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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00098
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: December 14, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00098
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text








Mature
Workers In
Great Demand

Editorial, Page 4


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLF. F,. 32611



Holiday Dinner
Planned For
Less Fortunate

See Story, Page 6
Im


ACA, Coach
Named
Conference Champs

Story, Page 9


Pandemic
Influenza Workshop
Set At Library

Story, Page 12
No


Wednesday Morning


Montic


Ilo


731 TH YEARNO98 50CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2005,


City Gives Graybar Last Chance


Vendor Given 2 Weeks To Make System Work


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials have given Gray-
bar Electric Company until next _
Tuesday to make the Internet system
operable or remove the equipment
from city property.
The city's latest ultimatum fol-
lowed City Attorney Bruce Lein-
back's report that Graybar may have
found a solution to the problem of
trees and other objects interfering
with the system's signals.
Leinback, who has been negotiat-
ing with the company's attorney to
resolve the matter amicably, told the
council last week that Graybar had
identified another system that could
potentially "accomplish what the
city wants."
That want, as city officials define
it, is the reception of a clear signal
by the system's customers. At pre-
sent, only about half the customers
receive a clear signal. The remain-
der receive no signal or a poor sig-
nal at best, a problem attributed to
interference by trees and other natu-
ral and manmade obstacles.
Leinback told the council that ac-
cording to the representations being
made to Graybar by the vendor of
the new system, it can "get around



Center For

Youths To

Be Pursued

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The effort to establish a YMCA-
style center here received a small
push recently with inclusion of its
advocacy in the agenda of the Jef-
ferson Legislative Committee (JLC).
The JLC is a local lobbying group
formed several years ago to petition
the Legislature on behalf of the
county. The group in recent years
has been remarkably successful in
obtaining funding for several pro-
jects designated as priorities by the
county.
At the same time, the County
Commission adopted a resolution
requesting that Congressman Allen
Boyd pursue federal funding for the
establishment of such a center here.
Commissioner Gene Hall, long an
advocate of the need for a youth
center here, is responsible for both
actions.
Hall urged adoption of the resolu-
tion following a meeting with Boyd
where the two discussed the issue.
Boyd, who obtained federal funding
for a similar center in another
county, reportedly encouraged Hall
to seek adoption of the resolution as
a starting point in the fund-seeking
process.
Dick Bailar, a member of the JLC,
noted that -- although not formally
on the group's agenda -- a youth
center was an issue that the group
had explored with various lawmak-
ers.
And the word from Boyd and the
legislators, according to Bailar, was
that the officials could do nothing in
terms of funding a facility that iden-
tified itself as a Christian-based or-
(See Youth Page 5)
t


the problem of trees, hills and man-
made obstacles."
But following its experience with
the present system, Leinback said
Graybar was reluctant to proceed
with further investigation of the new
system, absent a city directive.
"At this juncture, Graybar is being
cooperative," Leinback said. "Thie
company said it is willing to work
with us to provide another system,
remove the existing system, or sell
the city certain components of the
system that can be used in another
system the city purchases."
One possible drawback, Leinback
pointed out, was that the system
Graybar was now considering was
900 megahertz. Which, as Leinback
put it, "is not has high-speed as the
former system had the potential to
be, had it worked."
City officials were reluctant to
continue prolonging the matter.
which nwmvhasbeen. dragging on f-,
several months. Especially. gi \en
that the new system may not per-
form to city officials' expectations
for high speed.
"I'm close to the point of saying
enough is enough," said Mayor Julie
Conley, a sentiment shared by other
council members.
In the interest of fairness and ex-
hausting all the possible options,_


however, city officials decided to
give the new system a chance, albeit
a small one.
"I think within two weeks we
need a resolution on this thing, one
way or the other," Councilman Lu-_
ther Pickels said.


Pickels based his timeline on
Leinback's assurance that, within
that time, Graybar should be supply-
ing the city with a letter stating the
exact capabilities of the proposed
new system.
Leinback said Graybar's submittal-


GRAYBAR ELECTRIC COMPANY has offered
to sell the city parts of the system, should
the city ultimately decide it doesn't want.to


of the letter hinged on Graybar re-
ceiving a. like letter from the sys-
tem's manufacturer.
"Graybar wants the representation
(of the system's capabilities) to be
the vendor's, rather than Graybar's
representation," Leinback said, add-
ing that this was a consequence of
the company getting burned with the


go through with the deal. This heavy piece
of equipment on the northwest side of City
Hall is one of the system's components.


first system.
City officials pretty much nixed
the idea of purchasing system com-
ponents, should Graybar ultimately
have to remove the equipment from
the city's property.
Councilman Tom Vogelgesang
pointed out that purchase of the
equipment Was supposed to hinge
on the system generating revenues,
which it wasn't doing.
Luther, for his part, pointed out
that the city didn't want to provide
an excuse -- should it decide to go
with another vendor -- that the cause
for a malfunction of the second sys-
tem was in any way due to faulty
equipment ,carried over from the
earlier system.
"I've seen that happen too many
times before," Pickels said.
Councilman Brian Hayes was
pleased to hear that Graybar was
willing to let the city "walk away"
from the deal and wasn't contesting
the city's conclusion that the com-
pany had failed to live up to its con-
tract. Even so, he didn't think the
city should close the door com-
pletely on the matter.
"Even if this is a walk-away deal,
I think we've incurred some dam-
ages," Hayes said, referring to the
$2,060 monthly fee the city is pay-
ing AT&T for the Internet service
connectivity. "Maybe we shouldn't
let them off the hook completely."


Art Frame Factory

To Expand Building


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


.... The Planning Commission on
IIThursday night approved an addi-
tion to PS Art, the picture frame
manufacturing plant in the industrial
Se w park at US 19 South.
/ The addition, comprising 7,500
-.. -sq. feet, will increase the overall
/ size of the facility on Too Long
Keen Road to 27,500 sq. feet.
Planners had little to say about the
;M application, which they called a
Z: straight site review.
The only issue of concern was
PLANNERS, along with a few citizens, study serve. The discussion Thursday night was whether to make owner David
a map of the urban service area the pro- freewheeling and illuminated some of the Woodyard pave the entire parking
posed sanitary sewer system would like to debates likely ahead. (News Photo) lot, as recommended by Planning
Official Bob Arredondo, or pave
only that portion used by the semis

Planners' Freewheeling Talk On


Sewer System Is Tad Revealing


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Planning commission members
on Thursday night got into a free-
wheeling discussion on the pro-
posed sanitary sewer system that
illuminates some of the issues and
challenges facing the county ahead.
The informal discussion, which in-
volved citizens and planners alike,
was triggered by Planning Commis-
sion Chairman Bill Tellefsen's un-
rolling of a preliminary map
depicting the urban service area that
proponents of the sanitary sewer
system hope the system will ulti-
mately serve.


The issue, Tellefsen said, was one
that the Planning Commission
would have to address sooner or
later, in terms of what priorities and
land-uses to assign the different ar-
eas of the county, among other con-
siderations.
Immediately, a few planners and
citizens made the point that the pro-
posed urban service area encom-
passed the entire county, with the
exception of the wetlands and the
plantations. Areas, they said, that
couldn't be developed anyway.
What was to happen to farming
and the rural nature of the county in
general, they wanted to know.
"By doing this, you're helping de-
velopment," said Don Lee, voicing a=


concern he has uttered previously in
his ongoing fight against what he
considers the county's wide open
door policy to developers.
As Lee and others like him see it
(including some on the Planning
Commission) the proposed sanitary
sewer and water extension projects
at best unintentionally aide and abet
development, and at worse, con-
sciously pave the way for develop-
ment.
Proponents of the sewer and water
projects, on the other hand, see the
systems as necessary and long over-
due upgrades.
Not only will these systems raise
property values -- and yes, attract
development, they say -- but they
(See Freewheeling Page 5)


that deliver materials.
The planners ultimately voted to
have Woodyard pave only the por-
tion used by the semis. They left it
to Woodyard's discretion to decide
what to do about the rest of the
parking lot.
PS Art produces pictures and
mirrors for the hospitality industry,
namely hotels and motels. The com-
pany also does a little business with
commercial offices and hospitals.
PS Art employs a total of 32 peo-
ple, according to Woodyard.
He said the expansion will allow
for the storage of raw materials and
finished goods, in keeping with the
increased demand for the company's
products.
PS Art sells its pictures and mir-
rors in all 50 states, as well several
foreign counties, including England,
-Lebanon, Puerto Rico and Mexico.


ABIGAIL BOYD tells her friend, the lion, a story following
Toddler Story Time, a library-sponsored program encour-
aging young children to read. (News Photo)


CO







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005


Ell4
~T


LISA REASONER waits to read her part in the Opera House
GEORGE HOOK has produced Stage Company Radio Theatre Saturday, while Ron Cichon
and acted in numerous plays pauses in his reading for dramatic effect.
at the Opera House.


Opera House Stage Company


Exudes Spirit Of Christmas


RAY CICHON
SManaging Editor

The spirit of Christmas filled the--


air Saturday night, as the Opera
House Stage Company presented its
"Miracle on 34th Street" Radio
Theatre Show, preceded by a
smoked sirloin tip dinner, catered by
Carrie Ann & Company.
The "Monticello Broadcasting
Company Chorus" opened the eve-
ning's performance with a sing
along, of holiday music.
With Lisa Reasoner, cast as one of
the Donovan Sisters, audience mem-
bers were selected to appear on
stage and sing their lines about each
of the Twelve Days of Christmas,
'lS-.a ,s a crpwdpleaser. .
"Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer"
followed, with Colin Rolfe wearing
the antlers and the chorus adding its
antics.
A presentation of "Green Christ-
mas," a radio play about the impor-
tance placed on money during the
Christmas season, followed.
Players included: George Hook, as
Ebeneezer Scrooge; Ron Cichon, as
Abercrombie; Tom McGough as
Crass; Jack Williams as Bob
Cratchet; Jonathan Counts, as Man;
Rolfe as announcer; and the cast as
chorus.
Director Jan Rickey had her per-
formers dressed in the fashion of the
1940's, with men wearing suspend-
ers, and ladies in the skirt length in
vogue at the time.
Performers read their scripts as di-
rected, and the set resembled a radio
station of the 1940's, with perform-
ers seated, as. they waited their turn
to reat, and Carol Bynum as the-

Salvation Arm

Bell Ringers S<
The Salvation Army will set up its
donation kettles on Saturdays, at
the Winn Dixie on South Jefferson
Street, and at Fred's on North Jef-
ferson Street.
"Kick off your Christmas kettles
effort by being part of the action at
The salvation Army National Kettle
Kickoff," says Jefferson County
Chairman Georgiana Williams.
"We are also in need of Bell_


COLIN ROLFE, left, who played Santa, as one of his roles in


the Radio Theatre Saturday,
House stage, as is Chairman
(News Photo)
Foley Artist who created the low
tech and pre-electronic sound
effects.
Also on stage was Rebecca
Burkart at the Baldwin Grand, as the
second half of the Donovan Sisters.
Original commercials created by
the stage company were performed
with aplomb and one in particular
for Christ Episcopal Church, drew
hearty chuckles from the audience.
The tour de force of the evening
"Miracle," told the story of cynical
Susan Walker (Misty Stuart) coming
to believe in Santa Claus; Santa
(Colin Rolfe) released from Belle-
vue (a New York mental hospital)
and regaining faith in himself; and

y Seeking

aturdays
Ringer volunteers this year. Do
something good for the community.
Volunteer for The Salvation Army
this year," Williams pleads.
Williams can be contacted at 997-
6311, or checks and donations may
be made out to The Salvation Army
and mailed to the Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank c/o Jessica Corley,
treasurer for the Jefferson County
_Salvation Army.


is often seen on the Opera
of the Board Jack Williams.


Doris Walker (Reasoner) thawing
out and falling in love with Fred
Gailey (Jonathan Counts.)
Cast members .displayed their
versatility in reading multiple roles.
Among these were: George Hook:
Announcer, Grumpy Old Man,
Judge Henry Harper, Lou; Ron Ci-
chon: Mr. Shellhammer, Thomas'
Mara; Pat Cichon: Mother #2,:
Nurse, and Mrs. Mara.
Jack Williams: Mr. Sawyer, Mr.
Gimble, Charlie Holloran, Tommy;
Mara, Frankie; Carol Bynum,
Mother #1, Little Girl, Miss Prawn;
Jonathan Counts, Fred Gailey, Mor-
timer; Lisa Reasoner: Alfred, Doris
Walker.
Tom McGough made his official'
debut with the Opera House Stage
Company as R.H. Macy, and Dr.
Pierce.
In these radio shows, audiences
are carried back to a time before
television, where imagination;
played a major part of what was
seen in the mind's eye, so that as
long as a voice sounded real, it mat-'
tered not who played it, whether
male, female, young or old.
Thus to radio audiences it did not,
matter that Santa was clean shaven.
in the play. They couldn't see his
face. --


January 190-21,4006
A once-in-a-lifetime bus trip
to Ft. Lauderdale to see
TUTANKHAMUN AND THE (
GOLDEN AGE OF THE PHARAOH
Tu IHURRY! Reservation deadline is December 14th
Tour Includes:
Travel Via Luxury Motorcoach -
2 Hotel Nights .sAI( S "' ""
* Admission to the Tutankhamun Exhibit
SBreakfast Buffet Friday and Saturday HOLIDA
SBox lunches on the Thursday and Friday
* Beer and Wine Reception Friday Night LDcaId.do-loIiwn on I .*nP Ia
Museum Member Rate: $299.00 per person Non-Museum Member Rate: $349.00 per person
Includes a Family membership to The Brogan. Prices based on double occupancy. Single occupancy rates are available.
For further information, please contact the Museum at (850) 513-0700, ext. 232


JONATHAN COUNTS, JCHE
senior, is on the fast track tc
become a veteran Operz
House performer.


While it is impossible to comment
about each player and his/her part
given the varying number of lines t(
be read, and/or the complexity o:
the character being read, it would be
'unthinkable not to mention at leas
some of the players.
In no particular order: Lisa Rea-
soner is known to Opera House
audiences for her musical and dra-
matic talents.
Her role as Agnes in the Stage
Company's production of "I Do, I
Do," will always be remembered be-
cause of the demands of the part and
the expertise with which Reasonei
carried,out role.
Colin Rolfe is perhaps best know
for his role as Victor Lazlo ir
"Casablanca," in which he made his
Opera House Debut.
George Hook has directed several
Opera House productions, and ij
memory serves made his debut or
the boards here as a woodcutter ir
'A Bacd; Year, For Tomatoes," anc
played in other shows as well.
Jack Williams has played and/oi
directed virtually every Stage Com-
pany performance, but can never be
forgotten for his Academy Awarc
caliber histrionic tantrum in "Ter
Little Indians," when the Stage
Company was in its infancy.
Jan Ricke. has directed and ap.
pealied in man\ Opera House pro.
ductions. dating back to her iole a!
Clairee Belcher in "Stee
Magnolias." staged in 1996
Rebecca Burkart has been music
director for nearly e\ery production
since 2000. and has also entertained
at the piano for numerous Opern
House receptions.
Carol Bynum has been a Fole.
Artist, creating sound effects, since
the first radio show aired at the Op.
era House.
Jonathan Counts is the youngest
established player, on the fast tract
to veterann status at the Opera House
N\ho faced his greatest challenge t(
date as Romeo, in "Romeo and Ju.
liet."
In conclusion, the evening was
delightful addition to holiday
events, and helped set the mood fol
the season.


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THE MONTICELLO CLEANERS

Announces a change in ownership!


Joe and Ody would like to express their
heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to
all those who patronized and supported
the cleaners thru these years.


It's.been wonderful serving you. We feel
you Will be in good hinds and receive
the same service as before.


May you have a joyous Christmas and
fulfilling New Year.


God bless all of you.


kc te hunrq'y, fT
LI IrlOte hmeles- r P o


th ein6cest efo
r ~in I '*
~INATeativ


Monticello News

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307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, Fl. 32303 (904) 414-0844







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005 PAGE 3


p p .









JEREMIAH CAMEL, and the three wise men event drew more than 1000 visitors over the
at Bethlehem in Monticello. From left, Roger weekend. (News Photo)
Stadin, George Cole, and Dean Jerger. The


Bethlehem in Monticello Draws

More Than 1000 Over Weekend


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

More than 1,000 people, turned--
6ut over the weekend to visit Beth-
lehem in Monticello, which repli-
Gated the scenes current at the time
(,hrist was born.
"Friday night was the ideal scene,
weather wise," said spokesperson
Becky Stoutamire. "At about five
riinutes until seven, the stars were
bright and twinkling and there was
4 shooting star going across the
sky, setting the mood much like it
rust have -been for shepherds in
the fields 2,000 years ago."
Moving from scene to scene, visi-
tbrs viewed the angel telling shep-
lerds of the birth of Christ, the inn
at which there was no room, a sto-
ryteller, basket weavers, the
women at the well, net menders,
carpenters, and blacksmiths, the tax
collector and of course, the Nativ-
ity scene.


The cast costumed as in the time
portrayed, moved from scene to
scene, such as the beggar who
asked for "Alms for the poor",
never looking passersby in the eye,
as he walked up and down the
streets of the village.
"The cast members projected the
spirit of the. event," said
Stoutamire. "All the visitors en-,
joyed it. There was even one
women who had tears in her eyes
as she took the step back in time to
witness the birth of Christ."
After walking through
Bethlehem, visitors were invited to
enjoy hot chocolate, cider and
cookies in the Fellowship Hall.
Much entertainment was_
provided, including flute and piano
players and 15 guitar students from
Lincoln High School.
"It takes us a whole year to plan
for this event," said Stoutamire.
"Building the structures, setting up
the cast and making the costumes,


so many preparations are
involved."
The cast includes not only mem-
bers of the First UMC, but also vol-
unteers from several other local-
churches, including New Bethel


Tornado Drops Church

Sign in Wacissa Field


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

While Jefferson County was
spared, when a tornado went
through Crawfordville in Wakulla
County, last week, the parsonage
of the Ivan Assembly of God, was
badly damaged and the church sign
was reported as missing.
Subsequently, the sign was found
in a field behind the home of Over-
ton Raker on Gamble Rd.,in Wa-
cissa.
Raker said that the sign, measur-
ing five feet long and 18 inches
wide, had been dropped, com-


Missionary Baptist, Pinegrove Mis-
sionary Baptist, Waukeenah UMC,
and Killearn UMC.
Helping attendance was radio sta-
tion' Gulf 104 and a few of their
area affiliates, who .conducted pub-
lic service announcements about
the event throughout the week.


THE MONTICELLO CITY COUNCIL

is seeking to fill a vacancy on the City
Monticello Historic Design Review Board.
Interested persons shall have demonstrated
special interest, experience or education in
history, architecture of the preservation of
historic resources.

The position is a four-year voluntary term.
For further information or to file a letter of
interest, please contact City Clerk
Emily Anderson, 245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida 32344
by December 31, 2005
., *. -, *.'


pletely unharmed, by the tornado as
it passed over the county. (The tor-
nado passed over Fanlew at 1:45
and Wacissa at 2 p.m.)
"I know some people at that
church, I'm originally from there
but came here 35 years ago," said
Raker. "I called them and let them
know that I found their sign."
Speaking for Emergency Man-


The Jefferson Nursing Center will
celebrate the holidays with a Christ-
mas Party for its residents and their
-families, the staff, and members of
the community 2 p.m.. Saturday,
Dec. 17.
This annual event is an uplift-
ing time for the residents.
Citizens are encouraged to make
plans now to attend and have a fun
time. Bring Christmas gifts for
loved ones, and one to share wit'-


agement, County Veteran's Affair
Officer Mike Bishop said that resi-
dents of Jefferson County were ex-
tremely lucky "No damage has
been reported here and the tornado
didn't touch down."
He added that there was a really
good flow of communication be-
tween the EMS office, ACA,
JCHS, the Sheriffs Department,
City Police, County Fire Rescue,
the School Board and local nursing
homes and day care centers.
"They were all on their toes and
ready for anything," he concluded.


another resident. Gifts will be dis-
tributed at the party.
A dinner of baked chicken and
baked ham is planned. Yellow rice,
candied yams, collard greens, Italian
green beans, rolls, cornbread, and an
assortment of cakes and sweets will
be served.
A Christmas punch and Egg Nog
will compliment the meal.
Contact Mae Kyler at 997-2313 to
make advanced reservations.


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Staff. If ,iu v.c.uIhl iI e t1o find out I-i ore about TomoTherapr., pleas, con-
tact us fo.r rni ,fe iintcriiatoni.


Jefferson Nursing Plans

Annual Christmas Party


Check out our selection of Olhausen
Pool Tables for your home game room!

New Pool Tables

oy Balls, Cues, and
Other Pool
S ION, Supplies



Sandwiches Soft Drinks Beer Wine

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1698 Villiage Square Blvd Tallahassee, FL


I A message from the V.S. Del),artment ot the Treast







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Mature Workers


In Great Demand
Like fine wine, mature workers time basis.


:are getting better and more valuable
,as they age. They are at the top of'
Their game educated, experienced,
-productive, techno-savvy, and reli-
able.
You may have heard that approxi-
:mately 60 million baby boomers are
expected to leave the workforce
'over the next 15 years.
However, recent studies show that
mrnany baby boomers are not retiring
.,in the traditional sense of the word.
,They are opting to stay in the work-
,force often as "free agents," defined
:as temporary employees,
7freelancers, independent profession-
als, and consultants..
In fact, mature workers represent
-one part of the fastest-growing seg-
Sment in today's employment envi-
;ronment in the form of free agents.
; For these mature workers, the pri-
.ority is fitting their work into their
lifestyle.
Because mature workers offer a
'wealth of experience and are ready,
:willing and able to work beyond tra-
:ditional retirement age, they find
'temporary positions accommodate
:their needs.
Taking early retirement from a
-major international insurance pro-
vider in 2002, Steve Duke felt he
,still had something to offer profes-
;sionally.
He joined Kelly Services as a tem-
porary employee and is now work-
'ing as a claims adjuster in both ca-
:tastrophe and non-catastrophe sce-
"narios around the country on part-





From Our
TEN YEARS AGO
December 6, 1995
City employees should soon be re-
ceiving copies of the city's recently
implemented drug and alcohol pol-
icy, which went into effect Dec. 1.
The Sesquicentennial Winter Fes-
tival judges awarded two first place
* prizes for downtown merchant's
o window decorations,
School District non-instructional
personnel will enjoy a breakfast
8:30 a.m. Friday at the Opera
House, after which th'e district's Em-
ployee of the year will be an-
nounced.
The City Council was scheduled
Tuesday night to reconsider a rezon-
ing request that it denied on Nov. 7.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
December 4, 1985
The Monticello Volunteer Fire
Department will be holding its first
annual toy and rummage sale Satur-
day at 7 a.m. at the Monticello Op-
era House.
Four Jefferson County residents
have applied for the position of Vet-
erans Service Officer: Ronald Silk,
Robert Knecht Jr., Joe Whitson and
Betty Bishop.
School lockers that have been on
order since July arrived at JCHS this
week. Students will be assigned to
the 134 lockers on the first come
first served basis, said JCHS Princi-
pal Kelly Kilpatrick. Although there
is no rental fee for locker use, $4
will be charged for locks, he added.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
December 4, 1975
The Monticello News was honored
with a plaque at the Florida Press


"I amn able to pick and choose
where I 'would like to go and for
how long," said Duke. "The pay is
great and I'm in a claims environ-
ment where I know the computer
software, .-systems and processes,
which enabl's me to be productive
on 'the first day of a new
assignment:"
Duke's story reflects Kelly Serv-
ices' growing emphasis in placing
mature workers in a variety of em-
ployment scenarios.
As an AARP Featured Employer
and' one of AARP's 2005 Best Em-
ployers for Workers Over 50, Kelly
offers a wide variety of opportuni-
ties for mature workers including
full-time, part-time, and short-term
or long-term assignments.
"Mature workers are a significant,
valued segment.._,f o.pur,,workforce.
Increasingly, employers are seeking
these d-, njniic workers because they
bring vital experience, expertise and
maturity to their roles," said Kelly
.Services' President and Chief Oper-
ating Officer, Carl Camden.
Over the next two decades, today's
mature workers will be transforming
"retirement."
This generation of retirees will be
the healthiest, most physically
active, and the most motivated to
continue working.
Companies whose strategy in-
cludes hiring mature workers will
find they have high credentials and
are well suited to meet the demands
of the future workplace.




SFiles

Association Convention held in
Gainesville.
The Jefferson County Junior
Chamber of Commerce, of J.C.'s as
they are commonly known, installed
new officers and directors.
Judges Charles C. Anderson was
the speaker at the Thanksgiving Eve
services conducted by the Monti-
cello 'Ministerial Association.
Ike Grant, Director of the Jeffer-
son County Ambulance Service was
the guest speaker at the regular
meeting of the Civitan Club.
FORTY YEARS AGO
December 3, 1965
A 400 pound bear was killed by
Henry Reams and Tom Reams.
Airman Ronald H. Brumbley of
Wacissa has been assigned to March
A.F.B., California.
Mel Rick, Mel Rick Jr., and Bill
Culter, all of Valdosta, stumbled
into a rattlesnake bed while quail
hunting.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
December 2, 1955
Fred Williams, Harrell Hamilton
and Talmadge Pace placed on the
all-conference 'football team.
JCHS Tigers ended an up and
down season with a 13-0 win over
Perry.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
November 30, 1945
Col. Theo. J. Sledge was wel-
comed home with an informal re-
ception at the courthouse.
Curtis Waldo Harris, Albert H.
Gandy, Doris McClellan, George W._
Wirick,. and Major Joseph H.
Hughes Jr., all returned home after
being discharged from the service,


BY LISA CHAVIS

According to the U.S. Food &-,
Drug Administration, Americans
suffer from approximately one bil-
lion colds annually, making it the*
most common ailment in the coun-
try.
As many as half of all Americans
.are diagnosed with the flu each year.
Consumers may hear many com-
mon myths about colds and influ-
enza. However, those myths can
result in misdiagnosis, miscommu-
nication and mistreatment.


From Our Pho


L


JES STUDENTS view art work on the last
day of class in June, 1990. From left, Lia
Hill, teacher aide, Ashley Buzbee, J.G. Vick-


ers (back to camera), Toarra Campbell, and
Sharon Johnson, teacher. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment_



Peace? Good Will? Not Lately


In this season of "Peace on earth
and good will toward men," regret-
tably we have no peace and very lit-
tle good will.
We are at war in two countries and
face an enemy that lurks in the shad-
ows. Our fellow citizens are being
killed and maimed. That is nol
peace.
There is not peace at home either,
with the majority of the public un-
happy with the reasons given for
war and the conduct of it.
As for good will? Our voices are
raised in shrill and nasty debate that
is beyond the pale: There's name
calling and ugliness.
The Bush Administration has
brought attacks on those who dis-
agree with its policies to new lows.
Good' and deceit people ire sliced
because they speak out.
Attacks on Pennsylvania Con-
gressman Jack Murtha are only the
latest demonstration of the slime op-
eration.
Murtha is a decorated combat vet-
eran and friend of the military. But
because he dare raise questions
about the Iraq war and propose a
troop withdrawal over six months to
nearby countries to -save the lives of
our GIs. hints at his "cowardice" and


Publisher's

Notebook


I


mmo........ .


Ron Cicfhon


'"cut and run mentality" were ban-
died about by the Administration.
Of course, wlien the Bush Admin-
istration begins to draw down troop
levels next year, it won't .be "cut and
run," it will be sensible withdrawal.
At least that's what the White House
and Pentagon spinners will tell you.
1le atta,-ks on Murtha were un-
- 'scionablr
Of course, smearing combat veter-
ans is not a new thing. You'll recall
former Georgia Senator Max Cle-
land, who lost three limbs on the
battlefield in Vietnam, was linked to
Osama Bin Laden by Republican
operatives back in 2002 when he
was running for re-election.
I believe this kind of ugliness will


stop only when the public has had a
belly full of it. We may be. ap-
proaching that point. At least I hope
so.
But, for' no,, good ill' is'jist''a
dream.
Locally; -we have diga'greernent
over zoning and development. There
are very legitimate concerns ex-
pressed by those who want to keep a
rural flavor and those who promote
development.
Voices are raised, harsh statements
uttered, character is called into'ques-
tion, and this is just the beginning.
Issues of development will be With
us for years to come.
We have to find some common
ground without beating each other


up in the process.
I know something about being in
the public eye as a newspaper pub-
lisher, columnist, pastor, public
speaker, and chair of several boards
over the years.
Consequently, I know something
about slings and arrows and have
been targeted plenty.
I know if a person in a leadership
capacity says, "I like apples," some-
body will disagree. That's the price
of leadership.
But, disagreement does not have
to be ugly.
Lawyers do it right. They fight
like heck in the courtroom and then
lunch or play golf together.
'!'4This is':the Season: of Seasons.
This is when we marvel at what God
-has done. We call this Christ child
Prince of Peace. This is a time of
good will, toward others.
We need tc lower our voices, re-
spect other's opinions, recognize the
importance of free and healthy de-
bate, and stay on the subject exclud-
ing personal attacks.
As we celebrate the birth of
Christ, we might recall his admoni-
.tion to love God and love each
other.


Who Is Stealing Christmas?


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

For the life of me, I am dumb-
founded at who could be trying to
steal my Christmas. Almost every
day there is news somewhere in this
country of a. city council, school
system, private business, or any
other number of agencies that have
buckled under the weight of a
threatened law suit if they don't re-
move Christmas symbols and activi-
ties from public view.
Even the likes of Wal*Mart has
decided to avoid the word "Christ-
mas" and replace it with "Happy
Holiday".
Schools no longer have Christmas
break, they have Winter break and
you had better not call that nicely
decorated spruce tree in front of the
court house a Christmas tree, after
all we know it is only a Holiday
Tree.


Recent public polling has shown t
that a staggering ninety-five percent r
of the American population choose
"Christmas" as their favorite holiday
to enjoy. A like number enjoys see-
ing Christian symbols like a nativity
scene, hearing Christmas songs like
"Silent Night",sung by a chorus (in-
cluding school pageants) along with
Santa, Rudolph and the Jewish Mi-
nora. '
The main argument, of course, is t
that public funds should not be used
to promote a particular religion. It's
that old separation of church and
state. thing again. Let's backtrack a l
moment.
Our founding fathers and framers
of our constitution wanted to make
it quite clear that they did not want
a federal religion in America like
the Anglican church that was
formed in their former homeland of
Great Britain.
That was the driving force and
thought process behind their desire


to include in the constitution a sepa-
ration of church and state proclama-
ion.
Read the words! I believe there
was clearly an intention to keep the
governments bureaucratic meddling
out of religion, but they never envi-
sioned some twentieth century pur-
est interpreting their words as the
necessity of keeping religion out of
government. This is quite" clear by
their repeated reference to God and
a creator in their written documents.
Over the past 50 years, Americans
have gone complacent and have al-
lowed numerous mice to roar. In ef-
fect, allowing a. minority of a
particular opinion to control the day.
An old example that comes to
mind is the National Organization of
Women (NOW). I have met an enor-
mous amount of people over the
past 40 years and I can say conclu-
sively, I have never met a woman
who was'a dues paying member of
NOW or subscribed to their philoso-


In reality, their numbers do not
constitute even one percent of the
female population of America, yet
they have been given the credibility
as though they speak for all women..
The same situation is happening
with our Christmas. A handful of
rabble rousers have used our very
constitution (all be it a twisted inter-
pretation thereof) to hijack one of
our nations most cherished and en-
joyed holidays. What happened to
that old majority rules concept I
learned as a child?
I believe that our constitution is a
living document and that open de-
bate regarding what the founding fa-
thers intended in their words is part
of our great democratic process.
At some point, however, common
sense must be applied to what is ap-
plicable to the masses rather than a
handful of nay sayers.
Unfortunately, there is still one or-
(See Christmas Page 10)



Is
plenty of fluids including soup -
and lots of rest. A variety of over-
the-counter medication such as de-
congestants, expectorants, and
antihistamines are available to re-
lieve cold and flu symptoms.
Myth: You can catch a cold
from going outside in cold
weather. With apologies to grand-
mothers across the country, you can-
not catch a cold from going outside
without a jacket during the colder
months.
However, you can catch a cold
from other people who are infected


Armed with the proper informa-
tion about the differences between
the two illnesses and the appropriate
-treatments for each, many people
would stand a better chance of win-
ning the common cold war.
Here are some of the myths and
truths about colds and the flu:
Myth: The flu shot causes the
flu. The flu shot vaccine is made
.from inactive virus, which means
you cannot catch the flu from the
vaccine.
Myth: Antibiotics should be
used to treat the flu. The over pre-


scribing of antibiotics has the poten-
tial to be a global health care crisis.
Disease-causing bacteria are quickly
becoming resistant to many of these
drugs. In addition, influenza is a vi-
ral infection and does not respond to
antibiotics.
Myth: Chicken soup and herbal
remedies are great treatments for
cold and flu. While chicken soup
may make you feel better psycho-
logically, it has never been clinically
proven to be effective in treating a
cold or the flu.
Appropriate treatments include


Dispelling Cold, Flu Mytl








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...


Writer Responds To Comments


In November 30 Foggy Column


Dear Editor: best, military power?
Interesting that Mr. Foggy in his I don't know if he is, but I am still
column of Nov. 30 brings up so waiting on "credible" evidence on
many issues under the cover head- those potential evils.
line of "War Manipulation." Not knowing where I fall in the
It may be difficult to answer them "intelligent and educated" portion of
all, but an attempt at some of them the population, my opinions about
could be worthwhile. this war 'have changed only mod-
9 How much manipulation, if any, is estly since its beginning: "mission'
;debatable and what he considers to accomplished," and the present.
be "credible" evidence is unknown, My observations rely on what I
"but it would appear that he has con- read and hear. We know that the
veniently forgotten the Downing world's intelligence communities
'Street memo. were wrong about Saddam's poten-
; Remember that one which stated tial and perceived threat.
tt(hat "'intelligence was being fixed Only George-Bush and Tony Blair
'around policy'." He also appears to decided to act. With their actions,
have forgotten that the administra- totally despoiling .all the good will
'tion was fixated on Iraq immedi- that sprang forth after Sept. 11,
'atel, on Sept. 11, according to. much of the world was with us.
[Richard Clark, despite the fact that Now most of the world disagrees
'at that time there was no known with us to the point of disgust by
hlink, then, as now, between Saddam' many, Yes, many Democrats made
,and Al Qaida. the same mistake as "W" did based
k Has Mr. Fogg.\ also forgotten that on that faulty, data, but 22 senators
we were told that Iraq had WMD's, did not accept those facts stated by
bio. weapons, was building a nuclear the administration.
arsenal, and that we were in immi- So whose fault is that ? The,
.nent danger from a. third rate, at_Democrats who, believed the 'ad-


ministration, and now who disagree,
knowing they were given erroneous,- Now as a "member of the children
dare we say manipulated, informa- of the greatest generation" I can ad-
tion then? dress the "cut and run" statement


Seeing that all the previous rea-,
sons for invading Iraq were evapo-
rating suddenly, the war was about
democracy and deposing a despot, a
dictator that was totally supported
by the Reagan administration, when
he was killing Kurds and fighting
with Iran, as an aside, similar to our
support of the Taliban when they
were fighting the Soviets.
The world is full of dictatorial re-'
gimes that we do nothing about.
Why Iraq and Saddam? This is one
point where my viewpoint has
changed.
Iraq was clearly about oil. Iraq II
was supposed to be about an imme-
diate danger, links to Al Qaida, arid
terrorism, then about freeing a coun-
try so we could create a democratic
state.
But now I believe it is once again
all about oil. The question then be-
comes, is this war worth it for. the
oil.


about Vietnam.
Does Mr. Foggy seriously believe
that the boomers can be blamed for
that debacle? Can we point out that
it was the "greatest generation" that
ran the Vietnamese War? It was my
generation that died in it, for the
most part.
'Fortunately my contemporaries re-
alized it and decided to do some-
thing about it, just as many people
are realizing that Iraq 'II is, and will
continue to be a never ending quag-
mire until we leave, and yes, until
we free ourselves from middle east
oil which leads us to many other


discussions.
Mr. Foggy'again points out that
"reasonable discussion and
debate...is clearly part of the demo-
cratic process," then goes on to state
that if those debates are used in a
political context, they are somehow
wrong.
American History is replete with
stories of how any issue at any time
is fair game, in the game of politics.
This time is no different.
I agree that there should be "seri-
ous political consequences: for those
that involved the US in this war.
There are those that believe that
George W. Bush has committed im-
peachable offenses and should be
removed from office for his many
missteps, inaccuracies, and half
truths he has promulgated on the
American -public, let alone the
deaths of more than 2,000 American
servicemen and women as well as
tens of thousands of Iraqis.
The absurd idea that we should
stay in Iraq because of those who
have already died is convoluted rea-
soning at best.


The sooner we leave, the sooner'
we stop sending billions of dollars a
year to Arab hot beds of extremists,
and, the sooner no more Americans
will die needlessly and pointlessly.
I totally agree with Mr. Foggy in
that we should hold our elected offi-
cials totally accountable for this in-
sane war and that begins with
George W. Bush.
As to his use of an old saying,
"put up or shut up," and the newest
mantra of the other opposition party,
"cut and run," I see no fault in rec-
ognizing mistakes and doing some-
thing constructive with that knowl-
edge, leaving Iraq, the sooner the
better, as I see it.
If he wants to call that "cut and
run," fine.
When will "W" explain to the
American public how, or if he ever
had a plan to fight terrorism by cre-
ating the most fertile terrorist train-
ing facility in the world, namely
Iraq.
As Mr. Foggy stated: "Put up or
shut up, "Mr. Bush."
Harry Brenner


Residents Encouraged To Vote For


Candidates V
Dear Editor:
One has to ask, the question why
would someone from West Palm
Beach be so incensed by what is
happening in Jefferson County.
My family. is one of the founding
families going back. to the turn of
the century.
Growing up, we had the freedom
and sense of community that Jeffer-
son County now has.
My neighbors were like my ex-
tended family. No one locked their
doors.
My father would load up our car
with all of our friends and take us
up to the farm. We not only built the
house, but in the process we'built
our-character-and selfesteem. ,"'
* We v.ent hunting, fishing, cooked
what we caught, and learned respect
for nature. Most of all, we learned
to respect other people.
I have watched'as outside forces
commiindeered our community, de-
stroying its character.
First by redefining what freedom
is, and then rolling over people,
many of whom. have left for com-
munities like yours.
It's riot an accident that some of
.the most adamant people fighting
'the take over of your community are
refuges from towns like mine.
Is freedom the right. to life. liberty
and the pursuit of happiness, or to
sue' your neighbor, take their land,
and destroy their sense of security?
Do the rights of the majority give
way to the very wealthy minority?
When do' you say no to these
people? Do you wait until you find
yourself in the cross hairs, hoping
.someone will do for you what you
have failed to do for others?
The comp plan that is in place pro-
vides a framework that gives' people
the ability to plan their lives and
their future.,
When your government is com-
manded and' turned against you, it
becomes your responsibility to stand
up and say: Hell, NO! Your tax dol-
lars'are now being used to facilitate
the destruction of your lifestyle.
The comp plan as it is. is also a
:filter. The people who want to join
the. community will fight to keep it


Freewheeling
(Continued From Page 1)
will bring quality water to contami-
nated areas of the county and elimi-
nate the proliferation of septic tanks,
an environmental time-bomb wait-
ing to happen.
Tellefsen, for his part, kept em-
phasizing that the map was very pre-
liminary. "This is a beginning
point," he kept saying.
But the final word may have come
from Planning Commission Attor
ney Scott Shirley. He pointed ou
that resolution of the issue was go
ing to entail a long and extensive
policy debate.


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


Vho Support Their Views
as it is. People .who want to com- Be there, to make your voice
mandeer it will form their own en- heard, while it still mear
claves, gating themselves, with something.
security guards to maintain that Freedom is not ,free, as man
separation. Americans died to make sure yc
Once established, they always get have this right. There have always
what they want. They want a cheap been challenges to freedom. Apath
place to live, and a pliable local is most insidious.
government that will bend to their Stand up for your neighbor, an
demands. they will stand up for you. Or la
When an elected body goes down and get rolled over.
against the interests of the people If you saw, on Fox Ne%\ s, the sp(
who elected them,, hard questions cial on eminent domain seizure la
need to be asked. week, then you know what is hal
This is a golden moment when opening in my town.
your vote still counts. I am quite John Marshall Dewe
sure you will be betrayed tomorrow.


Williams Wins Quilt Raffle


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Ellen Williams won the drawing
for the North Carolina Lilly Quilt,
held during the recent downtown
Christmas Mixer.



Youths
(Continued From Page 1)
SThe lack of organized activities
for the county's youths -- and the
need for a .center to address the
problem -- is an issue that arises pe-
riodically in the community.
The latest effort involves a group
that is seeking a tie-inf with the
YMCA.
ganization ,such as the YMCA
(Young Men's Christian
Association).
"If you can word the motion as a
community center instead of a
YMCA facility, we can work on it,"
Bailar said.
So done, was Hall's response.


SUNSET GU 1LL
& Reception Center


tv Breakfast Hours
S&Menu
Sat. & Sun. *8a.m.-12 p.m.
Mon., Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 11 a.
S Saturday 8 a.m. -10 p.m.


;e
is

iy
IU
Ys
ly

nd
4y

se-
st
p-

.y


The Crazy Quilters quilt raffle has
raised $1265 to date, the proceeds
of which, after very little expense,
will go to the Jefferson Senior Citi-
zen Center.
"Thanks so much to the commu-
nity for supporting the need for the
Jefferson Senior Citizen. Center,"
says quilter Barbara Sheats.
Members met, on Dec. 6 to begin
cuLtting the blue and white pieces for
their newest quilt, .the "Oregon
Trail."
They will .meet at the home of.
member Jeanne Brernner 6 p.m. on,.
Tuesday until the quilt pieces have
been cut and pieced together. Then,
the quilting will resume back at the
Library.

Your Hometown Newspaper
Monticello News
Keeping You Informed
Of Our
Growing Community





925-7882 '
-At-he Villages
SOf St. Marks




MEMBER
dates still available
for holiday parties.

.m. 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday
* Sunday 8 a.m. 9 p.m. .A


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba


SMont620ce Yllork St., P.O. Box 425,

850-997-5553', F

Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
sonalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


The Jefferson County Recycling Proqram accepts
the following items for, recycling'.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes,-etc.

All glass 'bottles," jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection o
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)


Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0-184.











'PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005


Lifestyle


Red Hat Ladies Hold

Christmas Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

1 Cox's Soul Food Restaurant is
4 gearing up for the holiday season
and for the complimentary Christ-
mas Dinner they and generous
members of the community prepare
^ and offer to the less fortunate in the
q area.
.j This annual meal is already in the
Smoking. The community's help is
Once again needed with food and
supplies for the preparation.
In addition blankets, quilts, coats,
sweaters, especially larger sizes,
are being sought for a clothing give
away to coincide with the dinner.
The elderly citizens of this com-
Smunity are appreciative of all the
, kindness' done for them.
.i The most recent Thanksgiving
meal delivered by Cox's -served,
200 community recipientA needmtn
: help with their holiday. neal S-ome
f 50 more meals were delivered to


Jefferson


December

, DEBBIE SNAPP
. Staff Writer

The Jefferson Nursing Center has
Been keeping residents busy the
early part of December with a
^ schedule of fun events and enter-
Stainment.
P Resident Catheryn B. Hicks cele-
- brated her 85th birthday with fam-
ily and friends Dec. 5
Dec. 9 the staff held its own
Christmas party.
While the staff was enjoying the
; party, John Lilly, 4-H county coor-
'!. dinator, and 4-H members and
leaders entertained the residents
with Christmas songs and skits.
On Saturday, Dec. 10 members
from the Elizabeth Baptist Church
visited for a Christmas Carole med-
ley with the residents.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Muinlicelk Kiwanis Club
I joined with the H.i-allhh Start Coali-
tion of Jefferson, Madison, and
Taylor counties and the Jefferson
County Health Department to help
fund a "Back To Sleep" program to
prevent and eliminate infant crib
deaths.
These deaths, often called Sud-
den Infant Death Syndrome or
SSIDS, have most recently been at-
tributed to infant sleeping on their
stomachs and suffocation from
7: loose bedding materials or pillows.
The Kiwanis-supported program
provides infant sleeping outfits,
with an embossed "Back To Sleep"
on the front as a reminder to par-
ents to place their infants on their
backs to sleep.
Kiwanis locally and nationally is
a leader in supporting child related
initiatives.
For more information on the pre-
vention of infant death from SIDS,


|: ": .: .






bara Sheats, Carolyn IVMilligan and Pat
Monge. (News Photo)


Cox Soul Food To Prepare


Holiday Dinner For Needy


missed."
"Special thanks to Reverend
Marvin Graham and the Harvest
*Center, Jennifer Allen, Steve Hall,
Vivian Thompson-and all the others
who helped to serves and deliver
the meals," Cox concludes.


2Southwe

229.225.


the staff working on Thanksgiving
Day at Jefferson and Brynwood
Nursing Centers.
Donors in the community in-
cluded: the Greater Fellowship MB
Church, the Harvest Center,. the
House to House Prayer Band, Liv-
ing Word Church, Memorial MB
Church, St. Tabernacle COGIC,
Minister Terry Presley, and Rever-
end James Mack.
Louie Barrington, Max Bilinski,
George Bythwood, Dr. David
Green, Martha Hall, Henry Mays,
Gladys Neely, Rose Smith, Emma
Stokes, Maggie Stokes.
Allen's Liquors, AmeriGas,
Barnhart Pest Control, Bush Baby,
Great Adventure Outfitters, IGA
employees, Jackson's Drug Store,
Kelly & Kelly Coldwell Bankers
Properties, Thompson's Amoco,
the members of VFW Post 251
"'Some donors chose not to be
named,`" ~a\s Gloria Cox-Jones.
"We honor their wishes and thank
them and any others we may have


Nursing


Events
Members from Mount Olive
Church followed with their rendi-
tions of songs of the season.
Wednesday, Dec. 14 begins with
the Baptist Ladies arriving to sing
songs and visit the residents.
The Jefferson County Head Start
will be making a visit on Thursday,
promising an entertaining holiday
program.
The annual Christmas party for
the residents, family members and
friends is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dec. 17. Special treats and
gifts are planned for this festive oc-
casion.
Activity Director Voncell Ed-
wards can be reached at 997-2313
for information about these events,
upcoming events, and for volun-
teers to help with the ,entertaining
of the residents.


contact the Healthy Start Coalition
at 948-2741 or the Health Depart-
ment at 342-0170, extension 106.


"DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Red Hats of
America held their Christmas meet-
ing Saturday at the Chamber of
Commerce, and celebrated the sea-
son with a gift exchange and a sing
along.
After a luncheon of Pizza Lasa-
gna, and salad, hostesses Mona
Mackenzie, Mary Nowell, and
Thelma Birdwell introduced the
holiday program to the group.
Fran Black accompanied the la-
dies on her keyboard, while they all
sang Christmas songs and other
songs of the season.
Enhancing the musical program
was a bell ringer who used the
added accompaniment when appro-
priate.
The gift exchange followed and
included gifts of holiday
ornaments, Red Hat scrapbooks,
wind chimes, lottery tickets and
hand made items.
Poetry was read by the members.
"A 1950's Soldiers Sonnet" was,
read by Mary Connell, and "Re-
membered Names and Christmas


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Kiwanis Helps To Fund

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005 PAGE 7


Christmas






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Christmas





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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005 PAGE 9


Warriors, Coach Named



Conference Champions


Casey Gunnels was named as the
All Conference Player of the Year
and the Warriors were named Con-


Sticrence nampions.
For the first time in school his- Warriors named to the Panhandle
ry, six Aucilla Christian Acad- Football Conference Team include:
"my varsity football players and the Football Conference Team include:
school head coach were named to Colby Roberts; offensive line,
.e Football Panhandle Conference. olby R ; pnie n
' Head Coach Dave Roberts was Colby Waddail; punt kicker; and
Iad d the Conference Coach of the Chris Tuten, offensive guard.
ned the Conference Coach of the On defense, Ben Grantham, defen-


ACA, JCHS Athletes

Jammed Big Bend Leaders


I`RAN HUNT
Utaff Writer
Is-


87 points.
Keandra Seabrooks stands at
number nine, with 87 points, falling
from fnr


1. Aucilla Christian Academy var- Massey is at number three in re-
aity boys and Jefferson County bounds with 68, falling from the
J-igh School varsity girls have number one slot, and Donna Ran-
;gain been named to the list of Big som was added to the list, standing
Spend Leaders in basketball, last at number four with 60.
'week. Nakidra Thompson was also_
- In the boy's division, ACA's Ben- added, standing at number nine
*43rantham fell to number 19 from with 51, and Seabrooks stands at
free with 67 for. the season. number 14 with 47, down from
Ydded was Stephen Griffin who number three.
ranked at number 15 with 62 :
. Grantham was added in rebounds, Seabrooks was added in assists
i'tanding at number four with 56. and stands at number four with 25,
Griffin, also added, sitnds at num- and Massey was also added, stand-
ber five with 51. ing at number five with 23.
V Casey Gunnels was added in Seabrooks was also added in
|steals, standing at number tPo.o v. ith steals, standing at number five with
*17, as was Griffin,, standing at'- 31 for the season.
numberr threee with 13. In related news, as a team, the
* In :he girl's division, JCHS' Lady Tigers are ranked at the num-
,Shaumesed Massey is at number ber five team in the state for the
m1ine, falling from number six, with second week straight.


ACA JV Girls Defeat

Branford, Maranatha


4FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
19


When the Lady Warriors s
off against Maranatha, A
squeaked by 20-18.


Coacn Ginni Joyner si
The Aucilla Christian Academy Lady Warriors were down
JV girl's win two games. point with one minute remain:
In the game against Branford, the the fourth, and Hannah Sc
.Lady Warriors won, 18-14. pulled out the game-winning
ACA remained scoreless in the point bucket.
.first period, scored 12 points in the ACA scored four points
second, three in the third,, and three first; two in the second, five
Sin the fourth period. third and nine in the fourth p.
Michelle Mathis scored six points; Sorensen also led the Lady
'Savannah Williams, five points; Jo- riors in scoring with ten point
odie Bradford, four points; Chelsea Also scoring were Willian
'Dobson, two points; and Miranda points; Bradford and Cc
t:Wider, one point. Brasington two points each.


ACA Middle School Boys

.Win Over Madison Academy


*RAN HUNT
|taff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
middlee school boy's basketball
,team climbed to a 3-1 season after
defeating Madison Academy Tues-
lay, 26-22.
i Coach Ray Hughes said the War-
'iors led 10-0 at the end of the first
^period.
Leading the score was Alex Dun-
1le with 12 points, three rebounds
nd six steals.
} Brandon Dunbar, six points,
seven rebounds, five steals and four
assists; Wilson Lewis, two points,
ihree rebounds, three steals and one
assist; Clark Christie, four points,
Ssix rebounds and one steal; John
iStephens, two points, two
rebounds; Brian Scholte, six re-
,bounds, three steals; and Daniel
yWard, four rebounds.
The Warriors face Munroe, 4:30
p.m., Friday, there.
Hughes said that ACA beat them
in the first game of the season, 29-
"12.


squared
kCA

aid the
by one
ning in
orensen
gthree-

in the
e in the
period.
y War-
ts.
ns, six
ourtney


"'But I'm sure that they (Munroe)
are a lot better now," said Hughes.
"If we play well, we should do
pretty good."

HMS Squeaks BY'

Taylor County
40-38 Tuesday
The Howard Middle School
boy's basketball team squeaked by
Taylor County Middle, 40-38,
Tuesday.
Coach Steve Hall said that fol-
lowing the Bees first half slump,
they began to make a comeback.
By the fourth quarter, HMS was
down by 16 points and then they
broke out to take the win.
Hall sets the Bees' record at 2-1.
Demontray Johnson scored six
points; Marquice Dobson, 11
points, two free-throws.; Deontae
Jones, nine points, four rebounds;
Devondrick Nealy, eight points;
and Gregory :Dodson, three re-
bounds.


sive lineman; Jason Holton, and
Tuten, defensive backs.
Grantham, Gunnels, and Colby
Roberts also received Honorable
Mention in this year's All Big Bend.
The Warriors and coach were
awarded a trophy for the team and
one for Roberts, Friday morning
during a ceremony at the school.
Roberts said the six boy's would
later each receive a plaque ac-
knowledging their conference
achievements.
"They're real proud," said Rob-
erts. "It's good for them and it's.
good representation for the school,
and the football team and their ac-
complishments this year.
"I'm really proud of them. They
worked hard for the honor," Rob-
erts added.
He could not recall the season
statistics of the six Warriors but
did remember those of Gunnels,
who had 220 carries for a total of
1,411 yards, breaking the previous
school record of 1,392.
"Casey's record will be a really
hard one for anyone to beat in the
future," said Roberts. "His record
reflects that the Warrior offensive
line really came through, allowing
him the time and the room to run
the ball. They did an excellent
job."


NAKIDRA THOMPSON attempts to get by
Shanice Brooks who is blocking her from


::.,, 3; ..,, ...., .# .'.,.. 4
.. . .. .. .'.' .

" ,. ,. "" '.*


: '.f. -;. .. ".





the lay up, during his practice session at
Jefferson County High School.


Lady Tigers Rank In State


Poll First Time in 7 Years


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

For the first time in seven years,
the Jefferson County High School
girl's basketball team made the the
state poll ranking, and Coach Bill
Brumfield is looking forward to


JCHS Varsity Girls

Down Lincoln 40-37


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity girl's baskeibAli
debated ,'incoln 4,0-36, cliinbed t
7-1 season last week'.
For the second week in 'a row, the
Lady Tigers rank at the number
five team in the state in class 2-A.
In the first period, JCHS scored
10 points to Lincoln's four; in the
second, JCHS, 11, Lincoln, three;
in the third, JCHS, six, Lincoln,
seven; and in the fourth, JCIIS 13


and Lincoln 18.
Leading the charge for Jefferson
was Keandra Seabrooks with 11
points, six rebounds, two assists,
two steals and one blocked shot.
Deidra Arnold, eight points, five
rebounds, one -assist and three-
steals; and Donnia Ransonri! eight
points, 11 rebounds, three assists,
one steal anid one blocked shot.
Shaumese Massey, seven points,
11 rebounds, six assists, three
steals, three blocked shots; and
Nakidra Thompson, six points, 12
rebounds and one steal.


Lady Warriors Split

Last Two Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors split their last two
games for a 5-4 season.
The ladies won over Westwood
47-35. '
Leading the charge for ACA was
ninth grader Mallory Plaines with
22 points, 14 rebounds, two assists,
:eight steals and two blocked shots.
Bethany Saunders, nine points,
seven assists; Brittany Hobbs, six
points, six rebounds, two assists,
three steals; and Lindsey Day, six
points, 13 rebounds, two assists


and two steals.
Rikki Roccanti. four points; Cait-
lin Murph.i. five rebounds, two as-
sists; and Stephanie.Dobson, three
rebounds.
In the second game FAMU clob-
bered the Warriors 54-14.
Coach Daryl Adams attributed
the the loss to ACA's missed shots.
Day scored four points; Plaines,
three points, nine rebounds, one
steal, one blocked shot; Murphy,
two points, two rebounds, one as-
sist; Roccanti, two points; Corie
Smith, four points; and Hobbs,
three rebounds and one steal.


clinching his 100th career win this
week.
But the Lady Tigers are taking
nothing for granted, said
Brumfield. "And they will not un-
derestimate anyone and continue
to work hard."
Brumfield, who is in his 10th
year of coaching, added, "You can
see the confidence is really build-
ing this year, and they believe that
they can really achieve something.
"The best part is that the girls
have a lot of respect for each other.
They are like sisters. They get
along very well and it has been
fun," Brumfield added. "The kids
are having a great time. I don't
have to beg them to come to prac-
tice and when they are there, they
are ready to go to v ok
The Lady Tigers, who scrimmage
against the boy's JV team, pride
themselves on unselfishness, team-
work and the team motto, "Play
Hard".
The Lady Tigers have many
strong players on the team, with
cornerstones, Keandra Seabrooks, a
four-year starter, and junior Shau-
mese Massey, a three-year starter.
The pair, as of last week, have
combined to average 24 points and
17 rebounds per game.
Starters also include juniors
Donna Ransom, and Nakidra
Thompson, and sophomore, Deidra
Arnold.


There in also young quality depth
in players sophomore Shanise
Brooks, junior India Wyche and
freshmen Keneshia Coates and La-
toya Footman.
The Lady Tigers ranked at a 7-1
season, as of last week, and Brum-
field attributes that single loss to
John Paul, to the fact that Ransom
and Massey had fouled out in the
fourth period.
Brumfield also credits assistant
coach Nikki Cooks for the resurrec-
tion of the Lady Tigers this season.
Cooks, who was a four-year
starter at JCHS, earning all-state
honors and .basketball scholarships
to TCC and Central Florida.
The Lady Tigers went 19-3 in her
senior season, 1998, losing to
Pensacola Catholic in the Regional
Finals.
Brumfield said the goal of the
Lady Tigers is to beat Maclay this
week for the second time this sea-
son. "When we played them
before, we beat them bad, but that
doesn't mean anything," said
Brumfield. "We have to beat them
to make it to the tournament, and
that is our goal."
He added that JCHS is also striv-
ing to beat NFC, fourth ranked and
undefeated (7-0) for the season,
January 5.
Both Maclay and NFC are also in
District 5-2A with JCHS.


Catch it here at the

Monticello News


Reerch saves ives..f U


kt-T..l U ~f'~ y.i r.~i ~


Saturday Service ALLROADS HOMASVILLE
S na LyEAD TO (J lHONDA
fSunday Salesi rTHOM|ilL'H I N1-800-771-1144
[610E.Jtrk S St. Thomasville, Georgia


.1
IRAN HUNT
*taff Writer
IK


GreT n ....
STO RAGE








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005


Lilly Also Won State Awarc

JOHN LILLY receives a plaque from Mary Williams,
tional Association of Extention 4-H Agent Conference
Seattle.



4-H Coordinator earns

State, National Award


PEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

John G. Lilly, Sr., Jefferson-


County 4-H. Coordinator/UF, re-
cently received a Meritorious
Award Plaque from the Florida As-
sociation of Extension,4-H Agents
at the Florida Association of Exten-



Christmas
(Continued From Page 4)-
ganization out there circling like a
buzzard ready to pounce on any
constitutional issue that suits their
agenda.
They are, of course, the American
Civil Liberties Union. They believe
that it is their interpretation of the
constitution that counts and they are
willing to sue the pants off any or-
ganization, public or private, that
dares to disagree with them.
*To the country's dismay, their suc-
cessful brute snength and cavema1,
tactics has met ,. iih resounding suc-,
cess. I'm not sure, but I wouldn't be
surprised to learn that there is an
ACLU somewhere out there behind
the current national movement to
steal our Christmas.
The very essence and tradition of
good will and gift giving comes di-
rectly from Jesus Christ's birth and
the gifts he received from the Wise.
Men. If we are willing to eliminate
Ohristmas, then it only stands to rea-
son that we also stop the tradition of'
cprd and gift giving. Then let's see
what the likes of Wal*Mart think
about a policy of political correct-
ness. -
'As for me, I am going to continue
.calling December 25th "Christmas".
- regarding those spineless pathetic
creatures among us who easily fold
to pressures to eliminate Christmas,
Still wish you a Happy.Holiday.
(Dennis Foggy is a retired U.S.
Army Lt. Colonel and a former
school teacher. He is a resident of
Jefferson County.)


Notice of Application for Tax Deed:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.Z.
Harper the holder of the following'
certificates has filed said certificates for a
tax deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names
in which it was assessed are as follow:
certificate No. 214. Year of Issuance 1998
Description or Property Exhibit A begin at
the Northwest corner of the Southeast
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of
Section 36, Township 1 North, Range 3
East, Jefferson County, Florida and run S.
89 degrees 42 minutes 30 seconds E.
975.14 feet to a point, thence South 466.48
feet to a point in the center of a County
graded road, thence N. 71 degrees 08
minutes W. 1032.0 feet along the center of,
said road to a point, thence W. 0 degrees
37 minutes E. 134.74 feet to the point of
beginning. Containing 6.73 acres, more or
less, and being a part of the Southeast
Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of
Section 36, Township 1 North, Range 3
East, Jefferson County, Florida. Name in
which assessed John Lawrence, Jr. and'
Annie Lawrence, his wife. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,,
Na- State of Flbrida. Unless such certificate or
, in certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January 2006, at 11:00


s


sion Professionals Conference in
Sarasota.
. He subsequently received another
Meritorious Award from the Na-
tional Association of Extension
4-H Agents, las% month, at the Na-
tional Association of Extension
,4-H Agents Conference held in Se-
attle, WA.
The Meritorious Service Award'
is a recognition for National Asso-
ciation E\iension 4-H Association
members who are actively engaged
in Extension youth programs and
who have served and maintained
membership in NAE4-HA for more
than 15 years.
Lilly states that more than 52.
percent of county youth are en-
rolled in 4-H Clubs, with the enrol-
lement increasing on an average of.
two to three percent per year.
Currently there are 12 clubs, con-
sisting of community clubs; horse,
sewing, cooking, gardening clubs,
and school 4-H Clubs.
There has been ;an 11 percent in-
crease in count "eyveri participa-
"tion er'tfasv'v'd5r7 Ll I Vrip'tes.


Rain Cancels

Tennis Games;

Points Split
The matches slated for play
Thursday for the Monticello Mood
Swings, the A-league tennis team
and The Capitol City Aces, were
canceled and the points split be-
tween the teams.
"The rain was too heavy for
play," said Captain Patty Hardy.
"So all of the teams in the league
split .points, giving each team
three."
Hardy said this placed the Mood.
Swings in the 1lth place position
for the .first half of .the season.,
"That's better than at the end,"'
quipped Hardy. I
The ladies will enjoy a period of
rest for the remainder of the month.
They will resume play against he
Golden Eagle Talons, 9:30 a.m.,,
Jan. 5 in Tom Brown Park.


The Jefferson County Board of
Commissioners will hold a Wor
.4:00 p.m., Thursday, December
at the Jefferson County Public
375 S. Water Street, Monticello,
to review the salary of the Ambula
Director.


Jv warriors

Lose To

Westwood 34


f County
kshop at
15, 2005,


a.m. dated this 30th day of November
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28, c
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX
DEED: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that R.Z. Harper the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 125 Year of
Issuance 1998. Description or Property
The South two (2) acres of the N '/ of NE
of SE '/4 of Section 4, Township 1 North,
Range 3 East. The intent and purpose of
this deed is to convey two (2) acres of land,
more or less. This being a portion of that
property deeded to Annie Williams Jones
and Alex Jones, her husband, by Satarah
Williams, a widow, by deed dated March
18, 1969, and of record in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida in the Official Record
Book 39, page 577. Name in which
assessed Moses Douglas Jones. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificates or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the .property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28, c


.Lirary, In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Florida, Auction January, 7, 2006 @ 10:00 am:
ance/Fire 1993 Mitz Vin#4A3CF44BOPE047683;
January 14, 2006 @ 10:00am: 1995 Honda
Vin# 1HGCD7235SA045225; 1994 Chev
Vin# 2G1WL54T7R9164747; 1988 Honda
Vin# JHMBA413XJC029929: To be sold
as is for Towing & Storage charges.
Conditions & Terms at Auction. Dave's"
Towing .7261 East Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344 / (850) 342-1480
1-19 12/14,c


Notice of Application for Tax Deed.
The Aucilla Christian Academy NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
JV boy's lost to Westwood 34-19, .Transit Rentals of TLH the holder of the
last week, falling to 2-3 season, following certificates has filed said
Leading the scote for the Warri- certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
Leading the score or the Warn- The' certificate numbers and years of
ors was Daniel Greene with five issuance, the description of the property,
points, four steals and one rebound. and the names in which it was assessed are
A. J. Connell, three points, four as follows: Certificate No. 234 Year of
rebounds; Elliott Lewis, three Issuance 1999. Commence at the
'Southwest corner of the Northwest
points, six rebounds, one steal; Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of
Kyle Barnwell, two points, three' 'Section 15, Township I South, Range 3
rebounds, one assist and Stephen East, Jefferson County, Florida and run
Dollar, three points, one rebound, North 00 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds
e assist and one steal. West, along the West line of the Northwest
one assist and one steal. Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of said
Luke Whitmer, one point, one re- Section 15, 584.61 feet to the Southwest
bound and one steal; Prateen Patel, corner of that certain parcel of land as
two points, two rebounds; Casey described in the Public Records of
Anderson, one rebound, one assist; Jefferson' County, Florida in Official
and Rob Searcy, two teals. Record Book 79, page 301, thence North
:,.:.-a Q. '^ .^- .89 degrees. 15,minytes 00 seconds. East.,
.-..... ..ong.4he.South.boundary of said-Official
Record Book 79, page 301, 250.16 feet to


The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision



Monticello News

Classifieds


I

WE TAKE THE
DUNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


the Southwest corner of that certain parcel
of land as described in Official Record
Book 111, page 771 for a POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence from said Point Of
Beginning continue North 89 degrees 15
minutes 00 seconds East, along the South
boundary of said Official Record Book
111, page 771, 202.26 feet to a point,
thence South 10 degrees 01 minutes 14
seconds West 416.60 feet to a point, thence
South 83 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds
West 276.79 feet to a point, thence North
205.63 feet to a point, thence South 89
degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds West
203.44 feet to a point on the West line of
said Northwest Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter, thence North 00 degrees 25
minutes 05 seconds West, along said West
line, 30.0 feet to a point, thence North 89
degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East 203.66
feet to a point, thence North 205.63 feet to
the Point Of Beginning. Containing 2.49
acres, more or less. Name in which
assessed Jack Jerome Gaffney. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January, 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
12/7, 12/14, 12/21, 12/28, c


Notice of Application for Tax Deed
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
Transit Rentals of TLH the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows: Certificate No. 243 Year of
Issuance 1999. Commence at the Southeast
corner of the Northeast quarter of section
34, Township 1. South, Range 3 East,
Jefferson County, Florida and run West
1325.42 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence continue West 340.0
feet to a point, thence N. 0 degrees 16
minutes W. 1576.4 feet to a point on the
South right-of-way line of S.R. S-259,
thence N. 89 degrees 44 minutes E. 340.0
feet aling said right-of-way line to a point,
thence S. 0 degreeN 16 minutes E. 1577.98
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 12.31 acres, more or less, and
being a part of the North half of section
31, Township 1 South, Range 3 East,
Jefferson County, Florida. Name in which
assessed Southeastern Investment
Development Corp. All of said property
being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law and property described in such
certificate or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 12th day of January, 2006, at 11:00
a.m. dated this 30th day of November,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
'12/7,; 12/14. 12'21. 1228. C ...


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF' THE


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Products on Sale
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997-0058









YOURS MINE & OURS
(PG)
Fri. 5:00 7:25 9:35 Sat.
12:40 2:50 5:00 7:25 9:35
Sun. 12:40 2:50 5:00 7:25
Mon. Thurs. 5:00 7:25
NO PASSES

HARRY POTTER and
the Goblet of Fire
(PG13)
Fri. 4:15 8:15 Sat. 12:30 -
4:15 8:15 Sun 12:30 4:15 -
8:15 Mon. Thurs' 4:15 8:15

CHICKEN LITTLE (G)
Fri. 5:15 7:30 9:45 Sat.
12:45 3:00 5:15 7;30 9:45
Sun 12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30
Mon. Thurs.
5:15 7:30

WALK THE LINE
(PG13)
Fri. 4:05 7:05 10:05 Sat 1:05
- 4:05 7:05 10:05 Sun. 1:05
4:05 7:05 Mon. Thurs.
4:05 7:05

CHRONICLES OF
NARINA (PG)
Fri. 4:00 7:00 10:00. Sat.
1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00 Sun.
1:00 4:00 7:00 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:00 7:00
NO PASSES

JUST FRIENDS (PG13)
Fri. 4:35 ,7:10 9.40 ,Sat :45,
4:35 -7:;10 9:40 Sun. 1:45 -
4:35 7:10 Mon. Thurs. 4:35
7:10
NO PASSES


"N


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. v







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005 PAGE 11 -


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions W- ednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for FridaN
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS'
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 05-121 IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN A. REESE, Deceased. NOTICE TO
CREDITORS The administration of the
estate of John A. Reese, deceased, whose
date of death was October 5, 2005; is
pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division; File
Number 05-121; the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello,
FL 32344. The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons, who have claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must file their
claims, and who have been served a copy
of this notice, must file their claims with
this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER
OF THE DATE THAT IS THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
other creditors of the decedent and other
persons who have claims or demand s
against the decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with. this
court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS: December 7, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Cathi C. Wilkinson, of Pennington, Moore,
Wilkinson, Bell .& Dunbar, P.A. Post
Office Box 10095 Tallahassee, FL 32302
(850 222-3533 (850) 222-2126 (fax) Fla.
Bar #0282693. Personal Representative
Diane M. Purvis 413 Windmill Lane
Monticello, FL 32344.
12/7,12/14, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
FILE NO. 05-117-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
BRUCE C. DURRANT, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS The
administration of the Estate of Bruce C.
Durrant,'deceased, whose date of death
was October 23. 2005: is pending in the
-Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Number
05-117-PR; the address of which is
Jeffersof County Courthouse, Monticello,
FL 32344. The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and. the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons, who have claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, and who have been
served a cop} of this notice. must file their..
claims with this court ON OR BEFORE
THE ALTER OF THE DATE THAT IS
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the
descending and other persons who have
claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS: December 7, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Cathi C. Wilkinson, of Pennington, Moore,
Wilkinson, Bell & Dunbar, P.A. Post
Office Box 10095 Tallahassee, FL 32302
(850) 222-3533 (850) 222-2126 (fax) Fla.
Bar #0282693. Personal Representative
Sandra H. Durrant Post Office Box 373
Lloyd, FL 32337.
12/7, i,'A, c
HELP WANTED .


HELP WANTED:- FOR RENT-- .


850-973-9487. Application packet
must be received by 12/30/2005. EOE
i2/14, 16, 21, 23, c
Maintenance Worker wanted at
NFCC. This position will work in
several trade areas which includes:
College events set ups; Furniture
moving; Maintenance and repair of
buildings and/or equipment. This
unskilled position is labor intensive
and requires heavy lifting.
Qualifications: Must be High School
Graduate with general knowledge of
maintenance functions and use of
minor equipment. Applications to:
Director HR, North Florida
Community College, 325 NW Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
An application is available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application must be
received by 12/14/2005. EOE.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, c
P.T. Experienced bookkeeper needed
in Lloyd, must have good references.
Call 322-6600.
12/7, 9, 14, 16, c
Waitress/cashier part-time. Apply in
person to Court Yard Cafe, 110 East
Dogwood Street.
11/23, tfn, c
Kalan Kennels Holiday help needed:
Entry Level Kennel tech. Must love
animals, be over 18, and willing to
work hard. 850-877-5050
11/30, tfn, c
SERVICES .
Join the family of Christ Episcopal
Church for a traditional Midnight
Mass, starting at, 11:00 p.m.
'Christmas Eve. Arrive early; the
choir starts at 10:00. Regular Sun.
Service is at 10:00. We are three
blocks N of the courthouse. 997-4242.
12/14, pd
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933:3458. --
4/28, rfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense -of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a,drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
,stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump:' Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
FOR RENT
Mobile Home on Ashville Hwy. 2
Bedrooms, I bath $350.00 monthly
$350 Deposit. (850) 997-5434


Country living, 2 bedroom, 2
bathroom, $550 monthly 997-6653.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
FOR SALE
AKC Doberman puppies bred for
good dispositions tails docked.
Females only, shots, wormed, health,
certificated. $425. 997-8404, 556-2337.
12/9, 14, 16, 21, pd
2 Cockatoos $40 both with cage.
342-1456 or 510-0998.
12/9, 14, pd
Margaret and Louie Mills 'have
shelled pecans for sale. 1276 Clark
Rd. 997-2106.
12/9 -30, c


Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limousin bull, 14 months
old, Call 997-0901, leave,
message.
12/9 30, pd
REAL ESTATE
New starter home (1/1) mom/pop. -
in-law suite, vacation or hunters
cabin. 12K. (850) 228-4799
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, pd'
New Home 1288 Sq. Ft. Living Area,
3 bedroom, 2 bath attached garage in
town. Call 850-509-0849..
11/30, 12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30,,


No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
Nursery In
Jefferson County
Seeking Mature Responsible
Man with experience managing
"crews. Must speak Spanish &
English. Excellent Salary, Paid
Vacation, Bonus Benefits
available if qualified.
Call 850-997-8188


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT




Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Train in Florida.
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsm-schools.com


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571





Monticello Christian Academy


Now interviewing for

8th Grade Teacher


Call Pastor Mike

997-6048


KELlY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


For All of Our
Listings
Call 997-5516
or Visit
www.cbkk.com


* 1329 Acres Wooded tract with large
hardwoods and pine. Secluded area with excel-
lent home site $199,350

a 5 Acres Beautiful lot with pecans. High
& dry restricted subdivision. $95,000

a North Ridge Only 8 lots available. High
& dry home sites with great views.
Starting At $10,000 per acre

* 12.16 Acres Beautiful live oaks and pond
pond frontage. There is an existing home on
property, tenant occupied. $299,000
a 16.50 Acres on Lake Miccosukee
$288,750


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Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only
$16,500 per acre


New Listinq! Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on 2.39 acres in
Aucilla Forest & Meadows only $49,995

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse, ,/,bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice p061 a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000.

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street.
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each


On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
k year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000


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SITE MANAGER PT. 15 hrs/wk
Heritage Manor, Monticello, FL
Resume to: Flynn Mgmt. Corp., 516-
Lakeview Rd. Unit 8, Clearwater, FL
33756 Fax: (727) 447-5516.
12/2,7, 9, .4, 16, c
Technical Support Assistant wanted
at NFCC. This full-time position will
serve as technical Assistant for
Campus Theater and public events,
working lighting and/or sound
equipment. This position requires
heavy lifting, climbing, and a flexible
work schedule which may include
nights and weekends. Qualifications:
AA/As preferred. At least one year
experience with audiovisual
equipment and computers required.
Applicants to: Director HR, North
Florida Commnity College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application
packets considered. A complete
packet includes: letter of interest;
resume and application. Application
and full. job description available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call


Choice-Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! 8 acres with big double-
wide and small house on a pretty old hillside
close to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east
side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)


www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., DECEMBER 14, 2005


MILADY'S SHOP won first prize in the down- held Dec. 2, during
town merchants' window decorating contest Down Mixer.


FRAN HUNT t
Staff Writer C

An arrest warrant was obtained -
by FDLE for a Tallahassee man
suspected of the April 8, 2004 bur- t
glary of the Time Saver conven-
ience store on West Washington St. i
The warrant charges Vincent t
Eugene Hicks, 38, with the bur- v
glary. He is also suspected of com-
mitting nearly three dozen burgla- a
ries in the southeast, c
Hicks became the focus of a
multi-agency investigation by t
FDLE, Monticello Police Depart- t
ment, Tallahassee Police Depart- b
ment, Leon County Sheriffs Office (
and several other agencies last
year. t
The agencies began working to-
gether when law enforcement t
agents noticed a common pattern in
burglaries committed in Jefferson,
Leon, Gadsden, Calhoun, Palm
Beach. and Alachua counties as
well as some in Georgia and Ala-
bama.
What drew their attention were
similarities in the way the burgla-
ries were committed such as alarm
systems being disabled, holes
smashed through the walls and the i
type of tools used to open the safes.
The method of entry had earned
the unknown burglars the
nickname, "Hole In The Wall
Gang".
More than 30 cases with losses to-
taling more than $100,000 are be-
lieved to be linked.
In the Monticello burglary, ap-
proximately $4,600 damage was
done. The Burglars knocked a hole


approximately two feet by two feet
through the store's back wall, tore
out pipes and damaged the alarm
systems.
MPD Sgt. Roger Murphy said
however, nothing was taken during
:he burglary. "The alarm system
was deactivated and once they got
nto the-store, they tried to disable
the backup alarm system and acti-
vated it," said Murphy. "We don't
know if they knew they tripped the
ilarm or if they saw the police
coming."
He said that upon responding to
he alarm, MPD Sgt. Tim High-
tower discovered the hole in the
back wall, inspected the area and
discovered what was believed to be
a blanket used by the burglar as
he hole was knocked in the wall.
"He recalled similar reports of
he Hole In The Wall Gang and
called for backup," Murphy added.
The blanket was collected and sub-
mitted to the FDLE crime lab.
At a later date, the Tallahassee PD
made a stop on a vehicle reported
stolen and discovered what ap-
peared to be a burglary kit and
clothing," Murphy said.
Police impounded the tools as
well as the clothes Hicks was wear-
ing at the time. The blanket from
the Time Saver burglary and the
clothing were examined at FDLE's
Tampa crime lab where hair and fi-
ber analysis was conducted, and
linked fibers found on the blanket
to Hicks' clothing.
Hicks has been in jail since
August, 2004 when he was arrested
while committing a similar conven-
ience store burglary in Hoover, AL.
Because of the burglary tools


found during the auto theft arrest,
law enforcement agents had been
monitoring his movements and
when he was observed heading to-
ward AL, authorities there were no-
tified.
In response to the warning, police
in the Birmingham area set up sur-
veillance on likely targets.
Just as Hicks had crawled
through the hole he had smashed in
a convenience store wall, he was
arrested by police waiting inside.
He was subsequently sentenced
to prison.
Also arrested in connection with
that burglary was Richard Con-
cepcion, 35, of Immokalee, FL.
A warrant for the Monticello case
was issued last week in Jefferson
County charging Hicks with one
count of burglary.
When released from prison in
Alabama, Hicks will be returned to
Florida to face additional charges.

MCA Game

Rescheduled As

Double Header
The MVA Chargers were slated
to play the first game of the season
Thursday against Creekside, but
due to heavy and severe rains and
the Creekside school not having an
inside court, the game had to be
postponed and rescheduled.
"We'll make up for it by playing
a double-header when Creekside
comes here," said Burke.
That double-header is slated for
3:30 p.m., Feb. 7.


Library Workshop To Focus On

Pandemic Influenza Outbreaks


the Home Town Get


1 ~


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.t


1~..


SANTA and his sleigh, along with his rein-
deer fill the windows of the Courtyard Res-


,*-^ . .. ." .".; ,













SNAPDRAGON Gift Boutique won third
place in the downtown merchant's window
decorating contest. A tropical theme replete
decorating contest. A tropical theme replete


taurant. The window won second place in
the window decorating contest.


with ferns and flowers seems to prevail
here. (News Photos)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Pandemic Pandemonium work-
shop takes place 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Thursday, at the library on Water
Street.
The workshop is aimed at county
and city officials, school represen-
tatives, and health care representa-
tives.
Public Health Preparedness Coor-
dinator Jerry Combass reports that
influenza pandemics have occurred
three times in the 20th century.
The first and most deadly was the
pandemic of 1918-1919, resulted in
an estimated 675,000 influenza re-
lated deaths in the United States.
The other two pandemics oc-
curred in 1957-1958 and 1968-
1969, and though not nearly as
severe, caused far more deaths than



Holiday Window
Decorating
Contest Winners

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Chamber of Commerce an-
nounced winners of the merchant
Christmas window decorating con-
test.
The contest was held during the
Home Town Get Down Merry
Christmas Mixer.
First place winner was Milady's.
Courtyard Cafe won second place,
and Snapdragon won third place.
Chamber Director Mary Frances
Drawdy said all would be awarded
with plaques of recognition.
"Downtown really looks beauti-
ful at night, when it is all lit up,"
Drawdy said.
In related news of the Home
Town Get Down Merry Christmas
Mixer, the first place winner of the
chili cook-off, Gloria Counterman,
was awarded with a $20 gift certifi-
cate from Coffee Break.
Second place winner was Jack
Lacy, and third place winner was
Troy Randall.


expected in a typical influenza sea-
son.
The time span between these in-
fluenza pandemics ranged from 11
years to 39 years.
It has now been 37 years since the
last influenza pandemic. It is be-
lieved that another influenza pan-
demic can occur at any time and
possibly well outside the typical in-
fluenza season.
Asian Avian Influenza, also
known as "Bird Flu", is currently
on everyone's mind and "No one
knows if the current Avian flu will
mutate into 'The Big One', this
season, or the next. The clock is
ticking and we just don't know
what time it is," Combass said.
With this in mind, the workshop
is designed to focus on influenza,
how it is spread, interventions, and
potential impacts on the health,
economy and social fabric of a
community.
The culmination of the exercise
will result in a community-based
action plan that will consider re-
sponses to a threat where everyone
may be on their own for an ex-
tended period of time.
I cannot overemphasize the im-
portance of attendance and partici-


Bizzell Earns
GED At
Adult School

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Michael Bizzell became the 17th
graduate of the 2005-06 school
year to earn his GED at the Adult
School.
Bizzell said before coming to the
adult school, he was failing and not
caring what happened to him.
"I went to the adult school be-
cause it was a better environment
for me to do school work," said
Bizzle. They talked to me, got me
back on track and got me doing
what I should be doing to get my
education.
"I got my GED so I, can get.a job
and do something with my life," he
added. "I plan to go to a technical
school where I can get skills that
will enhance my career," he said.


pation," Combass said.
There will be a break for luncl
on your own from noon until ]
p.m.
To confirm attendance call Com
bass at 251-5641.


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Tallahassee Man Charged With

2004 Time Saver Burglary Here