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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00092
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: November 18, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00092
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text







New DC
Monument Honors
Volunteers

Editorial, Page 4


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAIIESVL-,F', FL. 32611


Sheriff Hobbs
Speaker At
Triple L Club

Story, Photo, Page 6


Ladies Tennis
Team 11th
Place In League

Story, Photo, Page 9


October Rainfall
Least Here Of
14 Counties

Story, Page 14


Friday Morning j





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.92,50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ws


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2005 ..


County Sees Health Care Hike


County Officials Weigh

Costs, Benefits Of Plans


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners once again are
wrestling with the sticky issue of se-
lecting a health insurance plan for
county employees.
On Tuesday, commissioners met
with Jim Odom, the insurance con-
sultant the board hired in 1999 to
help it navigate the very complex
and complicated world of health in-
surance plans.
Not that commissioners have many
choices in the present round, con-
cerning competing health insurance
carriers. Indeed, the only proposal
on the table is from the present pro-
vider, Vista Health Plan, Inc., for-
merly Healthplan Southeast.
At Odom's urging, Vista provided
the county with four options for
health insurance coverage, ranging
from a 19.92 percent rate increase to
a 1.06 percent rate decrease.
The lower the rate increase, of
course, the higher the cost of the de-
ductibles and co-payments assigned


to employees.
The dilemma commissioners face
is how to select a plan that is afford-
able and that yet provides the best
benefits possible?
Commissioners almost immedi-
ately eliminated from consideration
the first option, which represents. a
continuation of the existing plan at a
19.92 percent rate increase. Call it
Plan A, for convenience's sake.
Plan A increases the county's an-
nual cost by $98,444.40, from the
present year's $494,322.24, to
$592,766.64.
For employees, the increase
amounts to $71.71 monthly, from
$360.08 to $431.79.
For employees who include their
families in the coverage, the in-
crease is $178.63 monthly, from
$896.96 to $1,075.59. (The county
picks up the health insurance cost of
employees but not of their families.)
SUnder Plan A, employees' co-
payments are $200 a day for the first
five days of a hospital stay; $100 for
emergency room visits; and $30 for
-urgent care visits, with a maximum.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Attention to the county's many
wooden bridges -- a majority of
which are in dire need of repairs --
has become a priority of Road Su-.
perintendent David Harvey.
Harvey inforihed commissioners
recently that his department plans to
replace as many of the wooden
bridges as possible in the coming
year.
Of special concern to Harvey is
the wooden bridge across the Au-
cilla River on CR-257. Harvey told
commissioners that repeated over-
flows of the river and the resulting
water pressure has caused the pil-
ings to weaken.
Essentially, Harvey explained, the
water flow has eroded some six to
nine feet of base around the pilings,
creating an underground void that


Liability
Is Issue

has allowed the pilings to shift.
His concern, he said, is that the
bridge poses a liability to the county
should an accident occur. At the
same time, he said, the county can
ill afford the $170,000 that he esti-
mates it will cost to replace the
structure.
Harvey said that closing the bridge
to traffic was not an option either,
given that it would create a hardship
for residents of Jefferson, Madison
and. Taylor counties, all three of
which use the bridge.
In fact, he said, the road has the
potential to become a major coastal
evacuation route for the three coun-
ties, if .its last 12 miles are ever
paved.


LUCILLE HUNTER, acting Fire Rescue chief
(foreground), prepares with commissioners
.to interview candidates for the position.


annual out-of-pocket cost of $1,500
per employee and $4,500 per
family.
The extreme opposite of Plan A is
-... .:- ,,,.-- -" -'.


"The road goes all the way down
to US 98," Harvey said. "The prob-
lem is that the last 12 miles are dirt"
Harvey encouraged commission-
ers to seek state funding for the re-
pair of the bridge.
"It needs to be a priority," he said.
Meanwhile, he was exploring the
possibility of getting state or federal
permission to allow his department
to dump the appropriate materials
around the base of the pilings to sta-
bilize the situation, he said.
Harvey explained that conditions
were optimal for the execution of
such an action, given the present
drought and the lower levels of the
river.
The poor condition of the county's
wooden bridges and the critical need
to repair them is something that
commissioners have been hearing
more and more lately.
In September, for example, con-
-(See Bridges Page 3)


Plan D, which offers a 1.06 percent
rate reduction, or a total annual sav-
ings of $5,218.56 to the county.
Meaning that Plan D would re-


duce the county's annual cost from
the present $494,322.24 to
$489,103.68.
Plan D likewise would reduce


JIM ODOM, insurance consultant (standing) Thursday. From left, Commissioners Junior
reviews the different options with commis- Tuten, Skeet Joyner, Odom, Danny Monroe
sioners at Tuesday's workshop. Commis- and Jerry Sutphin. (News Photo)
sioners have to make their decision


"'l ". A .- ,. ,.-


DAVID HARVEY, Road Department superintendent, has
identified numerous wooden bridges for replacement in the
coming year. (News Photo)


Rec. Park Gets $450,000

Worth Of Improvements


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Come spring, the baseball field on
the new 15 acres east of the Recrea-
tion Park should be ready for use by
the Babe Ruth League.
That, at least, is the plan.
Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman reports that work is proceed-
ing on the concession stand and
bathroom, the next to last elements
in the development of the property.
"The biggest thing left after that is
getting the grass to grow," Aman
said Wednesday.
Construction Support Southeast is
doing the work on the concession
stand and bathroom.
Development of the property
started about three years ago, thanks
to a $200,000 Recreation Develop-
ment Assistance Program grant from
the Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP).
The work entailed clear-cutting


the pine trees on the property, re-
moving the stumps, and leveling the
field, which had a 40-foot drop from
top to bottom.
. MilHIbiilMi5W t1 .7:


Y
VA


AMAN
The plan also calls for creation of
a walking track around the perime-
ter of the 15 acres, which path will
connect with the existing track on
the west side of the park.
(See Park Page 5)


employees' monthly contributions a
few dollars in both the single and
family categories.
Plan D essentially is a duplicate
of Plan A, with one major
difference. Where employees pay no
deductible for hospital 'stays under
Plan A, employees pay a $1,000 de-
ductible under Plan D.
Plans B and C represent the mid-
dle ground, and this is where Odom
directed commissioners' attention.
"The middle of the road, bad as it,
seems, is sometimes the best path,"
Odom said.
Plan B represents a 13.90 percent
increase to the county, or
$68,721.72. For employees, that
represents a monthly increase of
$50.06 per employee and $124.69
per family, or $410.14 and
$1,021,65'respectively.
The major differences between
plans A and B (aside from the cost)
are in the areas of the hospital co-
payments and the annual maximum
out-of-pocket cost to employees.
Plan A has a hospital co-payment
of $200 a day for the first five days,
versus Plan B's $300 a day hospital
co-payment for the first five day.
The maximum annual out-of-
pocket expenditure for Plan A is

(See Health Page 9)


Expert Cites

Reasons For

Rate Hike

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

One reason the county's health in-
surance rates keeps going up has to:
do with the county's claim history.
According to figures provided by
Vista Healthplan Inc., three claims
alone cost the company $239,499
during the current year.
"They say they had 110 percent
medical loss ratio," insurance con-
sultant Jim Odom explained Tues-
,day. "That means for every dollar
they took in, they paid out $1.10 in
claims. In other words, they say they
are losing money on the county."
Odom reminded commissioners
that health insurance companies are
in the business to make money.
"Insurance companies like predict-
able risks," Odom said. "They are
really banks. They're in the business
to make a profit."
Other variables influencing the
rates, he said, had to do with the
size, age, sex and geography of the
group, among other things. Workers
in riskier occupations were naturally
going to pay higher rates, as were
(See Expert Page 5)


News To Publish
Combined Paper
The Monticello News will publish
a combined edition next week for
the Thanksgiving holiday, rather
than the two usual editions.
Wednesday's paper will be a spe-
cial edition containing features and
advertising, some of which normally
appears in Friday's paper.
Deadline for news and advertising
for the Thanksgiving edition is
noon, Monday.
The News office will close
Wednesday afternoon and reopen 8
am. Monday.


Bridges Become Priority


Of Co. Road Department


Commissioners expect to decide Thursday
who the next Fire Rescue chief will be. Six
persons have applied. (News Photo)








'PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005

School Board Presented


JCHS Academic Data Plan


;RAY CICHON
:Managing Editor

Jhan Reichert and Nancy Wide-
man of the Jefferson County High
School Continuous Improvement
Team, presented the school's Aca-
demic Data Plan to the School
'SV.a iS'


Board Monday night.
The Continuous Improvement
Model (CIM) Plan used by the team,
is an eight step process designed to
improve student achievement.
It is a solid teaching strategy, de-
signed to insure that students are
learning the necessary skills to suc-
ceed.


Initially, teachers and administra-
tors identify areas that need im-
provement.

Focusing on specific student
weaknesses, a plan for student im--
provement is created.

Teachers build an instructional
calendar that includes all the stan-
dards to be assessed. Flexibility is-
built in to allow sufficient time for
students having difficulty.

The next step in the plan is to fo-
cus classroom activities to include a
warm-up with a review, new
content, reinforcing new concepts,


and surveying .student-
understanding.
Frequent assessments are used to
check student progress and mastery.
Mastery is maintained by teachers
working to reinforce skills and
knowledge until they become part of
the student's knowledge base.
School principals monitor the pro-
gram's success.
At JCHS, all students are as-
signed a literacy period for 25 min-
utes daily.
Three or more of these periods
form a unit and students are subse-
quently tested on the material.
Based on their scores, students are
placed in tutorial or enrichment
classes.
Scores are reviewed weekly and
students reassigned as they progress.
Practice materials and instruction
are provided in tutorial classes.
Enrichment classes have educa-
'tibnal activities.
In math, students take weekly as-


sessments based on pre-selected
FCAT skills and benchmarks.
Data from these assessments is
collected.
Beginning in January, comprehen-
sive remediation will be provided
daily with weekly assignments.
In classes, English teachers pro-
vided instruction on the focus skills.
Skills assessments are given regu-
larly and teachers incorporate FCAT
benchmarks throughout the curricu-
lum.




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Veterans Day At JCHS


JROTC CADET GENEVA MILLER delivered "The Soldier's
Final Inspection," at the Jefferson County High School Vet-
erans Day Program, Friday. (News Photo)

Farm Service Committee

Election Ballots Mailed


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Ballots for this year's Farm Serv-
ice Agency (FSA) County Commit-
tee election were mailed to eligible
'voters Nov. 4, Mark G. Demott,
* County Executive Director reports
' Voters 'rdt complete their bal-
lots and-eruam-se.r-m a:,.,he.-Far,
.Service Agency county office,-
p1244 N. Jefferson St., by the close
1of business on Dec. 5.
If mailed, the ballots must be
postmarked by midnight Dec. 5.
, Eligible voters who, have not re-
Ceived a ballot should contact the


FSA county office at 997-2072.
' Voter requirements include:
*Be of legal voting age, and have
an interest in either a farm or a
ranch as either, of the following: an
owner, operator, tenant or share-
cropper, or a partner in a general
partnership or member of a joint
venture that has an interest in a
farm as- an o:%ner noperatorit:enant
oi. sharecropper. or.
*Not be of legal voting age, but
supervises and conducts the farm-
ing operations on an entire farm,
and:
*Eligible to participate in any
FSA program that is provided by
law, regardless of the status of
funding.


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THANKSGIVING

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6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20

First United Methodist Church

324 W. Walnut St., Monticello


Special Music: First UMC Choirs

Message: Rev. Ron Cichon

Offering: Benefits Fund For Needy Transients

Rev. Thermon Moore, Ministerial Assoc. Chair


Come And Worship Together!
Refreslynents Follow The Service







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.. NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 3


'Familiar Faces, Quiet Places'

New Local History Book


newspaper on antiques which she
edited for 13 years.
Articles by Counts on history and
antiques have been published in sev-
eral national antiques publications.


DEE COUNTS displays the cover of her up to date history
of Monticello and Jefferson County, "Familiar Faces, and
Quiet Places." (News Photo)


principal Richard Finlayson an-,
nounces the honor roll for the sec-
ond six weeks period at Aucilla
Christian Academy.
Students appearing on the roll
.and their grade levels follow:
A. In K-3/K-4 Multiage, receiving
'all S+'s were: Hunter Cain, Jocelyn
Davis, Alex Haselden, Ayush Patel,
,Wyatt Reese, Elizabeth Scheese,
Grayson Sircy and Austin Wheeler.
In K-4, receiving all S+'s were:
Grace Beshears, .Kash Connell,'
Marissa Cooley, Evan Courtney,
Antonio Cox, Emily Forehand, Ly-
dia Hall, Bethany Hayes, Austin'
Hebert, Anna Hillinski, Ryan Jack-
son, Ameer Khodr, Amber
Knowles, Haylee Lewis, Lynelle
'Loveless, Chloe Reams, Skylar
Reams, Megan Schofill, Levi Staf-
ford, Nicolas Swickley, Katherine
Wichel, and Mackenzie Wirick.
In K-5. receiving all S+'s were
"Trimothy Finlayson, Jessica Gid-
dens, Camryn Grant, Kenlie Har-
vey, T. J. Hightower, Hayley Jones,
Dennis Key, Ryals Lee, Cannon
Randle, Quinton Thomas, and Ria
Wheeler.
Receiving all S+'s and S's were:
Walker Davis, Elizabeth
Hightower, Noah Hulbert, Katie
James, Carly Joiner, Nour Khodr,
Jenna Merschman, Abigail
Morgan, Jake Pridgeon, Abby Rat-
liff, Brandon Slaughter, Joe
Walton, Tedo Wilcox, and Daniel
Wurgler.
In first grade, receiving all A's
were: Traynor Barker, Rebecca
Carson, Faith Demott, Stephanie
English, Sarah Hall, Chaz Hamil-
ton, Joe Hannon, Tyler
Hutchenson, Jenny Jackson, Erica
Keeler, Donnie Kinsey, Lindsey
Lawson, Hannah Lewis, Summer-
lyn Marsh, Gatlin Nennstiel,
Kirsten Reagan, Sarah Riley, Ram-
sey Sullivan, Larrett Terrell, Kate
Whiddon, Kirsten Whiddon and
Hank Wirick.
Receiving all A's and B's were
Meagan Beaty, Hannah Compton,
J. T. Harp, Emily, Knowles, Will
Sircy, Natalie Sorensen and John
Thomas Walker.
In second grade, earning all A's
were: Taylor Copeland, Megan
Giddens, Erin Lee, Ally Mall, Tay-
lor McKnight, Tomas Swickley, T.
J. Swords, Justin Welch and Emma
Whitmer.
All A's and B's were Jake Ed-
wards, Ian Haselsen, Sam Hogg,
Rean Montescarlos and D. J. Wilk-
inson.
In the third grade, earning all A's
were: Ty Chancey, Ricky Finlay-
son; Doug Gulledge, Sarah James,
Winston Lee, Carson Nennstiel,
and Bryce Sanderson.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Cole Barclay, Morgan Cline, Chey-
enne Floyd, Haleigh Gilbert,
Hunter Handley, Brooklyn
McGlamory, Jonah Newberry, Am-
ber Paulk, Sadie Sauls and Bradley
Vollertsen.
In fourth grade, earning all A's
were: Rachel Lark, Aimee Love,
and Jessica Welch.
Earning all A's and B's were: De-
van Courtney, Casey Demott, Lau-
ren Demott, Jacob Dunbar, Dakota
Ely, Ashley Herbert, Capas
Kinsey, Christiana Reams, Marisa
Thomas and Annie Yang.
In fifth grade, earning all A's
were: Ashli Cline, Jay Finlayson,


Jared Jackson, Kaley Love, Hadley.
Revell, Ashley Schofill and Wendy
Yang.. .
Earning all A's and B's were:
Nick Buzbee, Tres Copeland, Joey
Dowell, Russell Fraleigh, Hannah
Haselden, Dakotah McGlamory,
Whitney McKnight, Michaela Met-
calf, Sammy Ritter, Hans Sorensen,
Pamela Watt and Audrey Wynn.
In the sixth grade,. earning all A's
were: Matt Dobson, Marcus Evans,
Tyler Jackson, Vicki Perry, and
Shelby Witmer.
Earning all A's and B's were: Levi
Cobb, Austin Ritchie, Trent Rob-.
erts, Tori Self, Austin Shirley, Kel-
sey Wilcox, and John Williams.
In the seventh grade, earning all
A's were: Katherine Hogg, Kaitlin
Jackson, and Kent Jones.
Earning all A's and B's were: Tay-
lor Baez-Pridgeon, Chase
Bozeman, Clarkl Christy Taryn,
Copeland, Anna Finlayson, Jessica
Hagan, Lisa Kisamore, Carolyn
Mueller, Jacob Newberry, Devin
Reams, Elizabeth Riley, Marcus
Roberts and Sarah Sorensen.
In the eighth grade, earning all
A's were: Wilson Lewis, John Ste-
phens, and Dana Watt.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Ryan Barclay, Tiffany Brasington,
Kalyn Brown, Lane Fraleigh, Mat-
thew Harrington, Jessica Hunt, Ja-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Resident Derylene (Dee) Delp-
Counts is the author of the book:
"Familiar Faces and Quiet Places." ,
Counts was approached by Mary
Francis Drawdy, director of the
Chamber of Commerce, to write an
updated and easy-to-read history of
Monticello and Jefferson County.
The book is a project of the Cham-
ber and written in coffee table for
mat.
It's purpose is to take the older
residents on a trip down Memory
Lane and to introduce and acquaint
newer, and prospective residents
with the area.
Published by the Donning Com-
pany, the book was financed by
Farmers & Merchants Bank.
During a 10 month period, Counts
worked with local residents collect-
ing pictures and verifying informa-
tion. ,
Material was also gathered from


cob Pitts, Ryan Pritcher and Brian
Scholte.
In the ninth grade, earning all A's
were: Chelsea Dobson, Rebekah
Falk, Byron Love, Angela
McCune, Michaela Roccanti and
Savannah Williams.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Ashley Echols, Nikki Kisamore,
Mallory Plaines, Kayla Williams,
and Luke Witmer.
In the tenth grade, earning all A's
were: Rebekah Aman, Ben Buzbee,
Courtney Connell, Stephanie Dob-
son, Will Hartsfield, Alfa Hunt,
Prateen Patel, Ramsey Revell, Tris-
tan Sorensen.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Courtney Brasington, A.J. Connell,
Lindsey Day, Claire Knight, and
Bethany Saunders.
In the eleventh grade, earning all
A's were: Melissa Martin, Caitlin
Murphy, Jennifer Pitts, Rikki Roc-
canti, and Taylor Rykard.
Earning all A's and B's were Jo-
anna Brittany Hobbs, Will Knight,
Angela Steinberg, Jennifer Tuten,
J. T. Ward, and Brittany Williams.,
In the twelfth grade, earning all
A's were: Ben Grantham and Katie
O'Steen.
Earning all A's and B's : Keri
Brasington, Jana Connell, Casey
Gunnels, Alexandria Searcy, Corie
Smith, and Chris Tuten.


cular Dystrophy Association
800-572-1717


People help
MDA...because
MDA helps people.


the Keystone Genealogy Society
and Library, the Jefferson County
Historical Association and the Flor-
ida State Photographic Archives.
A book signing is scheduled for 5
to 7 p.m., Friday, Dec. 2 during the
Christmas in Monticello event, at
the Farmers & Merchants Bank
training center on Dogwood Street.
Plans for additional signing are
on the drawing board.
The cost of this history book is
$39.95, and a signed first edition is
suggested as a Christmas Gift for
one who has everything.
Counts lives in Monticello. She
was born in Michigan and moved to
Jefferson County as a young child.
She attended Florida State Univer-
sity and spent 21 years as a certified
legal assistant in Florida, Alabama,
and Louisiana.
She was also business manager
.and feature writer when she and her
husband Bill owned the Monticello
News in the 1970s.
In 1988 the couple founded Cot-
ton & Quail Antique Trail a monthly

Tax Deduction
For Donated

Used Vehicles
The American Lung Association
encourages citizens to donate used
vehicles for an income tax deduc-
tion, before the end of the year.
To do so, call 1-800-LUNG-USA,
and the vehicle will be towed at no
cost.
Detailed instructions will be sent
with two simple forms to complete.
Donated vehicles will be auc-
tioned, and proceeds' benefit the
American Lung Association.
Funds help the Association fighl-
against lung disease through re-
search, patient education, 'asthma
summer camp for children, and
school programs.
Additional information about the
program is available by calling An-
gelika Parker, director of develop-
ment. at 850-386-2065.


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Bridges Become Priority


(Continued From Page 1)
sultant environmental engineer
Frank Darabi warned officials that
the poor condition of the bridges
was putting the county at great legal
risk.
"This needs to be a priority," Da-
rabi said. "These bridges have been
needing help for a long time. You
need to come up with the money to
fix them."
Darabi noted that the Department


of Transportation periodically in-
spects the bridges and notifies the
county of their condition, which in-
formation is on file.
"If something happens, you are li-
able," Darabi said.
The Jefferson Legislative Commit-
tee reportedly has made the solicita-
tion of funding for the repair of
bridges one of its priorities for the
next session of the Legislature.


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DISEASES







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor

S^i' LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




New DC Monument


Honors Volunteers


Although most people can name a
litany of famous athletes, entertain-
ers or historic statesmen, few can
easily list the Americans who have
changed our country through their
volunteer service.
Monuments in Washington, DC,
appropriately pay tribute to our war
heroes and great Presidents, but un-
til now there has not been a tangible
acknowledgment of the contribu-
tions of the great leaders of our so-
cial and service sectors.
Thanks to a new initiative of the
Points of Light Foundation, our na-
tion's capital is now home to a
unique national monument that fills
the void. Known as the "Extra Mile
- Points of Light Volunteer
Pathway," the new monument tells
the stories of selfless men and
women who built their dreams for
service into great movements that
have created enduring change in
-%merica. 'A
The monuniefits consists of a se-
ies of bronze medallions forming a
ne-mile walking path just a couple
,f blocks east-of the White House.
Each marker bears the likeness of an
honoree, a description of his or her
achievement and a quote.
The Extra Mile was officially
dedicated with great fanfare on Oc-
tober 14th, with Former President
George Bush attending a ceremony
hosted by political commentator
Cokie Roberts.
"At a time when Americans are
volunteering their time in unprece-
dented numbers to help their fellow
citizens who have fallen victim to
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is


Clerk Has KE

In Budget P

BY CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
Clerk Of Court

Q: I'd like to know more about the
county's budget process. What's the
Clerk's role in this process?
A: The office of the Clerk is a
complex organization that performs
a wide range of record keeping, in-
formation management, and finan-
cial management for the judicial
system and for county government.
The Florida Constitution and Flor-
ida Statutes decree that the Clerk
carry out duties as custodian of
county funds.
As custodian, the Clerk ensures
that taxpayers' money is managed
according to law. The Clerk com-
piles information for the proposed
budget based on requests submitted
by all the constitutional officers,
county departments, and other agen-
cies.
The Property Appraiser certifies to
the County Commission the taxable
value of real property for the current
year and prior year.
The Clerk uses the certified value
of real property within the county as
the basis for calculating a proposed
millage rate. The proposed millage
rate represents the amount of money
per $1000 of taxable property value
that will be assessed as ad valorem
taxes.
As part of the budget process, a
rolled-back millage rate must also
be calculated.
The rolled-back rate represents the


'ery fitting that we dedicate a per-
nanent -tribute to the leaders of the
service movement in America,"
President Bush declared to attendees
at the event.
"I've always said that any defini-
tion of a successful life must include
service to others. My hope is that
this monument will serve to inspire
a similar commitment in all those
who visit the Extra Mile over the
generations to come."
The Extra Mile honorees include
well-known figures like America
Red Cross founder Clara Barton and
civil rights activist Frederick Doug-
lass, as well as far less celebrated
men and women whose legacies rep-
resent remarkable social achieve-
ments.
The pathway is lined with tributes
to founders of organizations like
Goodwill Industries, Rotary Intema-,
tionab and Easter Seals. Funding for
the 'Extra' Mileiwas- raised entirely
from private sources, with the
KPMG Foundation as the signature
sponsor.
Robert K. Goodwin, president and
CEO of Points of Light Foundation
for the past ten years, appreciates as
well as anyone the impact of volun-
teering on American life.
"Despite the magnitude of their
achievements, this is a relatively un-
sung group of heroes who have long
deserved to be publicly recognized,"
he said. "These are amazing private
citizens ,who gave of themselves,
without regard to personal gain, to
make our world a better place to
live."


By Role

process
millage rate which would be as-
sessed if the budget requirements re-
mained the same as the prior year.
The Clerk must also gather esti-
mates of revenues from taxes,
grants, and other sources that will be
used to fund the proposed budget.
Using all the information
provided, the Clerk presents the pro-
posed budget to the County Com-
mission. It is the responsibility of
the County Commission to approve
or adjust any portion of the pro-,
posed budget.
Once that process is complete, the
Clerk incorporates the Board's rec-
ommended changes and keeps the
final budget.
The Clerk's role in the. budget
process is to provide information
and oversight to make certain that a
balanced budget is approved by the
County Commission.
If you have any questions or com-
ments about this column, please for-
ward them to: Carl D. Boatwright,
Clerk of the Court, County Court-,
house, Room 10, Monticello, FL
32344.


Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed
and include phone
number of Writer
,i ,h '


From Our Photo File

^5l -^-,f- A*-Wf-


IN MAY, 1990, the Monticello Volunteer Fire
Department's tanker truck sported a fire en-
gine red paint job, after rolling around the
county for two years in gray and green


paint. L-R: Chief Tom Bowan,
Wayne Malloy, Fire Rescue
Bates. (News File Photo)


Sue Malloy,
Chief Larry


Opinion & Comment


Ither Notons

, Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I retired last week. Since one of
my goals is to get in better shape, I
joined a walking group. This walk-
ing group reminds me of a song by
one of my favorite balladeers James
Taylor. He sings "I'm 'a steam roller
baby. I'm going to roll all over you."
Well that is exactly what will hap-
.rpons, ;ifyo i get in ,ioi.it, oof, ,he
S.steamroler walkers"'!Boy. are these
;:fast! ,, .. ,, ,, ,. ,, ,.;
I can barely keep up with
Gretchen Avera who is about a foot
shorter that I am. I foolishly thought
that my height and stride might
make up for some of my slowness. I
guess I just have to work up to it.
I often meet Jack Carswell at the
Coffee Break for a few minutes be-


Drug Se
It's scary. when someone you care
about has a drug or alcohol problem
- especially if you're the only one
who knows.
It's even worse when he or she
swears you to secrecy. What should
you do? Sometimes what matters
more is what you don't d. .
Best-selling author Patricip
McCormick tackles this topic from a
younger brothers perspective in her
newest middle-grade novel, ."My,
Brother's Keeper" (Hyperion Books
for Children, $15.99). With great
compassion and wry humor,
McCormick explores the anguish 61f
living with divided loyalties and the
costof keeping family secrets


fore the walk. The usual topic is
what is needed and good for Monti-
cello. I suspect that the conversa-
tions around the Cafe Fina, the Liars,
Club and in front of the, Edenfield
Store all revolve around much the
same thoughts. I am impressed that
so many citizens here devote, such a
great deal of time talking about what
is good forus all.
Lots of discourse about planning


The rails-to-trails bike path is also
coming along. Bulldozers and fel-
lows with shovels are working. I am
looking forward to walking on that
path once it is complete. The hubb\
and I used to walk at the recreation
park before light. I discovered that
when startled, armadillos jump
straight up. Scared the tar out of me
and made me wary of walking there
before dawn.


recently, some,of it a bit unpleasant.-'., lyien i.ofd'L Twas.in the Leon
However. this .'i preferableto 'a& s-. CfbitV" 'C'urtNwbotse' e 'fia the.
lent cmizen.y.. -P.ublic serv,:ants.-ar.,buildung-was over run-wth official.,


elected to listen, but we ma\ need to
issue asbestos underwear when thdy
take the oath' of office.
While walking, you notice more.
The new black and white street
signs are crisp, historic looking and
can be read easily. Hooray! Good
job.


military) police types. This happens
every so 'often but this time things
looked unusually serious. Someone
had smelled a noxious odor from a
small red car parked in the under-
ground garage. The odor was picked
up by the exhaust fan that cools the
garage, and pretty much the whole


courthouse smelled horrible.
As an old homicide investigator, I,
too, thought there was a body in the
.trunk of that red car. Judges were I
competing with each other to sign
search warrants for that car and tihe
whole process was expedited.
Women began to retch, and a gen-
eral panic gripped the entire place. i
The trunk was forced open to r-
veal, nothing. The owner of the car
appeared and allowed a complete
search, revealing, nothing.
Finally the owner said that he had
hit an armadillo on the way to work.
Sure enough he had jumped up im-
paling himself on the hot engine. He
continued to cook after the poor
owner when to work.
That armadillo was "steamroller
baby, a churning urnm of burning
funk."


crets Must Be Handled


Here are some helpful tips straight
from the author for teens who are
dealing with drug abuse amongst
their family or friends:
Don't stick your head in the sand.
Go online and get information about
the effects of drug and alcohol
abuse. E-mail your sister, brother or
friend the links you found. If you're
lucky, she'll be prompted to get help
on her own and you won't have to
be the one to tell anyone.
'Don't wait too long., Encourage the
person to te!! an adult. Set a dead-
line. If, for instance, your sister talks
to an adult in a week, tell her you'll
keep it to yourself. If she hasn't done
-anything at the end of the week, it's


your turnm.
Don't tell just anyone. Consider all
your options. It may be better to
start with a neutral person perhaps
a guidance counselor, coach, teacher
or pastor.
Don't keep it to yourself. Someone
else's out-of-control drinking or
drugging problem that's too big for
you to handle on your own. You'll
feel so much anxiety, you're likely
to start acting out without even
knowing it.
Don't turn your back. When you
see the darker side of someone you
care about, it can be tempting to run
in the other direction. It's okay to
say that you're worried, but keep the


lines of communication open.
Don't jump to conclusions. It's un-
likely, for instance, that your sibling
is going to be instantly shipped off
to rehab.
Chances are, some kind of after
school therapy or support group is
all she'll need. Maybe even just a,
few meetings with the guidance
counselor will do the trick, espe-
cially if you intervene before the
problem gets worse.
Don't assume the worst. It's easy
to imagine the adults going ballistic
when they find out. Chances are,
they'll share your concern and get
your friend or sibling the help she
needs.


Boomers May Be Caregivers


Training relatives in caregi ming
can ease their burden' and aid stroke
survivors. More than 81 million
baby boomers live in the United'
States, and most are at or exceed the
age of 55.
This is the age when the odds o
having a stroke and becoming a
stroke caregiver starts to increase It
is important to know how to prevent
stroke and how to. prepare in cas
you or a family member experience
one.
Each year, 700,000 people have i
new or recurrent stroke. In adults
over 55, the lifetime risk for stroke
is greater than one in six and women
have a higher risk than men.
The first line of defense for dal
people, not just those over age 55; is
to know the stroke warning signs,
manage stroke risk factors and visit
the doctor regularly.
Some risk factors are high blood
pressure, smoking, obesity, having a
family history of stroke or having
had a TIA (transient ischemic
attack), or "ministroke."


If you or a family member has one
or more of these risk factors, there is
a real possibility you could become
'a stroke caregiver.
Making plans now will save an
immeasurable amount of time and
stress later and allow you to concen-
trate on what really matters in a.
health crisis your family member.
According to an American Stroke
Association survey, two out of three
people say they are prepared in the
even they become a caregiver, yet
only 7 percent of those same respon-
dents are planning or have planned
for the event.
"Families don't realize that even
stroke survivors who regain func-
tional independence will need con-
stant, full-time care for an extended
period of time while rehabilitating.
They amy need care for one month,
10 years or a lifetime," explained
Robert Adams, M.D. and American
Stroke Association volunteer.
Taking simple actions now can
help protect against and, in some
instances, eliminate the impact that_


comes with becoming a stroke care-
giver.
First, know and manage 'your
and your family member's stroke
risk factors.
Second, identify materials to
educate yourself and family on what


being a caregiver involves.
Third, ask 'your at-risk family
members about their financial situa-
tion.
Finally, take stock of your own
financial health and retirement sav-
ings.


Heritage
everywhere else.
Church steeples once rose high
above all other structures in a vil-
lage, were seen for miles, and
pointed people's thoughts toward
heaven. Today they are idyllic re-
minders of a past we probably can-
not recapture.
Church steeples have gradually
disappeared for at least three
reasons: they add significantly to the
cost of church construction, some
congregations no longer want their
facility to "look like a church," and
(See Church Steeples Page 5)


Of Nation's


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist


Not long ago I made a trip to Bos-
ton, which included forays into
southern New Hampshire and
Maine, as well as rural Massachu-
setts.
As in previous trips I enjoyed the
beauty of the countryside, Boston
Harbor, and New England cuisine.
But the thing I enjoyed most was
seeing again the many varied church
steeples so common in New Eng-
land and increasingly uncommon


Church Steeples Part








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...


Zoning Changes


Farm Lands, Wril
SDear Editor: sions, manmade recreational areas
In the Nov. issue of one of the and the like, have been allowed.
farm magazines we receive is an ar- Little attention has been paid t(
tile covering how country families' how these developments will impac
lifestyles have been changed, and livelihood, landscapes, wildlife, anm
not for the better. the quality of life of the people ii
Many acres of agricultural land surrounding areas.
have been changed, and subdivi- Little, clear, clean creeks anm


Voter Questions Concern

Of Commissioner Tuten
Dear Editor: his matter.
I read County Commissioner Jun- Although he did not have the time
ior Tuten's letter to the paper on to speak with me then, he made nc
Nov. 11, 2005, regarding Mr. further attempts, that I am aware of,
LDewey's paid advertisement. .to contact me about my concerns.
First of all, I could care less Not responding to your constitu-
whether Mr. Tuten is a conservative, ents' concerns, and not finding the
fhoderate, or a liberal. All that mat- time to discuss issues, do not neces-
ters is that he fairly represents and sarily display the characteristics of
protects Jefferson County. a concerned and good infentioned
.I live in,Mr. Tuten's district. His elected public official, in my opin-
letter said he was a concerned and ion.
good intentioned person and that the Protect the county and the comp
comp plan was a very serious issue. plan. I think that this is all any op-
My wife and I have corresponded ponent of these changes has asked
with Mr. Tuten several times regard- of Mr. Tuten, as an elected County
ing this issue, and received no re- Commissioner.
sponse. But so far he hasn't done it, so we
I introduced myself to him at continue to disagree.
County Commission meeting, in- Sincerely,
tending to ask him a question about Wayne Searcv


r


5:VETERANS were in attendance at the vari-
ous Veterans Day Programs held Friday.
Here they stand at Jefferson Elementary


Trail Ride, Fun


Shrinking


ter Says


ot
d
n

d


streams that run through farmlands,
which were safe for children to play
in, and for everyone to enjoy, have
increased in force and depth and
now flood, as runoff increases from
lands that were developed.
What were quiet weekends, are now
filled with pollution and noise from
lawnmowers and weed eaters.
Local governments see develop-
ment as.a quick way to put cash in
their coffers, so little attention is
paid to responsible land planning.
growth, and the rights of surround-
ing property owners to earn an in-
come from their land, and preserve
their scenic landscapes.
Suburban sprawl has been allowed
as local governments failed to fol
low comp plans and are now 'in


Day Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society reports-
that there is still time remaining to
RSVP for the annual Trail Ride and
Family Fun Day, 10 a.m., Saturday,
on the Carswell property, Hay Pond
Farm. off of Dills Road.
The menu will be Al's Gourmet
chicken dinners and Boston Butt
-Barbecue pork sandwiches, both
served with all of the fixings at $8
each. The cost will include either a
'canned drink or bottled water.
All proceeds will go to the Hu-
mane Society.
The trail ride begins at 10 a.m.
and lasts until noon. The entry fee
is, $10 per horse and riders are
asked to bring their own horses be-
pause rental .horses will not be
available Also, it is mandatory


that entered animals are to have
proof of a negative Coggins test.
Also during the Family Fun Day,
at approximately 1:30 p.m., activi-
-ties will also include pony rides.
hay rides, horseshoes, egg and |
spoon races on horseback, horse-
back musical buckets, croquet, bad-
minton, sing-a-longs and contests
for the coolest horse, and best
turned out, just to name a few.
Prizes will be awarded.
Raffle tickets will also be avail-
able for $1 each or 22 for $20. The
prize, a beautiful Bay yearling.
Barn related door prizes will also
be awarded, including halters, lead
ropes, feed and other horse-related
items.
For further information or to
RSVP for lunch so -sufficient food
can be prepared, call Carswell at
997-4000.


volved in legal matters.
SLittle or no attention has been paid U S te e s
to procuring, or developing small
businesses which provide employ- (Continued From Page 4) Church steeples literally
men rnant people no longer understand heaven, lift up our count
.Does', any of the above sound fa, the symbolism church steeples rep- and express the beauty of
miliar to you? If not, you haven't resent and therefore do not miss liberty in a free country.
attended any recent planning or them. Church steeples are a visit
county commission meetings, or Chuich steeples are not a biblical con in an American cult
meetings re requirement The absence of one on lost its way. Steeples. speal
This is happening in our county a church is not necessarily a state- existence of God, the ab
now. Please get involved and help ment about that church's theology or know truth, and the nece
keep our agricultural areas from fidelity to the faith. knowing truth and selling it
k turning into housing areas for resi- 'Church steeples are cultural and Church steeples are a r
dents fleeing from Leon County traditional. They 'say something that free societies functii
Marceline Hamilton about what people. want to do and when they acknowledge
experience in the buildings they Church steeples are an aesti
'' grace and spiritually beautiful par
". ,. Church steeples are a means of heritage and hopefully, a
S signifying worship, a need and a de- our future, too.
'- -"-'.-. sire to turn our thoughts and our .(Rex M. Rogers, Ph:L
hearts toward God. author and president of Corh


School as the National
performed. (News Photo)


Program Honors Vetera


--- Park
=it ...a.0 (Continue From Page 1)
More recently, the park received
Another $200,000 from the DEP for
'li'mp'ro'simentt to -, the' west side.
-Much of this money willgo to re-
q' surfacing arid renovating the tennis
courts, according to Aman.
Other things to be accomplish
with the money include construction
of another covered pavilion and re-
pair of the bathroom outside the
park office.
Earlier, the park received $50,000
Anthem is for new lighting, drainage and other
improvements to the two infields on
the west side.
S.All told, the park has received

n 5 prosements during the last three
n, ''years, according to Aman.


University, Grand Rapids,
pens this column, which apt
92 newspapers.)


SUNSET
& Reception


Mon., Wed., Th


point to
enances,
religious

bible bea-
re that's
k to the:
)ility to
ssity of
not.
reminder
ion. best.
truth.
thetically
t of our
part of

)., book
nerstone
Mich.,
pears in


NIw







"l: ," -' -.. ,:' "




Five or more

sunburns

double your risk


of developing

skin cancer.


MAD'


Protect your skin.
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FRAN HUNT
(i StaffWriter
f; Jefferson Elementary School
ai Veterans .Day Program, Friday,
6 honored local veterans and treated
them to lunch in the cafeteria.
The program began with JES
Principal Sandra Collins. welcom-
ing the veterans to the program,
and, the JROTC Color Guard post-
;ing the Colors as veterans saluted,
,remo' ing the service caps, honor-
ing the flag,.
a. The National Anthem was per-
formed by music teach Ms. Dupuis,
mezzo-soprano and Mabel Sher-


Expert Cites
(Continued From Page 1)
older workers, he said.
i! And public entities, by their very
:-nature, tended to have older
workers, he noted.
&r. "As the population ages, it costs
_;,more," Odom said.
He pointed out that the board
could always go out for other bids,
if it wasn't satisfied with the present
proposal. But he reminded commis-
sioners that of the 15 to 20 packages.
the county mailed out last year, it
had received only two bids. And
Vista Healthplan had been the low
bidder.
- "There's other players out there,"
1"Odom said. "You can go to the mar-
ket anytime you want. The problem
"is that once you decide to go out for
"Tbids, Vista can say bye, bye."
Then where would the county be
leftf?


man, pianist.
The JES Singing Tigers per-
formed the songs "America," and
"You're A Grand Old Flag" and the
- JROTC retired the colors.
Superintendent of Schools Phil
Barker made the closing remarks.
"To hear a child sing does some-
thing special for the heart and'the
spirit," said Barker. He thanked
Collins for her leadership and Di-
puis and Sherman for their per-
formances, and all of those present
for sharing in the event.
Sherman performed the four
service songs.
'The program closed with Dupuis


requesting all present to stand and
sing "America the Beautiful"
The veterans filed out on their
way to the cafeteria to enjoy a hot
lunch.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005


Lifestyle


Sheriff Hobbs Offers Safety

Precautions To Triple L Club


-1
..DEBBIE SNAPP
.Staff Writer

The Triple L Club met recently
at the First Baptist Fellowship Hall
to hear a program about Home
,Safety, presented by Sheriff David
Hobbs.
Hobbs offered tips on preventing
,home burglary. Among the tips are
,these:
*Invest in solid doors and good
.quality locks on doors and windows.
Make it more difficult and time con-
suming for a burglar to gain entry;
*Lock your doors every time you
leave your home. This includes just


stepping next door and running an
errand;
*Don't keep valuables where they
can be seen from the windows;
*Be sure to keep your garage
doors closed when you are away.
An empty garage broadcasts your
absence;
*When you are 'away on vacation
or for more than one day use a timer
to turn off and on lights in your
home. This gives the appearance of
someone at home.
*If someone comes to your door
and asks to use the telephone make
the call yourself. Never invite a
stranger in your home;


Lifeline Link Up Program

'Provides Telephone

Service For Needy Families


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

More than 1,300 program,
brochures/applications were sent
home in the backpacks of every
,child in Jefferson County's public
school system, from kindergarten
through Grade' 12, as, officials
joined in distributing literature, about
the statewide Lifeline andLink Up
:Program
This is a program designed to as-
,sist families who struggle to main-
,tain telephone service, through a
.public-private partnership, formed
_o assist qualified families. ,
.The Public Service Commission
(PSC,) Department of Education
(DOE,) Office of Public Council
(OPC,) school superintendents
throughout the state and Florida's
telecommunications companies in-
Vadding BllS!uth, Sprint, and Veri-
.n have joined rsoilce' to pro-'
Pote the Link-Up Florida and Life-
line Assistance programs statewide.
The two programs provide savings
;on monthly telephone bills to quali-
fied families.
Link-Up offers a reduction in
connection expenses associated with
initial phone services, and Lifeline,
provides reduced charges for local
|hone services.
s Families with students receiving a



Homes Of
Barbara Shealy Aman
Barbara Cornelia Shealy Aman,
vage 86, passed away on Sunday, No-
vember 13, 2005 at her residence in
jPerrN, FL. She was born in Boston,
JGA. Coming from Monticello, she
7had lived in Perry since 1935. Mrs.
?Aman was a Baptist and,a member
Yof the Calvary Baptist Church. She
enjoyed music, reading, volunteer-
ing at the nursing home and mis-
sionary work. She is survi\ ed by her
;husband of 68: )ears, Wilbur M.
:Aman, of Perry. .,
e Other survivors include; 1 son;
tWilbur Gerald Aman and wife Ger-.
4aldine, of Eridu, 3 daughters; Carol
,Joan Beaty, of Lamont, Cheryl and
,Jimmy Couliette and Karen and
;Norman Baker, all of Perry, 2 broth-
ters; John Walton Shealy and wife
.,Vera, of Charlest6n, SC; Joseph
',Shealy and wife Lynn, of Tampa, 3,
sisters; Dannie and Henry Munn, of
SHavana, Edna Teston, of Atlanta,
.Ga., and Jean and Rudy Reeves of
JTallahassee; 9 grandchildren and 13
great grandchildren, a host of nieces
.and nephews also survive.
Funeral Services will be held on
Thursday, November 17, 2005 at the
* Calvary Baptist Church. Interment
will follow at Mt. Gilead Cemetery.
kFamily will receive friends on Wed.
Evening from 6-8 p.m. at Burns Fu-
,neral Home Chapel. Joe P. Burns
fFuneral Home in Perry is in charge
of all the arrangements.
Lucious Hill
Lucious Hill was born August 4,
t1924 in Monticello (Waukeenah
$Florida,) to the late Rosa Jones Hill
lwand the late Lucious Hill Sr., died
%Saturday, November 12, 2005.
He served 3 years in the US
*Army, lived 31 years in Monticello,
land then moved to Tampa where he
lived 50 years until his death.


free lunch through the national
School Lunch program (NSL) can
now use an additional eligibility cri-
terion for Lifeline and/or Link-Up in
BellSouth and Sprint territories.
Public school superintendents
have joined with the industry and
the PSC to make sure that every
child in Florida's public, charter,
and developmental research schools
receives the brochure/application for
the programs.
Consumers are automatically eli-
gible for the Lifeline/Link-Up pro-
grams if they currently participate in
any one of the following: Medicaid,
Food Stamps, Temporary Assistance
to Needy Families (TANF,) Supple-
mental Security Income (SSI,) Fed-
eral Public Housing Assistance
(Section 8,) and/or Low Income
Home Energy Assistance Program
(LIHEAP.)
In Sprint and BellSouth territories
pat icipanontibfr The tari6cil School
Lunch-Free Lunch program also is a
qualifier.
In addition consumers whose
household incomes are at or below
135 percent of the poverty level may
be eligible to participate, based on
income.
To obtain an application, contact
Sprint at 1-888-723-S010; BellSouth
at 1-888-757-6500;orVerizon at I-
S00-483-4000.



Mourning

He leaves to cherish his memory
his wife Minnie Hill; two daughters
Lonnie Andrews and Rosa Lee But-
ler; five sons Lucious Hill II, Lu-
cious Hill III, Donnel Turner,
William Hill, and David Hill; one
living brother Charlie Hill Sr. and
two brothers proceeded in death
David Hill and Joe. Hill; one aunt
Millie Stevens; oine sister-in-law
Ruby Mae Lamar; 39 grandchildren;
and 21 great grandchildren.
Service will be 11 a.m. Saturday,
November 19, 2005 at Mt. Pleasant
MB Church in Capps.
Words of Comfort will be offered
'by Rev. Issac Manning, Beth Page
4 MB Church, Wacissa, Florida.
Eastside Funeral Home, Inc.,
Tampa, Florida is in charge of the,
funeral arrangements.
Maxwell Fitzallen Veira
Maxwell Fitzallen Veira age 44 a,
Registered Pharmacist died
Monday, November 14 in
Tallahassee.
The service will be at 2:00 p.m. on
Friday November 18, 2005 at
Greater Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist i
Church in Tallahassee with burial at
Concord Cemetery also in
Tallahassee. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 3:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. Friday, November 1'8,
2005 at Bethel AME Church in
Tallahassee and on Friday at Greater
Mt. Zion from noon until the
service.
A native of St. Vincent.West In-
dies, Mr. Vincent had lived in Talla-
hassee, most recently for the past
six years. He was a graduate of FL
A&M University, where he received
his Pharmacy Degree. He was pur-
suing the Ph. D. Degree in Pharma-
cology from FL A&M. Mr. Veira
was employed as a pharmacist at
CVC Pharmacy on Apalachee Park-
(See Home Of Mourning Page 7)


*Post a "Beware of Dog" sign;
*When leaving on vacation have
your mail and newspaper deliveries
stopped.
Hobbs also shared tips on how to
protect oneself while shopping.
Among these:
*Avoid shopping alone, and try to
shop with a friend or relative;
*Park your vehicle in a well
lighted area, and place your valu-
ables out of sight;
*Know your surroundings and
keep an eye on the people around
you;
*Carry your purse close to your
body;
*Avoid talking to strangers;


~A


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VONCILE HUNTER. back, talks with Mary Connll and
*Aproah yu vhice wthVOur heIffDai H oNEbbs k, wh rt~ealk w aithMay Cronnell anda


*Approach you vehicle with your Sheriff David Hobbs, who pre,
keys in your hand; recent Triple L Club meeting.
*Keep your vehicle doors locked
and your windows shut atalltimes. V victoria Kar
Tips to protect oneself while '
walking include: Observes 90f'
*Avoid walking alone at night. In- O s e Ve 9 0
stead go with a friend or during day-
light hours; DEBBIE SNAPP
*Do not use headphones while Staff Writer
walking or driving;
*Always walk in well lighted area Victoria Karoupakis, born Nov.
after dark; 10, 1015, celebrated her 90th birth-
*Avoid the use of shortcuts; day Saturday, NoW.. 12 with her faim-
*Keep away from tall shrubs, ily and friends at the Jefferson
where someone could be lurking, Nursing Center.
*Always stay near the curb;
*If someone stops and asks for di-
rections answer from a distance, do
not approach the vehicle;
*Do not display cash openly, es-
pecially when leaving an ATM.
Hobbs entertained questions from ,..
the audience and distributed helpful |
literature, and his business card in-
viting citizens to contact him if they
had further questions or concerns. I
Leaders of this month's program
were Mary and Ken Connell. Host-
esses were: Maggie Shofner, Dorris -
Uptain, Phyllis Weldon, and Shirley KARNOUPAKIS

In other Triple L news, members She as one of se en children'.
enjoyed in a trip to Wakulla Springs born to Greek immigrant parents in
recently, where they shared lunch Morgantown, WV., and raised in
and caught up on local news inter- McKeesport, PA.
ests.


Red Hat Ladies Ponder

Meaning Of Thanksgiving


The Red Hats of America met Sat-
urday to celebrate the Fall season
and the Thanksgiving holiday, with
a holiday meal prepared by Mary
Frances Drawdy, at the Chamber of
Commerce.
The ladies considered all they
have to be thankful for in their lives
and Marge Rossi shared a story
from a friend titled "And God Said
No," which she said sustains her in
her fight against cancer.


JCHS Collectin

For Christmas
Students at Jefferson County
High School are accepting dona-
tions for their "Christmas For a
Child" project.
The goal of the project is to col-
lect donations of children's
clothing, toys, books, jewelry and
parental items for hurricane victims
for Christmas, because of the re-
cent loss, of family homes and in-
comes, children will more than
likely go without this year.


The Chamber was decorated with
flowers in Fall colors and hostesses
were Rossi and Camela Naranjo.
Members made plans for their
Christmas meeting, Saturday, Dec.
10, at the Chamber, during which
they will exchange gifts and show-
case their Red Hats in Holiday style.
Hostesses will be Thelma
Birdwell, Mona Mackenzie, and
Mary Nowell.


g Gifts

Project
All community members are en-
couraged to donate items for the
children at the school office during
school hours.
In related news, JCHS will be
conducting its blood drive for hur-
ricane victims, from 1 p.m. until 3
p.m., Nov. 21.
All blood types are needed, espe-
cially the universal donors, 0 posi-
tive and 0 negative, and members
of the community are encouraged
to donate blood.

.


New Bethel AME
TO Distribute'
Commodities

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

New Bethel A.M.E. Church in
Conjunction with Elizabeth M.B.
Church will provide food to needy
infants, the elderly, and anyone
needing assistance from the USDA
Commodities Program 9 a.m. 1
p.m. on the fourth Saturday of each
month.
This is Second Harvest Food is a
i USDA Commodities Food Program.
The distribution location will be at
New Bethel A.M.E., 6496 Ashville
Highway.
For additional. information con-
tact Essie Norton at 997-5683 or
997-6929.


noupakis McClellans Set

th Birthday Gane Grinding


She moved to Weirton, WV. upon
marriage in 1937 to George Kamou-
pakis who passed away in 1970.,
She came to Monticello in 1998 to
be closer to her daughter Dianne
Westbrook. .
Karnoupakis has two surviving
siblings, an. older brother in Penn-
sylvania, and a younger brother in
New Smyrna Beach, FL.
She was a homemaker- and in-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The McClellan family will hold
their traditional Cane Grinding
'Wednesday, Nov. 23 through Fri-
day, Nov. 25 at their home, 6151
Waukeenah Highway.
The community is invited to come
out and watch cane juice be made


evolved with the Greek Orthodox, into cane syrup.
Church women's organizations in "Delight in the wonderful smells
Weirton, WV. of cane syrup cooking," adds Billie
Her family was her career with a McClellan.


few years in clothing retail sales.
Many of her family was able to at-
tend the celebration, of her 90th
birthday.
Her immediate family present in-
cludes her son, Nestor Kamoupakis,
and wife Gail, and grandson Kris
Kamoupakis, and wife Cindy.. and
great-grandson Nicholas, as well as
-,.. gFanddaug4lte ra,J-l.ey. all.-fr nt

Daughter Dianne Westbrook and
husband Buddy, of Monctitello,
along with local friends, were also
present.

IN LOVING MEMORY
Mrs. Ossie Bell (Honey) Odort
It has only been a year since you,
left us so quietly, although it seems
like an eternity.
Mom. know that we are keeping
your charge and that you wiHl al-
ways be loved and missed by your
family.
We miss you. ;
Willie Mae, John,
Savannah, Fannie,
Josephine, Lil, Isabella,
Jack, Jennie, and all
the grands. family,
and friends.





... u i


The Most
important
Instrument in

the Treatment
.. Of Stroke


U'


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Central_

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166

Sunday:
-0 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The fear of
the LorW
teaches a man
wisdom.
Proverbs 15:23


Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


The
Earned Income
Tax Credit.
You've earned
it. Why not
claim it?
If you're working hard just to make
ends meet and have one or more
children living with you, you may
qualify for the EITC. Think of it as a
reward for doing one of life's most
beautiful, most important and most
loving jobs. Visit our Web site or
ask your tax preparer if you qualify.
A message from the Internal
Revenue Service.
www.irs.gov

SThe Internal Revenue Service
Working to put service first


sented a Safety Program at a
(News Photo)


-1.
o.'









Health Fair, Nutrition

Class At Mt. Morilla


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 7

Brinsons Observe 44th

Wedding Anniversary


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Healthy Jefferson Healthy
Hearts Campaign and. Mt. Morilla
Church are partnering to offer a
Health 'Fair and Nutrition Class
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Saturday.
A Free Heart Health and Nutrition
Class is planned at 12:30 p.m.
The Mt. Morilla Youth Day and
Community Health Fair will offer
youth day activities for kids and


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The First Baptist Church of Lloyd
will host a presentation by Gail
Hartzog entitled "Meet Lottie
Moon" 6 p.m. Sunday, in the sanc-
tuary.
-The presentation is a dramatiza-
tion of the life of the Southern Bap-
tist Missionary, Charlotte "Lottie
Digges-Moon who served in China
for 40 years.
The presentation will follow


Church News

Mr. Ararat AME Church in Wau-
keenah celebrates its annual Harvest
Day Program 11 a.m., Sunday. An
all you can eat dinner % ill be served.

Salem.AME Church will observe
its annual Family and Friends' Day
11 a.m., Sunday. Guest minister is
Rev. Gregory Gathers and his con-
gregation, of Mount Morilla MB
Church in Lamont.
"Getting To Know You" Felliow-
ship Program 2 p.m., Sarurday at
Northside Church of Christ, North
Railroad Street.


health activities for the whole
family.
There will be presentations and
information on high blood pressure,
heart disease, prescription
assistance, Healthy Start services,
the Car Seat Program, and Diabetes-
Take the Risk Test.
Healthy drinks and snacks will be
made available for all.
Project Director Agnes McMur-
ray can be reached at 877-1529 or
997-7471 for more information.


Moon from her childhood in Vir-
ginia; as a teacher in Cartersville,
GA.; through her missionary days in
China; until her death there in 1912.
"Moon died of starvation as a re-
sult of her sacrifices 'for the people
with whom she worked," explains
Hartzog.
The Lottie Moon Christmas Offer-
ing is the largest mission offering by
Southern Baptist churches.
They hope: to raise more than $100.
million for missionaries in 120
countries.
Hartzog is the Director of Plan-
ning at Chipola Junior College in
Marianna.
She travels each Christmas season
to different churches presenting the
life of Moon.

Music Night At
Calvary Baptist
Calvary Baptist Church will host a
Bluegrass Gospel and Country Mu-
sic Night 6:30 p.m. Saturday, featur-
ing the sounds of the Calvary
'Bluegrass' Band; the Echols County
STravelers; and the Agner Family.,
All .are encouraged to bring a
friend and expect to have a fun time.
This is planned to be a good night
with great bluegrass gospel music.


/


~/ /


MITCHELL

First Birthday
Jaila M. Mitchell celebrates her
fist birthday Friday, Nov. 18.
She is the daughter of Jamell
'Mitchell and Cortney Siplin, ,
Maternal grandparents are Donnie
Siplin, and' Marva and Nelson.
Woodson.
Paternal grandparents are Wanda
Jackson White, George White, and,
Lavanuel Mitchell, Sr.
Great grandparents are Carrie Cue,
Betty J. Williams, and Queenie
Mitchell.
Godparents are Micheal Johnson
and Greg Seabrooks;


SHARE Pickup
:Day Saturday

DEBBIE SNAPP
'Staff Writer

Aucilla SHARE Pickup and Dis-
tribution Day is 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at the Central Baptist
Church 655 TindellRoad.
As there is no food storage facility
availalbe, food packages will have
to be picked up at this time..
If the packages are not picked up
they will be forfeited and sold to
someone else.
Volunteers and cash donations, to
help pay for gas expenses will
gladly be accepted any time .:


School Menu,
Monday
,Pizza, Whole Kemnal Corn, Fruit,
Cookie, Milk.
Tuesday
Roast Turkey, Creamed Potatoes,
Green Beans, Fruit Salad, Hot Roll,
Milk.
Wednesday
Thanksgiving Holiday.
Thursday
Thanksgiving Holiday.
Friday
Thanksgiving Holiday.


'I


Etta and Clyde Brinson recently
celebrated their 44th wedding anni-
versary, and renewed their vows
Saturday, Nov. 12 at St. Tabernacle
Church of God in Unity.
A reception followed at the Monti-
cello Woman's Club on Pearl Street,
hosted by their children.
They Brinsons have four children
and seven grandchildren.
The couple received many guests,
with out of owners from Palmetto,
St. Petersburg, Atlanta, GA., Wil-
mington, NC., and Evergreen, AL.
Most of their family and friends
live in Jefferson County and sur-
rounding area.
The Brinson's were married Nov.
18, 1961 at the ages of 19 and 21.
The couple shared the following
promise with their guests:
"How good it:is to let our memory
wander and travel back across, the


fruitful years, to count how many
miles we've walked together.
On pinnacle of dreams, through
vats of tears, along the level grourid
of every day, we've made our way.,
In sickness and in health, in jdy
and sadness, together side by side,
sunshine or shade, we've worked to-
ward common goals, found satisfac-
tion in all the hours, of which our
years are made.
All things were possible because
we shared, because we cared, after
many years.
We still hold dearest of all life's
blessings.
Anywhere on earth, the trust and
honor that we give each other, tlte
love that gave our other blessings
birth.
Praise be that I am yours, by plan
divine, that you are mine."


Homes Of Mourning
(Continued From Page 6)


way in Tallahassee.
He was a veteran of the U.S. Na% N
and was an active member of Provi-
dence Baptist Church.
He leaves, his loving wife Mar-
quita Christie Veira of Tallahassee.
Others saluting his accomplishments
and treasuring his love include his
sons, Franton Veira of Tallahassee
and Francois Veira' of New York,
N.Y. His mother and father 'Samuel
and Cynthia Veira of St. Vincent,
West Indies;, his brothers Israel, Jul-
ian, Eldred, Winston, McWilson,
Hugh,; Albert, 'Kert, Desmond and
Samuel, Jr.; his sisters Valerie, Ur-
sula, Cecile, Lorn'a, Judiani,
Mishka. Suden. Florina, Marcia, and
Jennifer; his mother-in-law Louise
Christie of, Tallahassee, and his
Father-in-la" .Charlie Christie of
Monticello. Numerous nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends, in-
cluding his parents.and colleagues at
CVC Pharmacy.
General Cobb
General Cobb age 44 a Tow Truck
Operator in Dallas, Texas died.


The service will be at 11:00 a.m.
.on Saturday; November 19, 2005 at
Ne\i Zion Missionary Baptist
Church in Green% ille \ ith burial ,t
Young Reaper-Bellam Cemeter\
also in Greenville. Family will re-
ceive friends (viewing) from 2:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on FridayNovem-
ber 18,., 20,05 at Tillman Funeral
Home.
Mr. Cobb was a native of Green-
ville and had:been a resident of Dal-
las for more than 20 years. He wasa
self employed tow truck salvage
yard operator.
.He leaves his wife Sandra Tank-
sley Cobb of Dallas; Others mourr-
ing his passing are his brothers
Lugene' Cobb, J.C. Cobb, Jr., Willie
Cobb and Dennis Cobb; his sisters
Bessie C. Dixon, Rosa Cobb, Annie
C. Hooker,'Carrie Bell Gallman, Ida
C. Kimmons and Hagah C. Camp-
bell along will several nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends. He
was preceded in death by his father
and mother J.C. Cobb, Sr. and Isa-
belle Rayford Cobb. t


Mr. Retailer!












If you read this, you have



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Monticello News




997-3568


'Meet Lottie Moon' At

Lloyd 1st Baptist Sunday


ETTA AND CLYDE BRINSON








PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005


RealH state


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E-MAIL: WPM1232@AOL.COMm
Reieta -5omeria ,Ivetmn
















.Tennis Team Drops


dTO 11th In League


Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 9


Coach Colzie Speaker

At Seminole Club


"FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

During the past two weeks, the
.JVMonticello Mood Swings ladies A-
,league tennis team, dropped to 11th
place in the league.
/, In tennis action, Nov. 3, the Mon-
ticello Mood Swings won one of
its six matches .
STeam #1, Katie Brock and Lisa
Jackson, lost its matches, 2-6 and
4-6..
STeam #2, Patty Hardy and Cindy
Wainright, won by forfeit.
.- Team #3, Lorei Salie and Susan
- Goodwin, lost its first match, 6-7,
.won the second, 6-4, and lost the
tie breaker, 1-6'.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff and
iAngie Delvecchio, lost its matches,
"1-6 and 5-7.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor and
T risha Wirick, lost its first match,
5-7, won the second, 6-2, and losi


the tie breaker, 1-6.
Team #6, Maxi Miller and Jenni-
fer Ellis, lost its matches, 3-6 and
4-6.
Last week, when the ladies won
two of their six matches at Tom
Brown Park.
Team #1, Brock and Jackson, lost
its sets, 2-6 and 0-6;
Team #2, Hardy and Wainright,
lost its sets, 3-6 and 6-7.
Tteam #3, Goodwin and substitute
player Kelly Hetherington, won its
sets, 6-2 and 7-5.
Team #4, Kirchhoff and Delvec-
chio, lost its sets, 5-7 and 3-6.
Team #5, Wirick and substitute
player Roslyn Bass, lost its sets,
2-6 and 3-6.
Team #6, Miller and Ellis, won
its first set, 7-5, lost the second, 3-6
and won the third, 6-3.
The Mood Swings will enjoy a
week off for; the Thanksgiving holi-
days.


''''


--.------/ 7


TEAM SIX of the Monticello Mood Swings ladies tennis
team includes, from left, Jennifer Ellis, and Maxie Miller.


Lady Warriors Ready


Seminole Club members wrap up
their season with James Colzie, FSU
cornerbacks coach, the speaker at
their meeting Thursday, at Jerger
Farm.
Colzie is a member of the 1993
FSU National. Championship team,
and joined FSU after having been
named the Miami Herald's Athlete
of the Year in 1994.
He brought his talents to the FSU
Defense, helping to make. it the
number one rated defense that year,
and going on to bring the National
Championship to Tallahassee.
During his tenure on the squad,
Colzie assisted FSU in winning four
ACC Championships, playing for
another National Championship in
1996, and achieving a a record of
43-5-1 overall.
Graduating from FSU in 1996
with a degree in International Af-
fairs, Colzie became a free agent


with Tampa Bay, but returned to his
roots in baseball and spent a year
with the Montreal Expos.
He became the Head Coach for'-,
Miami Christian in football, '
baseball, and was an assistant coach,l.
in basketball, winning a state cham-
pionship in the latter.
He was also instrumental in devel-;'_
oping a program at Florida Interna2
tional University.
Colzie returned to FSU in 2004 as*'
the defensive backs coach, where-
his expertise is used to best advan--.
tage.
For directions to the Seminole
Club meeting place, contact And\-
Jerger at 997-1653.
RSVP to Jim Messer at 997-2230,,
for the meeting, and plan to bring,
your own steak and drink of choice.
.Potatoes, salad, and dessert will be, .
provided. Bringing your own steak'
knife is recommended.


For season's opener

FRAN HUNT Finlayson said that both he and Health Care Increases


ACA Middle School Boys

Ready For Season Opener


FRAN HUNT
/Staff Writer

Coach Ray Hughes reports the
,roster for the Aucilla Christian
Academy middle school boy's bas-
ketball team.
There are 13 boys on the team this
/ year.
Players include: Brandon Dunbar,
Alex Dunkle, Wilson Lewis, Joe
SMizell, Ryan Pritcher, and Brian
Scholte.
Also, John Stephens, Daniel
Ward, Clark ,Christy, Kent Jones,
,. Jacob Newberry, G. H. Lifford and
:Marcus Roburts
The bbys have been working hard,
read\ i'n for their first game of the
season against Munroe..
'._, The team has concentrated on
the basic fundamentals of basket-
Sball including offensive and defen-
sive methods, and tactics, passing,
shooting, dribbling,, rebounding
and steals, Hughes said.
"I have two key players this year,
SDuabar and Dunkle," said Hughes.
When the Warriors face Munroe,
Hughes said he believed the boys
woiild do all right.


"They beat us twice last year, but
I think we're in pretty good shape
for this year," concluded Hughes.

Turkey Shoot
Saturday
Boy Scout Troop 803 will sponsor
a Turkey Shoot 9 a.m. Saturday, on
,U.S. .Highway 90 east at Steve
Walker's.
This annual event will be held rain
or shine. Citizens are encouraged to
stop by and try their luck.
Bring your own gun. Shells will
be furnished. Shooting is at targets,
not at live bird's.
The cost, is $2 ash ot.


Opening

the door
to hope

Call ouP *
lifeline. ,
It's toll-free.
1-800-572-1717 I
wwwmdausa org ,,,,..,..,..


Staff Writer '" assistant coach Richard Watt, enjoy


The Lady Warriors middle school
girl's basketball team has been
practicing to prepare for the season
kickoff game :against Munroe,
Thursday:. '
Coach Mac Finlayson said that
the Lady Warriors practice daily,
during daily physical education
classes. '
"That 40 minutes sure,goes by
fast,", said Finlayson.
"They have been working on bas
ketball fundamentals, execution: ol'
offensive plays and proper defen-
sive tactics," he added. "They're a
great group of kids and they have a
great attitude toward learning the


\ working ith thlie girls very much.
When going into Thursday's
game, Finlayson said it is going to
be a tough and hard-fought game
for the Lady Warriors.
Referring to Munroe, Finlayson
recalls, "They will be' fundamen-
tally sound, and are a very welf
coached team.
"It is going to be extremely
tough. She (Munroe's coach)
knows what she's doing .when it
*comes to basketball," said Finlay-
son. "She has been their varsity
basketball coach for the past 19,
)ears." ,
The game is 3 p.m., Thursday,
here.


(Continued From Page 1)
capped at $1,500 per employee and
$4,500 per family, versus $2,000
and $6,000 for the same categories
under Plan B.
Odom explained that these caps do
riot apply to prescription drugs,
which are separate.
"That's $2,000 per person and no
more than $6,000 for family, no
matter how many in the family,"
Odom said.
Plan C, which commissioners ex-
pressed the greatest interest in pur-
suing, entails a 6.95 percent rate
increase, or $34,348.44 more than
the present plan.
For employees, Plan C would
raise the monthly payment $25.02
for employees and $62.33 for fami-
lies, bringing the monthly contribu-
tion to $385.10 and $959.29
respectively.
Like the other options. Plan C''
again is essentially a duplicate of
Plan A, insofar as the benefits. The


major difference is in the hospital,
deductible. "
Plan A has a zero hospital de"-
ductible, whereas Plan C has a $500,
deductible.
Odom explained that the $500 is a
one-time charge per employee pet -
year. The deductible, he said, could
accumulate from a varieties of,
sources, including visits to hospitals,
clinics, and outpatient facilities.
"The decision we got to make ie .
do we want, to gamble %\ith people
going to the hospital." Commissioi
Chairman Skeet Joyner said. "If wd-*
go with last column (Plan ). we're e
rolling the dice %\ith anyone going.
to the hospital."
He asked Odom to get with the in-
surance company and have the latter
provide statistics, if possible, on the g
number of county employees who
;\isit hospitals and other emergencye
facilities.
Commissioners had until Thurs-.
day to reach their decision. *


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For complete information about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at www.savingsbonds.gov.
A public service of this newspaper


-- .-. -I *





!PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005
*:***:**********:**:*********:**************:***************:***:******:* t*u ***:nes-* **::**:*:



-

















101
ForA The

















.H fNG TO PURCHASE -eaton-, :- ,
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P' ] r Keep informed of news, events and regulations 386-362-1620 .
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Fighting to Protect Your Heritage of
SHunting with Dogs in Florida. Matt's Taxidermy 4
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MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
No wA ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR ENROLLMENT
(LIMITED SPACE)

997-6048

1590 N. JEFFERSON STREET


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 1O00K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 41,3-3074 EOE


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 11


It keeps Bring Your
m1 t Holiday
more than Guests tor

memories BUSH BABY
al1TP 1 on Friday,
(mvte. the day after
T'1 r n fi i-nc t r


American Heart
Associations
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke


Keeping You Informed In Our Growing Community

Monticello News


I llnanKsgI V ng1 or
Saturday for a fun
Shopping Spree.
Everything
In Store
10% OFF
Both Days.
Doors Open
Friday 1-9
Saturday 10-9
280 N.Cherry St.


2 WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

S997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
*Tuorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


I


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


L I


Septic Tank & Land Clearing l
Complete Septic Service & Repair "
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing i 10 C h evroi

Thomas B. Scott, Sr. Timberwolf Long Cut Wintergreen
RtlBox137 2 for $3.25
Lamont, FL 32366 (Supply Limited) (Special Pack)
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620 Pepsi Cola 12pk $3.59


i i


Register's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997-2535


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN


0 Trim
0 Mow
0 Remi
0 Main


Limited to supply on hand

32oz Pepsi Fountain Beverage .99
Good thru Nov. 27, 2005


Allyn Sikes
S Owner
1 830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303


(850) 224-3473 1 [E00) 541-8702
vvww. abbiesf lowers. corn


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior ~ Exterior
Lie & Ins #4676


We have another order of leather purses *

Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes or cigars.
We accept all manufacturer coupons:

nI BETTER BODIES
!o il AOvmft -,


ming Call for quality work
ing 0 Stump Grinding 45 Years In The Trade
val 0 Aerial Device Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
oval 0 Bush Hogging I
tenance 850-997-7467 850-544-2917

997-0039 Lic. & Insured *Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY REPAIR


U ________________ U


CARROtLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"

,* ,

Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
o.n Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


LA CHIUTA

T A Craig

Limerock Larichiuta
*Clay Lloyd, FL 32337
-Sand 997-6788
*Top Soil


E CHASE
Jena Fernanc
Senior Mortg
17 Years Of S
850-224-2427
FHA/VA
Self Employed ~ New C(
Credit is


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE

(


Iez
age Specialist
Service

L/CONV.
onstruction/Land
issues OK


Keal
"Service Is

EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


ton Tire Repair
Our Business on and oof the Road


850-997-091
850-264-68
850-997-0
850-997-544


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100



B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing,
*e .

Brad McLeod
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

BIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS Co.

997-4150


REE ESTIMATES FREE PATS
IrE E LOCATION SERVICEd
FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT I
966 N. BARBER HILL RD. LAMONT, FL
03 Shop I 997-4160 1
871 Cell ANDY' & TLNA AMES, OWNERS
937 Fax
3 Home From Dent Repair To Complete Restoration


1. 24 hour Service, 7-days Yhy wait when you don'i have to" Call now
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired nght by skilled, neat technicians.
3. Free Energy Survey oIr new systems can save you big.
No obligation!
4. Two-year repair warranty Most stop at 30 days! Benson's
repairs stay repaired!
10-Year warranty on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy financing to suit you' Just call.
i 7. Free Air Quality Check Letl us check what's
in your air for your health.
8. Up front pricing No surprises, just honesty
.the way it should be.
For over 20 years, thousands have chosen
the caring comfort of Benson's.
Your 24 hr Service Hotline:
s fll a oit id we'l ltihppitlyprove T- y n2
our value to you. 5 1 9
Benson T. Crren 562-313


1412 E. Base Street
Madison, Florida 32340
(850) 973-3026
BEST PRICES IN TOWN
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD?


Affordable Business Communications, LLC
Specializing in Meridian and Norstar Telephone
I Systems and Voice Mail
*Licensed and insured. Nortel trained and certified.
Telephone installations, moves, adds and changes
New, remanufactured and used phones/systems
Walter & Dana Nloxley
1025 S. Mulberry St., Monti cello, Ft, 32344-1205
Mobile Phone: 850-264-9455
email: ABCI'cle(ametscapemct
Your CMTlTaTMTMO Savings


Dwyi Hall. Owaer


Lawn & Landscaping
r- --------------- --
Mention This Ad & receive I
I A 10% Discount I
-- ---- -

11025 East Mahan ~ 877-4550

Residential & Commercial Lic.# #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING Co. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383.


I IF


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel *
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic Tack Contractor &
Excavation Contractor '
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lic. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


D.L. 's Gun & Pawn Shop, Inc.
Cash in a flash!
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
Guns ~ Diamonds ~ TV's ~ VCR 's ~ Stereos
Radios Gold ~ Guitars ~ Silver ~ Tools
Mon.-Sat. 9-6 575-7682
1511 Jackson Bluff *Tallahassee


am Bowling
broker Associate


o 997-4789
1-888-701-2205
www'.pamb@nettally.cor


5.
B'
a,
B,
5.
lit
'I
ft
4
5'
9


ft

n .
W(f

m


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
4 family reunions, parties
Events and Types *
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Sales Manager


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A All trade-ins are welcome
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005













1..


DIRECTV GIVES YOU 100% DIGITAL-QUALITY PICTURE AND SOUND ON EVERY CHANNEL
DIRECT


Get HBO', Starz Super Pack
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PROGRAMMING 3 months!
Just purchase the TOTAL CHOICE' package, HBO', Starc'
Super Pack and SHOWTIME UNLIMITEDl. Offer ends
02/28/06 and is available on approved credit. New
residential customers only. DIRECTV hardware and
programming sold separately. Add $4.99/mo. lor separate
programming on 2nd and each additional TV.


Includes satellite dish, up to
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Annual programming
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SIGN U TODAY


BIGFOOT SATELLITE

1-800-254-3630


An Authorized DIRECTV Dealer
PROGRAMMING OFFER, Oiler available selling 11/0/05. In fourth month, customer's TOTAL CHOICE package, HBO, Starz Super Pack and SHOWTIME UNLIMITED services will continue at the
reuhr IT-3l.l Ih? r l 1 9''r, Tir irip r'- 7 -,,- h.-z r -, -.l- .- rr- rr -.,- -. ir. rl-r. i- I. rr .-I. -, 1', lrP"; ," .-m -.- I 0i.'r;n |T, r-- P .rr .- 1 ,,- r -.- I ,l
DIRECTV Cuslomef Agreement; copy provided at DIRECTVcom and in your firsi bill. HBO is a regslered service mark of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME and related marks are Irademarks of Showmie INeworks Inc.. a Viacom
Company. All Righls Reseved. Star and related channels and service marks are Ie properly of Slar Enlerainment Group LLC. 2005 DIRECTV inc. DIRECTV. he Cyclone Design logo and TOTAL CHOICE are registered
trademarks of DIRECTV Inc. All other rademarks and service marks are Ihe property ol heir respective owners.


iS,,


STUDENTS at Howard Middle School light
candles representing branches of armed
services at the Veteran's Day Assembly, Fri-
day. L-R: Devondrick Nealy, Air Force; Sara


Macdonald, Army; Paris Littlejohn, Marines;
Gerrold Austin, Navy; T.J. Murphy, Coast
Guard. (News Photo)


* *.me.er..e.j~


* d6erdeC.,..TTI a

* Sr.~
* w~d~n.


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ANGELA SCOTT catalogues books at the
new Jefferson County Public Library on
South Water Street, The library will soon, r


also house the Keystone Genealogical Li-
brary. (News Photo)


:S ,.


JACOB FORD was among attendees at a re-
cent Story time at the library, which fea-


tured a puppet show. Children helped
orchestrate the program. (News Photo)


VVA .AN R A




If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The

Monticello News

You Can't Be Without It


"Can we help, Mom? Please?"

The need to help.

Children see it so
clearly because their
hearts have 20/20 vision.

Childreach sponsorship
provides needy children
and families overseas with
an opportunity for clean
water, good nutrition,
S education, and hope for a
better life through self-help
programs that really work.


child reach
U s W..rU. EMBR ..INERNATIONA

To learn more about Childreach, please call

1-800-599-9797
or write: Childreach Dept. U304 155 Plan Way Warwick, RI 02886
Chddrealchrlasifounded im 1937asFoster Parents Plan.


In Case Of Emergency Dial 911


If>~


^


t .; : I -,. t ,!v I' : I'! i I f!t !,I


I
lL


4w







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGA.vNOTICE -
The Jefferson County School Maintenance
Department is accepting bids for the floor
repairs at the Howard Middle School
Gymnasium. Submit your written bid to
Donald Johnson, 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Fl 32344. For questions
call (850)342-0142.
11/18,23, c


Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Maintenance Worker wanted at
NFCC. This position will work in
several trade areas which includes:
College event set ups; Furniture
moving: Maintenance and repair of
buildings and/or equipment. This
unskilled position is labor intensive
and requires heavy lifting.
Qualifications: Must be High School
Graduate with general knowledge of
maintenance functions and use of
minor equipment. Applications to:
i Director HR, North Florida
Community College, 325 NW Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
An application and complete job
description is available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application must be
received by 12/02/2005. EOE
11/16, 18, 23, 25, c
* Aucilla Christian Academy is
currently accepting applications for a
bus driver position. Must have (or be
willing to obtain) a CDL class B with
P and S endorsements. Also, must be
a positive Christian role model. For
more information or to apply, please
contact the school at 997-3567.
, 11/16, 18, c
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses Be part of a team working side
by side with other health care
professional. RN/PRN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance ~ Vested Retirement after
six years ~ Comprehensive State of-
Florida Benefit Package. If your
prefer per diem, rather than career
service, we also have OPS
(non-benefited positions). RNs $29-31,
LPNs $19-22; For additional
information contact Sharon
McKinnie, R.N. at 850-922-6645.
email:
mckinnie,sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11,
16, 18, 23, 25, c
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
The Jefferson County Teachers
Credit Union, 1500 W. Washington
St., Monticello, FL. 32344, is now
accepting application for a full time.
teller/loan processor clerk.
Competitive wages and great benefits
package included. Employment
applications may be picked up at the
Credit Union office between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. All
applications must be received by
November 18,2005 at 4:00 p.m.
11/4,9, 11, 16, c


MEAT GOATS

BUCKS

50 to 90
Pounds

(850) 997-6599


Glass Bowls, Platters,
Relish Dishes, Pitchers,
Vases; Silver serving
pieces, Compotes,
Candelabras, Gravy Boats.
All at
BUSH BABY
Open week nights
5-9 and 10-9 on
Saturday.
Now Until
Thanksgiving.


HELP WANTED
Waitress/Cashier part-time. Apply in
person to Court Yard Cafe, 110 East
Dogwood Street.
LOST
Brown/Blonde Cocker Spaniel spayed
female 4 years old. Black collar with
blue registration tag. Last seen on
1-10 near Lloyd exit. Call 510-7583 or
303-237-2500 or 720-480-1647 or
656-9170.
11/16, 18, 23, 25, pd
GARAGE`SALE
Estate Sale Sat. 8:00 12 pm 1927 E
Washington 1.8 miles from
courthouse on U.S. Hwy 90 E.
Furniture, Antiques, Exercise Equip.,
Rugs, Bric@Brac.
11/18, pd
FARM YARD & GARAGE SALE:
704 Barnes Road, Monticello, FL
32344. Saturday, November 19, 9:30
am to 2:30pm. No early sales.
11/18, pd
SERVICES
Handyman Painting Int/Ext, Gut-
ters, Sheetrock, and House Cleaning.
Free estimates, call Billy & Lidieth @
997-5631.
11/9, 11, 16, 18, pd
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
China Painting Lessons Call Mrs.
Rush 850&-894-0265
10/21, 26, 28, 11/2,4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil %ith natural Ila'orings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names, creeds
,or practices? Jesus established His
church called the church of Christ
and you can be a member of it. We
are ready to help if you are ready to
learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
AUTOMOTIVE.
1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806
10/21, tfn, c


1982 Dodge Van w/utility rack, runs
good, $800 or Best Offer. 591-0245
anytime.
tfn
FOR SALE
Love seat, Earth tones, like new, $250.
Student Desk with chair $25, Area
rug, 63"x94" $25, beige carpet
remnant, 6'x12', $15. 2 PVC chairs
with cushions, $10 for pair. 997-8809.
11/11, 16, pd
Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limeusin bull, 14 months
old asking $. Call 997-0901, leave
message.
11/11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30, pd
Whitney Spinet Piano $800; Love
Seat, earth tone colors $100. Both in
excellent condition 997-3105.
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4,9, 11, 16, 18, pd
Rat Terrier puppies 9 weeks old, vet
checked and health certificates,
3-girls, 1-boy. Call Tom 997-1866.
11/4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Louie & Margaret Mills have shelled
pecans for sale. 1276 Clark Rd.
997-2106.
11/2, tfn
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
11/18, fcan


FOR SALE


Redecorating? Good prices on used
furniture: couch, love seat, end tables,
dresser, chests, chairs, more.
997-8803.
Pit Bull puppies $150 males, $200 fe-
males. Colors: Black, Red, Cham-
paign. 591-4148 or 997-1705

FQR RENT
Prime do%%niosn office space no%%
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
9/28, tfn, c
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
2 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, new
carpet, no pets, no children $550
997-6653
11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23 & 25 pd
NEW HOME 1370 square foot. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for under $475/
month payments. University Homes -
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
10 acres- 1,750 sq. ft. 3/2 house w/800
sq. ft. mother-in-law suite (cypress)
stables, workshop. Very private,
beautiful property w/huge oak trees
and pasture. $350,000, 850-997-4040.
11/16, 18, 23, 25, pd


RE AL ESt.


A great find. 3BR, 2B home w/garage,
large lot, much more. Nice
neighborhood. $152,750. 997-1888.
11/18, c
WANTED:
We need 2' chain link fence sections
that can be donated to the Jefferson
County Humane Society. Call the
Jefferson County Humane Society at
342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
10/12, tfn, c
Someone to graft pecan trees, medium
size to small, from a Desirable to an
Elliott, at least 100 trees. Call
997-4854.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,
c
Pecan harvesting equipment,
specifically a Shaker, Harvester,
Cleaner. Call 997-4854
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,


c
WANT TO BUY
Want to buy real cheap used good
condition large storage shed. We will
pick it up. Call the Jefferson County
Humane Society at 342-0244. Leave a
message we will call you back.
10/12, tfn, c

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

S575-6571


"You'll be Glad You Did"

f 850-509-5004

www.DonnaHazlewood.com
250 S. Jefferson St Monticello, Fl 32344

+ HUNTING TRACT. 50 mol acres of woods
Creek. Hwy 19 frontage. $6,000 per acre

* HORSE FARM. Home on 20 acres w/barn
Pasture. Will divide. Leon County $922,500

* DAVE'S TOWING. Be your own boss. Business
w/home & outbuildings on 4.50 acres. $259,000

* HOME ON 2 AC. 4BR/2BA with Pool.
Covered back porch. End of cul-de-sac.
Leon County: $139,900


j i14 4 1 11 iqwIm o


*U"L


Immediate openings for mechanically inclined individuals in TALLAHASSEE. Please apply online
at:
www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.
DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.
iWrk forIalert*


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850) 997-5516


Calling All Investors!
SI 10 Frontage- 10 acres. Mixed use
Interchange/Business. Only Large tract
available!
* Income Producing 52.47 acres with
8 rental mobile homes. 15 acre vacant
lot with county water hookup
* Great Access to Hwy 19 N- 11.68
acres zoned mixed use Business/
Residential. Residential/Commercial
septic on property.
* Mill Creek Ridge 372 beautiful
acres. Great for country retreat or
development!


k Simply the Best!


k

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-


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See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours


I'


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(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's
Pond Area cleared and ready to build
on, nice trees, paved road $27,500 each
A lot for the Money Comfortable 4 bed-
room 3 bath home on five fenced acres
w/guest house/playhouse w/ bath, big
shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100 pecan
trees and a nice pool a real dream for a
growing family $400,000
Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St.
$155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe-Sold Peary
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County-SOLD Peary
Does It Aqain 10 mostly open ac, corner
of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Townt on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
Check Out This One! .8 acres with big
doublewide and small house on a pretty old
hillside close to Leon County off Julia Road
$160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game' $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
- 3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
3/2 brick home w/pool, barn, 5 acre pas-
ture $1500 mo

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340


We have qualified buyers!
..A Are you interested in selling?

A Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!

AEAAAAfAA AkSLSL


Ill


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 18, 2005

Apply Now For Small Farm

Limited Resource Initiative


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Residents may apply for Small
Scale Resource Farm Initiative at
the USDA, Farm Service Center,
1250 N. Jefferson Street.
Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30
:p.m.. Telephone number is 997-
:4058.


The signup period continues
through Dec. 15, 2005.
The program is sponsored by the
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS) designed to help
farmers overcome barriers they face
in reaching their goals.
It is designed to help small farm-
ers co-exist with larger agricultural
operations.


October Rainfall Here

Least In 14 Counties
hovers around one inch, with rain-
RAY CICHON fall lacking in general throughout
Managing Editor the District,
In October, rainfall was highest in
Rainfall in the county for October-Bradford County, at 4.58 inches,
was 1.22 inches, below the 2004 and lowest in Jefferson County at
rainfall of 2.76 for the month, and 1.22 inches.
least in District.
Average rainfall in the county for At the Aucilla River in Lamont,
the month is 3.07 inches. the level was 46.96 inches, versus
The Suwannee River Water Man- the average level of 51.21 for Octo-
agement District (SRWMD) rainfall ber.
for October, 2005, was 2.40 inches The District continues to recom-
in the 14 counties comprising the mend that water conservation be an
district, ongoing activity for all water users.
Counties in the district include: Water is conserved by using the
Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Colum- minimum amount needed for spe-
bia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamiton, Jef- cific applications, and by irrigating
ferson, Lafayette, Levy, Maidson, lawns, plants, and crops only when
Suwannee, Taylor and Union. necessary, and in the morning be-
Cumulative rainfall for the past 12 fore 10 a.m, and in the evening
months is at 56.03 inches, compared hours after 3 p.m., when lower tem-
to the long term average District perature and wind velocity reduce
rainfall of 55.2 inches. the amount of water lost to evapora-
Rainfall surplus for the past year tion.


climate control BETTER THA]N
It's simple
Heal and cool your I
home smartly with ZERO M OV
ENERGY STARE to \ _
reduce your home FORYOUR
energy use. FOR YOUR 1


The initiative is critical to the
quality of life small farmers and
ranchers in sustaining their opera-
tions and is available in 12 states
throughout the southeast, including
Florida.
It focuses on revising guidelines
on conservation practices and poli-
cies that have caused small farmers
and ranchers not to participate in
Farm Bill Programs, or prohibited
them from ranking high enough to
be enrolled in the program.
Priority issues being addressed are
fencing requirements and watering
systems for livestock grazing sys-
tems, irrigation of small acreages,
and improvement of soil health
through use of specific conservation
practices, such as terraces, water-
ways, gully control structures and
pasture plantings.
The cost share rate is 75 percent
from NRCS, with 25 percent due
form the producer (Unless the appli-
cant qualifies as a Limited Re-
sources Producers which is 90
percent cost share from NCRS, with
10 percent from the producer.)
To assists this initiative in reach-
ing its objectives, both acreage and
income caps have been set for Flor-
ida.
The acreage cap is 236 acres ,
with no more than 100 acres of
cropland included in the total, and
the income cap is 200 percent of the
County Median Income.


ZERO DOWN,

VE IN COSTS

NEW HOME *


4


-j

4
A;


DRAKE


'Drake' Named
Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has named -
"Drake" as its adoptable canine Pet
of the Week.
Drake is a tan male Monticello
Mutt with a black muzzle.
He was born June 4, and is neu-
tered with all vaccinations up to-
date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bau-
tista describes him as being an all
round good dog.
- "He'd make a good watch dog, is
sweet, and very energetic," said-
Bautista.
She added that Drake would be a
good dog for an older child and he
likes to run and play.
Drake gets along well with other
dogs but it is not known how he is
around cats.
To adopt Drake or any of the
many other adoptables at the shel-
ter call 342-0244.


Premier Mortgage Funding
A local lender solving your problems!
850-875-2240 850-545-0418 cell
WWw.ibrittgagesbymarsha.com rnS
*CREDIT RESTRICTIONS APPLY


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND USE
CHANGE




Jefferson County Commission will have a public hearing on a proposed comprehensive plan land use
change in the Waukeenah area. The proposed change is from Mixed Use Suburban-Residential and
Agriculture 3 to the Residential 1 land use category. The subject property includes parcel numbers 08-IS-
4E-0000-0550-0000 and 17-1S-4E-0000-0020-0000 and contains approximately 377 acres. The location of
the proposed land use map change is indicated on the map below.











CR 259


















A public hearing on the proposed land use change will be held on December 15, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at the
courtroom of the Jefferson County courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The
meeting may be continued as necessary. The application material may be reviewed at the County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill Street, Monticello, FL. From the Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


Annual Trail Rider!



Family Farm Day


c Hay Pond Farm
J Monticello, Florida n

| Saturday, November 19, 2005O
n10:00 a.m. Trail Ride begins
12:00 p.m. Al's Gourmet Smoked Chicken & BBQ
S1:30 p.m. Horseback games and activities



Sv$8.00 lunch (includes a can drink or bottled water) /




m aAttention all non riders!!!


Fo Hay Rides*Horseshoes*Activities

SBsoBuy your raffle ticket for the beautiful bay yearling


Barn Door Prizes
Please call and let us know if you are
Shaving lunch with us j
a 997-4000



All' proceeds go to the Jefferson

SCounty Humane Society, Inc.

Bring your own horse,' no rentals available \
SNegative Coggins Required


Srom the Court House in Monticello, go one mile on HWY 19N Take a right on r
Boston Hwy (CR149). Go 1.8 miles. Take a right on Dills Road (CR 149-A) Go
S 2.8 miles; take a left into Hay Pond Farm
~ c- -o~ -o. -- -Uhaving -~* luc with u


To learn more, go to
energystar.gov. A


SDoes Your Home Need f
A Breath Of Fresh Air?
Experience the all new state-of-the-art
Air Purifying Technology
NO filters, not electrostatic precipitator...
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mountain-top fresh air
the way nature makes it!
Clear dust, smoke, chemical odors, cooking and
pet odors, kill mold and mildew, kill germs,
whole-house technology covers up to
3000 sq. ft. with ONE unit!
Call for free info or risk-free evaluation today!
As heard on national radio talk shows
/ Why not provide your family with
the best in the industry?
Bettie D. Campbell, Enterprises, Inc.
Bettie D. Campbell," Independent Dealer
877-388-8443 888-514-3059 850-856-5942
www.freshairliving.com/bdcampbell
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