
County Emergence Management
Director Carol Ellerbe, reported
that the county escaped the brunt of
area weekend storms, but heavy
rains caused minor flooding.
APRIL
The stage was set for the adop-
tion of the Development Code,
when planners and commissioners
resolved the stumbling block.
This was accomplished by the
elimination of the five lot exemp-
tion, and setting up countywide
road standards.
Asst. State Attorney Jackie Ful-
ford replaced Michael Bauer when
' the two swapped assignments,
Bauer relocating to Wakulla.
County officials expected to.have


impact fees in place by July 1.
These were expected to be about
$280 for both fire and ambulance
services.
The Health Department's Project
PACE (Protocol for Assessing
Community Excellence and Envi-
ronmental Health) was designed to
seek solutions to the obesity prob-
lem in the county.
The five lot exemption previously
in effect in the county has been re-
scinded. Formerly, the exemption
allowed individuals to develop sub-
divisions of five or fewer lots with-
out review by planners or commis-
sioners.
City prepared to increase its rate
for water usage effective July 1.
City Council approved an increase
of $1 in city limits and $1.50 out-
side the city.
Big Bend Transit expected to be-
gin its shuttle service in the City,
May 2.
The service is a joint venture be-
tween the Transit Company and the
Department of Transportation.
City Council contemplated tighter
regulations and fees for public
events, to help cover the cost of pc
lice patrol.
County was expected to receive
$400,000 grant money earmarked
for housing rehabilitation .
A workshop was set to explore
problems at the- .Grants Office,
which precipitated the resignation
of Director Cory Burke.
The City extended its annexation
amnesty program for another two
months, through June 15.
City Clerk Emily Anderson said
there were still several residents
who planned to apply for annexa-
tion.
Long .awaited Bike Trail. con-
struction was slated to begin, with
the advertisement for bids.
Total estimated cost of the
project, which DOT was to fund,
under its Rails to Trails Program, is
$708,782......
City Officials were taking steps
to control coming growth and took
steps to tighten regulations and as-
sume review procedures previously
handled by the County, and set fees
under its new policy,, .
: Former Commissioner of Educa-
tion Betty Castor spoke to the local.
Democratic Executive Committee
and said the districting process was
in need of reform.
The Sheriffs Department was or-
dered to return to a defendant,
money that was confiscated in
2001.
Sheriff David Hobbs told the
County Commission that the
County would not be out any
money, as a special account held
the funds.
County' Commissioners decided
to restructure the Grants Depart-
ment, and join the operation to the
Building Inspection Depart'nuent.
and to hire a separate grants wi i..r.
Outgoing Grants Office Director
Cory Burke, .who resigned after
less than a year in the pi ,it; -n, pre-
sented commissioners v. tt- l: er as-
sessment of the operation .
In essence she stated that the di-
rector spends 90 percent of the time
administering the Housing Author-
ity, leaving little time for grant
writing.
Driveway Ir,:tallations were pro-
jected to become, more costly, as
residents were to have the option of
having either the county or a pri-
vate contractor install them.
The County had been charging


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28,,2005 PAGE 5


eview


$500 for the installation and ab-
sorbing the loss. The cost was pro-
jected to become some $3,000 for-
the County to install a driveway.
Health Department Director Kim,
Barnhill reported a case of menin-'
gitis in an eight year old boy at the'
elementary school.
She said the boy's disease was vi-,
ral rather than bacterial, with the.
latter more serious.
The School Board held a work-
shop to discuss a $700,000 cut in,
spending. This was necessary
when Finance Director Hal Wilson
explained that the $1.1 million in
excess of income was spent in the
2005 fiscal year.
The budget was balanced by a
transfer of non reoccurring funds,
which now have to be replaced.
Planners approved the Oak Hill
Farm subdivision, a 300 plus acre
residential development, about a
mile south of Lloyd, off SR 59.
Capitol City Travel Center was
slated for major refurbishing, in-
cluding the addition of a two story:
- structure on the west end.
Despite an inclination to place the,,
Grants Office under the supervision
0-
of the Building Inspector, commis`-
sioners continued to explore ways
to restructure the department.
County Commission set impact,
fees for a June 16 hearing which'
would assess developers for
growth. .
Plans were underway for North
Florida Community College to of-
fer a Building Construction Tech-
nology vocational program at Jef-
ferson County High School.
The course was expected to get
underway when .school opens in
August.
A School Board Workshop ex-
amined proposed budget cuts for
2006, 2007, with Superintendent
Phil' Barker expected to make spe-
cific personnel and other recom-
mendations at the May ,9 School
Board meeting.
At issue is some $100,000
needed to replenish the fund bal-
ance used to balance in part the
2005 budget,' when declining en-
rollment brought declining funds.
Tax Collector Lois Hunter was,
concerned about f':,rr.,?r Ti, Col-
lectol Frances Walker relocation
ofh1 'i office to'lthe county from
Perry.
Crux of the matter was that
Walker was under contract to send
fees from the. business to Taylor
County.
Hunter feared additional fees
from this county would find their
way to Perry.
Commissioners approved a Comp
Plan amendment -which would al-
low exceptions in the areas zoned
agricultural.
Circuit Judge L. Ralph Smith dis-
missed charges against eight year
old Johnnie Lee Morris because he
believed the child was too young to
comprehend the charges against
him. '
Charges arose when 'Morris
punched a classmate, kicked and/or
struck several school officials and
scratched a Resource Officer.
MAY
The state awarded the city $1.5
million earmarked to repair prob-
lematic sewer lines.
The 2005 District Florida Writes
scores were up over 2004, and
HMS grade eight student, Ireshia
Dengon, scored a 6, the perfect
score.
The County was to request that
SDOT do a second bypass study, ex-


. ,.,,i ..."? ...' *! 1. "'," .;

Machine Operators
$1100 per hour
Fork Lift Operators
$1100 per hour
Blowmold Technicians
$1350 per hour
Quality Assurance Techs
$1300 per hour
Line Mechanics
$1750 per hour


NOU
TURN
This is no time to turn back.
Keep MDA's lifesaving research
moving forward.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


pected to cost between $300,000
and $500,000.
The City adopted fees and rules
for parades, following a clash with
the Melon Festival Group over
crowd control and supervision.
* Monticello, in-town shuttle serv-
ice held its ribbon cutting cere-
Smony and began its run.
', Service included 10 runs per day,
six days a week.
Despite a $150,000 increase in
Stare Aid, the School Budget short-
fall remained, as monies had to be
replaced in the fund balance which
were used to balance the previous
budget.
Former Captial City Bank teller,
Emily Vinson, charged with steal-
ing more than $100,000 from the
bank over a period of time plead no
contest to grand theft, and sen-
tenced to 15 years probation and
five months in the county jail.
Nine contestants were slated to
compete for the crown of Water-
melon Festival Queen at the annual
pageant, June 11.
Entrants included: Charlsie
Boyatt, Alana Chambers, Casey
Handle, Amber Lee,. Kim Prime,
Lindsey Scott, Carmen Skipworth,
Tierra Thompson,Chevarra Ulee.
An ATV crash on Ashland High-
lands Drive caused the death of a'
15 year old Tallahassee Youth.
FHP reported that Douglas B..
Stetson, Jr. was killed in the'crash. "
City Council approved a revised&
preliminary plat for the Pecan Hills
Subdivision, a 12 acre parcel east
of South Waukeenah' Street, and
south of Chase Street.
The Business Circle was back on
the City Council Agenda when
Margaret Levings presented the re-
sults of a recent survey.
,She said there were 70 parking'
spaces in the downtown area,
which could be increased to 123, if'
the circle became a reality.
The School Board Ok'd 22 staff
layoffs, consisting of two adminis-
trators and a combination. of
teacher aides and non-instructional
personnel,; and a budget reduction
plan. to help restore the fund bal-


1) illki lw)


*1




U
J


BOBBIE GOLDEN, coordinator, and Skeet Joyner, county
commissioner at a .meeting of Responsible Pet Owners of
Jefferson County. (News Photo)


ance consumed to balance the pre-
vious year's budget.

'The County Legislative Commit-
tee, alias the Lobbying Committee,
celebrated an almOst "certain
Victory, when the county, wIas ex- '
pected to receive $4,095,144 in '
funding to renovate the old high
school buildings for county use,
purchase' the TMH building 'next'
door to' the clinic, and to' e'xpaid
the. city sewer system tp Cpoqpers
Pond Subdivision. '


Six entrants were to compete in
the Junior Miss Watermelon Festival
Pageant, June 4.
'These included: Kaitlin Jackson,
Lisa Kisamore, Megan Lee, Jes-
sica Prevatt, Ramsey Revell, and
Torie Thor.

Fire Chief Larry Bates believed

he found a way to lower the Insur-
ance Services Office (ISO) from 9
to 5, which would significantly re-

(See Year In Review Page 7)


Nestle has several immediate openings at its Madison County
bottling facility. Employment opportunities are available for flexible
and self-motivated individuals seeking careers in administration,
logitics, quality assurance, production and maintenance.

Nestle Waters offers great starting pay, ranging from $11 to $1750
an hour depending upon the position. Our outstanding benefits
package includes health and dental insurance along with a 401K
and profit-sharing plans.

.Stop by and fill out an application (directions below) and take
the first step toward a challenging and rewarding future with
Nestle Waters. Applications are also available at


DEADLY NEUROMUSCULAR
DISEASES
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1-800-572-1717 MDA helps people.


A rewarding job with the nation's leading bottled water company
may be closer than you think. Nestle Waters North America is hiring.
And its Madison County plant is only minutes from
Valdosta, Lake Park, Jasper, Mayo, Branford, Monticello and Greenville.


Employment Connection centers in Madisofi, Perry, and Live Oak, Florida and the
Georgia Department of Labor in Valdosta, Georgia. For more information,
call Nestle Waters at (850) 971-2100 or visit our website
at www.madisonblue.org.


I0OnS.


From 1-10:
Take exit 262 North through
the town of Lee to SR 6. Turn
East (RIGHT) for approx. 3 miles to
Hawthorn Road. Look for the Deer Park sign.
Turn RIGHT on Hawthorn Road and follow the
signs to the parking area.
From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West
approx. 15 miles. Entrance is on LEFT.
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NO.RTHi 4MiRi{2A


2P7104-F












PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005


Lifestyle


Progress Energy Donates


Humane Society


Officers Change


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Humane Society
were advised of organizational
changes during their recent meet-
ing.
Foster Care Committee Chair
Martha Jean Martin reported that
that Wendy Leeman has offered to
take up Martin's duties as chair.
Jane Cleveland is temporarily
taking over the duties of treasurer
.until a qualified person can be
found permanently, and Angela
Henderson will serve as the Hu-
mane Society secretary.
"That will help me devote more
time to the duties of vice


president," said Martin.
She advised that there are pres-
ently 13 animals in foster care, in-
cluding four dogs, one cat and
eight kittens.
"We currently have 15 active fos-
ter homes, ten inactive homes and
five who have been removed as
foster families, either because
they moved, or adopted the "pets
they housed.
President Caroline Carswell ad-
vised that Feb. 18 had been set for
the Bless the Beast Feast, at the
Opera House, at a time to be deter-
mined.
"We are going to need a setup
-crew, a cleanup crew, people to


Homes Of Mourning


Robert Mack Herring
Robert Mack Herring, age 78, a
retired truck driver died Tuesday,
December 20, 2005 in Monticello,
Florida.
Funeral Service was at 11:00 a.m.
Friday, December 23, 2005 at Eliza-
beth Baptist Church,. Monticello,
Florida. Family received friends
Thursday, December 22, 2005 at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Inter-
ment followed at Elizabeth Baptist
Cemetery.
Mr. Herring was a native of Ocala,
Florida a former resident of Umi-
talla, Florida. Mr. Herring has been
living in Monticello for the past 21
years. He was a Truck Driver for 60
years, and World War II Veteran.
He was also a member of Elizabeth
Baptist Church.
He is survived by his wife Geneva
Herring of Monticelle, Florida;
Thtre-s-is Db'nohri'e"J'e'Hetri.g and
Kenny Mack Herring both of Fayet-
teville, North Carolina, Albert Eden-
field, Jr. of Apopka, Florida; six
daughters Minnie Lee Waldoff,
Carol Marie Smith, Marlene
Jeanette Smith all of Monticello,
Florida, Sharon Annette Campbell
of Apopka, Florida, Dorothy Louise
Boivin of Dixon, California, Brenda
Gail Cookston of Zellwood, Florida;
29 grandchildren, 38 great-great
grandchildren, and two great-great-
great grandchildren.
Frannie Bellamy Jenkins
Frannie Mae Bellamy Jenkins, age
54, a Cosmetologist, died Thursday,
December 15, 2005 in Tallahassee,
Florida.
The service was at 2:00 p.m. on
Friday, December 23, 2005 at
Young Reaper Missionary Baptist
Church, Greenville, Florida with
burial at Bellamy Cemetery in
Greenville, Florida.
Viewing was from 2:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. on Thursday, December
22, at Tillmans Funeral Home.
I Survivors include two daughters,
Larriece Nelson and LaTonya Jones;
a son LaFrazier Jones; sisters Cob-
bie Robinson, Rosa Williams,
Yvonne Bellamy and Betty Jean
,Williams; several grandchildren and
any other relatives and friends.
Eddie Lee Randolph
Eddie Lee "Duck" Randolph, age
46, a handy man, died Tuesday, De-
cember 20, 2005 in Tallahassee,
Florida.
The service was at 11:00 on Fri-
day, December 23, 2005 at Junious
Hill Missionary Baptist Church,
Monticello, Florida with burial at
Ford Chapel Cemetery in Monti-
cello.
Viewing was from 2:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. on Thursday, December
22, at Tillmans Funeral Home.
A native and lifelong resident of
Monticello, "Duck" was a helper to
many throughout the community.
He could be seen all over town driv-
ing his riding lawn mower with its
trailer hauling "Duck's Stuff."
He is survived by his parents,
.David, Sr. and Albertha Randolph;
his sister, Ruby Huntley and hus-
band, James; and his two brothers
David, Jr. and James and wife,
Sandi; along with many other rela-
tives and friends.
Joseph "Joe" Rivers, Jr.
Joseph "Joe" Rivers, Jr., age 69, a
retired Mechanic, died Thursday,
(See Homes Of Mourning Pagel4)


December, 15, 2005 in Tallahassee,.
Florida.
The service was at 11:00 a.m. on
Saturday, December 24, 2005 at Mt.
Zion AME Church Lloyd, Florida
with burial at the church cemetery.
Viewing was from 2:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. on Friday, December 23,
2005 at The Tillman Funeral Home.
A native of Jefferson County, Mr.
Riers was a longtime resident of
Tallahassee. He had worked as a
Mechanic for many years at various
garages in Tallahassee, having spent
several years working, at Perdue
,Automotive. .
Mr. Rivers was a member of Mt.
Zion AME Church in the Lloyd
Community.
Those cherishing his love and his
life include his daughter Monica
Rivers Bryant and husband Robert
and his son Charles Rivers and wife
Valerie, kboth.of Talahassee; his ,sis-
ters, Frances R: Walker and
husband, Phillip of Tallahassee; and
Bertha R. Lightfoot and Elies R.
Mayweather, both of Miami,
Florida; and his brother Robert Riv-
ers of Miami; an aunt, Daisy Rivers
and an uncle, Isaiah Waymon and
wife, Dollie, both of Tallahassee;
two goddaughters, Janice Gatlin and
Cassandra Jesse, both of
Tallahassee; six grandchildren and
15 great grandchildren, along with
numerous nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends.
Mr. Rivers was preceded in death
by his parents, Joseph, Sr. and Elies
Waymon Rivers.
Adrianne McKenzie Walker
Adrianne McKenzie Walker infant
passed into Jesus' hands December
18, 2005 in Tallahassee, Florida.
Graveside Service was held
Wednesday December 21, 2005,
10:00 a.m. at Oak Ridge Cemetery
Madison, Florida for the family. No
visitation was planned.
Miss Adrianne McKenzie Walker
was survived by her parents Mat-
thew and Jennifer Walker of Wau-
keenah, Florida, Maternal
Grandparents, Ken and Leslie Joiner
of Madison, Florida, Paternal
Grandparents Sloan and Melva
Walker of Waukeenah, Maternal
Great Grandparents Elizabeth and
the late Jimmy Sullivan of Madison,
Florida, Patricia and the late Mack
Joiner of Monticello, Florida, Pater-
nal Great Grandparents the late Mel-
vin and Betty Buzbee and Ulysses
and Frances Walker of Waukeenah,
Florida and a host of family.


I


-~ -



CORP LANCE GAINES presents Gaye Hanna, of Progress
Energy a certificate of recognition. The company donated
$1,000 to the Toys for Tots Program. (News Photo)




Schools To Serve

More Nutritious Food


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sciences,-
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
reports that county schools will be
serving more nutritious foods as
well as offering more physical ac-
tivities for students.
"Federal Law states that by June
30, 2006 all schools must develop,
a local wellness policy, that in-
volves parents, students," a repre-
sentative from the School Food
Authority, School Board, school
administration and the public," said
Copeland.
She said that with the passage of
the Act, the Federal Government
recognizes that a coordinated effort
by the entire community is neces-
sary..
"As early as April of 2005, a
Wellness Committee began to as-
semble in the County and in July,
this was formed into a partnership
with the Jefferson County Health
Department," said Copeland.
"Committee members have met
monthly to address a school nutri-
tion and local wellness policy," she
said.
Members of the committee in-
clude a District School Administra-
tor, a School Board member, a
school nurse, a school social
worker, an ACA Administrator,,
Health Department employees, Jef-
ferson County Extension Office
staff. and a few community repre-
*sentatives as well as a few students.
Copeland said that to date, posi-
tive suggestions have been made
and changes implemented.
Timers have been placed on
vending machines, at the public
schools to serve products only as
allowed by law, and machines are
stocked with more nutritious foods.
Also, the school lunch program
offers fruit daily, as well as two
vegetables, and baked French fries
are served using no trans fat.
ACA, though under no mandate to
do so, has also made changes to
adopt healthier school lunch
menus.
"Additionally, the Health Depart-


ment is working on submitting a
grant proposal to the Center for
Disease Control," said Copeland.
"If awarded, local elementary
-schools, both public and private,
will be provided with tools to in-
crease the physical activity of their
students.
"A healthy school environment
goes way beyond school meals in
the cafeteria.
"A healthy lifestyle and maintain-
ing a healthy weight requires a
combination of healthy food
choices and appropriate amount of
physical activity, medical care,
etc." said Copeland.
v -"The- '-el':.Il elline c mihiittee
is addressing these concerns and
trying to positively impact students
and the health of the entire commu-
nity," she added.


$1,000 TO TOys

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Progress Energy's local employ-
ees raised more than $1,000 in do-
nations for Toys For Tots.

Three Marines, Corp. Lance
Gaines, Corp. Scott and Gunnery
Sgt. Duncan, picked up the toys
last week and presented Progress_
Energy with a certificate of appre-
ciation.


For Tots
Accepting the certificate for Pro-
gress Energy was Community Re-
lations Assistant Gaye Hanna.
Hanna said that employees
started collecting for the project
about Nov. 1.
"Some area children are going to
see a much brighter Christmas,"
she added.
"We're hoping this really catches
on and expands," said Hanna. "We
want to eventually make this the
-main area of operations for the
North Coastal Region.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 7


Year In Review


(Continued From Page 5)
duce fire insurance rates.
Bates told the County Commis-
sion that Consultant Michael Yar-
brough, said his firm specialized in
working with small counties to im-
prove their ISO ratings if the Fire
Departments follow his recommen-
dations.
County Commission Chair Skeet
Joyner expressed his disapproval of
the use of county vehicles by em-
ployees for personal business, even
if to attend certification classes.
The commission took no action
on the issue.
Ricardo Fadell, 20, of
Monticello, was shot and killed in
the East King Street area.
John Jermain Mitchell 24, of
Tallahassee was arrested after wit-
nesses identified him as the
shooter.
Police Chief David Frisby re-
ported to City Council t he de-
partment brought in $3,935.82
from traffic fines in February and
March. He asked that the Council
put aside $1,000 of the monies to-
wards the purchase of new police
vehicles.
The Street Committee proposed
to the City Council the idea of
making West Dogwood into a one
way street to create more parking
spaces and ease the traffic problem
in the downtown area.
The Council agreed to do this for
a trial period of 120 days.
County officials continued to ex-
plore possible ways of restructuring
the Grants Office, and heard from
groups interested in taking over the
operation on a contractual basis.
No decision was made.
The Council also took the first
step towards raising water rates by
$1 inside the city limits and. $1.50
outside the city, with final action
set for June 2.
FCAT reading scores rose, while
math scores dropped in district
schools. Grade five at JES should
the most improvement over all
grades.
County Commission approved a
major development in the Lloyd
area, Oak Hills Farms, on the east
side of SR-59, 1.5 miles south of
Lloyd.
Humane Society became an issue
at the County Commission when
former members presented com-
missioners with a letter addressing
"to discuss a misunderstanding that
developed through a series of oth-
erwise benign events."
Planning Commission Atty. Scott
Shirley and Official Bob Arren-
dondo had to agree they said what a
citizen claimed they said, and
d ------f


Melon Princess. Kaitlin Jackson
was named first runner-up; and
Tori Thor, second runner-up.
Named Little King was Donnie
Kinsey, and Carly Joiner was Little
Queen.
Sponsors reported that the 55th
Watermelon Festival Kickoff Din-
ner and Program that the event was
a great success.
The County Commission gave
the go ahead to a citizens' group
that was pursuing the possible es-
tablishment of a central sewer sys-
tem and treatment plant in the
Lloyd area.
Dick Bailar, spokesman for the
Jefferson County Utility Develop-
ment Committee, said the forma-
tion of the group was triggered by
concerns about the environment
and economic development.
Atty. George Reeves, represent-
ing the plaintiffs in the Racetrack
lawsuit, stated that the lawsuit re-
mained very much in effect, despite
reports to the contrary.
The County Commission di-
vested the Grants Office of the
food distribution program, as a step
towards the intended restructuring
of the department.
The action came on the advice of
Extension Office Director Larry
Halsey who has been named in-
terim director until the restructur-
ing is completed.
Alana Chambers was crowned
Melon Festival 'Queen. Charlsie
Boyatt was first runner-up and
Lindsey Scott, second runner-up.
School grades rose at HMS and
JCHS and fell at JES.
The grades are: JES, F; HMS, C;
and JCHS, D.
An upscale subdivision was
planned adjacent to the Holly Hills
area, with some 50 one acre lots
envisioned in, the project.
Developer Riley Palmer re-
mained in negotiation with. Tim
Braswell for the possible purchase
of the property and questioned the
City Council about the option of
annexing the property as part of the
city.

The Jefferson County Health De-
partment was one of four health de-
partmentsidentified as a winner of
the Davis Productivity, Award, a
major government improvement
initiative, designed to recognize
state employees whose work in-
creases productivity and promotes
innovation to improve delivery of
services.
As the death penalty case of Paul
Howell, convicted of killing FHP
Trooper Jim-r' L.Iford' in 1992,
continued tc v.:i its way through
the legal sys', .


wuu act acuoriurgiy, after a tape However,'Howell was reported to
recording of the situation proved be running out of options, concern-
the citizen to be correcting his appeal of the death penalty.
Memorial Day celebrations The 55th Watermelon Festival
around the county honored all who drew a large crowd as the earlier
made the-supreme sacrifice, rain and breeze brought cooler air,
JUNE making the crowd the largest in re-
City Council took the step to be-. cent memory.
come a high speed wireless Internet New rules which will impact
Provider. The Service was ex- growth, Planning Official Bob Ar-
pected to be available in three to rendondo informed County Com-
four months. missioners.
The 55th Watermelon Festival The new legislation placed addi-
opened with the Kickoff Dinner tional planning requirements on lo-
and Program at the Opera House. cal governments.
County Commission revisited the The City eyed $1 million upgrade
concept of numbering county vehi- of the water system, which paved
cles. No action was taken and fur- the was for a major residential de-
ther discussion was planned. velopment just west of town.
The Sheriffs Department reports
the completion of an eye to eye Representatives of the Humane
check of all known sexual offend- Society and two of its critics ap-
ers in the county. peared before the County Commis-
County Commissioners decided sion to air opposing views on the
to steer clear of the disagreement effectiveness of the animal rescue
between Tax Collector Lois Hunter organization.
and her predecessor Frances Because of its slate of successes
Walker. in the Legislature during the last
Walker sought to relocate her tag session, the Jefferson County Leg-
,business from Taylor County to islative Committee was held up as a
Jefferson County, and because of a model of lobbying worthy of emu-
contract with Taylor, the fees lation by other small counties.
would go to Taylor County. for the The County adopted impact fees
duration of the contract. and expected to begin to collect
Hunter refused to sign off to al- them Aug. 1. The Total fee per
low the relocation, on the grounds new house is $220.04 for Fire and
that it would take monies out of Ambulance Services.
this county. Fire Rescue received permission
Auditors gave the City a clean from the County Commission to
bill of health on its financial state, apply for a federal grant which
and determined that the City was would make it possible for the de-
not in a state of financial emer- apartment to hire two additional
agency. Emergency Medical personnel.
These last words were not com- The City Council voted to abolish
forting to some members who won- the Police substation and not renew
dered if there was more behind the its annual lease. The substation ac-
scenes than what met the eye. complished its goal of cleaning up
Ramsey Revell was crowned the Rooster town area.


WATERMELON FESTIVAL queen and her runner-up, Alana Chambers, queen, Charlsie
court. From left, Lindsey Scott, second Boyatt, first runner-up. (News Photo)


g mmj, i 2 1 ft. I A
... ........ .. ... .. ...
PO P ,.r._.

I mar.


RAMSEY REVELL is crowned 2005 Water-
melon Festival Princess by outgoing Junior
Miss Amber Curry. The Princess Pageant


JULY

S.City .CoIunIl Ites unanimously
tQ,make West Dogwood Street. one;
way, westbound.
Parking spaces were to be created
on both sides of the street at 30 de-
gree angles.
The County budget process be-
gan and County Commissioners
heard from department heads and
others about their budget needs for
the coming year.
Edd "Guy" Thomajan, 87, long-
time resident died alone at his
home. He was a colorful local char-
acter, a movie and stage actor.
County Commissioners continued
hearing budget requests and still
had no idea of projected revenues.
The City and County identified
projects for funding, with the intent
to facilitate receipt of state and fed-
eral grants.
The preparation for the Library
move was proceeding. smoothly, .
with the expected reopening date of
Aug 1, at the former JCHS Media
Center on Water Street.
During the annual Fireworks
Celebration, July 4, two fireballs
went astray and sailed into the
crowd. The incident was caused by
a malfunction of the devices and no
one was hurt.
The Department of Juvenile Jus-
tice awarded the local Juvenile Jus-
tice Council $33,000 with the goal,
of giving youths a second chance.
The program allows law en-
forcement officers to cite offenders,
who will then be tried by a jury of
their peers and perform community ;
service for the offense, sparing
them a criminal record.


was previously
(News Photo)


July 4 Fireworks Celebration
drew a crowd of 5,000, about the
same as' la; )ear, and'cuniiidered
the largest number in history.
SCount) officials "ere scheduled
to receive a $200,000 grant from
the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection for continuing
improvements at the Recreation
Park.
The Sheriffs Department charged
a Madison County man, Willie
Boone, with sexual battery and re-
lated offenses stemming from an
incident here on June 18.
The animal control issue resur-
faced at the County Commission
when residents spoke about neigh-
bors dogs mauling farm and other
animals, and presented pictures of
the abuse.
A group of citizens hoped to offer
a solution to commissioners, who
said the problem was a lack of
funding, by Aug. 1.
Hurricane Dennis dumped much
rain on the area but officials said
the County was "extremely lucky,
and that it was not as bad as it
could have been."
Commissioners split up. the duties
of the Grants office, and decided
to hire a grants writer who would
work on behalf of all departments,
and report directly to the Commis-
sion.
With the problem of a lack of
quorum plaguing the Planning
Commission, resident Dick Bailar
proposed redefining a quorum,
based on voting members presenIt at
the meeting.
A Jacksonville man, Mandu Itiat,
55, died when his vehicle ran into
the rear of a slower moving tow


Miss Pageant.


truck on I-10, in the county.
Taxable land values went up,
aci'olid he Ciu'n y, dif, A'ad d ch',.l'
district, rhe result of ne" consiruc-
tioh and rising property values s
The Health Department reported
the first case of Encephalitis here,
and residents were encouraged to
try to avoid mosquito bites, the
means of spreading the disease.
The county continued to assess
the damage caused by Hurricane'
Dennis. Damage was greater than
originally thought, and Carol El-
lerbe, director of local; Emergency
Management, .planned to. submit
damage information to the state in
hope of having the area declared a
disaster area, which would be eligi-
ble for FEMA assistance..
'A 20 year old Leon County man
was arrested by Sheriff's Deputies,
after a two day manhunt in the La-
mont area.
mon West Lee Norton, Jr. was charged'
with several counts of burglary and
grand theft, among other offenses.
The City Internet Service 'was
ready to go online and could serve
240 patrons.
System's Domain Name is :
MyMonticello.Net.


Commissioners agreed to raise
fees for the Building and Planning
Departments and noted that the fees
mirror the cost of doing business.
Hurricane claims in the County
exceeded $1 million last year, as
compiled by the Florida Office of
Insurance Regulation.
Developments were springing up
around the city with more in sight.
Some 900 houses were added to the
City since 2000, and 200 more
were planned.
The Monticello Bike Trail was
about to become a reality, though.
in a downscaled version.
Response to advertisements for,
bids indicated that the City did not'
have the funds to pay for its origi-
nal plan.
$550,000 was budgeted for the
trial, and the downscaled version.
was to cost $485,972.
Police issued fines kept bringing
money into the City, and generated
$3,000 during the months of
March, April and May, Chief
David Frisby reported.
A decrease was advertised in
school taxes with a millage rate of
8.219, a decrease of .162 from the
2004 rate of 8.381 mills, in 2004.
The County qualified to receive
expanded funding form the federal
government to help pay for the re-
pair ;or replacement of public prop-
erty damaged by Hurricane Dennis.
Road Superintendent David Har-
vey had his crews replace the sign
at Hopkins landing, which marks
the only public access to Lake Mic-'
cosukee in Jefferson County. An1
earlier sign had been torn down by
vandals.
A shortfall of $200,000 prompted'
the City to eye a tax increase, and'
recommend an increase from 7.51
-mills to 8.0 mills; .
Meridan Community Servicel
Group, of Tallahassee, a private)
.consulting firm,, was hired by their
County Commission to manage)
housing, issues, formerly handled
1 by ihe-Grants Office,
City Finance Committee gave.;
$15,000 to three organizations. Re-I
ceiving the funds were: Economic,
Development Council, $12,000;
Jefferson County .Legislative Com-,
mittee, $750; and Main Street,,
$2,250.
;a,,n,('i AUGUST :H
.The, Chamber :of Commercev
hosted ;a2ridialogue, bet" een the i
School Board, County Commissiont
and City Council, on the topic off
"Increasing School Enrollment .as a)
Means to Economic Development.")

County Atty. Buck Bird informed4
commissioners that the contract,
from TMH would soon be ready1
and the county was prepared to)
purchased the Tallahassee Memo-,
rial Hospital Building to expand
Health Department Services.
The Aucilla Area Regional Land-
fill voted to raise its tipping fees a
total of $4 o ver the'next two years.
Commissioners approved 131
acre subdivision in North of 3
County. Bellamy Pecan Groves I
Subdivision No. 1 is located off
Bassett Dairy Road, off Ashville-
Highway. Carla Wheeler is the de- ,
veloper.
The animal issue continued in the 4
forefront, with the latest proposal
calling for: an advisory board to
form.
(See Year In Review Page 9)


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005


Sports


Area Athletes Play In

TALECO Senior Bowl


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Two area athletes, Demetrius-
Hicks representing Jefferson
County High School, as both an of-
fensive and defensive lineman, and
Danny Morris representing Florida
High as a wide receiver, recently
participated in the Second Annual
Tallahassee-Leon County (TAL-
LECO) Senior Bowl.
Hicks played for the Navy team
and Morris played on the opposing
White team.
Navy edged white, 15-14, a
showdown decided in the final 15


seconds of the game.
The Navy defensive unit was
named as the defensive MVP.
The TALECO Bowl is designed
for athletes to demonstrate their
skills.
Approximately 80 senior football
players, representing ten schools
took part in the final chance 'to
showcase their talents in Tallahas-
see, for family and friends as well,
as make a favorable impression
collegiate recruiters.
Schools participating included
JCHS, Florida High, Lincoln, NFC,
Chiles, John Paul II, FAMU, Leon,
Godby and Rickards.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Hadley Revell, 11, recently-
bagged her first deer, an impressive
eight point buck.-
Her father Davis Revell, said that
he had taken Hadley hunting on
prior occasions,- but that she had
never bagged a deer before. __
"She killed it behind the house',"
said Revell. "She was pretty k'x-
cited, both before and after the
kill."


I Warriors Defeat


I Westwood 40-33


7 .' ""



DEMETRIUS HICKS, left, 'represented Jefferson County
High School, and Danny Morris, represented Florida High
in the TALECO Senior Bowl, recently.


He added that once. she had the
deer in her sights, she was so ex-
cited that she had to hold her breath
to enable her to take the opportune
shot.
"It was a clean kill, and he went
right down," said Revell.
He added that they are going to
have the rack mounted to com-
memorate her first kill.
"I told her that an eight-point
buck would be extremely hard to
top," said Revell. "I was 38 years
old before I killed one that big, and
she did it at 11."


Tiger Boys Fall 74-69

TO Suwannee County
F N :.UN ... .' .Tim.Cr mity, tenpbintvs,'sixias-
FRAN' HU NT sists and going two for four from
Staff Writer' the free-throw line; Lamarkus Ben-
nett, 13 points, three steals, four as-
Jefferson County High School- sist, and going two for five from
varsity boy's basketball team fell to the free-throw line; James Skip-
a 3-3 season after losing to Suwan- worth, ten points, eight rebounds,
nee County,-74-69 last week. and going four for five from the
free-throw line.
Coach Omari Forts said the Ti- Jitavin Bennett, 15 points, eight
gers missed 17 free-throws. "If we rebounds, and going one for two
had made those we would have from the free-throw line; and Lu-.
won," he added. cius Wade, four steals and three
Demario Rivers led the score for rebounds.
the Tigers with 19 points, five re- The Tigers will compete in the
bounds and shooting at 50 percent Thomasville High Elks Classic,
from the free-throw line, going-Dec. 26, 27 and 28. All Tiger
seven for 14. game times are at 8:30 p.m.



JCHS January Soccer

Schedule, Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer,

The January schedule for the
JCHS Soccer Team has been final-
ized.
Tiger play resumes against John
Paul II, noon Jan. 5, here; Port St.
Joe, noon Jan. 7, here; West Gads-
den, 6 p.m., Jan. 10, here;
Bozeman, 5 p.m., Jan. 12, here; and
Apalachicola, noon Jan. 14, there.
Suwannee, 6 p.m., Jan. 17, here;
Godby, 6 p.m., Jan. 19, here; and
Lafayette, 5 p.m., Jan. 20, there.


The district tournament will be
conducted in West Gadsden, 6 p.m.
Jan. 23, when team #4 takes on
team #5; 4 p.m. 'Jan. 24, team #2
-takes on team #3 and at 6 p.m.,
team #1 takes in'either team #4 or
#5; and 6 p.m. Jan 26 brings the
Championship Tournament.

JCHS soccer players include: Ed-
wardo Baron, Brian Brock, Jona-
than Flowers, Scott Golden, and
goalie Jason Kirkpatrick.
Alex Lingle, Thomas Lyle,
Jashawn Moore, Tony Roberts, Je-
_ sus Rosas and Thomas Smith.


ACA Boys Fall To

Apalachicola 86-42


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity bov's bask )a I ieam fell to
Apalachicola 86-42, in recent ac-
tion.
"They (Apalachicola) are a very
good team, and they're very
strong," said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
"It was a pretty lopsided score, but
I was pleased with our. effort."
He added that he was pleased that
ACA got 42 points on the board. ,
"They had eight three-pointers in
the third and outscored us by 15,"
said Nennstiel. "That hurt us the
worst."


~ We'll play Apalachicola again
after the New Year and I hope that
we can make a few adjustments,"
he added.
Leading the score for the Warri-
ors was Wade Scarberry with 12
points, four rebounds and one
assist.
Ben Grantham, ten points, five
assists, six rebounds, one steals, six
blocked shots; Stephen Griffin,
seven points, two rebounds and two
assists; Luke Sadler, five points,
one assist; Casey Gunnels, four
points, two assists, two steals; Stu-
art Williams, two points, three re-
bounds, three steals; Jim Stephens,
two points; and Justin Payne, one
rebound.


A
'5', -
~

' .;~iJ--


HANDLEY REVELL, age 11, recently bagged her first deer,
an eight point buck. At left, is her father Davis Revell, who
said he was 38 years old before he bagged his first big
deer.



ACA, JCHS Athletes


Big Bend Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Male and female athletes from-
ACA and JCHS were added to last
week's listing of the Big Bend
Leaders.
In boy's basketball under scoring,'
Demario Rivers (JCHS) was added
to the list, and ties for the number'
one position with 174 points, 'he'
averages 29 per game.
In rebounds, Ben Grantham
(ACA) fell from number four and'
stands at number five with 56.
Stephen Griffin (ACA) fell from
the number five position to number'
six, with 51 rebounds. I ''V''
Jitavian Bennett (JCHS) was"'
added, at number 15 with 33 re-
bounds.I
Three JCHS Tigers have been'
added in the category of assists.
Tim Crumity stands at number
two with 27; Rivers, at number
eight with 23; and Lamarkus Ben-"


nett, at number nine with 21.
In steals, Rivers (JCHS) was.
added atnumber two with 22; Cru-
mity (JCHS) at three with 20.
Casey Gunnels (ACA) fell from
number two to number five with
17.
Lamarkus Bennett (JCHS) was
added at number seven with 15.
Griffin (ACA) fell from number
three to nine, which is tied with Lu-
cius Wade (JCHS). Both have 13 "
and average 2.2 per game..
In girl's basketball for scoring,
Shaumese Massey and Keandra Se-
abrooks, both of JCHS, fell from
number nine to member 20 with
111.
In rebounds, Massey (JCHS) fell
from three to eight with 96.,
Donna Ransom (JCHS) was
added to the .list at number nine
with 86.
Nakidra Thompson (JCHS) fell
from number nine to 12 with 74.
Seabrooks stands at number 16,
up from 19, with 69.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy--
varsity boy's basketball team "de-
feated Westwood, 40-33 last week,
and climbed to 6-3 season.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said the
Warriors missed 23 lay-ups during
the game and Westwood picked off
20 of those rebounds.
"Westwood played a zone defense
so we had to work harder for the
baskets," said Nennstiel.
He added that by the end of the
third quarter, ACA was trailing 27-
22, but the Warriors were able to
nearly double the points in the
fourth period that they had gotten I
the previous three periods.
"We scored 18, points, in the
fourth," .said Nennstiel. "I'm dis-
couraged that we had a hard time_


making the baskets, but I am en-
couraged with the win," he added.
Leading the score for the Warri-
ors was Ben Grantham with 19
points, eight rebounds, two steals
and two blocked shots.
Stephen Griffin scored nine
points, two of which were three-
point shots, and had two steals,
four blocked shots, four assists and
eight rebounds.
Luke Sadler scored eight points,
one three-point bucket, and seven
rebounds; Stewart Williams, two
points, six. rebounds, four steals,
two assists.
Wade Scarberry, three steals, six
rebounds; Justin Payne, four re-
bounds; Reggie Walker, two
points, .one rebound; and moving
up from JV to help out due to the
absence of Casey Gunnels, was
Kyle Barnmwell, who played all four
quarters and had two offensive re-
-bounds.


ACA BOys Down Villagers In

1st Round Of Tournament
-The Aucilla Christian Academy shots.
varsity boy's basketball team beat Casey Gunnels, seven points, two
the Villages, 5'l-40, duritig the first- assists, one rebound, three steals;
round of the Branford Christmas Stewart Williams, three points, two ,
Tournament last week. rebounds; Luke Sadler, four assists,
Coach Dan Nehnstiel said' the four rebounds, one steal; and Reg-
Warriors took the lead from the be- gie.Walker, two rebounds.
ginning' 'of the game and never Prior to going into the second day
trailed: '.*' :- of the Tournament, Nennstiel said
Stephen Gn'tin led. the Warrior Warrors will face the Branford
charge with 19 points; four assists, Bulldogs.
nine rebounds, three steals and "The last time we played them, it
three blocked shots, was a high scoring game, and we
Wade Scarberry, 13 points, one won, 69-66," said Nennstiel. "I
assist, four steals; and Ben Gran- .hope that we can continue to play
tham, 12 points, five assists, 13 re- well and finish out the season
bounds, two steals, two blocked' strog-o-) -


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Hadley Revell, 11,

Bags Her First Deer








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 9


Year In Review


(Continued From Page 7)
Wendy Moss presented the pro-
posal to the City Council and
County Commission. Mayor Julie
Conley appointed Councilman Lu-
ther Pickles to represent the city on
what is to be a joint city/county
committee.
The city approved an 85 acre an-
nexation for an upscale subdivision
called Crooked Creek, just west of
town and south of US 90. Riley
Palmer is the developer.
Fire Rescue Chief Larry Bates re-
signed to work in Leon County,
noting it was time for new leader-
ship here.
The City proposed to raise the
millage rate from 7.5 to 8 mills,
when it was faced with a potential
$170,000 budget shortfall.
The City considered piggyback-
ing on the County Fire Impact fee
of $90, which the County did not
impose in Ci;y limits.
County Commission set a work-
shop to explore an animal control
ordinance, and examine the propos-
als submitted by Wendy Moss and
another by Responsible Pet Owners
of Jefferson County.
Thomas Drawdy, Jr. 30, died in a
one car accident when his vehicle
overturned as it rounded a curve on
SR-59.
The County cut the Budget
$321,000 and faced a remaining
$200,000 cut, as budget hearings
continued.
Animal Control problem worked
its way into the County budget dis-
cussions and officials found no
consensus.
Word came from the Department
of Transportation that the angle of
parking around the courthouse and
surrounding streets would be
changed from a 45 degree angle to
30 degrees.
When 1,435 acres came up for re-
zoning, the Planning Commission
rescheduled the applications for 73
acres off Us 10 and 1-10 from ag to
residential, and 377 acres of US 27
near Waukeenah to rezone as
residential-1.
The Commission denied the ap-
plication of St. Joe Paper Company
to rezone 985 acres near the Leon
County line on the grounds of lack
of infrastructure and the rezoning
of little benefit to Jefferson County.
Commissioners eyed citations as
a way to control bad dogs, but
stopped short of making any com-
mitment.
Congressman Allen Boyd spoke
to local Democrats and expressed
the hope that the political system
would self correct, given time.
Commissioners balanced the
County's budget and eliminated an-
other S128,000 from the deficit to
end up with a $518 surplus.
Commission Chair Skeet Joyner
offered a solution for animal con-
trol, by suggest Beth Thorne, head
of Solid Waste Management, who
can be recertified easily, pick up
the animals, but no decision was
made and all were not in agreement
with the proposal.
The revised Development Code
was finally approved by County
Commissioners. The work has been
five years in the making.
Two Comprehensive Plan
amendments which had to be
rescheduled because of a
procedural error took up much time
at a County Commission meeting.
Reportedly the Property
Appraiser, David Ward, did not
provide a correct mailing list.
County Atty. Buck Bird reported
that Ward said he could provide an
updated list if the Planning
J.:ir,r., :,:ri, asks for it.
County Commission approved an
increase in Building Inspection fees
to 35, up from the previous $18.
The City backed off a tax
increase but residents will pay
higher sewer rates. Rates increased
S3 for City residents; $4.50 for out
of city residents.
Comaissioners came up with a
program to cure the dog problem,
which i, .., ..i solely on dangerous
animals,
After a complaint is filed, a
S,,.;P' 's Deputy will determine if
the animal is 'l:,nri.-roiui-, and if so
have the animal picked up and/or


city the owner,
P,;h h.,,,,m; of the Solid Waste
.f.i'i'".:i:ni Department, has been
.l1ii., and will pick up the
animal and transport it to the
appropriate shelter,
'The Ci;', Internet system ran
into a - .k: when it was learned that
of 0. 120 people who want to use
(he i-rn only 30 can access it
wif.hout p,,uifing up an antenna 30
feet high,


The Legislative Committee on In-
tergovernmental Relations esti-
mated that it would cost the county
$558,559 in constitutional salaries,
$23,015 more than last year.
Barring hurricane related compli-
cations, repairs on Lake Micco-
sukee Dam were expected to be
completed within two weeks.
The consultant firm hired to han-
dle the $700,000 house rehabilita-
tion project reported smooth and
rapid progress in the effort.

SEPTEMBER
The library reopened at its new-
location on Water Street, after a
long hiatus because of the move,
and an earlier closing than planned
when the air conditioned system
failed.
The new facility offers more
space and services, and 3,000 more
sq. feet.
Members of the County Commis-
sion and the School Board were on-
hand for the ribbon cutting, mark-
ing the cooperation of the two
boards, as the School Board leased
the former JCHS Media Center to
the County for the library.
The effects of Hurricane Katrina
were felt locally as gas prices
jumped daily, and state officials
warned of coming fuel shortages.
Eight people applied for the job
of Fire Rescue Chief, with commis-
sioners expecting to take about two
weeks to interview candidates and
make their choice.
The fluctuation is gas prices lo-
cally, as much as 29 cents per gal-
lon within a few blocks, was
explained by a local operator who
spoke on the condition of anonym-
ity.
Superintendent Phil Barker ex-
plained his decision to enroll his
son in a private school, after re-
ceiving criticism for allegedly
sending the wrong message about
the public school system.
Barker defended his action
saying: "I'll be a superintendent
once, but a father forever."
The 17th annual Trade Fair was
set for Sept. 22, at the Opera
House.
The County Commission ap-
proved the Animal Control Pro-
gram which revolved around Solid
Waste Director Beth Thorne be-
coming certified to oversee the pro-
gram.
County residents joined hands to
assist Hurricane Victims with or-
ganizations and churches partici-
pating in the effort to feed and
clothe the evacuees
Numerous entities, such as Law
Enforcement and Fire Rescue, sent
supplies to stricken areas, though
most could not spare man power to
send.
A series of community events
were held to observe Sept. 11 Pa-
triot's Day.
Among them Congressman Allen
Boyd presented County Commis-
sioners with a flag' which flew over
the capitol building in Washington,
to fly over the courthouse here.
Local animal groups joined
forces to assist the four legged vic-
tims of Hurricane Katrina.
St. Joe Timberland Company
withdrew its request, Aug 30, call-
ing for the rezoning of 985 acres
off US 27, near the Leon County
line.
The request had been denied ear-
lier by the Planning Commission.'
Lloyd Lions Club members con-
tinued to collect food and cash do-
nations for local hurricane evacu-
ees.
Planners approved the rezoning
request 5-3 of 73 acres of US 19
and south of I-10 from agricultural
to residential.
Rezoning of 377 acres off US 27
acres near Waukeenah was post-
poned.
Officials set legislative priorities
for next year, with the Emergency
Management Center taking top pri-
ority.
Outgoing Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Bates urged commissioners
to explore lowering the cost of fire
insurance here, by investigating the
possibility of lowering the Insur-
ance Service Office (ISO) rating.
City Council approved the rezon-


ing of 111 acres in a series of ordi-
nances and increased the sewer
rates.
The State awarded Howard Mid-
dle School $25,890 for increasing
their grade of the state report card
one letter to a "C."
The County continued to main-
tain its Emergency Disaster Plan in
the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and
consistently updates the document.
Jefferson Education Foundation


MEMBERS of the Lions Club collected Campbell, Kevin Campbell, Arun Kundra
money and food items for victims of the and Jerry Andrews. (News Photo)
Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund. L-R: June


presented the School Board with a
$10,000 check from Progress En-
ergy for a project designed to K-8th
grade teachers improve math teach-
ing skills.
Consultant Environmental Engi-
neer Frank Darabi warned commis-
sioners that the county's bridges
were in dire need of repairs. The
fix must be permanent and it won't
be cheap, Darabi stated.
Councilman Tom Vogelgesang
wanted the City to address his com-
plaints about overgrown lots, aban-
doned houses, and other "quality of
life" issues in the City.
City Superintendent Don Ander-
son maintained he would need sub-
stantial additional manpower to do
so.
Jeffrey Cappe, 47, was hired at
Fire Rescue Chief, and replaced
Larry Bates, Sr., who resigned.
The old county library building
was sold for $105,750 to Angela
Dombro, of Lamont.
The County Commission adopted
a Comprehensive Plan amendment
that allows special exceptions in
agricultural areas, such as inns, Bed
and Breakfasts, hunting lodges,:
clubs and other outdoor recrea-
tional uses.
The amendment resulted for a
lawsuit filed by opponents of the
Go-Kart Racetrack, whose suit re-
mained in limbo.
Critics charged the change vio-
lated the plan's intent.
Commissioners approved a reso-
lution which allows emergency re-
sponse teams from Georgia and
Alabama to come here in the event
of a natural or man made disaster.
Commissioners studied the possi-
bility of additional impact fees for
transportation and law enforcement
services, among other things.
A joint meeting of the Planning
and County Commissions dis-
cussed the problems concerning
notifying property owners near pro-
posed developments, and was
termed a brainstorming session,
which offered no solutions per se.
City and County officials and.
other interested parties continued to
explore the possibility of establish-
ing a central sewer system and
treatment plant, preferably in the
Lloyd area.
Officials agreed in principle to
seek funding to determine the feasi-
bility of such a project. The study
was expected to cost -about
$65,000.
Road Department Superintendent
David Harvey told the County
Commission that the county could
get as much as $155,000 from the
federal government for the repair of
roads damaged by Hurricane Den-
nis in July.
Commissioner Gene Hall sug-
gested the County Commission
change its meetings to evenings to
accommodate citizen participation.
No action was taken as the Com-
mission meets in the evening once
per month and once per month in


the morning for reports from de-
partment heads.,
Internet Service Action was
pending and in the hands of attor-
neys, as only a small percentage of
users could receive the signal.
Word was after the much vaunted
service was supposed to be online,
its viability has been questioned.
The largest gathering in recent
memory, some 165 people, turned
out for the annual Farm Bureau
dinner. An auction at the event
raised $1,200 for storm victims.
The County adopted its final
budget of $22,129,472, and in-
crease of $4.3 million over last
year's budget of $16,590,025.
The Lloyd Community Preserva-
tion Trust reported that Phase 2 of
the ongoing restoration of the
Lafitte Store was nearing comple-
tion.
OCTOBER
The Hometown Getdown drew-
some 500 citizens and organizers
were busy planning the next event
in November. The goal is to hold
such an et ent once per month.
The Ernest Fulford Family was
chosen as the 2005 Family of the
Year, and represented at the 51st
Outstanding Farm Family Weekend
at the North Florida Fair.
Two county juveniles and a Tal-
lahassee man were charged with
armed robbery of the CVS Phar-
macy.
Spencer Conner, 18 of Tallahas-
see, and Raphael Smith and Roder-
ick Prather, both 16, of Monticello,
were apprehended by City Police.
Senator Bill Nelson visited here
and spoke about energy, the Iraqui
War, and large deficit, challenging
voters to say enough is enough.
A large two story, mult-use build-
ing was planned for the downtown
block, just south of the courthouse
parking lot.
Carswell, Greenfield, and
Kunstler Business Management is
the developer and Riley Palmer, the
contractor.
Representatives of the Senior
Center pressed Senator Bill Nelson
during his visit here, for $650,000
in federal assistance, to expand and
renovate the existing facility, which
the operation had outgrown.
The City rezoned 26 acres on
Goldberg and Rocky Branch
Roads, and made annexation man-
datory, under certain
circumstances, and also increased
the monthly sewer rate.
An accord between the City and
County paved the way for the
sewer system study to proceed,
with the intent to secure funding
form two state agencies.
During its first 104 days of serv-
ice, Monticello In-Town Transit
Shuttle logged 12,135 miles and
collected $183.50 in fares.
Brisk business at JCKC Card
Games helped make up for declin-
ing revenues at the dog track.
County officials began exploring
the privatization of the ambulance


service, as a result of the resigna-
tion of two Fire Rescue directors.
Four paramedics had their certifi-
cates revoked by the State Depart-
ment of Health.
The four include: William Larry
Bates, who resigned as Fire Rescue
Chief; Stephen B. Thomas, who
also resigned, here; Stephen Box,
of Tallahassee Fire Rescue; and
Matthew Williams, of Jacksonville
Fire Rescue.
Graybar Electric Company, con-
tractor which sold the City the
equipment for a new Internet Serv-
ice, agreed to conduct a survey to
better identify the problem.
The City had to hire a consultant
to interpret the results of the
survey.
The Planning Commission rec-,
ommended by a 6-3 vote, the ap-
proval of a combined 377 acre, two
parcel property off US 27, from
mixed use, suburban residential and
agriculture 3, respectively, to resi-
dential.
New officers and directors were
installed at the Annual Chamber of
Commerce Dinner; at the Opera
House ;
Outgoing president David Frisby
passed the gavel to incoming Presi-
dent Margaret Levings.
County officials feared a looming
budget crises and prepared the pub-
lic for a possible repeat of 2002,
when the county was forced to lay
off 22 employees.
The City hired an expert to check
testing of the Internet effort here,
and officials' enthusiasm for the
system was rapidly waning when it
was discovered the foliage of the
numerous trees interfered with the
Internet signal.
The Coal-fired power plant drew
opposition here in a study offered
by the Health Department.


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John Hedrick, chair of the Pan-
handle Citizens Coalition, asked
commissioners to take a stand
against the proposal, in the form of
a resolution, already approved by
Madison and Wakulla Counties.
County Attorney Buck Bird ad-
vised County Commissioners to re-
frain from commenting on any of
the quasi-judicial proceedings
scheduled to come before them.
A missing child triggered a
search here for the three year old
boy, involving several law enforce-
ment agencies, and raised the pos-
sibility of putting the mother's
custody of the child in jeopardy,
when he was found across town,
unharmed.
County Commissioners voted
4-1, with Commissioner Danny
Monore casting the lone nay vote,
to approve a 73 acre rezoning ap-
plication.
Property rights trumped all other
considerations for the approving
Commissioners.
Roy Schleicher, of Tallahassee,
was hired as the County Grants Di-
rector, after his resume showed a
wealth of experience.
The City was expected to have an
updated map soon to reflect a more
realistic representation of its
boundaries. Property Appraiser
David Ward expected to complete
the map soon .
Commissioners side stepped a
request that they take a stand
against the proposed coal-fired
power plant in Taylor County,
claiming they lacked sufficient in-
formation to make an informed de-
cision.
City Council planned to vote on a
resolution to name bicycle trail un-
der construction, after former
Mayor Ike Anderson.
City Clerk Emily Anderson sug-
gested the name, because Ike was
frequently seen bicycling around
town.
NOVEMBER
Jefferson Communities Water
System Inc. sought $5.1M for the
phase two e\pjnsion, which would
fill in some of the service gaps left'
by the original water system.
The WILD Bookmobile no
longer offered service to the
county, when the-County Commis-- -
sioners did not fund the ?$25,000!;
WILD requested to operate the,,
service here.
Home Town Get Down Hallow-
een weekend drew more than 500
attendees, and the second weekend
of Haunted Ghost Tours which
raised $3,673.95 for the Main
Street Program.
After months of negotiation, City
Council gave Graybar Electric
Company an ultimatum: either fix
the Internet System by Nov. 15, or
remove it from City property.
City Council approved the an-
nexation of 85 acres west of town,
of Riley Palmer property, formerly
known as the Tim Braswell prop-
(See Year In Review Page 11)


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Year In Review


(Continued From Page 9)
erty. Palmer would.pay the cost of
the extension of water and sewer
services, to be reimbursed by the
City.
Healthy Start sponsored a pro-
gram to detail health problems in
the county and to help form focus
groups to address the problems.
Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
alerted readers of a jury duty scam
which could lead to identity theft.
He reported that the clerk never re-


quests personal information over
the telephone.
Code enforcement was the next
big issue Commissioners were
slated to take up. Clarification was
sought about the part of the ordi-
nance which reads "action may be
initiated by the appropriate county
officer any time this individual
deems a violation exists."
City Council questioned why pro-
posed developments approved
more than a year ago, appeared to
be going nowhere. Developer


Riley Palmer suggested delays
were caused by permitting compli-
cations.
The City Council adopted a new
map to more accurately and realis-
tically represent boundary lines.
Nearly two years after the city of-
ficials approved nearly $12,000 for
the update of the city's code book,
the product was expected to be:
completed shortly.
The mother of a three year old
child, whose alleged disappearance
in October almost triggered an Am-
ber Alert, was charged with child
neglect.
City Police filed the charge


'against 23 year old Amber Brun-
gardt, when the child reported
missing, was found unharmed in
another part of town when the three
year old showed up at a resident's
door.
Keystone Genealogy Society re-
ceived permission from the County
Commission, to relocate in the pub-
lic library on Water Street, at no
charge to the county.
The society's former location on
East Washington Street no longer
provided adequate protection for
priceless archives.
County Commissioners prepared
to hire a new director for Fire Res-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 11
cue, as they wrap up. their inter- the project.
views. Two groups seeking funding for
S Following the resignation of separate water and sewer systems,
Chief Larry Bates, Jeff Capps was made steady progress.
hired, only to resign shortly to ac- Jefferson Communities Water
cept a better job in Leon County. System Inc. sought $5.1 million for
County officials prepared to ad- the extension of its water system,
dress the matter of health insurance via a loan from Rural
which comes up for renewal Jan. 1. Development, an arm of USDA;
Last year only one bid was re- and the Jefferson County Utility
ceived from a provider. Development Committee sought a
Residents living on dirt roads similar amount for the creation of a
damaged by Hurricane Dennis in central sewer system.
July were expected to see their im- An electrical contractor's ex-
provement, as Commissioners ap- pressed interest in possibly pur-
proved the work, after FEMA chasing property at the Industrial
awarded the county $110,000 for (See Year In Review Page 12)


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PAGE 12. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005

row.,


"UNCLE" JAMES GADSDEN, left, turns a
shovelful of dirt for the groundbreaking of
the Gadsden Square Project at West Walnut


Street. At right is his nephew, Jack
Carswell. (News Photo)


A


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loft'

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- -- --- - -





AD~


A COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER
'was served at the Opera House. From left,
Jan Rickey, Gloria McGee, organizer of the


)


$ ',
- "'...'.


event, LaShonda Andrews,
worth. (News Photo)


Year In Review


(Continued From Page 11)
Park prompted commissioners to
take stock of the county owned
land there, and to ask Property Ap-
.praiser David Ward to do an as-
sessment of the property.
The appraisal put land value at
,the Industrial Park at $15,000 an
acre.
Work was expected to begin on
some of the housing units sched-
uled for rehabilitation or demoli-
tion under a $700,000 Community
Development Block Grant, the
County was awarded late last year.
One day before the deadline,
Graybar Electric Company had yet
to respond formally to the City's ul-
timatum to either get the. Internet
system up and running or remove
.it.
County Commissioners wrestled
with a hike in the cea, of health
.care and weighed the costs, and
benefits of various options.
Officials cited a major reason for
the rate hike was several costly
claims in the last year.
Bridges became the priority of


the County Road Department, con-
cerned about the liability issue.
Of special concern was the Au-''
cilla River Bridge CR-257 which
had weakened pilings because of
frequent river overflows and water
pressure. Some six to nine feet of
base around the pilings had been
eroded, creating a void which al-
lowed the pilings to shift.
The Recreation Park received
$450,000 worth of improvements
and the baseball field on the new
15 acres east of the park was ex-
pected to be ready for use by the
Babe Ruth League in the spring.
Business dropped some 10 to 15
percent at JCKC, owner Steve An-
dris said. His comments came oh-"
tLc hcis of the State repealing all
the rules involving poker tourna-
ments, after two courts held that
under current Florida law, the State
could not put a $45 limit on entry
fees.
The matter was under appeal.
Lt. Mark Matthews, a longtime
Fire Rescue employee, was named
by the County Commission as the
new Fire Rescue Chief.


Maggie Killings-


County Commissioners selected
the health insurance plan that of-
fered the best possible benefits to
employees at the least possible cost
to the county, Vista Health Plan C.
Farm Cit\ \\eek %as obei,%'ed
with its annual hie.k,.faji held .it the
Courtyard Restaurant drawing
some 20 to 30 attendees.
The County Commission ap-
proved a resolution giving the Jef-
ferson Communities Water System,
Inc. easement for extension of water
lines.

Plaintiffs in the lawsuit against
the go-cart racetrack under con-
struction on the east side of the
county, filed new paperwork in the
case, requesting Commissioners
and the Tallahassee Karting Or-.
ganization LLC, to produce a vari-
ety of documents.
The facility is 80 percent com-,
plete.
Fred Shoftner was elected School
Board Chair, with Franklin High-
tower as vice-chair.
The County applied for a $15,000
state grant to update the capital im-
provement element of the Compre-
hensive Plan.
Commissioners postponed a
Code Enforcement Workshop until


the new year. A separate seven
member board was under consid-
eration.
DECEMBER
Jefferson Legislative Committee-
requested Road Department Super-
intendent David Harvey to produce
a list of the county's roads and
bridges, detailing the condition of
each.
The committee hopes to convince
lawmakers of the dire need of fund-
ing to replace bridges.
The County continued to examine
its options for the repair of 14
roads damaged by Hurricane Den-
nis in July.
FEMA awarded $111,000 for the
repair, $58,000 short of the
$168,380 quoted by Curtis Con-
struction Company, the low bidder.
With the tempo of developments
increasing across the county, and
monies from the fire and ambu-
lance impact fees trickling in,
county officials considered impos-
ing other impact fees, such as a
transportation impact fee to offset
wear and tear and traffic
congestion.
The Sheriffs Department re-
ceived a $139,000 grant to upgrade
its Enhanced 911 (E-911) system,
which would help pinpoint the lo-
cation of cell phone callers.
Low and moderate income first
time home buyers in the county had
an opportunity to participate in a
program that offers down payment
assistance and low interest rates.
The program is a partnership
with the County Commission and
the Escambia County Housing Fi-
nance Authority.
Commissioners managed to ruffle
the feathers of the Road Depart-
ment Head David Harvey and the
Health Department Coordiantor
Kim Barnhill.
Harvey's gripe was over the con-
fusion of how the Road Department
was to provide in kind work, and
Barnhill's gripe was over funding
cuts for the Health Department.
New Fire Chief Mark Matthews
proposed to the County Commis-
sion to return the department to a
24/48 hour schedule, 24 hours on;
48 hours off, versus the existing
schedule of 24 hours on and 72
hours off.
.. C inissonel approved the
plm'n 'Ml a he',. .'.*.ill implement' n
l.i I.u pio'.d ed .ii ttlie'' cJ
satisfy the payroll office that this
can be done within the existing
budget.
The City learned that the Suwan-
nee River Water Management Dis-
trict (SRWMD) was willing to
commit $1.9 million in funding for
a water reuse project here.
SRWMD would fund 75 percent
of the project with the City picking
up the other 25 percent, hopefully
from a Community Development
Block Grant from the Department
of Community Affairs.
City Council approved Compre-
hensive Plan Amendments ilal 0i.-
gether affected a combined 100.08
acres in and around the city.
Comcast Cable's proposal to raise
rates infuriated City officials, after
Comcast just reduced Tallahassee
rates.
A representative of Comcast was
to appear before the Council to ex-
plain the increase.
(See Year In Review Page 14)


LEGALS
NOTICE OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on a surplus relocatable in the
office of the school superintendent,
Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building, 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344 until 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 25, 2006 at 2:00 p.m.
The bids will be opened publicly at that
time. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope "Surplus
Relocatable Sale." Bids will be presented
to the School Board at the regular board
meeting on February 13, 2006 at 6:00
p.m. The bid will be awarded to the
highest bidder at that time. The Board
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Please call Donald Johnson, Maintenance
Director at 850.342.0142 to set up an
appointment to inspect the relocatable.
Relocatable must be removed from the.
school board premises within thirty (30)
days after bids are awarded. Room:
99-004, Sq. Ft. 864, Description: 24 x 36,
Yr. Constructed: 1971, Bldg. 00017.
NOTE: The Relocatable will be sold "AS
IS". The relocatable includes a "wall
hung" A.C. Heat Pump System. NOTE:
Minimum Bid for the 24 x 36 relocatables
is $3,000.00.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE 'OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on surplus vehicles in the office
of the school superintendent, Desmond M.
Bishop administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
until 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 25,
2006. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope, "Surplus
Vehicle Bid." Bids will be tabulated at
3:00 p.m. and presented to the School
Board at the regular board meeting
Monday, February 13, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.
Please call Willie Carr, Transportation
Supervisor at 850-342-0136 to set up an
appointment to inspect the vehicles. The
Board reserves the right to reject any or
all bids. Vehicles must be removed from
the school board premises within ten (10)
days after bids are awarded 1993 INH/TH
IHVBBPLN3PH524316 DT-360 AT-545
65 Pass. As is Bus #93-36; 1982
GMC/CARGO Van 2GTDG25H8C453263
As Is Vehicle #01. Obsolete bus a $2,000
minimum.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given
that the School Board of Jefferson County.
Florida, located 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida 32344 will
receive bids on or before 2:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, January 31, 2006 for the sale of
the following described property owned by
the School Board of Jefferson County,
Florida: OLD ADULT EDUCATION
SCHOOL 700 EAST DOGWOOD
STREET LOCATED ON THE CORNER
OF DOGWOOD AND EAST
WASHINGTON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA. PROPERTY
APPRAISER PARCEL ID NUMBER
(1l0-00-10-03'0-0000-0101 This property is
being sold "'as is" and no representations
are made or implied as to zoning, access.
or its suitability for any intended or
specific purpose. The parcel is situated in
the City of Monticello in Jefferson County,
Florida. MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE BID
- $325,000.00 Bids will be publicly opened
at 2:00 p.m. In the board room of the
district office located at 1490 West
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida.
No bid will be opened if received after 2:00
p.m. Please mark on the envelope,
"Surplus Property Sale Bid Opening 2:00
p.m. January 31, 2006." Aniyone desiring
information on the procedure for
submitting bids should contact Hal Wilson
at (850) 342-0100. It is anticipated that the
highest bid will be presented to the School
Board for approval on Monday, February
13, 2006. The School Board of Jefferson
County reserves t;!c right to reject any or
all bids. By Fred Shofner, Chairman
Jefferson Coumny School Board, Phil
Barker, Superintendent Jefferson County
School Board.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
Jefferson County is seeking to fill a
new county planner position. County
application forms may be obtained at
www.co.jefferson.fl.us click on jobs
with Jefferson County of at the
county Planning and Building Inspec-


LEGALS

tion Department, 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, Florida 32345.
Base salary is $29,900 $30,000. Ap-
plications accepted until position is
filled. The county is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer and drug testing is a
required part of the pre-employment
physical.
12/28, 1/4,c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND.-
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FORT
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 05-167-CA MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION.,
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR
AEGIS LENDING CORPORATION
PLAINTIFF VS. JACKY JEROME.'
GAFFNEY, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD,,'
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES'
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES,
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
JACKY JEROME GAFFNEY; NANCY;
GAFFNEY, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD,
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,'
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES-
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,"
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST'
NANCY GAFFNEY; JOHN DOE AND'
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS
IN POSSESSION DEFENDANTSS),
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
a Summary Final Judgment of--
Foreclosure dated 12/14, 2005 entered in *
Civil Case No. 054-167-CA of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and'
for JEFFERSON County,-
MONTICELLO, Florida, I will sell to the'"
highest and best bidder for cash at THE"
NORTH DOOR at the JEFFERSON"
County Courthouse located at ** in:"
MONTICELLO, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on '
the 12th day of January, 2005 the'
following described property as set forth"
in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:-
THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS-'
EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN THE-
COUNTY OF JEFFERSON AND THE'
STATE OF FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK'
213 AT PAGE 18 AND DESCRIBED AS'
FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE"
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE-
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THEC
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION'
15, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 3 0
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY, '
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 00 :
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 05 SECONDS'
WEST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF"
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE '
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID"
SECTION 15,349.0 FOR THE POINT OF`
BEGINNING, THENCE FROM SAID-R
POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH-
89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00-'
SECONDS EAST 203.44 FEET TO A'-
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 205.63 FEET
TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 201.94 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE WEST LINE OF SAID:
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER, THENCE"-
NORTH 00 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 05
SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID WEST "
LINE, 205.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.96
ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Dated this
14th day of December, 2005. Carl D
Boatwright, Clerk of the Circuit Court By:
Jeri B. Pearson, Deputy Clerk. IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES :
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse at
904-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
12/21, 12/28, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.Z.
Harper the holder of the following
certificates has filed said certificates for a
tax deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names
in which it was assessed are as follow:
certificate No. 214. Year of Issuance 1998
Description or Property Exhibit A begin at.
the Northwest corner of the Southeast


BUSINESS Call9






__DIRECTORY _
-r ff


BURNETTE PLUMBING &

WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs -- Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced -
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


Simply the Best!


Call Andy Rudd For


Appliance Service


Needs @


997-5648


MONTICELLO 'S ONLY LOCAL /HEATING & COOLING COMPWiNY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.

Pickup & Delivery Service Available

562-2962


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"





Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


i i


Register's


Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


JAMI'E 'S BODy


'WoR~Xs


PERSONAL TRAINING

SENIOR FITNESS

PILATES


FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 99 7-4253


U I


o,










To Place Your Ad





997-3568


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 13

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
C L^ A SI ^'^^*3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00

C L A S S IF IE Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday) Noon for Friday
Your Community Shopping Center Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of
Section 36, Township 1 North, Range 3
East, Jefferson County, Florida and run S.
89 degrees 42 minutes 30 seconds E.
975.14 feet to a point, thence South 466.48
feet to a point in the center of a County
graded road, thence N. 71 degrees 08
minutes W. 1032.0 feet along the center of
said road to a point, thence W. 0 degrees
37 minutes E. 134.74 feet to the point of
beginning. Containing 6.73 acres, more or
less, and being a part of the Southeast
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of
Section 36, Township I North, Range 3
East, Jefferson County, Florida. Name in
which assessed John Lawrence, Jr. and
Annie Lawrence, his wife. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
'Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
:12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX
DEED: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that R.Z. Harper the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
-The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 125 Year of
Issuance 1998. Description or Property
The South two (2) acres of the N r/ of NE
'A of SE '/ of Section 4, Township 1 North,
Range 3 East. The intent and purpose of
this deed is to convey two (2) acres of land,
more or less. This being a portion of that
property deeded to Annie Williams Jones
and Alex Jones, her husband, by Satarah
Williams, a widow, by deed dated March
18, 1969, and of record in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida in the Official Record
Book 39, page 577. Name in which
assessed Moses Douglas Jones. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificates or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida. ,
12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28,c c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
Transit Rentals of TLH the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 234 Year of
Issuance 1999. Commence at the
Southwest corner of the Northwest
Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of
Section 15, Township 1 South, Range 3
East, Jefferson County, Florida, and run
North 00 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds
West, along the West line of the Northwest
Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of said
Section 15, 584.61 feet to the Southwest
corner of that certain parcel of land as
described in the Public Records of
Jefferson County, Florida in Official
Record Book 79, page 301, thence North
89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East,
along the South boundary of said Official
Record Book 79, page 301, 250.16 feet to
the Southwest corner of that certain parcel
of land as described in Official Record
Book 111, page 771 for a POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence from said Point Of
Beginning continue North 89 degrees 15
minutes 00 seconds East, along the South
boundary of said Official Record Book
111, page 771, 202.26 feet to a point,
thence South 10 degrees 01 minutes 14
seconds West 416.60 feet to a point, thence
South 83 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds
West 276.79 feet to a point, thence North
205.63 feet to a point, thence South 89
degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds West
203.44 feet to a point on the West line of
said Northwest Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter, thence North 00 degrees 25
minutes 05 seconds West, along said West
line, 30.0 feet to a point, thence North 89
degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East 203.66
feet to a point, thence North 205.63 feet to
the Point Of Beginning. Containing 2.49
acres, more or less. Name in which
assessed Jacky Jerome Gaffney. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January, 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
12/7, 12/14,12/21, 12/28, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
Transit Rentals of TLH the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 243 Year of
Issuance 1999. Commence at the Southeast
corner of the Northeast quarter of section
34; Township 1 South, Range 3 East,
Jefferson County, Florida and run West


1325.42 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence continue West 340.0
feet to a point, thence N. 0 degrees 16
minutes W. 1576.4 feet to a point on the
South right-of-way line of S.R. S-259,
thence N. 89 degrees 44 minutes E. 340.0
feet aling said right-of-way line to a point,
thence S. 0 degrees 16 minutes E. 1577.98
Y


LEGALS
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
'Containing 12.31 acres, more or less, and
being a part of the North half of section
31, Township I South, Range 3 East,
Jefferson County, Florida. Name in which
assessed Southeastern Investment
Development Corp. All of said property
being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law and property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January, 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28, c

HELP WANTED
Technical Support Assistant wanted
at NFCC. This full-time position will
serve as technical Assistant for
Campus Theater and public events,
working lighting and/or sound
equipment. This position requires
heavy lifting, climbing, and a flexible
work schedule which may include
nights and weekends. Qualifications:
AA/As preferred. At least one year
experience with audiovisual
equipment and computers required.
Applicants to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application
packets considered. A complete
packet includes: letter of interest;
resume and application. Application
and full job description available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application, packet
must be received by 12/30/2005. EOE
12/14,16, 21,28, c
Kalan Kenne!s Holiday help needed:
Entry Level Kennel tech. Must love
animals, be over 18, and willing' to
work hard. 850-877-5050
11/30, tfn, c

SERVICES
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
Backhoe Service: dri esa's. roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the.appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight'loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational, names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466

FREE
FREE...FREE PINE STRAW! You
rake Some piles You take. Call for
appointment to obtain directions for
time to Rake & Take...997-4350.
12/28, c
FREE...FREE FIREWOOD! You
cut... You haul all. Call for
appointment to obtain directions and
for time to come Cut & Haul
Off...997-4350.

FOR SALE
Margaret and Louie Mills have
shelled pecans for sale. 1276 Clark
Rd. 997-2106.
12/9 -30, c
Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limousin bull, 14 months
old. Call 997-0901, leave
message.
12/9 30,pd


REAL ESTATE
New Home-1288 Sq. Ft. Living Area,
3 bedroom, 2 bathattached garage)in
town. Call 850-509-0849.
11/30, 12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30,
pd


FOR RENT
2 BR, 1 single wide mobile home
on 5 acres, private. $400 mo. Call
after 4 p.m. 997-2429.
12/21, 28, pd
lBd, lBth $500.00/month. 997-6653.
12/21, 28, 01/04, 6, pd
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.

Nursery In
Jefferson County
Seeking Mature Responsible
Man with experience managing
crews. Must speak Spanish &
English. Excellent Salary, Paid
Vacation, Bonus Benefits
available if qualified.
Call 850-997-8188


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


AUTOMOTIVE,
93 Ford F-250 New tires, Brakes
Tone-up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6 cylinder
*NADA Book is 2,400 selling price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible Red,
New Top, New Tires, 6cyl $4,200
997-6066, 6806, Wilson Auto LLC

1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles $3500
cash. Clean New Tires call 997-2646

Registered Nurse:

Ophthalmology Practice seeks
RN for Ambulatory Surgery
Center, PT Position; Flexible
Hours 15 20 hrs. 2-3 days/
week; Surgery Experience
Preferred: Competitive Wages

NATURE COAST
REGIONAL SURGERY
CENTER
PERRY, FL
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
CALL: 850-584-2778
FAX: 850-838-3937



Un-edStt.


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 ~-3/2 $715 -~4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities,

I 575-6571






RETAIL ASSISTANT MANAGER MONTICELLO, FL
FRED"S, a retail discount chain with locations throughout the mid-South,
continues to expand, offering excellent opportunities for career oriented
individuals who are interested in Retail Management.
Offering:
*Annual salary starting at $23,660
*Competitive Benefits
*401(k) Retirement Plan
*MEDICAL AND DENTAL INSURANCE
*individual training
The successful candidate will have: 2 YEARS RETAIL EXPERIENCE
interested candidates should send their resumes or letter of qualification
to: FAX #901-202-7539
E-MAIL GPRICER@FREDSINC.COM


R4


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
997-5516


Thank You For All of Your Sipport and Business
In 2005, We Look Forward to an Even Better
2006!
www.cbkk.com


* Just Reduced 3BR/2BA mobile home on 5 private acres. New
paint, fireplace and more! S 89,000
* Just Listed 3BR/2BA updated Fleetwood with new additions. Car-
port and storage buildings on 3 acres! $S 115,000
a New Construction 3BR/2BA on comer lot. Marble and tile floor-
ing, buyer can choose carpet for living room! $ 165,000
* Hickory Hollow 4BR/2.5BA on 7 gorgeous acres. Creek runs
through property. Additional 5 acres available. $ 260,000

-'appy New Year
A _o_00


k Simply the Best!


A


k


k


k




k iL* ^T f~ e

kL..i E


k


k


.iS


SA New Year


A Is On The Way!

k A new beginning is on the wing,
And we'd like to thank you for everything.


k

Ak


Plus, send our best wishes to those we hold dear,
For a happy, healthy and prosperous year.

We're grateful for your continued patronage
and look forward to seeing you
in the year ahead.


A A A AA

t *


k


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^








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 28, 2005

Year In Review


(Continued From Page 12)
The Sheriffs Department was
seeking the whereabouts of Jessica
Rae Warren, 15, who disappeared
from her home with no apparent
explanation.
The City gave Graybar, Internet
vendor, two weeks to make the sys-
tem work, when it was learned that
the company might find a way
around the tree and reception prob-
lem.
The effort to establish a YMCA
center here was included in the
agenda of the Jefferson Legislative
Committee, in its lobby for funds.
Planners discussed the proposed
sanitary sewer system, which en-
compassed the entire county, save
for wetlands. Indirectly, this would
pave the way for development, a
hot issue here.
The Planning Commission ap-
proved the expansion of the PS Art
picture frame .manufacturing plant
in the Industrial Park.
The planned expansion comprised
7,500 sq. feet.
The PS Art company fulfilled the
goal of job creation as it grew into
a multi-million dollar operation.


DEE COUNTS displays a copy
County, titled "Familiar Faces
Photo)


The company employs 32 em-
ployees and ships its products to 50
Despite strong opposition from
area residents, the County Commis-
sion approved a Comprehensive
Plan amendment rezoning 377
acres near the Waukeenah commu-
nity.
The proposal must now be re-
viewed by the DCA (Department of
Community) affairs for state ap-
proval.
Commissioner Skeet Joyner pro-
posed a compromise to make the
rezoning issue more palatable, as-
suming it is approved by the DCA.
Joyner's plan would put 204
houses on the high ground over-
looking the lake, and dedicate the
remaining 177 acres to conservation
easement in perpetuity.

The County Commission adopted
the revised Dangerous Animal
Control Ordinance, and recognized
three newly certified animal control
officers who will be enforcing the
ordinance.
The three include: Solid Waste
Department Director Beth Thorne,
and employees Lamar Poppell and
_Vince Little.


of her history of Jefferson
and Quiet places." (News


JEREMIAH CAMEL was a popular attraction Stadin, George Cole and Dean Jerger. (News
at Bethlehem in Monticello. He is shown Photo)
here with the three wisemen. L-R: Roger


Monticello Native Loomis Dean

was Award Winning Photographer


CHRISTOPHER DEAN
Son Of Deceased

Monticello Native Loomis Dean,-
was one of the legendary photogra-
phers whose work made "Life"
Magazine the leading photography
showcase for more than four dec-
ades.
He died Dec. 7, 2005, in Sonoma,
CA., at the age of 88.
Born in Monticello, his father,
William, was 'an artist, and his
mother Maud was a one-room
school teacher.
Dean moved with his family to
Sarasota,. home of the Ringling
Brothers Circus, when he was 16.
He was, as he said, "transfixed," and
actually did run away with the cir-
cus.
Years later, the first of his 52 cov-
ers for "Life" would be a photo of a
Ringling Circus giraffe and famous
clown, Lou Jacobs. .
Dean. chose his life's work
abruptly, when he watched a friend
in a darkroom developing film.
"Seeing that image appearing
mysteriously on the wet paper hyp-
notized me...I was hooked," he said.
He hitchhiked to the top-notch
Eastman School of Photography in
Rochester, NY, where he received a
scholarship and washed dishes to
pay his way.
His professional career began as a
"Junior Press Agent"' with the Rin-
gling Brothers Circus, where he cul-
tivated a side job photographing the
vast array of circus performers and
workers.
For four seasons of mainly one
night stands, he covered the country
with the circus train, developing his
film at night in his hotel room, and
rinsing the prints in the tub.
In World War II, he became an
Air Force photographer, and cov-
ered the war in the Pacific from the
air and on the ground.
In 1947, he joined the staff of
"Life," considered the dream job of
the day. For Loomis Dean, it led to a
lifetime of cosmic encounters.


They began in Hollywood, where
he not only photographed film stars,
but fanned out over the country to
photograph stars in general from El-
vis Presley and Liberace, to Noel
Coward, J. Paul Getty and more
In 1956, enroute with his wife and
children to his new post in "Life's"
Paris bureau, aboard the Ile de
France, they came upon the sinking
Andrea Doria, and returned to New
York with the survivors and Dean's
pictures.
Returning to Paris by air, he was
in time for communist riots, and war
in Suez, followed by a succession of
major world events, from wars to
royal weddings, from popes to fash-
ion designers, lemur animals in
Madagascar, and oil sheiks in Ku-
wait.
In all, he stayed 25 years in Paris,
"an absolutely marvelous
experience," he called it.
In "Life's" heyday, some of its top
photographers arrived at their as-
signments 'like visiting royalty.
Dean turned up with hayseed inno-
cence that charmed the might off
their perches, and often into rare
moments of eccentricity.
The Prince of Liechtenstein, win-
tering snobbishly in St. Moritz,
gladly posed for him in his winter
undies, balancing on a Bongo
Board.


Noel. Coward obliged as the em-
bodimiient of Mad Dogs and English-
men, formally dressed, standing in
the middle of the desert.
Of his numerous awards, a favor-
ite was the 1965 Papal Prize in
Rome. He donned a dark suit and
flew in from Paris to receive it from
the Pope himself.
The text was complex, and his
name was misspelled: "To Mr.
Lommis Dean for the plasticity of
the image and the relief of the color,
which translates in' visible terms the
idea of the Church in movement in
the light of grace, and the sanctify-
ing experience."

Dean never missed a beat.
"Why," he told the Pope, "that's ex-
actly what I had in mind."
Dean is survived by his former
wife Mary Sue, daughter Deborah,
son Christopher, and grandsons Ben
and Wyatt.
His oldest daughter Susan and his
second wife Peggy passed on 15 and
3 years ago, respectively.
Memorial donations may be made
to The American Child Photogra-
pher's Charity Guild,
(www.acpcg.com) or Make a Wish
Foundation.
Dean's funeral will be at a later
date, with burial in Roseland Ceme-
tery in Monticello.
An obituary in standard format
will be submitted at that time.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Aucilla SHARE registration takes
place 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays,
Dec 31 and Jan. 7, at Central Bap-
tist Church in Aucilla, and at the li-
brary on Water Street.
Pick-up and Distribution Day is
scheduled for 9:00 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, Jan. 21' at the Central
Baptist Church location only.
The cost of the Basic January
Package is $18, with a retail value
of $36.
The package consists of 2 lbs.
Carriage House breaded chicken
breast bites, 2.6 lbs. split chicken
breasts, 1 lb. ground turkey, 1 lb.
fully cooked Bratswurst, 1 lb.
ground beef 85/15, 1 lb. Gnocchi,
plus a selection of fresh fruits and
vegetables.
January Specials include the Su-
perbowl Package for $15.50.
It consists of Oriental Chicken
Wings, cocktail franks, breaded
chicken tenders, breaded cheese
sticks, meatballs, pizza bites, and
sliced hard salami, 6.5 lbs. of hard


hitting game day appetizers.
The Chicken Cordon Bleu Pack-
age can be purchased for $12.25
and consists of 8- 6 oz. breaded
-chicken breast filets stuffed with
mozzarella cheese and ham.
And the Steak Box, for $12.00,
includes 6- 8 oz USDA choice filet
of beef. *
Reminders to those interested in
participating in the program in-
clude:
*Only cash, food stamps, or EBT
accepted.
*No food orders can be accepted
for the January food package after
Jan. 7.
*Registration copy and Volunteer
Service Reports are required on
Distribution Day when food is
picked up.
*Volunteer service is.anything you
do for someone other than family
that you are not paid for.
*As there is no food storage facility
available, food must be picked up
on the designated day or it will be
sold to someone else.
Cash donations for.gas expenses
will be gladly accepted and appre-
ciated.


Humane Society Officers


collect door prizes and auction
items," said Carswell.
She said that more volunteers are
always needed in the foster pro-
gram and the need for volunteers
for further adoption booths is ur-
gent.
"Just once a month or once every
other month is extremely helpful,"
said Kennel Operation Director
Tina Ames.
Martin reminded that the Humane
Society greeting cards are available
at the shelter office, 12 cards for
$8.
The art work on the cards was


done by children at Jefferson Ele-
mentary School, the winners of the
school's art contest featured on the
cards.
Also available at the shelter of-
fice are the Pet Math T-shirts for
'$10. All sizes are available.
To purchase the cards or the shirt,
contact one of the Humane Society
Board members,


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


LIMITEDTIME


The Department of Children and
Families (DCF) has changed how
customers apply for food stamps,
Medicaid, and cash assistance.
In an effort to better serve the
community, the department has
launched a program called ACCESS
Florida.
This program increases access for
citizens applying for food stamps,
Medicaid, temporary cash
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assistance, and refugee assistance,
by making web based application
.available.
Eligible Floridians can now apply
for public assistance services from
any site with Internet services, in-
cluding from their own homes; pub-
lic access computers; community
access sites; as well as DCF's Serv-
ice Centers.
To apply for public assistance on-
line, log on to:
www.myflorida.com/accessflorida.


C-,
C,,


Church News
New Bethel AME Church will
host the Watchnight Worship Serv-
ice, 10 a.m., Dec. 31., along with-
Memorial MB Church, and Greater:
Fellowship MB Church. Guest:
speaker is Presiding Elder 0. C.:
Williams, Quincy District. Song:
Service Bethel AME Church Choir.


Homes Of

Mourning

(Continued From Page 6)
Susie Elnora Campbell
Susie Elnora Campbell, 82 of
Monticello died Sunday, Decembef
18, 2005 at 6:50 p.m. at TMH.
Campbell was a native of Jeffer-,
son County.
She was a Homemaker and Custo-
dian in Ohio, Michigan and a cus-
todian at Jefferson County Senior
Center. Campbell was a member of
Memorial MB Church in
Monticello.
Campbell is survived by 2 sons
Maecio (Debra) and Lester Camp-
bell both of Monticello, 1 sister
Ethel Brown of Jacksonville, 2
sister-in-laws Ella Ulee of Jackson-
ville and Mary Ulee of Monticello, 8
grandchildren and 8 great grand
children a host of nieces, nephews,.
cousins and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services will be Wednes-
day, December 28, 2005 at Memo-
rial Missionary Baptist Church.
Moderator B. Duvall officiating. In-
terment will follow at Thompson
Valley Cemetery, active pallbearers
are the nephews Norris Howard,
Ernest Ulee, Laron Gay, Leman
Ulee, Terrance Walton, Johnny
Morris. Flowers Attendant, the
grand children. Honorary pallbear-
ers are Lester Campbell, Maecio
Campbell and Jeffery Campbell and
deacons of Memorial MB Church.
Branch Street is handling arrange-
ments.


American Heart
AssociationsMy
Fighting Heart Disease.
and Stroke

The Most

Important

Instrument in

the Treatment

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',,A 995, AmriE~can H,,art A660ciabor


4

Aucilla Share Sets

Food Pickup Date


Citizens Can Access Public

Assistance Programs Online


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