<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00099
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: December 16, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00099
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
    Classified
        page 15
        page 16
Full Text

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL, 32611


Rev. Mal Jopling
Ordained
Priest Saturday

Story, Photo, Page 6


MADD
Celebrates
25 Year Effort

Editorial, Page 4
Edtril pag 4


[r^ Friday Morning D





Montic


scenes From
Chamber
Christmas Party

Photos, Page 8


ilo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Jr. Leadership
Students FOCUS On
Criminal Justice

Story, Photos Page 16


ws


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2005


Local Company



Fulfilling Goal


Of


Job Creation


Enterprise Grows Into

Multi-Million Operation


... .. "
DAVID WOODYARD, owner of P. S. Art, frame. The pictures and mirrors produced
watches as Debra Miller laminates artwork by the company grace motels and hotels
in preparation for its installation into a across the country. (News Photo)


Recycling Program Hits


Record-Breaking Sales"


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Kudos to Beth Thome, director of
the Solid Waste Department.
And kudos also to the thousands
of county residents who now are re-
cycling.
Thanks to the combined efforts of
the two, the county during the last
fiscal year (that's Oct. 1, 2004
through Sept. 30, 2005) realized a
savings of $70,556.
How so?
Consider: The Solid Waste De-
partment made $57,556 from the
sale of reclaimable materials -- such
as newspapers, metals and alumi-
num cans -- that it sold to the vari-
ous companies purchasing such
used materials.
It also saved another $13,000 in
.tipping fees by not dumping the ma-
terials in the regional landfill, which
charges $41 per ton.
The economic, and environmental
benefits of the recycling program go
well beyond the $70, 556 in savings,
however.
By recycling, residents also help
slow down the depletion of natural
-resources in general, assure a longer
life for the landfill (it's an extremely


costly and complicated process to
open new cells and close and re-
claim old ones), and they help re-
duce the potential for water
'contamination.
Thorne says greater participation
in recycling program by residents
accounts for the record-breaking
revenues the program realize in the
2005 fiscal year.

Sales Exceeded
$57,000 In 2005

She attributes the greater partici-
pation in great part to public educa-
tion. She notes that her department
regularly places ads in the newspa-
per, urging residents to recycle.
At the same time, the elementary
and middle schools are conveying
the same information to students,
who hopefully convey the message
to their parents.
"People are beginning to under-
stand better that we need to save the
landfill," Thorne says.
Meanwhile, she says, more people
are moving into the county -- people
who come from areas where recy-
cling is mandatory.
Not to be discounted either is the


growing market for recyclable mate-
rials.
It used to be years ago that the
county couldn't give away its recy-
clable materials, Thorne notes.
"The county literally had to pay
people to pick up the white goods,"
she says.
White goods, in the jargon of the
Solid Waste Department, refers to
appliances such as refrigerators and
ovens.
.But more and more in recent
years, Thorne says, the demand for
recyclable materials has been grow-
ing dramatically.
The figures speak for themselves.
In fiscal year 2001, when Thorne
took over the Solid Waste Depart-
ment, the revenues from the sale of
recyclable materials were $6,548.
In fiscal year 2002, that figure
more than tripled to $26,639.
In fiscal year 2003, it jumped to,
$36,405.
And in fiscal year 2004, it went to
$45,231.
Last fiscal year, of course, the fig-
ure was $57,556.,
Does she think the sales will con-
tinue to increase?
"Absolutely, it will continue to go
up" Thorne says. "More people are
coming into the county, and they're
(See Recycling Page 6)


.~


.1 ~ I.,


BLEAK winter mornings such as this have streaking the sky, and the silhouette of bare
their own special beauty, with a thin layer of trees on the horizon. (News Photo)
fog on the ground, rose-colored clouds
A


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The goal of the Economic Devel-
opment Council -- aside from at-
tracting new businesses here -- is to
work with existing industries to cre-
ate a new jobs.
What better example of the fulfill-
ment of that goal than P. S. Art, a
picture-and-mirror framing com-
;pany in the industrial park that has
*been quietly and steadily increasing
its payroll and job opportunities
over the years.
Expectations, moreover, are that
the company will continue to add
jobs in the future, if the present rate
of growth continues. And indica-'
tions are that that growth is likely to
continue.
Established in the late 1980s, P. S.
Art (the P. S. stands for Personal
Service) now' employs 32 people
and ships its products to all 50 states
and several foreign countries, ac-
counting for multi-million sales an-
nually.
That's quite a difference from the
days 15 years ago when owner
David Woodyard and a couple of
helpers handled all the work.
P. S. Art actually was a spin-off
from Kaleidoscope Limited Inc., a
Lamont company that is still in busi-
ness.
Von Reichman started the spin-off
company in the mid 80s and ran it
until 1990, when she sold it to
Woodyard. At the time, the opera-
tion was housed in the old Coca
Cola bottling plant on East Wash-
ington Street.
The business had a couple of lean
years in the beginning, due to the re-
cession of the early 90s. But ever
since, business has been good and
growing steadily, Woodyard says.
So much so that the operation out-
grew its Washington Street location
and relocated to a larger building in
the industrial park in 1994.
Since then, Woodyard has had to
expand the building twice to keep

Legislators
Set Annual
Public Meet
The Jefferson County Legislative
Delegation will hold its annual pub-
lic hearing Monday, Jan. 9.
The hearing will be held in the
Monticello Opera House, beginning
at 6 p.m.
Members of the legislative dele-
gation are Senators Al Lawson and
Nancy Argenziano and House Rep-
resentatives Loranne Ausley and
Will Kendrick.
The hearing affords citizens and
elected officials an opportunity to
meet with the legislators and discuss
areas of concern, ask questions and
offer comments for .the upcoming
2006 legislative session.
For more information, contact
Lawson's office at 487-5004.


up with the increased volume of
business. And just last week, he re-
ceived county approval to expand
the building yet a third time, which
will bring the total footage of the fa-
cility to 27,500.
The additional space is needed to
store raw materials and some of the
finished products, which now are
shipped immediately upon comple-
tion.
As Woodyard explains it, the op-
eration stocks no finished products
or inventory, other than a few raw
materials. Everything is custom or-
dered, he says.
Every once in a while, however,
finished orders stack up because of
unexpected delays at the receiving
end.


"The expansion will give us more
room for the storage of raw materi-
als and flexibility with the tempo-
rary storing of the finished
products," Woodyard says.
He expects the additional space
will be filled to capacity "in a heart-
beat".
Touring, the facility, it's easy to see
why. Everywhere are crowded card-
board boxes and wooden palettes
holding cut glass, wood moldings
and the'other materials that go into
the production of the pictures and
mirrors. Taking space also are the
packaged orders waiting to be
shipped.
Woodyard is modest about the
conversion of his company into a
multi-million dollar operation. He
attributes the company's success to a
host of factors that include filling a
niche market, providing a quality
product at a fair price, and putting
(See Local Company Page 7)


DEBRA CRAIG, the children specialist at the Library, reads
a story during a recent program. Listening to the story are
Grayson Boyd and Ester Fulford. (News Photo)


Women's Ag Role


Is Being Redifned


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
Right off the top of his head, Ex-
tension Office Director Larry
Halsey can name three small-scale
agriculture operations in the county
that are run by women and that fo-
cus exclusively on organic farming.
He can name a fourth large-scale
operation that's Inanaged by a
woman, although this one is not or-
ganic.
The ability to cite the names off
the top of his head is no statistical
evidence that organic farming is get-
ting more popular here or that
women are its main practitioners,
Halsey says.
But it does underscore a sense he
has that, yes, "more and more
women are filling that niche.".
Meaning small-scale organic
farming.


"You can argue the merits of tradi-
tional farming versus organic farm-
ing," Halsey says. "But the intent of
organic farming is to grow healthier
products that usually are sold to lo-
cal markets and directly to custom-
ers.
"It involves personal contact with
(See Women's Page 14)

News TO Publish
Combined Editions
The Monticello News will publish
one edition the Wednesdays of Dec.
21 and Dec. 28, rather than the two
usual editions.
Both papers will be combined edi-
tions, containing features and adver-
tising, some of which normally
appears in Friday's paper.
Deadline for news and advertising
is noon Mondays, Dec. 19 and Dec.
26.


137TH YEAR NO.99, 50 CENTS







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005

County Man Arrested After


Car Chase Here Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


the driver.
Officers Sgt. Mack Norton and
Chris Eades responded.
Murphy said that as the marked


A county man, Michael- units were arriving in the area,
Brueckner, was arrested and suspect drove back onto South J
charged with aggravated assault on ferson Street, continuing to dr
a law enforcement officer, erratically.
aggravated fleeing and eluding, and Murphy attempted to stop 1
driving with a license suspended driver, who sped off. The vehi
and revoked, following a car chase turned on to West Washingt
down South Jefferson and West Street, where the marked units h
Washington streets, Saturday. caught up with him.
City Police Sgt. Roger Murphy The driver refused to stop a
reports that about 4:30 p.m. when an attempt was made to b
Saturday he was driving an him in, rammed Murphy's vehic
unmarked police vehicle and in an attempt to get away.
noticed a vehicle being driven Murphy said the driver cross
erratically on South Jefferson into oncoming traffic, forcing
Street, and pulling into the number of motorists off the roa
;hopping center. way to avoid a head-on collision.
Murphy observed the driver for a The pursuit continued west
few moments, and decided to sum- US-90 at which time, a Jeffers
mnon uniformed officers in marked County Sheriffs unit joined in t
Vehicles, to make a traffic stop on efforts to try to stop the reckle


NFCC President Updates

School Board About

New, Existing Programs


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

" North Florida Community College-
President Morris Steen, and Dr.
Phillip Mantzanas presented the
School Board, Monday, with a syn-
opsis of the current and planned ini-
tiatives of the college, in Jefferson
County.
hIn his presentation, Steen reported
tbat, stident enrollment is at 1956,
4p 133 from last year; and total land
i '163 acres, up from 96 acres last
year.
! Among new programs are a para-
mredic program, and a Child Devel-
opment Associate.
Partnerships with St. Leo Univer-
sity, Embry Riddle University, and
RMU create -'.+ prograny whichh
.l -suwdent,.ia'earn assoelate and
bachelor-.degree uon NFCC's.cam-
plis.
A. dressing the 30,000 teacher
shortage in Florida, NFCC's Certifi-
cation Program led to 26 earning
certification, three from Jefferson
County.


the
ef-
ive

the
cle
ton
had

nd
ox
cle

;ed
a
ad-

on
on
he
;ss ,


Training for substitute teachers is
also offered at the college.
Steen said a Registered Nursing
program to get underway in January
-is to NFCC, what the medical
school is to FSU, in contributing to
the need for health care providers.
The program begins with 24 stu-
dents. *
.Dual Enrollment in Jefferson
County encompassed 155 students
over the last 4.5 years, earning 1601
college credit hours, valued at
$83,019.
Financial Aid was extended to 141
Jefferson County students, over the
last 4.5 years.
At Green Industries Institute, 300
students are served annually.
Steen reports than numerous
courses from NFCC are available on
, line,:. inp- additior;,to. classroom
- o se :. i* .'1 -. a --. .

*the S: E & -___**t


driver. Officers and deputies con.-
cluded that pursuit was getting torp
risky to the public and the pursuit
was terminated.
Officers recorded the suspect's li-
cense plate, and officers and depu-
ties drove to the registered owner'El
address near Lloyd.
"The owner told investigators she
loaned the car to Brueckner, to run
an errand into town, and that he re-
sided at her residence.
Murphy obtained a recent booking
photograph of Brueckner and iden-
tified him as the driver of the vehi-
cle.
A check on Brueckner indicated
that his driver's license had been
suspended for similar offenses.
Murphy said that a short time
later, he was notified that Brueck-
ner had returned to the residence
and deputies were notified.
Sgt. Ray Lacy and Deputy Kevin
Tharpe responded to the residence
and as they approached, they ob-
served Brueckner on the front
porch.
Brueckner ran inside the resi-
dence and locked himself inside.
After gaining entry, deputies lo-
cated Brueckner hiding on the roof
of the residence. Lacy talked him
into coming down. Brueckner was
taken into custody and booked into
the Jefferson County Jail.
Additional charges are pending.


THE SOUND of the blacksmith's hammer
could be heard ringing through the night at
Bethlehem in Monticello. (News Photos)


r. The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


INRDCORY PMAL


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


QEE DEALER
FOR PETAILQ


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
01 T INCLUDES:
$ 8 3+tax Normal Installation
1 ?l3+tax 6 Months Free Tank Rental
100 Gallons of Gas
iJ Lu

AmeriGas
US L9.8..at CR 259:. Monticelloi Florida
997-3331


MENDING NETS at Bethlehem in Monticello,
was Leighton Langford.


THE MONTICELLO CITY COUNCIL
is seeking to fill a vacancy on the City
Monticello Historic Design Review Board.
Interested persons shall have demonstrated
special interest, experience or education in
history, architecture of the preservation of
historic resources.

The position is a four-year voluntary term.
For further information or to file a letter of
interest, please contact City Clerk
Emily Anderson, 245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344
by December 31, 2005


Southeast Regional Cancer Cenrtei. a member of The North Florida Can-
cer Network ,is pleased to bung proven. state of the art treatment to the
people of North Floicila. TormioTherapy is a new highly effective form of
treatment deliveiv anrd is ideal fol the treatment of prostate cancer.
Southeast Regional Cancel Center was the fnirth facility to begin treat-
ment with this new technology andr we are pro-ud to be pioneers in this
rew frontier.Dr. Rost' has spoken artoundr- the world or' the use and bene-
fits of Torntheriapy for cancel patients. This technology allows the pa-
.tier-it to receive the most acc'.rate, non invasive tieatrnent available for
prostate carncei.TomroTherap', has prouded Oi -r oaternts with a better
qIualit, of life., .Atlh fe .i oi no side effects. our treatn-ent is done on an
SOutpatientr i :Iasis. itli eas-, .icce:s. lit, to ,our ph sician arid rinrsing
staff. If .,u' .'..ou. ild iI e ,- t ,'t iniout more aboiit TonmoTherapo please con-


I .-. .- I I i tilli 11 oaf] IhLull
IF







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 3
Teach Children .......


About Money Early


WRAPPING.gifts for the County Christmas Monday, and donations are still badly
Drive, Tuesday night, were, from left, Nellie needed. (News Photos)
Aikens, and Gina Diehl. Deadline is

Christmas Drive List Grows;

More Donations Needed


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Despite the many donations-
which have poured in for the An-
nual County Christmas Drive, more
are still needed and there are a few
days remaining to make those, do-
nations.
As of approximately two weeks
ago, there were 32 families that
were in need this year and there
were 87 children in those families.
Spokesperson Gladys Roann said
at the time that the list would
probably grow, and that it did.
There are now 40 families which
contain some 106 children.
"Much of the recent donations
were last minute," said Roann.
"There are probably more who


want to give, and there is only a lit-
tle time remaining."
The absolute deadline for accept-
ing donations is Monday, and Ro-
-ann urges all who to make their do-
nations by that time, so they can be
delivered to those in need.
Roann said that without addi-
tional donations, many children be-
tween the ages of six months and
16 years will not have a Christmas
this year.
Donations of children's toys, es-
pecially toys for girls are needed,
as well as items for teens, adults
and the elderly, along with mone-
tary donations.
"Anything someone can give will
help make someone's Christmas a
little brighter," said Roann.
All donations go to the needy-


families in the county and all work-
provided is done so by volunteers.
Roann said that the drive usually
provides each child on the list with
at least two new toys.
Last year, the community was
able to assist more than 80 families,
and approximately 132 children, as
well as some dozen of senior citi-
zens, with gift certificates, food, ar-
ticle of clothing and toys.
To adopt a family, which is usu-
ally done by business contributors,
a child or an elderly resident during
the drive, contact Roann at 342-,
0115 or Lucille Hunter at
3.42-0178.
Or drop-offs can be made at the
Dunn Building on North Jefferson
Street or Jefferson Elementary
School


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Jefferson Counr, 4-H
Coordinator.11F John Lill, shares
\\ith parents some Nlhone\ Basics
for Children, since money affects
everyone in the family including
the children
In light of this fact, educating
children on the importance, value,
and all around "basics" of money ,
in turn benefits the entire family.
:X Some basic lessons in educating
children about mone., as indicated


Christmas
Story Set At
Lloyd Church

DEBBIE SNAPP
StaffWriter


The Preschool and Children's
Sunday School classes of the First
Baptist Church of Lloyd will pre-
sent "A Children's. Christmas
Story," 6 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 18,
on the church grounds.
Light refreshments and hot
chocolate will be served following
the pageant.
The children will portray a live
nativity scene with preschool ani--
mals included.
"Bundle up and come join in the
celebration of Jesus' birth,':' encour--
ages church member Paulette Hat-
field.
,The church is located off highway
59 in Lloyd. Follow .the church
signs


in "Adapting to Change: Teaching
Children About Money," by Patri-
cia Frishkoff, include:
Start young.
*The best way to learn about
money is to practice.
*Money, both getting and giving,
involves emotions; children model
what they see.
*Allowance, yes, but no handouts.
*Use money wisely and respect-
fully, and not always on yourself.
*Don't confuse love with money;
Money smart children become
money smart adults, underscoring
the importance of early training.


1501 CA PV~IT hJUSI R hINW


Package Deal! $4- s5a
Diesel Tpacto Pace 9 5
*Diesel Tractor
-Rotary Cutter
-Boom Pole
-Drawbar
16 ft Dual Axel Trailer
*Includes Warranty
*Other Pkgs Available
CHECKS CREDIT CARDS I I -
$0 Down $99/mo WAC
LW il 1TlA ORS "THE TRACTOR
SI r 0 ~ PLACE"
Exit 11 off 1-75 114 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


Local 4-Hers Enter Projects
In North Florida Fair


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer .
Jefferson County 4-H had twelve
participants to enter exhibits in the
North Florida Fair.
Members entering their projects
and the categories include:
AnnaBelle Bowling, sewing,
crafts, and collections; Arsenio
Bright, crafts, poetry, and sewing;
Alana Chambers, sewing, crafts,
photos, posters, and baking.
Shanka Farmer, photos; Jacob
Gray, photos, poetry, plants, col-
lections, crafts; Cydney Hastings,
sewing, crafts, baking; Jordan
Hastings, baking, crafts; Angela
Scurry for poetry, canning.
Abby Starling sewing, crafts,
canning, and painting; Gabe Star-
ling, crafts, sewing, canning;. Mi-
chael Starling, sewing, photos,
canning, crafts; and Michelle Ward
for sewing, posters, flowers, and
crafts.
Each 4-H member entered up to
rBWTFlVrida
SKidCare I
Free or Low
Cost Heaith
Insurance
for Kids
*B:A^HIT77 INfl


When was

the last

time you

made an

i investment

that saved

lives?


15 projects. They recevied money ,
and merits awards for these entries.
Members entered items-they Aade
through the 4-H year, such as
baked goods, handcrafts, sewn gar-
ments.


As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, onT.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794O7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


THE MONTICELLO CLEANERS
Announces a change in ownership!


Joe and Ody would like to express their
heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to
all those who patronized and supported
the cleaners thru these years.

It's been wonderful serving you. We feel
you will be in good hands and receive
the same service as before.

May you have a joyous Christmas and
fulfilling New Year.


God bless all of you.


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


SU W ANN -F--i 415 S W. Pinewood Dr'
IAMILTONEE- Uve Oak, FL 32064
TECHNICAL CENTER (386) 364-2750
FINANCA.LAID'ISAVAILABLEAANDACCEPTD.APPROVED FOR VA MEANING
BENFI.ACI fEDTyffKCCO'NL ONtOCCUPATONALmiA7EDvCNTIOM, INC.' "


EVER ON


2005 NISSANS
There Really Is A Differencel
2005 NISSAN ,,,,,,, 2005 NISSAN
ARMADA SE ~ ; .... XTfERI S 4X2

MSRP' "J ',' ,,", ? .... .... M5BP'"a




NOW 28,298 Now'19,709

2005 NoSSAN 2005 NISSAN

S, r ,, ... .. CREW CMA 42SRPT
NQW$31042...OW" C' N26t984
2 2005 NISSAN 2005 NISSAN
FSFRONTIER KING iOsTW31SE
MSR1tw*B CAB [ 41X2 .. ..... MSRPikQk.
NOW15,251 .' No,29,791
LOWER OVERHEAD MEANS LOWER PRICES
COME TO THOMASVILLE & SEE FOR YOURSELF
The Prestige Difference.

YOUR LOW PRICE LEADER..ALMIS
19 North to Thomasville

OF THOMASVIE 1-800-333-9785
WWP. $IGNSSA. E







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




MADD Celebrates


25-Year Effort


Py helping to change the public's
view of drunk driving, one organi-
zation has helped save more than
300,000 lives. For 25 years, Mothers
Against Drunk Driving (MADD)
has saved lives and prevented inju-
ries through activism, education and
victim services.
A 2005 MADD/Nationwide Insur-
ance Survey conducted by Gallup
shows that 94 percent of Americans
believe that driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol is a major highway
safety problem.
Deterring drunk driving is key to
solving the problem and the survey
reveals that the public supports
high-visibility crackdowns on drunk
driving, as one of the most effective
tools to deter drunk driving.
Support for sobriety checkpoints
jumped from 79 percent in 1993 to
83 percent in 2000 to 87 percent in
2005.
Increasing frequent and highly
publicized checkpoints is just one of
the ways the nonprofit organization
aims to reduce. alcohol-related traf-
fic fatalities and injuries by 2008.
Additionally, the organization will
continue to support high-risk-driver
legislation that will close lethal
loopholes in the justice system, as
well as help to pass primary seat belt
laws in every state.
The Gallup survey shows that the
public supports these measures.
Founded by a handful of broken---


hearted mothers, the organization
has grown to about 600 affiliates
and two million members, which in-
clude dads, daughters, sons, uncles,
family and friends. Recently, the or-
ganization named its first male
president, Glynn R. Birch.
While alcohol-related traffic
deaths have dropped by approxi-
mately 44 percent since 1980, says
Birch, nearly 17,000 alcohol-related
traffic fatalities and half a million
injuries still occur every year, and it
is estimated that about three in every
10 Americans will be involved in an
alcohol-related crash during their
lives.
"We cannot celebrate mediocrity
any longer. If nearly 17,000 people
died on one day versus over 365
days, the public would be outraged.
In order to end drunk driving, every-,
one must help support local law en-
forcement and legislative leaders in-
a quest to make roads safer for eve--
ryone," Birch added.
Timothy A. Hoyt, vice president
of safety for Nationwide Insurance,
said, "Nationwide has long been a
supporter of MADD's efforts to
make roadways across America
safer' for everyone. We believe it's
part of our responsibility to be a
good corporate citizen and have
demonstrated leadership through na-
tional campaigns that improve high-
way safety. We join this cause to
help ensure there are fewer drunk
-driving tragedies." (NAPS)


America Should Get

Out Of Torture Role


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Horrible pictures from Iraq's Abu
Ghraib prison first gave Americans
a taste of what torture and public
humiliation might look like at the
hands of Americans.
The perpetrators in this instance
may have been "rogue soldiers" of
questionable characters, but they
were still our soldiers. And the in-
terrogation techniques that got .out
of hand at Abu Ghraib were our
techniques. That's what most
shocked our conscience.
Turns out that since 9/11 and the
inception of the War on Terror, the
Bush Administration has broadly
supported the use of so-called "en-
hanced" interrogation techniques.
"Enhanced" apparently means that
almost anything is permissible short
of "organ failure" or death.
U.S. Sen. John McCain, himself a
victim of torture during five years of
a POW in Viet Nam, wants Con-
gress to establish new rules for de-
tainee treatment and interrogation,
banning "cruel, inhuman or degrad-
ing" techniques. The Senate recently
agreed with a 90-9 vote.
This is not a simple issue. Chris-


tian values demand respect for hu-
man life made in the image of God
and reject the idea even of cruelty to
animal let alone human beings.
Christians recoil at the thought of
intentionally inflicting harm upon a
helpless individual with an "end-
justifies-the-means" mentality, yet
also acknowledge the periodic ne-
cessity of a "just war."
Christians don't generally mourn
the loss of life of persons who indis-
criminately kill innocent people,
whether as a one-man mass mur-'
derer or as a terrorist in an organ-
ized cell group. But neither do they
embrace tactics reminiscent of the
Inquisition.
Aside from the host of political
reasons why torture should be out-
lawed, there are philosophical ideals
at stake. In the end, I must cast my
vote for "No torture." America
should listen to John McCain. On
this issue his experiential wisdom is
too credible to ignore. America
should get out of the torture busi-
ness.
(Rex M. Rogers, syndicated news-
paper columnist with a Ph.D. in po-
litical science, also serves as
president of Cornerstone University,
Grand Rapids, Mich.)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed
and include
phone number of writer


rn Our Photo File




;AIW!


WAITING for graduation to begin at Howard
Middle School, in June of 1990, were these
five Honor Graduates. L-R: Katie Goodlett,


Mary Waldinger, Chandra Hayes, UDeoran
Furrow, Joni Wilson. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Short Takes & Other Notion$


or people in the rockers in front of
Edenfields, will let you chime in.
ThP TblhI nf Yf Kn-liaora at l hin


i i aU1 Uie o JVnow e age at runc
I was walking in one of the Talla- or the Liars Club will welcome your
hassee malls and noticed bunches' of side of the topic being bandied
forlorn men sitting orn benches. I about that day.
imagine they were waiting for their These are some of the loosely
wives and credit cards. tablished groups, but one can always
They looked as sad as Eeyore in go "fishing" for a conversation on
..Winnie the.. Pooh, headsungJow. ibetch- in' town. Just sit for a
and all alone. By contrast the..while and a partner in discourse will
benches in Monticello usually hold along .
folks, happily deep in lieI conterI- :
station. Have you ever noticed that the
I'm sure that some young people large Tallahassee stores do not put
would disagree with me,. but I am chans about.' They obviously want
often glad to live in a town whete to discouiage people sitting around,
there are no movie theaters or malls, while Monticello businesses cherish
You can always find a talking group it. Shopping is much more than a
to join. smash and grab operation here. It is
The breakfast coffee drinkers at a social event.
the Downtown, at the Coffee Break Did you see the news about the.


older woman who was knocked to
the ground by an early bird shop-
ping crowd?
I cannot imagine shoving someone
to the ground in order to buy a play
station so you can push buttons and
be all by yourself. Real live people
are much more fun. You learn
sometimes too.
.We were returning from a camp-
ing trip with all seven of our chil-
dren when they were preteens. They
decided to amuse themselves by
having an adult debate. The debate
teams were the girls v. the boys.
They agreed upon on the rules of or-
der, time allowed and ended with a
pledge of civility. The topic they
chose was women's rights.
Within several minutes the debate
turned into a verbal brawl. "Oh yea!
When I grow up I will never come


Breakfast Important Fo


When your child goes to school on
an empty stomach, she's losing up to
a quarter of the daily recommended
intake of critical vitamins and min-
erals.
This loss directly impacts energy
levels, memory and focus. Studies
show that children who start the day
hungry score lower on achievement
tests and have higher absenteeism
rates than children who eat
breakfast.
The second annual "Report Card
on America's Breakfast Habits" con-
ducted by national parent teacher or-,
ganization PTO Today and The
American Cereal Council, revealed
that 30 percent of elementary
school-age children are still going, to
school at least one day per week 6n
an empty stomach showing no im-
provement from last year's Report
Card.
In school-age children are now go-
ing to school without breakfast



Marrow
There's hopeful news for the more
than 35,000 children and adults who
develop life-threatening diseases of
the blood or immune system, includ-
ing leukemia, lymphoma and ge-
netic diseases each year.
For many of these individuals, the.
best hope for a cure is a marrow or
blood cell transplant from a volun-
teer donor or donated cord blood
unit.
In once such case, Jerry Arreola, a
46-year-old San Antonio, Texas,
resident and longtime employee of
the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) felt
compelled to make two marrow and
blood cell donations for a recipient
he didn't know and thought he
would never meet. Postal workers


twice a week.
LThis dangerous trend exists de-
;pne parents' acknowledgment that
starting the morning with breakfast
is 'an important way to prepare kids
to learn.
The Report Card did offer hope
and easy solutions. Moms noticed a
positive impact on their children's
performance at school when they
took the time to sit down with their
kids for breakfast. And the chance
of kids skipping breakfast when
mom partook was reduced by two-
thirds.
The conclusion is that parents
need to make the grade each morn-
ing as role models for their children.
"Parents are the most influential
role models in their kids' lives," said
Tim Sullivan, father of four and
president of PTO Today.
"That's why it's crucial for them to
stress the importance of eating
breakfast to help prepare their kids


for school each day. And it doesn't
have to be difficult a simple way to
get kids off on the right foot is by
sitting down together for a bowl of
cereal and milk."
To show the effect of this issue,
PTO Today and The American Ce-
real Council conducted two-week
in-home surveys with 1,000 families
across the country to complement
the Repprt Card. Participating par-
ents shared a cereal-with-milk
breakfast with their children every
day and recorded changes in their
children's attention spans and school
work.
The testimonials confirmed that
when the families sat down for a ce-
real breakfast each day, the results
were positive, in and out of the
classroom. Furthermore, the kids'
excitement to take part in the survey
and eat breakfast as a family im-
pressed parents.
One participating mom in Simi
Valley, California commented, "Ce-


to your house! You are such a slob
you will probably have ,rats!" TreI
girl responds "Well, fine in fact 1
will BUY a rat just so you never
come over!"
Our now grown children laugh at
,the story and our family does own, a
stuffed rat as a joke. The lasting ef-
fect of all our talking is that our
children talk. They talk lots, ard yo4
can hardly get a word in edgewise ,
our house. They are .informed artl
articulate.
I have never heard a Monticel,
conversation descend to the "rit
level." However, I have heard wo
derful, creative ideas develop. So go
fishing for a conversation. Plc4
yourself down on a bench or just i t
down with one of the loosely orga4
ized groups. They will be glad H
have you sit a spell and talk.



r Kids
real was a quick, easy and nutritious
breakfast I felt good about startiri
the day with. Not spending so mui
time cooking breakfast left moi
time to sit together at the table
we've definitely started a habit." 4
Moms and dads nationwide c

take their own two-week cerell
challenge through
www.americancerealcouncil.org
see how starting the day together 4t
the breakfast table can positive,
impact their families.
Starting your child's day off right
is more than just making sure she
has done her homework or has h4
lunch for the day. It starts in the
morning around the breakfast tabf
and is as easy as a bowl of cereal 1
with milk.
Not only will you feel good aboit
sending your child off with the moit
important meal of the day, but yA
know she will be ready mentally an
physically throughout the dat.
(NAPS)



sted
this work by building relationship
with individuals, corporations, aI
other organizations to recruit volut-
teer donors and raise funds to su-
port scientific research, public
outreach and financial aid for m-
row transplant patients and their
families.
During National Marrow Aware-
ness Month and throughout Nover-
ber, the world's transplant
community makes a special effort to
recognize the 10 million individual
who have registered as volunteer
stem cell donors. This includes pa-
ticipants from 56 donor registries n
41 counties and 38 cord blood bans
in 21 countries. 1'
(See Donor Page 5)


who make similar donations refer to
this as "delivering the gift of life."
To date more than 25,000 USPS
employees have joined the National
Marrow Donor Program (NMDP)
Registry through the Delivering the
Gift of Life Campaign. Of the
25,000 Postal employees who have
joined the NMDP Registry, more
than 60 have made life-saving mar-
row donations.
The USPS is the first organization
to add 25,000 donors to the
Registry, which helps match donors
and recipients through a world wide
network.
The Postal Service joined forces
with the NMDP, The Marrow Foun-
dation and 3M in 1997 to establish


the Delivering the Gift of Life Cam-
paign. This campaign focuses on
building awareness of the need for
unrelated volunteer marrow donors
and recruiting volunteer donors for
the Registry.
A marrow or cord blood transplant
requires careful matching of .patient
and donor tissue types. Although a
family member is the most desirable
donor, 70 percent of patients do not
have a matched family donor. The
NMDP and its funding partner, Theh
Marrow Foundation, make trans-
plants possible for these patients.
The NMDP connects, supports
and informs patients, donors, physi-
cians and researchers in 30 counties.
The Marrow Foundation supports


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY


Donor Plan Boo






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 5


letters...


Increased POl

Requires Mor
Dear Editor: This is not so. I've recent
Most of our county residents seem to Chief Frisby, Sheriff Ho
to be unconcerned about the agricul- Thorne, at the Recycle Cer
tural areas that have been rezoned one from the County Road
for residential development, as they ment, City Superintendent
are not adjacent property owners, or derson, and Matt Matthew,
don't live near enough to be Rescue.
affected. The response was sim


ITobacco Settlement

Monies Sought For

PPrevention Program


tRAY CICHON
iManaging Editor
Floridians for Youth Tobacco-
E.ducation Inc, is circulating a Con-
situtional Amendment Petition
Form concerning the use of Tobacco
Settlement money each year.
Ever Since the demise of SWAT
kSrudents Working Against
Tobacco) because of lack of
funding, statistics show a rise in the
use of tobacco by young people.
The petition seeks to place on the
ballot an amendment, which if ap-
proved by voters, would require the
Legislature to use some Tobacco
Settlement money annually, for a
mrprehensive statewide tobacco
ication and prevention program,
usrig Centers of Disease Control
-Abest practices.
, The amendment requests that an-
nual payments of 15 percent of the
4005 Tobacco Settlement payments
J.i Florida, adjusted annually for in-
flation, be provided for the program,
effective immediately.
Spokesperson Alan Brock states
,at copies of the petition form are
available at county schools and at


ly spoken
bbs, Beth
iter, some
d Depart-
Don An-
vs of Fire
nilar from


IS


the Extension Office.
The petition is strongly supported
by the American Cancer Society, the
Heart Association, and Lung Asso-
ciation.
For the amendment to appear on,
the ballot, sufficient petitions must
be received by Dec. 31.
For additional information, Con-
tact Verna Brock (former County
Librarian) at 606-2676, or at home
at 421-3730.


Donor Plans
(Continued From Page 4)
In the United States, the NMDP
plays 'a key role in facilitating life-
, saving transplants. ,Through the ef-
forts of, NMDP Network. donor
centers and recruitment groups; the
NMDP Registry includes 'more than
5.9 million donors and 45,000 cord
blood units available to serve pa-
tients around the world.
Tissue type is inherited, so a pa-
tient is more likely to find a match
within their racial or ethnic commu-
nity.


everyone, when asked how the in-
crease of residents in the area ap-
proved for development would
affect their departments.
Each said more people would ex-
pect more services from their de-
partments, with the same number of,
employees, as they didn't expect any
big increase in their budgets.
As a result, the quality of services
would be reduced.
I was told that some of the city
streets needed repair now, and the
situation would' worsen with in-
creased traffic.
I received the same information
about county roads.
Beth Thorne said that the recy-
cling areas in the Waukeenah areas
are at about full capacity and can
only get worse when more people
move in, and there is not enough
money in her budget to hire more
employees.
The County Commissioners are
expected to vote on another area to
allow more residential development
at their next meeting.
Please attend and oppose this re-
zoning as it will reduce the quality
of your life.
Sincerely,
Marceline Hamilton


Make Holiday

Travel Safe


pulation

e Services


-r"
SEE TPi- fUTUI

Please volunteer
today.


g Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


The busy holiday season is upon
us, bringing with it lots of food, a
change in weather, and plenty of
holiday travel.
Traveling over the holidays can be
time-consuming and hectic, making
it important to slow down and take
precautions while on the road. Be-
low are some suggestions to help
you arrive safely for holiday cele-
brations and festivities:
Give your vehicle a once-over.
Check your battery, engine, brakes,
tire pressure, coolant, transmission
and windshield washer fluids before
driving. Also, make sure mirrors
and seats are adjusted and seat belts
are working properly.
Avoid major travel days and late
nights. Consider arriving at your
destination a day or two before ma-
jor travel days to save time and frus-
tration. Also try to avoid driving late
at night as darkness may make it dif-
fic'ult to see in adverse weather con-
ditions.
Obey road signs and traffic laws.
This information has your safety in
mind. Do not speed and make sure
everyone in your vehicle is wearing
a -seat belt. -In addition, if you're
planning to drink alcoholic bever-
ages, select a designated driver in
advance. Make sure this person is
aware of all responsibilities.
Respect commercial vehicles.
When driving near commercial ve-
hicles such as trucks and buses, be


Taking extra precautions during
the holiday travel season is neces-
sary to help ensure the safety of eve-
ryone on the road.
Being mindful of your surround-
ings will help avoid an accident or
breakdown and will make celebrat-
ing the holidays even more enjoy-
able.





Creatg SAVINGS
New CenturyN
.fSavings


DIV[ IN!


aware of their "No-Zones" danger-
ous blind spots where your vehicle
disappears from the view of the
truck or bus driver. Remember: If
you can't see the driver's face in the
side-view mirror, he or she cannot
see you. When passing these vehi-
cles, complete your pass quickly and
safely.
Be cautious of winter conditions.
Be aware of black ice, a thin layer of
transparent ice that forms when the
temperature is around the freezing
point. Ice buildup on mirror arms,
the antenna or top comers of your
windshield are signs that patches .of
black .ice may have formed on the
road. Also use extra caution when
approaching elevated structures like
bridges. They are usually the first to
freeze and are not always treated
with ice/snow melt-materials. When
you need to slow down quickly in
slippery conditions, lightly pump
your brakes to help reduce the
chance of locking your tires and
spinning out of control. If your car
has an anti-lock braking system,
hold the brake down as far as possi-
ble in an emergency.
Eliminate distractions. Make
sure children have things to keep
them occupied so they do not dis-
tract you. Keep the radio at a low
volume and do not use your cell
phone while driving. Pull over or
have a passenger make any neces-
sary calls.


Q Muscular
S Dystrophy Association
g Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
S1-800-572-1717
o www.mdausa.org
a_


Advertising

With The

Monticello News

Opens Door
For You!!


I -
I;


KEISER
COLLEGE
TALLAHASSEE


'-"



Dive into MDA, and
learn more about
summer kids' camps,
family support groups,
and life-saving research.


I
I

I

I

I

I

I

.1
I.

6I

I

I
'I

-aI
I'
I

I

I

I
I

Ii

1'

I

I
I

~1
I
I


Omlo EM. 0.00w wos w0 -om.0Mmw.Mm0 -mme-o .p o um- awm


2. , '. '!.,.l











PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005


Lifestyle


L'kerah Haire Named

Club Youth Of Month


PEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello/Jefferson Boys
and Girls Club Youth of the Month
is eight year old L'kerah Haire.
: She is the daughter of Teneha
Noble and Lester Haire, and has
two brothers and two sisters.












Writing. ,
f -k,.". -







HAIRE
She is a second grade student'at
the Jefferson Elementary School.
Her favorite subject is Language
Arts and she also 'enjoys creative
writing.


"She has a vivid imagine and as-
pires to be a writer when she grows
up," says Club Director Gerrold
Austin.
Haire enjoys going to the movies
and especially enjoys the Fun Sta-
tion.
She likes to roller skate and play
outside with her friends.
She is a members of the SMART
Girls Step Team at the Club.
She is always eager to go to and
learn about church, and participates
in the youth activities there.
"L'kerah is a very bright child.
She commands, aention through,
her warm smile and bubbly person-
ality. She is a big help with the
younger students at the Club," adds
Austin. -
"She is very friendly and she's
never met a stranger. She is very
well mannered and respectful to
everyone.
She is an exceptional child and is
deserving of this recognition' and
praise,",concludes Austin.


-U.'


i '



^^ ,l-'


HEALTHY START Clothing 'Drive at the
County Health Department also collected
baby furniture and accessories. At left is


Shena McFadden, and Joyce
Photo)


Steele. (News


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Xi Lambda Upsilon Chapter
of Beta Sigma Phi met at the home
of Jean Folsom on Sunset Drive for
its annual Christmas Party,
recently.
Members were greeted with
Santa. reindeer, sno.men... and
Christmas trees, and many. lights
outdoors, as they arrived.
Following an invocation by Emily
Walker, a meal of chicken tetra-
zenni, salad with raspberry
dressing, rolls, and iced tea was
served on tables decorated with
holly, pine, and red candles, Christ-
mas China, silver and crystal.
Dessert was Italian Creme Cake
with mistletoe coffee.
Each members brought a gift for
a nursing home resident, to-be dis-
tributed by the Service Committee,
as well as a Christmas ornament for



Church News

Refuge House Of God Outreach
Ministry on MLK Ave., will hold a
Revival 7:30 p.m. nightly, Friday
and Saturday, concluding 11 a.m.
.Sunday. Speakers are Bishop Jack-
son and Pastor Craft of Orange
Lake, FL.

New Bethel AME Church and
Elizabeth MB Church has changed
the date of the distribution of USDA
commodities to 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Saturday. The distribution date re-
turns to the fourth Saturday of the
month in January and thereafter.


Recycling
(Continued From Page 1)
coming from place where recycling
is mandatory."
And that's a good thing for the de-
partment, which last year became
self-sufficient and is expected to op-
erate that way from now.
The Solid Waste Department de-
rives its income from the landfill as-
sessment, the rental pf roll-over
boxes to business, and the sale of
the recyclable materials, among
other sources.


NOW AVAILABLE!
New Pool Tables
Balls Cues
Other Supplies
SSoft Drinks Beer -Wine,
850-668-7665
1698 Village Square Blvd.'Tallahassee
OpenNoon'til2amIDysaWeeWd


the Ornament Exchange, conducted,
by President Connie Boland.
Entertainment for the, evening
%as "-Special Recipe for Christmas
Cookies" by Carolyn Wright.
There was also the singing of the
"Twelve Days of Christmas" lead
by Carolyn Bentley Cheshire, and
lots of laughter ensued.
The hostess gift, a festive Santa
Claus. u as won by Cindy Chancy.
Boland PsAeed each'guesti with'
a Christmas ornament filled "with
candy.
Folsom then presented each guest,
with a gift of fashion jewelry.
In attendance for this holiday af-
fair were: Barbara Boland, Connie
Boland, Judy Carney,. Cindy
Chancy,'Carolyn Bentley Cheshire,
Dee Counts, Peggy Day, Linda De-
mott, Mary Frances Drawdy, Jean
Folsom, Carolyn Hayse, Betty
Messer, Alice Sander, Mary Ann
Van Kleunen, Emily Walker, Ve-
linda Williams, and Carolyn
Wright.


IN MEMORY
Willie L. Adams
In memory of our father, our
brother, and my husband, Willie L.
Adams, who passed away Dec. 9,
2001:
Miss me, but let me go. When I
come to the end of the road and the
sun has set for me, I want no sites in
my gloom filled room.'
Why cry for a son that is free?
Miss me for a little, but not too long,
and not with your head bowed low.
Miss me, but let me go.
Sadly missed by:
Your wife, Mamie Adams,
Children: Jacquelyn Seabrooks,
Jennifer Hill,
Willie Adams, Jr.
Theodore Adams,
Grandchildren and
other relatives and friends


REV. MAL JOPLING, rector of Christ Episcopal Church was
ordained as a priest Sunday at St. John's Cathedral 'in
Jacksonville. With him at left is his wife, Marsha, and at
right' VMarsha's mother, 'Martha Swem._ ,


Christ Episcopal Rector

Ordained Priest Sunday


Rev. Mal Jopling, Rector of Christ
Episcopal Church, was ordained a
priest by the Right Reverend John
Howard Episcopal Bishop, at St.
John's Cathedral, in Jacksonville,
Sunday.
Some 300 persons attended the rit-
ual, including some 30 members of
Christ Episcopal Church.
The service was marked by
organ, brass, .tympana, and choir
music.
Hannah Clark and Catherine
Crew, of Christ Church, assisted in
the service by carrying a cross and
the banner of Christ Church.
A festive reception ended the eve-
ning before the Monticello contin-
gent drove back home, arriving late


in the evening.
: Rev. Jopling's ordination allows
"him to be the full time Priest of
Christ Episcopal Church Monticello.
He and his-wife, Marsha, moved
to Monticello after he graduated
from seminary.
She teaches at Leon High School,
and Fr. Mal is already working in
the community.
They have two grown children
and one granddaughter.
Marsha Jopling has family in Tal-
lahassee, and Mal has family in
Gainesville, Maryland, Tampa, and
St. Augustine.
Both families were well repre-
sented at the service.


DREAMS COME TRUE
With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
"My kids" have
big dreams, too.
Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
SJerry Lewis, National Chairman
S1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


Freddie Scott
Completes Army
Basic Training
,Army Pfc. Freddie J. Scott has
graduated from basic combat train-
ing at Fort Jackson, SC.
He is the son of Paula Reddick of
Horseshoe Road, Monticello, and a
2005 graduate of Jefferson County
High School.
During the nine weeks of training,
the soldier studied the Army mis-
sion, history, tradition and core val-
ues, physical fitness, and received
instruction and practice in basic
combat skills, military weapons,
chemical warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony, marching,
rifle marksmanship, armed and un-
armed combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy, military
justice system, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training exercises.


Healthy Start Drive

Brings Baby Items


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Healthy Start held a clothing
drive for maternity and infant
clothing at the Jefferson County.
Health Department, Friday
Baby toys and baby furniture
was also sought.
"The clothing drive was a great
success," says Shena McFadden,
Healthy Start program coordinator.
"We received newborn through
toddler clothing through 4T for
boys and for girls.
"We also received many toys,
diapers, and blankets to give to our
clients. There were donations of
strollers, bottles, and newborn care.
items," she adds.



Statistics
Show
We Remember

85 percent of what
we read


15 percent of what
we hear


That's why
Advertising With


Monticello:

SNews

Is Your Best Buy!


The items will be given to the
Healthy Start clients for Christmas
and the leftover items will be given
to the clothing closet at the First
Baptist Church.
As an added incentive to the
clothing drive, a kitchen basket raf-
fle was held.
Everyone bringing a donation
was given a two-part ticket for the
drawing to be held Friday. '
McFadden can be reached at 342-
0170, ext 106 for more information
about the Healthy Start programs.


FLORAL DESIGNS
SINCE 1934 Flower Arrangements
Wedding Floral Designs
Home Silk Designs
House Plants & Dish Gardens,
Balloons & Stuffed Animals" .
Fruit & Gourmet Baskets.

"One of the most attractive things about flowers,i|-.
their beautiful rese're." Henry David Thoreau .

190 E Dogwood Street- ~ Monticello 850.997.2015 Mon- Fri 9am -5pm, Sat 9arm--pl .
www.gellingsflowers.com -


Xi Lamba Upsilon

Sorority Enjoys Party


to Central "',

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
6 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Whoever loves
discipline loves
knowledge, but
he who hates
correction is
stupid.
Proverbs 12:1

Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


I,


Al







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 7
L


MEMBERS of the YES Group of Elizabeth Springs, GA. Front: Alice Sellers, Sarah Pur- Brenda Register, Ed Register. Back Nell
Baptist Church recently toured Pine Moun- vis, Bill Bellamy, Donna Warren, Henry War- Bellamy, Dorothy Jeffery, Juanita Cone,
tain, GA, and the next day went on to Warm ren, Marie Holm, Betty Barfield, ML Purvis, Howard Holm, Ruth Bailey, Walter Bailey.


Elizabeth Baptist YES i


Group Visits

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Youthful Energetic Seniors
(YES) of Elizabeth Baptist visited
Pine Mountain, GA., recently,
where they enjoyed a tour ot men
Butterfly Center and a trolley ride,
through Fantasy Of Lights at Calla-
way Gardens.
The following day, they contin-
ued into Warm Springs, GA, where
they visited FDR's Litle White-
house, shopped at antique shops
and had lunch at the Bulluch
House.


Local Comp,
(Continued From Page 1)
customer satisfaction above all else.
He is proud that many of his origi-
nal clients have stuck with the com-
pany, the hallmark of a satisfied
customer.
Too, he says, the economy has,
'been good;. a couple.of his competi-
tors have gone out of the business.
(allowing him a bigger share of the
pie): the hospitality industry --
which he caters to almost exclu-
-sively has been experiencing a
Sboom in hotel and motel construc-
tions and renovations; and he has
been blessed with a couple of large
Customers, whose growth has as-
sured his company's own expansion.
:But bottom line although he
won't explicitly say it -- Woodyard
brought some 20 years of manage-
rial and manufacturing experience to
the P. S. Art operation.
The manager of a manufacturing
division in the Wrangler Blue Jeans
Corporation, Woodyard moved to
Tallahassee when the company shut-
down the manufacturing division
and moved it overseas.
He subsequently worked in manu-
facturing jobs in Cairo, GA, and
Midway, FL before coming here. He


'The First Step




,-


To Any

Buying

Decision


Monticello

NeWs

Classifieds



997-3568


; Pine Mt.
Group chairperson Nell Bellamy.
said, "God is good" referring to;a
trip that began with heavy rain and
dead batteries on the church bus:
"It left all of us in the Christnmts
sprit and some anxious to return
home and begin decorating for the
season," she added. "For this, ye
give thanks.".
She concluded that the YES
group extends much appreciation to
Jeff Sorensen and the gang' at
Sorensen's Tire for their prorapt
and courteous service on that rainy
Monday morning. "Merry Christ-
mas guys," she said.


any
was considering other employment
options when P. S. Art became
available for sale.
Wanting to remain in the area
and being familiar with production
line operations -- "the same princi-
ples apply," Woodyard says -- he
,embraced the opportunity.
The operation fino\ runs day and
night and, averages between 400 and
500 units a day, or about 2,0(0 pic-
tures and mirrors a week. So far this
year, according to Woodyard, that
production translates into 124,000
mirrors and pictures.
On any given day, the production
area is a beehive of activity, with
'workers at the different stations cut-
ting and joining different-sized
frames, laminating the artwork, cut-
ting the corresponding matting, and
installing the mirrors and a-twork
:into the frames.
Much of the work is done by auto-
mation, but a few jobs still are done
by hand, either because the work is
,very basic or it requires special at-
tention to detail.
Once. completed, the products are
shipped to hotel supply companies,
which then distribute the pictures
--and mirrors to individual hotels, mo-
tels and franchises across the coun-
try and beyond.
Consider that the next time you're
'in a Holiday, a Hampton, a Hyatt
Regency or any of the thousands of
other hotels and motels across the
country. Those paintings and mir-
rors on the walls of the lobby, the
rooms, and the hallways may well
have originated in Monticello.



Flunkfl f
800.377.539


BUILDERS CLUB was recently formed at Howard Middle right, Kiwanis past pres
School. Front, L-R: Eric Evans,, president; Lakaydria Parris, Kathy Walker, advisor, B
secretary; Tylisa Jordan, vice-president; Jasmine Francis, elect.,.
and Jasmine Grahams, co-treasurers. Back, Doug Wain-



Kiwanis Builders Club


Formed At Howard Middle


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Kiwanis Club re-
cently announced the formation of
the Kiwanis Builders Club at How-
ard Middle School.
The HMS Builders Club inducted
its slate of officers, Nov. 30.
'Officers include: Eric Evans,
president; Tylisa Jordan, vice-
president; Lakaydria Parris, secre-
tary; and Jasmine Francis, and Jas-
mine Graham, co-treasurers.
The induction ceremony was con-
ducted in front of the student body,
with Doug Wainright, immediate
past president of the Kiwanis Club,
President David Frisby, and Jim
Norton df the Jefferson County
School District, each addressing the
students.
Frisby presented Evans with his
gavel of office.
Evans then presented all Builders
Club officers and members with
their official pins.
Kathy Walker, HMS Guidance
Counselor, serves as the faculty ad-
visor to the club.


Kiwanian George Hinchliffe said
all in attendance expect great things
from this fine group of students.
"Since the installation, they have
conducted several meetings," he
added. "They are a fine bunch of
students and are handling things on
a very professional level."
Following the ceremony,, Build-
ers officers joined the Kiwanians at
the Country Club for the weekly
meeting and lunch.
The Builders Club is dedicated to
both school and community serv-


Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
manatees.
Smyfwc.org/psm


Its i1f (^ !
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17TH FROM 9 TO 3 .
HOLIDAY SALE 10% TO 50% OFF
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT BY TRAFTON HARVEY
Hudson Park in Crawfordville Appearance by Santa
', Everything is handmade. Jewelry, wood work, purses, canes, soaps.
home decor, Christmas decor, glassware, children' furniture, food, etc.
,. FOR INFORMATION CALL 926-4622 b4'? 'V


ices projects and builds good citi-
zenship.
The Builders Club serves middle
schools, while the Key Club serv-
ices high school students and the
Circle-K Club, college students.

These organizations help develop
civic duty and responsibility, pro-
viding an opportunity for young
people to continue serving their
.community throughout their educa-
tional career, and as adults through
Kiwanis.

"M 5M UM MWS r!'


ident; David Frisby, president;
ill Hopkins;- Kiwanis president-

| .UU ^.T]^ (~4 4(-!; .*.- -..


air purifier
ICs simple. Look forr the
ENERGY STAR 'to redu,:.e
your home energy use
To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


YO RH M A A S TI CE ASI

MAY RENHUS ASS S I CR


Ala





Kt19


_ nfningSaturday Service L ROADS RAOS

l' our Sunday Sales -THOMASVILLE! s Te a,.".;,-24'=,m"
U -^t!- nd af !*~ 800-'771-1144lt ii


,~# rq!I
~jA 9J(1


k ~'1-


SWEET 16 ON 12/19


W}E.LoTV yo-u


J~O~~DTAD'


Ala







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005


Scenes From Chamber Christmas Party


;SOCIALIZING at the annual Chamber of ginia Blow. Back left Skeet Joyner, Frank
Commerce Christmas Party are, from left, Blow.
I HenryEtta Boatwright, Jerry Boatwright, Vir-


SHARING a laugh at the annual Chamber left, Skeet Joyner, Bill Gunnels, and Ron Ci-
of Commerce Christmas Party, are, from chon.


LISA REASONER, left, Liz Beaty listen atten-
tively to words of Brenda Sorensen, Thurs-


SAMPLING refreshments, as they look over
the selection, Thursday night at the Cham-


day night. Background left, is Chris Peary
speaking with one off camera.


ber are, from left Joy Eveland, George
Miller, and Jane Hand.


ENJOYING refreshments at the Christmas
Party are Helen "Pickles" Bentley, back to
camera, Johnny Morris and Jo Mlorris. De-


PAUSING in their enjoyment of the refresh-
ments at the Chamber Party, to smile


spite the downpour, a good turnout was re-
ported.


broadly for our camera, are, from left, Pam
Kelly andVirginia Blow.


, MARY FRANCES DRAWDY, and Debbie Snapp pause for
. this photo op at the Chamber party.


MARGARET LEVINGS, Chamber president and David MARY FRANCES DRAWDY and Wild Bill Beaty share a hug
Frisby, past president smile for our camera. at the Christmas party. (News Photos)






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 9

,,M ,,,,


Real Eate


fill
iE.--p.


AWNl


IF


It11

A .-E
El,.I

-"El,.

A,
Arx


mtllI

All
, l1

Acu"
ALA N

A&%'




A01.,


-If"







.j If



g is
I I'p.


AL If







i is






v 11


WAICHOVIA
Timbre Denmark
Mortgage Consultant
Wachovia Mortgage Corporation
FL1925
1997 Capital Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: 850-320-1094
Fax: 850-920-1089
timbre.denmark@wachovia.com


The Hatteras by JAPSOpNA
850.577.1000
633 Park Ave E., Tallahassee, FL


(/;a ~ 4 &dff^ ll


EVANS CONSTRUCTION
& Development, Inc.
706 S. Hwy 27 Havana, FL
539-9696
CBC1250580


READY To BUY OR


850.219.1440
2777 Miccosukcc Road. Suite 3
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
It idj cid r REalty & _1 rtgn e Oln w w w .anchortallahassee.com
F- T ALJU-A:e.i LL Visit our website fbr virtual tours
search for properties:
local*coastal*statewide





Brand new construction in Jefferson County. Boston Highway. 5/5 one of a kind home with
4/3 homl with a fireplace, wood flooring. 2 car true southern charm. Features hardwood floors,
garage, fiench doors and vaulted ceilings. Doug separate living, dining and thfamily rooms, and 3
Mishler 850-933-8844. $339,900. fireplaces. S349,900. Linda Tolkmilt 850-545-
MLS#140266. 2514. MLS#143139.
ONE..,.,, -, --. i.


SELL?


RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL
HOMES-ACREAGE-FARMS
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES

TALLAHASSEE MONTICELLO
AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES

MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE
NO FEE TO LIST
CALL FOR COMPLETE LISTINGS


SABOR REAL STA


m MLS~


Gorgo.u non (oni-rutiI-n in NMinriltii.-
4/2 home features 1,852 sq fl., fireplace, 2 car
garage, ceramic aoors, vaulted ceilings, french
doors and more. S249,900. Doug Mishler 850-
933-8844. MLS#141473


Open and inviting floorplan. New construc-
tion, 4/3.5 features a large master suite witl
walk-in closet. On 2.68 acres. To be completed
by May 2006. 388t,500. Lauren Garcia 850-
209-21)45. MLS# 140270


MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor
SALES ASSOCIATE


TE


EI- DLO3
OPORUaNITY~o


850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE You DESERVE / PEOPLE You TRUST"


~iim~iM a~^ ;^-- n m .wr yat" V .-.^i- V na ,SB^.lt iw^,!8ia'sa

Sir CUSTOM BUILT HOMES IN SOUTH GA. NORTH FLORIDA
= HOMES6 Y P T 3
"Built to last for generations" .n'r r O "
-The Killarney ".i n"',"
.. ... .. ... ....% .. 4 _.. .


4 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Heated.........2406SF
Garage...........506SF
Porch............200SF
Total...........3112SF


We will build on your land or our land. Stop by for a free floor plan book
and consultation. Let us help you design the home of "Your Dreams"!
www.chrismillhomes.com
2404 Bemiss Rd. Valdosta Ga.
(229) 249-0901 #FL0i ense


3BR, W/Option of 41"BR
Heated.........1823SF
Garage............484SF
Porch.............385SF


Total............2692SF


&


I II


0 I II


M-OT(C(P ap 60 1 (P ap


1. 24 hour Service, 7-days Yhyy wait when you don't have to'? Call now
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired nght by skilled, neat technicians.
3. Free Energy Survey for new systems can save you big.
No obligation!
4. Two-year repair warranty Most stop at 30 days! Benson's
repairs stay repaired!
-5. 10-Year warranty -'on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy financing to suil you! Just call.
7. Free Air Quality Check Let us check what's
in your air or your health.
8. Up front pricing No surprises, just honesty -
the way it should be.
Foreer .0 year,. ihcusandi ha-e chosen
Jsa." I ai Dur 24 hr Senke Hullone
b our valuetoii 0 j- t ,"" -
BHH aH Benson T.Crn U5 L- 02 3 ll


fL-DIOMM*


41














oiIl










Air%
-:ni 1

AON










Air%












11 PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005


Sports


Tiger Boys Win 2;


,Season Now 3-2


ZFRAN HUNT
,Staff Writer

". The Jefferson County High
. School varsity boy's basketball
,,team climbed a 3-2 season after
winning their past two games.
When the Tigers played Maclay,
:*they squeaked by for a 59-58 win,
in the first district game of the sea-
son.
' Demario Rivers scored 34 points,
-24 of which were in the second
halfl, had six rebounds and four
f. steals.
Tim Crumity, 11 points, three as-
' sists, six steals; Lamarkus Bennett,
.-one point, two steals, three assists;
.Jitavin -.Bennett, one point, seven
*.,assists and Marco Kapor, two
points, four rebounds.
Lucius Wade scored two game
.changing baskets in the fourth pe-
riod for four point, J. C. Fead and
*Paul Huggins each scored three


points.
In the second game, the Tigers
downed Wakulla, 75-71.
Coach Omari Forts was excited
during the second game, Rivers
broke the JCHS single game scor-
ing record (44) with 45 points, 23
in the first half and 22 in the sec-
ond. He went 17 for 17 from the
free-throw line, had nine rebounds,
seven steals and six assists.
Rivers currently leads the Big
Bend in scoring, averaging over
31-31 points per game.
The former Tiger single game
scoring record was set by Robert
Williams in the late 70's under then
coach Chalmus Thomas.
Crumity, five points; Lamarkus
Bennett, eight points; James Skip-
worth, Jitavin Bennett, three points;
and Lucius Wade, seven points.
Forts said that both Lamarkus and
Lucius led the team with their de-
fensive efforts.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


JACKIE McCLEES gives a little love to Distance Derby Win-
ner "Whytellmango" of. Powertrain Kennels.


* The Aucilla Christian Academy
middle school boy's basketball de-
feated Madison Academy 44-30,
and climbed to 5-1 season.
Brian Scholte led the Warriors
with nine points, seven rebounds,
two steals and four assists.
Brandon Dunbar, eight points, six
,rebounds, five steals and three as-
'sists; Alex. Dunkle, six points,
"seven rebounds, three steals, one
assist; Clark Christie, six points,
two rebounds; and John Stephens,
five points, two assists, one re-
bound, one steal.
Lane Fraleigh, three points; Mar-
cus Roberts, two points; Wilson
Lewis, two points, three assists; Ja-
cob Newberry, one point; and Joe
Mizell, two points, two assists.
Last week the Warrior beat Mun-


Varsity Warriors Win Over

Bell 53-50; Now 5-2 Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity boy's basketball team won
over Bell 53-50, last week, for a
5-2 season.


Tigers Travel

TO Tampa TO

."See Game

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As a reward for their season end-
ing upset over Taylor County, the
Jefferson County High School foot-
ball team recently enjoyed a trip to
Tampa.
JCHS Coach David Collins said
the Tigers, along with him and
Coach Harry Jacobs, attended the
recent football game between the
University of South Florida and the
University of West Virginia.
Collins added that during the
game, the only touchdown for the
USF Bulls was scored by former
Tiger star quarterback Carlton Hill,
who also plays quarterback for the
SBulls.
"He is a true freshman," con-
cluded Collins.


`warrior JVs

Fall To Bell

SFRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
JV boy's basketball team fell to a
2-4 season after losing to Bell last
week, 39-31.
"We were winning at the.half,"
said Coach Jeremy Tuckey. "But
Swe lost the lead, missed a lot of
free throws and lay-ups. Neverthe-
less, it was a fun game to watch."
Leading the score for the Warri-
ors was Kyle Barnwell with 19
points, six steals and seven re-
bounds.
A. J. Connell, three points, two
steals and two rebounds; Stephen
Dollar, five points, two steals; Rob
Searcy, two points, four steals, one
rebound; and Elliott Lewis, two
points, two steals and three re-
,bounds.
Prateen Patel, one steal; and Luke
Whitmer, three steals, one block.

Opening

the door

to hope

Call our ., g
lifeline,
It's toll-free.
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org Muscular Dystrophy
Association


"It was an exciting game but .frus-
trating at times,' said Coach Dan
Nennstiel."We trailed for the whole
game until the fourth period."
Leading the charge for the Warri-
ors was Stephen Griffin with 22
points, one steal, four blocks, one
assist and four rebounds.
Wade Scarberry, ten points, one
assist, three rebounds; Ben Gran-
tham, nine points, one steal, one
block, two assist, nine rebounds;
and Casey Gunnels, six points, six
steals, six assists.
Luke Sadler, four points, one
steal, three rebounds; Stewart, two
points, one steal, one block, one as-
sist, four, rebounds: and Reggie
.Walker. one rebound i


U -
AUCILLA WARRIOR Justin Payne, listens to ors currently stand at 5-2 season. (News
the referee explain why a foul was called Photo)
during the Branford game, recently. Warri-


Lady Bees Face


Rebuilding Year,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School Lady
Bees basketball team is in a re-
building year, having lost 12 play-
ers from last year's roster, which
included all of the team starters.
Coach Corinne Stephens said that
all but two of this year's team are
sixth graders new to the game.
She added that the two Lady Bees
returning have been forced into
starting roles and asked to step up
their game several notches.
Commenting on losing the first
two games of the season held
against Madison Central and Tay-
lor County Middle, Stephens said,
"We are starting completely over
with a team having little or no ex-
perience. "We have come a long
way since day one, but we still


have a very long way tL go."
She added that both Coach Jor-
dan and herself lihse seen the Lad
Bees Mnake .a, lot of improvement
that wouldn't be obvious to specta-
tors of .the games, ."because they
were not at practice the first few
days," she said.
"These sixth graders are good
athletes, but have absolutely no
game experience and they are play-,.
ing against eighth grade girls who
have three years worth of games
under their belts," Stephens said.
"They (HMS) are learning and I
hope enjoying the opportunity to
have so much playing time."
The game scheduled against Trin-
ity was canceled.
The Lady Bees will stand at an
0-2 season until the game salted
against Havana Middle, 4 p.m.,.
Jan. 5, here.


Tiger JVs Now

5-1 Season

F.RAN HUNT..
Staff Writer ,


Tiger JVs are 5-1 season, after re-
cent victories.
In the first game, JCHS beat Ma-
clay 53-17.
Dontrell Oliver lead the Tigers
with 16 points; Anthony Johnson,
14 points; Anthony McDaniel, four
points; Maricio Scott, six points;
Jamaal Brooks, two points; Geon-
*dre Pittman, six points; Kelvin
Norton, one point; and Theo
Barger, four points.
Tigers won over Wakulla 79-49.
Oliver lead with 27 points; Scott,
18, points; Johnson, 14 points;
.Brooks, 12 points; and Torrence
Tucker, McDaniel and Barger,
each scored two points.


An accident left Kehny Denton paralyzed
b .. the waist., Afie ir.r i .:,
tEaot-. Seals turned Kenny's glimmer of
hope into a bright new career. One in five
Americans has a disability, and Easter
.Seals is there with expert help, hope and
humanity. To learn more, call Easter
.Seals or visit www.easter-seals.ors


Creating solutions,
changing lives.


a






I


BREATHING. NOT EVERYONE TAKES IT FOR GRANTED. LOOK FOR THE AMERICAN LUNG
ASSOCIATION ENVELOPE IN YOUR MAILBOX. FIND THE CHRISTMAS SEALS. SPREAD
THE WORD ABOUT ASTHMA. GIVE OXYGEN TO RESEARCH. HELP FIND A CURE.


AMERICAN
LUNG
ASSOCIATION.


* 1. 8 0 LU N G USA WWW. LU N G USA. OR G "
WWW. C H RISTMASS EA LS. OR G *


roe 22-19.
Alex Dunkle scored eight points,
five rebounds; Brandon Dunbar,
four points, four rebounds, two
steals; Brian Scholte, four points;
Ryan Pritcher, three points, two re-
bounds; Clark Christie, two points,
four rebounds; Wilson Lewis, one
point, two steals, three assists; and
Daniel Ward four rebounds.
The next game slated for the
Warriors is against Brookwood, 7'
p.m., Jan. 5, there.

Middle School

Girls At ACA

Split Games

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy !
middle school girl's basketball Z
team, split its last two games.
When the Lady Warriors faced
off against Madison Academy, they !
won 13-10.
Tiffany Brasington scored three :
points; Sydney Plummer and Sarah
Sorensen each scored four points;,.
and Nikki Hammrick scored two
points.
In the game against Munroe, the,,
Lady Warriors lost 31-11.
Brasington scored three points;V
Dana Jane Watt and Taryn Cope- 5
land each scored two points; and!)
Caitlin Jackson scored four points.
Coach Mac Finlayson said that
Lisa Kisamore did a good job of:
setting up the screens, working theov
offensive players. -
RB F Fl rida
'J KidCare ,
Free or Low
Cost Health .
Insurance' "
for Kids 'T *

WwWv.floridakidcare.org i
M- 1f877-316-8748 "
rsoed by the-Florida Department of Health


TODAY IETES POIE
0I-) A FIErST WO1D s.

NOT BAD FOI
AN I X--AVARINI .











America's number one
cause of adult disability is
stroke, often leaving victims
with dramatic speech,
language, and memory
problems. But there is help
and hope for improving
impaired functions like
talking and writing. A
certified speech-language
pathologist can recommend
a treatment program and

offer guidance for family
members helpingto
c create a total environment
for caring and rehabilitation.

For information on stroke
and the therapies available,
contact the American
Speech-Language-Hearing
Association at 1-800-638-
TALK or visit www.asha.org.


O AMERICAN
S'EEC I-ANGUAGE.
HEARING
ASsoc(IAION
ANNIVERSARY


ACA Middle School Boys

Down Munroe, Madison






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 11
W^ %.t)!<^t-^'^ ^^ei


Christmas


c


Shopper......


v & ea" frtt 00


V 19th & 20th Century Antiques Furniture* Gifts V
" Fine Collectibles Baby/Nursery Decor
'Twvo Locations in the "hfieart" of Havana, Fforida
y 539-5011 539-7999 y
208 && 213 N. Main St. y
'w v v v -v vwv vvv v'v vwww vY


OF TALLAHASSEE,

Offering gifts from nature,
' S the arts, the sciences, and
world cultures.


950-994-0009


Beautiful, fun and interesting
gifts for adults and children!
Great stocking stuffers and
FREE gift wrapping,
Sunday from 1-5,


Shop Now for
Hanukkah and Christmas!
681-8565
1950 THOMASVILLE ROAD
AT BETTON PLACE UPPER LEVEL
HOURS: MON-SAT 10-6


*
*
*.
*
*
*
*
*


Open Daily -
'' 7' nr" \ i \reless Internel 100.. Kona Coffee -
S-Breakfast & Lunch
-= Ice '", '*"-"" Featuring Bad Ass NMocham
13UY8 A2O.]R Ka
GIET^* A o *


1208-B Capital Circle SE, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (Across fiom the New Sams Club)


850-877-5999


- .. -~


BedRooms
5-PIECE STARTER
BEDROOM GROUP
Dresser Mirror
Cr etjite*d-'Noard


VINYL

SOFAS


1 FURNITURE INC.


J h.netwu J.o#1
I.

m'unmg Me


10% OFF EVERYTHING
In Our Store!
r------ COUPON -
I Cctom aning
up to $100-10% OFF'
over $100-25% OFF
Offer good thru December 31, 200
L ---- ---- __-_-_--------


Dg 3epawdmenL wdee je
JVeuw .anajeten
310 S. Sange St.
Aadi "n, 9i&dda
(850-973-4376
I5 : .' New Qwners:
SI Donny & Mickie Salter
..


"My husband brought a thousand
cookies home from work.
You wouldn't believe the crumbs."
Mrs. Claus, North Pole
IA


U


Discover the Healthier, Easier, Smarter' way to
clean up after the holidays. See the experts
next door at the Oreck Clean Homet Center.
A trio of powerful cleaning tools for one'low price! It
starts with the famous 8-lb. Oreck XL Classic upright.
Designed for greater cleaning power and ease of
use, this lightweight vacuum eliminates 99% of parti-
cles down to 0:3 microns and adjusts automatically
from carpet to bare floors. Right now when you pur-
chase the XL Classic upright, you'll also get a
Compact Canister vacuum (a $165 value) and a
Cordless ElectrikbroomTM 2-in-1 floor and hand vacu-
um (a'$100 value) at no additional cost).


Get all 3 for $299
(Offer good through 12/15/05)


.0


997-8533
1403 S. Jefferson St.


AVOID THE RUSH! COME SEE US!

*Merrill's *Chacos *Acorn *Crocs *Georgia Boot
*North Face Tents, Sleeping Bags, Backpacks & Apparel
*Columbia *Woolrich *Royal Robbins *Flyshacker *Lift Is Good
*Walls *Guy Harvey *Ethyl
*Crabtree and Evelyn *Burt's Bees *Boker Knives *Coast LED's *Adventure Books
*Pet Supplies *Emotion Kayaks *Specialty Wines and Beers
*Robert Sabuda Pop Up Boos *Stuff For Kids
GREAT ADVENTURE OUTFITTERS
225 N. Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344
850-997-5900
www.greatadventureoutfitters.com


s7fc


((ilZ~


OF
r ORECK TALLAHASSEE
/ 1891-2 Capital Circle NE (850) 402-1192
I. Mon-Fri 10 am-6 pm Sat 9 am-2 pm


@200,.. . . . ..''ll,.ht *word1'.


PA)ENCO'S LLC
I 166 E. DOGWOOD ~ 997-0075
UNIQUE HOME DECOR & GIFTS
WITH A PERSONAL FLAIR!

SPECIALTY GIFTS FOR
EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST!!

Fountains, Weathered Iron, Shabby
Chic, Americana, Classic and
Shabby Cottage Home and Yard
Decor, Shutters, Jewelry, Candles,
Potpourri, Pillows, Collectibles,
Signs, Heritage Lace, and More.

Design your own gift Baskets
Food Spa Items Potpourri, Candles,
Jewelry, or a mix of it all.


'I

S


..........


------------------- -


J4 11


CamnVaWva






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005
NO uovw*u I to", *C "toT'. ^^- ^^^'- .;.e.3t- .-^^^*^


C


Christmas





Shopper......


A


Ryi I)


*b"-" q~-~
*5'~
5-
5,
C
'4


The New.....
A to Z Uniform Shop

Holiday Prints & Colors Are Here! New Pant Styles!

New Owner/Manager Shelia Huling, RN

Gift* CetfctsAalabl


Layaway Now for .
Christmas
Storage. when you need it.
BETTER BUILDINGS..BETTER PRICING


Free DeliverY
& Set-UP


Better Sovings
Wood or Steel


A-Frame Carports & Garages
Residential Commerical In-House Financing
Concrete Work & Land Clearing


Big Bend Buildings
1700 S. Byron Butler Pkwy. 584-2260


Shane & Diane Knowles, owners


Mon-Fri 9:00-5:30
Sat. 10-2, Sun. by appt.


Find that perfect Christmas gift for your girlfriend, and treat yourself to something ...
m, Foesive & *F ulous 6the HolidaG
^ A A .*'. .. "d0


*


O


5outhem belles
4C 5oap Co.
i.'lancJmadce Milk 5ap
Vivian Allen, 850-567-0724


OUR SOAP IS HANDMADE
Pure soap with no fillers
All ingredients natural
No animal products
Not a drying soap ,


GIVE A UNIQUE GIFT
THIS HOLIDAY SEASON!
Tnli Produa is A, idlabl jt Eaj-c.. id PLirnact .-.
* 1605 E. Plaza Drive 877-7108 and Stewart Pharmacy *I
1350 E. Tennessee St. Ste. C-2 216-1021


SHOE


2551 E. Pinetree Blvd
Thomasville, GA 31792
226-4961


Give The Gift
Of Health....




Integrated
Therapeutic Massagi
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
Pamela dliffe,'Ph. ,h'D

510i2268
325 IJohn K1nox Road
www ,jo ful Irmind l';. orgi[


We also carry Merrell, Born, Hushpuppies, Naturalizers, Softwalks,
Georgia Boot, Redwing, Wolverine, and Many More Brands


A GIFT THAT WILL BE ENJOYED BY ALL!
The best, old-fashioned, country sausage money can buy!

Sausage Balls
1 1/2 Ibs. Bradley's Bulk Sausage (hot, med. or mild) -
2 c Grated Sharp Cheddar Cheese /
2 c Bisquick '.
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F Mix sausage, cheese &
Bisquick in large bowl. Form dough into small balls.(1/2 to
3/4 inch). Place balls on ungreased cookie sheet and bake until
golden brown (about 10 minutes). Serve hot. Makes about 4 dozen balls


928 N.Mn at Third Avenue )e




IoI a -y Jours:
17 pe -Saur ay looguni l ** iina -


421-9700
* *


1122 Thomasville Rd MANOR @
open mon-sat lOam-7pm


rUCrocs Ior..

IChrisfmas
Large Seleclion For Everyone!
- : I

Home Decor Accessories ifts
229-263-4473 311 E. SL-crLen Stret
Downtotn, Quitman, GA 31643
Swrw.Sa t-H- -4 Sl


. 9fw


midtown


I
I
I




:1
rf


I

I
Ii

I

I



I
4


I

I
.4
I

* I
I
I

~% '1
I
:4
*1
- I




a








S



I
I





*1
I





I
I
I
:4
"1
.4
I
:4


J
I
I


m


m


11




MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 13t


T1- mJWU = C.UHU
4:0mT I-CIIE s. ICON. 0 ICONv. LWNS C


Mr. Retailer!



If you read this, you have
just been exposed to the
dynamic effect of
newspaper advertising.



Monticello News
997 -3568






PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005


women's Ag Role Being Redefined


(Continued From Page 1)
the people who consume the prod-
ucts. Thus, it's a bit interpersonal
and social as well as agricultural.
That, at least, is my sense, from an
arm's length view of the operations."
Halsey also notes that he has been
receiving more and more inquiries
about organic production, including
the raising of grass-fed beef, as op-
posed to the traditional factory farm
feedlot production.
The extension office, in fact, now
hosts a small farm web site that, ac- _


cording to Halsey, is IFAS's largest
repository of organic farming infor-
mation.
On the whole, Halsey says, or-
ganic enterprises tend to be smaller,
their practitioners younger, and the
aim to serve consumers as directly
as possible, versus traditional farm-
ing.
As for the question of women in
farming, Halsey says the traditional
agriculture roles of women as cooks
and bookkeepers are "a thing of the


"Women now are full-fledged
partners and in many cases they are
managing the farms while their part-
ners are earning an income off the
farm," he says.

Halsey's observations were trig-
gered by recent newspaper articles
noting a growing number of Florida
women joining the ranks of organic
farmers, at the same time that the
demand for organic products is
growing across the country.
According to statistics cited by


the Gainesville-based Florida Certi-
fied Organic Growers and Consum-
ers, "female farmers' inclination
toward chemical-free growing has
been (made) clear by their atten-
dance at organic conferences."
The trend toward small organic
farms is especially evident in areas
of the state where traditional large-
scale farms are giving way to urban
development, according to the one
article.
The second article notes that an-
nual retail sales of organic food
products now total about $13 billion


in the United States, with fruits and
vegetables the biggest-selling prod-
ucts and organic meats, dairy and
poultry products among the fastest-
growing in popularity.
The writer attributes the growing-
popularity of organic products to a
growing demand for chemical-free
products along with environmental
concerns.
Nationwide, the writer notes, con-
sumer demand for organic food is
far outstripping supplies, with no
end in sight to the trend.


OUR LIFELINE

IS TOLL-FREE

Grab the line and
let us help you.


THE VOICE OF HOPE

1-800-572-1717
Im i^ | Muscular Dystrophy
Association


BUSINESS



DIRECTORY


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior & Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676


? WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
J 997-6500*
WHEN You NEED TO SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair'*Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
*Tuorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


Register 's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(14 Mile Off US19 South)


997-2535


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
0 Trimming
Mowing 0 Stump Grinding
0 mowing 0 Aerial Device
0 Removal 0 BushHogging
0 Maintenance

997-0039 Lic. & Insured


PantngSevc


Weacep2almanfctrr88 poj


S We accept all manufacturercoo,,.

1-10 Chevron'
pk. 3pk Ct. +tax
305 $1.59 $4.43 $13.30
Marlboro72MM$2.36 $6.77 $20.84
Reg. Marlboro $2.99 $8.49 $26.93


Bowie
Lancaster


$1.69.$4.69 $18.69
$2.99 $16.99 6/2pk
Buy One Get Qne


Copenhagen $4.39can Grizzly $1.69can
Red Seal $2.99can Longhorn $1.25can
Cougar $2.99can
Kayak- p rice to low to print .
Ti'fierwolf "'$lf:99can '
We have another order of leather purses
Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes or cigars.


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


Portable Toilets


Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home


Portables for construction sites,
family reunions, parties
Events and Types


Craig
Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


*Limerock
*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil


CHASE
Jena Fernandez
Senior Mortgage Specialist
17 Years Of Service
850-224-2427


FHA/VA/CONV.
Self Employed ~ New Construction/Land
Credit issues OK


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS
BIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS CO.

997-4150


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business ont and off the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


PreBssue CeanngL- -B
^^S~ffffiiT~Since 1977~ ^^^


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100


Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764 Fax 850-997-8388


A&S Flooring, L.L.C.


43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


% /'- ( '/7- erj
Allyn Sikes
Owner
1830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303


' S50 224-3473 1 [o00) 541-8702
www. abbiesflowers.com


Lawn & Landscaping
r-----------------
I Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount I

11025 East Mahan ~ 877-4550


p


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


SB & M Tractor Service *Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing *Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic Tack Contractor &
;i .....*' 4 ,"- .,. '- -' ,?5'l'' fl, 'Ec i Otf. onlI~L 5 *)[ -: *: ." "
Brad McLeo2d Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLvod
SCell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346 ell: (850) 509 -1465
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091 Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lic #SR0971265
10534 South Sal Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


BETTER BODIES


AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY REPA1R_..


REE ESTIMATESd FREE PARTS
S LOCATION SERVICE
VROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION)
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT
966' N. BARBER HTLL RD. LAMONT, FL
I 997-4160 *
ANDY & TLNA AMES, OWNERS
From Dent Repair To Complete Restoration


stttn Point[f l Quality is 0

BENSONS .>"
HEATING IR CONDITIONING
1. 24 hour Service, 7-days WYhy wait when you don't have to' Call now
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired right by skilled. neal technicians.
S3. Free Energy Survey for new systems can save you big
No obligation!
4. Two-year repair warranty Most stop at 30 days! Benson's
repairs stay repaired!
5. 10-Year warranty on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy financing to suit you! Just call.
-. 7. Free Air Quality Check Let us check what's
in your air for your hballh.
.' 8. Up front pricing'- No surprises, just honesty -
-the way it should be.
For over 20 years, thousands have chosen
the caring comfort of Benson's.
st we ppy pro ur hrServ132iceotlne:
Benson T. rtcn 5623132


u a


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE COULD

BE YOUR FOR

$10 PER WEEK


1. 1.


CARROLL HILL AUTo ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service



Thornmasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


am Bowling
rOker Associate


j. 997-4789
1-888-701-2205
www'.pamb@nettally.com


U ~


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.
Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial


Family Owned
Lic. # RA0067121


Office: (850) 342-3294
CELL: (850) 509-2903


\Ultimate

^ i geAuto

877-7222 :
,l) ;ue Davis Very large selection to choose from,
Sales Manager All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%


Trradepr
pus,,, Pullt1O r
It Ill!
We 0ve A1Ve
,,,EveqY"e


Free warranty on every vehicle sold
rag 6000 (REDINT AD W(REINT
tice TT
LeT TO[SNT MATEAAT[


Cal YRNE Jdsmain i

hapn h ltmteWy


Clean
$*


ICP


Mg


1










To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Commnunity Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 15

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE :


Notice of Auction to the Highest Bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been sized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit#27
Darrell Broxsie Household goods, Unit#3
Sylvia Lamar Household goods, Unit#54
Sandra Saunders Household goods.
Auction Date: December 31, 2005 Time:
10 a.m. Place: Monticello Mini Storage,
corner of York & Railroad Streets,
Monticello, FL.
12/16, 12/21, c


IELP WANnTED
Technical Support Assistant wanted
at NFCC. This full-time position will
serve as technical assistant for
Campus Theater and public events,
working lighting and/or sound
equipment. This position requires
heavy lifting, climbing, and a flexible
work schedule which may include
nights and weekends. Qualifications:
AA/AS preferred. At least one year
experience with audiovisual
equipment and computers required.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete. application
packets considered. A complete
packet includes: letter of interest;
resume and application. Application
and full job description available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet
must be received by 12/30/2005. EOE.
12/14, 16,21, 28, c
PT bookkeeper needed in Lloyd must
have good ref. call 322-6600
12/7, 9, 14, 16, c
Kalan Kennels Holiday help needed:
Entry level kennel tech. Must love
animals, be over 18, and willing to
work hard. 850-877-5050.
12/2, c, tfn
Cypress Truck Lines, INC Driver
Designed Dispatch. FLA ONLY/Flat
Bed students welcome. Home every
Weekend,most nights (800) 545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
12/16 fcan
Driver Covenant Transport. Excellent
pay & Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos,. Teams,,.
Graduate Students. -,. Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)695-7279 xl9.
12/16, fcan


Site Manager PT 15 hours per week
Heritage Manor, Monticello, FL
\Resume toi Flynn Mgmt. Corp., 516
iakeview Rd. Unit 8, Clearwater, FL
33756 Fax: 727-447-5516
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, c
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn

SERVICES
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the .sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names, creeds
,or practices? Jesus established His
church called the church of Christ
and you can be a member of it. We
are ready to help if you are ready to
learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
REAL ESTATE
NEW HOME 1370 square foot. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for under $475/'
month payments. University Homes -
.850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
New home 1288 sq. ft. Living area, 3
bedroom, 2 bath, attached garage, in
town. Call 850-509-0849.
11/30, 12/2, 7, 9, 14. 16, 21, 23, 28, 30,
c '
New Starter Home (1/1) mom and
pop) in-law suite, vacation or hunters
cabin,1 2K,850-228-4799-cell.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, pd


5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths!,Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn

FOR RENT
3-bedroom, 1 /2 bath, central air and
heat, near school.
2-bedroom, 1-bath, central air and
heat, near school. 509-8745.
12/16, 21, pd
Country living, 2 bedroom, 2
bathroom, $550 monthly, 997-6653.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
-,Jack Carswell, 997-4980.
I1.30. fn. c
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd


FOR SALE
Louie & Margaret Mills have shelled
pecans for sale. 1276 Clark Rd.
997-2106.
12/9. tfn, .
Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limousine bull, 14 months
old. Call 997-0901, leave message.
12/9 30, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
12/16, fcan
AKC Doberman puppies bred for
good dispositions. Tails docked.
Females only. Shots, wormed, health
certificates. $425, 997-8404, 556-2337

Registered Nurse:

Ophthalmology Practice seeks
RN for Ambulatory Surgery
Center, PT Position; Flexible
Hours, 15 20 hrs. 2-3 days/
week; Surgery Experience
Preferred: Competitive Wages

NATURE COAST;
REGIONAL SURGERY
CENTER
PERRY, FL
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
CALL: 850-584-2778
FAX: 850-838-3937


AUTONMO E ,
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles
$3,500.00 CASH. Clean. New tires.
Call 997-2646 M-Th 9-5.


1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806
10121, tfn, c
93 Ford F250 New tires, bitakes, tune
up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6 cylinder,
NADA Book is $2,400 Selling Price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible- Red,
New tip, new tires, 6 cyl. $4,200; *
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Auto,
LLC.
Nursery In

Jefferson County
.Seeking Mature Responsible
Man with experience managing
crews. Must speak Spanish &
English. Excellent Salary, Paid
Vacation, Bonus Benefits
available if qualified.
Call 850-997-8188


BJSOINESS".' ,'-,-. :
OPPORT UNITIES;


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free
Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323.
B02000033. Call US: We will not be
undersold!


Monticello News
Keeps You
S Informed!!



CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


""'M RRT IN A.MCDO\ ELL
BRANCH MAN 'AGER

MANPOWER

2417-3 Millcreek Ct.
Tallahassee, Florida 3230S USA
(85.0) 386-8150 Fax (850) 386-3074
martina.mcdowell@na.manpower.conm
www.us.manpower.com


rf~w~wa


"N


. ,


Monticello Christian Academy


Now interviewing for


8th Grade Teacher



Call Pastor Mike

997-6048






Now ir -
',R 6e e


Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers


2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


Homes For The Holidays .
Let Us Help Yon Get IntoA New Home
For The Holidays. KELYIN &KELIY S
SCall One of Our QualifiedAgents Today! PRO II RT IFS" t
i 997-5516

^ Greenville Mobile home in great condi- Golf Course Views -
< tion 3Br/2Ba on 1 acre. $55,700 This home is in great
neighborhood. 4 :,
3Br/2Ba Mobile home on 5 wooded acres 4Br/2Ba on 3.24
A w/ large hardwoods. New Paint & Fire- acres. 2 car garage, '
place. $97,500 .large deck, stainless fT
steel appliances. This fT
I Cute & Cozy Lovely 3Br/2Ba home on appliances. This
1q 2.44 acres. Very Roomy! Carport, work- won't last!
(T shop & More! $165,000 $249,900 fp!






Simply the Best! k










M REALTOR

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only st
$16,500 per acre


New Listinq! Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on.2.39 acres in
Aucilla Forest & Meadows only $49,995

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
SArea cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

j Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath,,
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
Playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
S, pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing 'family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road.
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home 4
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000 .
A-
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge .,
Lane off Rocky Branch R6ad and Sunset Street
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 .
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage,,barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000 %

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! 8 acres with big double- A
wide and small house on a pretty old hillside
close to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

S Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east 1
S side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000/acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500.

Rentals Available
A 2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
A. 3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
SRealtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
tnwww.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!


FVWWWNA


IWW^e~Wiwwww


6m







PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., DECEMBER 16, 2005


JES Students Collect

Food For Needy


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In conjunction with the Annual-
County Christmas Drive and the
Christ Episcopal Church food bank,
the newly formed student council at
Jefferson Elementary School con-
ducted a canned food drive and col-
lected more than 1,000 cans of
food for needy families in the
county.
The drive was conducted in all


grades at JES and coordinators
held a contest to see which class
would collect the most cans.
Spokesperson Gladys Roann.said
that the class with the greatest num-
ber of cans of food would win a
party.
The winning class was the first
grade class of Sherico Parrish,
which collected more than 450 cans
of food.
This class will be given a pop
corn and juice party,' and students
will enjoy a movie, near the end of


the school day.
The collected can goods will be
distributed Monday, along with
other items donated to the annual
County Christmas Drive.


Jr. Leaders Learn Of

Criminal Justice Jobs


fIRST GRADE class of Sherico Parrish, at
Jefferson Elementary School, won the
school's contest to collect the most cans of


food for the less fortunate. The class col-
lected 450 cans of food. (News Photo)


DAVID FRISBY, police chief was among the held recently. L-R: Brittany Hobbs, Amanda
presenter the Junior Leadership Workshop Hunt, Melissa Martin, J. T. Ward, Frisby.
-----'----


DIANNE FREEMAN, coordinator, speaks to
Junior Leadership Students at a recent
workshop. L-R: Tammy Davis, Tameka Mas-


sey, Keiona Scott, Aressa Blackman, Brit-
tany Hobbs, Amanda Hunt, Melissa Martin.
(News Photos) ,


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Chamber of Commerce Jun-
ior Leadership Program recently
featured presentations about em-
ployment opportunities in the local
Criminal Justice System.
Among the presenters were Mi-
chael Bishop representing Emer-
gency Management; Sheriff David
Hobbs; Police Chief David Frisby,
Judge Bobby Plaines; Warden Mar-
tha Humphries, Jefferson Correc-
tions Institute.
The intent of this program was to
encourage young adults to seek em-


ployment in the county area, and,
to give them a heads-up on the
kinds of jobs available to them.
The students visited with, and
-toured the facilities of, the day's
presenters, and were encouraged to
ask questions.
The students taking part in this
program are juniors from Jefferson
County High School and Aucilla
Christian Academy.
Students include: Aressa Black-
mon, Joanna Cobb, Tammy Davis,
Serena Harvin, Brittany Hobbs,
Amanda Hunt, Shaumese Massey,
Tameka Massey, Melissa Martin,
Tony Roberts, Keiona Scott, An-
gela Scurry, and JT Ward.


Do you need a loan?
.If you are searching for the best home At Honey Mae Home Loans, we don't let
equity loan, ask these three questions: a computer tell us what to do. We
1) Will you guarantee the lowest can give vou a loan when others
rate In writing? We promise the lowest say no even if you have a low credit
rate in writing. We won't merely match, score.
your lowest rate If we can't beat it-even 3) What are the chances my loan
after you've gone through the entire will be approved? We approve 6 out
loan process with us- we will pay you of 7 applications And some of
$250 just for applying with us. these people have credit scores
2) Will my interest rate increase, below 530. We can give you a quote
If I have a low credit score? To over the phone, in complete privacy,
other loan companies, you are just a without obligation-no matter your
faceless credit score. The lower your financial situation.
score, the higher your interest rates. 1-800-700-1242 ext. 243
















You have your reasons.

For a recorded message of
current rate information, 'Cleati, NwT c F li

1-800-4US BOND *Rent by the Mo-
Year-r IndClim
Tak SAVINGS
nmerica BONDS DLIVJ
Public service of this newspaper


Homeowners with money worries

may qualify for low-interest loans


Have you been turned down fora ban?
Do you need more than $10,000 for ay
reason? Are you paying more than 7 %
interest on any otherloans orcreditcards?
If you are a homeowner and answer-
ed "yes" to any of these questions, they
can tell you over the phone and rn/tiou
ob/gawoniif you qualify.
. High edit cad debl? Less-than-perfect
credit? Self employed? Late house pay-
ments? Financial problems? Medical


bills? IRS liens? tdIa'h/mate'-!
If yu are a homeowner with sufficient
equity, there's an excellent chance you
will qualifyforaloan-umva/Azi7/..i24
/oows.
You can find out over the phone-and
free of charge-if you qualify. Honey
Mae Home Loans is licensed by' the
the FL Dept. of Financial
Services. Open7 days a week for
your convenience.
1-800-700-1242 ext.233


Check out our selection of Olhausen
Pool Tables for your home game room!

New Pool Tables
doI Balls, Cues, and

.ex.A Other Pool
u 0,Supplies


Sandwiches Soft Drinks Beer Wine

(850) 668-7665
1698 Villiage Square Blvd Tallahassee, FL


CHECK

YOUR

HOT-,

SSPOTS

Don't blow your stack over fire safety!
Some simple rules to follow when
buying, installing and using a
woodstove:


I


Get the manufacturer's written I
installation requirements and -
follow them. And check with
your fire department for,
local fire and building codes
engineered for your safety.

If you have --I-
questions, ask the
fire department.
Fire prevention
is their mission.
Make it yours
too!


A message from this publication and the U.S. Fire Administration.
*******-----ml---I-I---m-