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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00091
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: November 16, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00091
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text










Medicare

Part D Offers

Choices

Editorial, Page 4


StD1ARY OF FLORIDA IHSTORY
4T LIBRARY 'EST
IVER ITY OF FLORIDA
GAII1E5VILLF, FL. 32611





Baughman, Hobbs
Co-Chair

United Way Drive

Story, Photo, Page 7


Graceville Loss

Ends Warriors'
Post Season Play

Story, Page 9


Rev. Thermon Moore

Guest Speaker At

Post 49 Breakfast

Story, PhotosPage 12


Wednesday Morning
-4


137TH YEAR NO.91, 50 CENTS


Montic


Ilo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 16. 2005


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Work should soon begin on some
of the housing units scheduled for
rehabilitation or demolition under a
$700,000 Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) awarded the
county late last year.
Harold Eastman, of Meridian
Community Service Group, reported
the project's progress to commis-
sioners recently.
Meridian Community Service.


Group is a Tallahassee company
hired by the commission to handle
the county's housing issues after the
Grants Office was restructured.
Eastman told commissioners that
four of the 18 housing units desig-
nated for rehabilitation or demoli-
tion were scheduled to be worked
on in the coming weeks. He said the.
county was fortunate to have five
approved contractors who were will-
ing to bid on the contracts.
"This is unheard of in the
industry," Eastman said. "Usually,
it's one contractor."


He said that now that the con-
tracts were being bid out, the work
should proceed quickly. The reason
the work had taken this long to get
started, he said, was that his com-
pany had had to do much prepara-
tory paperwork upfront.
The county initially received
$548,000 for the work. That amount
was subsequently raised to
$700,000, however.
CDBG funds come from the US
Department of Housing and Urban
(See Housing Page 3)


Groups Pursue



Utility Systems


ENGINEER BILL ROGERS, left, and Bob Coo- aid. Here they meet with Eugene Pittman, of
per, right,, were two of the key players in the Rural Development, during the first phase of
realization of the Jefferson Communities the project. (News Photo)
Water System Inc., along with Dan MacDon-


Interest In Industrial Park


Sites Prompts Assessment


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

An electrical contractor's ex-
pressed interest in possibly purchas-
;ing property at the industrial park
prompted commissioners to take
stock of the county-owned land
there.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner informed the board recently that
a potential buyer's inquiry had
prompted him to ask Property Ap-
praiser David Ward to do an assess-
ment of the county's industrial park
property.
Per Ward, Joyner said, the fair
market value of the county-owned
land at the industrial park was
$15,000 an acre, not counting par-
cels fronting the jail or US 19,
which would command a higher
price.
Of course, the county wasn't
bound to sell any of its parcels at
$15,000 per acre, Joyner said. The
county could always choose to sell_
at higher or lower price, he said. But
the $15,000 set the baseline.
Joyner described the potential
buyer as an electrical contractor
whose business is presently located
in Tallahassee. He said the contrac-
tor lives in this county and is inter-
ested in possibly relocating his busi-
ness here.
According to Economic Develop-
ment Director Julie Conley, the indi-
vidual has expressed an interest in
buying between two and five acres
at the industrial park and construct-


Appraisal Puts I
Land Value At I.
$15,000 Acre ::

ing an 8,000 sq. foot building on the
property.
She said the individual indicated
that his company does annual sales
of $3 million and would employ 20
people.
In related news, Conley said a
group representing an unknown
company had inquired about the
availability of property at the indus-
trial park. She said it was the nature
of these site selection groups not to
give any information about their cli-


ents, however. Hence, she knew
nothing about the potential buyer,
she said.
Closer to home, CVS Pharmacy
may be purchasing the property
across the street from its present lo-
cation on US 19, previously the
home of former Sheriff Kep
Fortune.
Conley said CVS wants to relocate
to the new location, provided the
city grants a variance from the prop-
erty's present zoning, which is
mixed-use/business-residential.
The issue, Conley said, is that the
zoning does not permit construction
of buildings that exceed a certain
footage, which CVS requires for its
facility.


BUSINESSES and others pursuing economic development
opportunities in the county usually direct their inquiries to
the Economic Development office on US 19 South. (News
Photo)


Progress

Reported

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Two groups seeking funding for
separate water and sanitary sewer
systems are making steady progress
toward the achievement of their re-
spective goals.
The two groups are the Jefferson
Communities Water System, Inc.,
which is seeking $5.1 million for
extension of its existing water sys-
tem; and the Jefferson County Util-
ity Development Committee, which
is seeking a similar amount for the
creation of a central sewer system.
Representatives of the Jefferson
.


Communities Water Syste
.met with representatives o
Development on Oct. 27 f
view of the group's loan app
Rural Development is an ar
US Department of Agr
which funded the original p
large part.
The Jefferson Communitie
System is seeking a com
loan-grant to fund the second
of the project.
Bob Cooper, a represent
the Jefferson Communities
System Inc., called the
meeting instructive. He
group should hear from Ri
velopment in January whe
project will be funded.
If funded, the plan is to
the present water system an
or so miles, taking in man
areas left off the original
--- ^


ALTHOUGH the city's involvement with the Internet sys
started gaining publicity about six or so months ago, e
ration of the system's feasibility began when Counci
Eugene Hall still sat on the council. From left, co
members Luther Pickles, Hall and Brian Hayes. (I
Photo)


em Inc. This would bring public water to
of Rural residents of Nash, Hatchett, Thomp-
for a re- son Valley, Curtis Mill, and Blue
locationn. Lake roads, among others.
m of the All told, the extension is expected:
riculture, to pick lip about 400 houses, putting
project in the system's customer base well
over 1,200 residences.
es Water ft took proponents of the water.
ibination system more than eight years from
nd phase the conception of the project to the
realization of the first phase a little
tative of more than a year ago.
s Water By contrast, the Jefferson County
Oct. 27 Utility Development Committee is a
said his new group. Indeed, the group
rural De- formed less than a year ago. But it
their the has made remarkable progress in its
short time.
o extend Most recently, the group orches-
other 40 treated an agreement between the city
y of the and the county that puts it in a posi-
project, tion to seek funding for a $60,000
feasibility study, a necessary step to
* determine the exact cost and viabil-
iryv ofa central sewer system.
(. -.' On Tuesday, representatives of the
S group met with representatives of.
the Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP), from which state
agency the group is seeking part of
the funding for the feasibility study.
The meeting was to seek the DEP's
assistance in the preparation of the
loan application.
Concerns about the environment
(the potential for water contamina-.
tion from septic tanks) and the de-1
sire to promote economic.
development are behind the efforts
;of the Jefferson County Utility De-
stem velopment Committee.
xplo- Proponents of the project believe
Iman the time is propitious for such a pur-
uncil suit, given the state's interest in pro-
News moting sewer-related capital
improvement projects.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

One day before Tuesday's dead-
line, Graybar Electric Company had
yet to respond formally to the city's
ultimatum.
That ultimatum, issued by the City
Council on Nov. 1, called for Gray-
bar to correct the reception prob-
lems associated with the Internet
_ system it provided the city, or re-
move the equipment from the city
premises.
City Attorney Bruce Leinback has
been negotiating the issue with
Graybar's attorney.
"I got a phone call from Graybar's
attorney last Thursday," Leinback
said Monday. "She asked how firm
the city's deadline was. I informed
her it was firm."
Leinback said Graybar's attorney
indicated that her company did not
think it could achieve a solution by
Tuesday's deadline.
"She said she would speak with
the technical people at Graybar and
she would write a letter stating
Graybar's position," Leinback said.
Discussed too, he said, was the
.-option of Graybar removing its
equipment from the city premises,
which the company seemed amena-
ble to doing.
Until receipt of the Graybar attor-
ney's letter, however, the city really
had no answer, Leinback said.


The city and Graybar have been
sparring over the issue of the Inter-
net system for several months now.
The problem arose because the
system's signal reaches only a small
percentage of potential customers.
This notwithstanding Graybar's rep-
resentation that the system would
provide 80 percent coverage within
a mile radius of the system's anten-
nas.
The culprit, according to the ex-
perts, are the trees, which suppos-
edly interfere with the signal. The
one solution proposed thus far has
been to erect higher-than-treetop an-


tennas at each of the residences ex-
periencing poor or no reception.
City officials wonder about the
cost and viability of such a solution.
Who will pay for the antennas and
how effective will they be, officials
want to know.
But more pertinent, they wonder
how a company of Graybar's lon-
gevity and expertise could not know
that trees would impact the system's
reception.
"This is not Yuma, Arizona," one
council member remarked face-
tiously.
(See Internet Page 3)


MEMBERS of the Jefferson County High School chorus and
band performed the Star-Spangled Banner at the annual
Veterans Day program, held on the front lawn of the high
school. See story, page 10. (News Photo)


C


Graybar's Response To City was

Still Pending AS Of Late Monday


Work on $700,000 House Rehabilitation

Effort Scheduled To Get Underway Soon


I


alp;








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005


'Ode To American Flag' Moves HMS


Audience

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Students at Howard Middle_
School presented its annual Veter-
ans Day Program, Friday.
Residents from the community,
veterans, School Board members.
HMS staff and students, %were
touched by the words and songs of
the children and those who ad-
dressed the crowd, reminding them
the importance of appreciating vet-
erans, and that it is because of
those veterans that we Americans
can enjoy the freedoms we do to-
day.
Student Stanley Brooks %%el-
comed the crowd and the JCHS
JROTC Color Guard, Alan Kent.
Tabitha Smith, Charles Pitts, Ge-
neva Miller and Thomas Smith,
presented the colors.
Rev. Curnell Henry offered the
invocation and added, "My mes-
sage is to remember to thank % eter-
ans who serves our great country
for a noble cause. They serve be-
cause it is necessary for the greater.
good.
"Remember to thank veterans for
all they have done for our country
and all that they continue to do and
may God bless America."
Brooks led the Pledge of Alle-
giance and the HMS/JCHS Choirs
and the Star Spangled Banner.
Five students, Raven Mosley, Ja-
corey Dixon, Patrick Pagel, Teylqr
Richard and Amber Weinrich, re-
cited the Ode To The American
Flag, which deeply touched veter-
ans and all of those in the room.
who have never served in the
armed forces.
All were moved by the words: "I
am the flag of the United States of
America, I was born on the 4th of
July, 1776 and the Declaration of
Independence is my birth certifi-
cate.
"The bloodlines of the world runs
through my ,veins, for I offer free-
dom to the oppressed. I stand for.
many things and for manm people.
I am the a natrint r"
"I ha, e fc'ught in e er, battle >:f
every war, for more than 200 years:
Gettysburg, Anzio, Normandy,
Guam, Iwo Jima, Korea, Saigon,
Granada, Beirut, Panama, in the
Persian Gulf, a score of places,
long forgotten by all but those who
were there with me.
S"I was there, led by soldiers, ma-
rines, sailors and airmen. I follow _
tbiem, I watch over them. They.
ipve me.
'; "When freedom called, I an-
swered and stayed until it was over.'
I', left my heroic dead in Flanders
fields, in the oceans of.the Pacific
4nd Atlantic, in the steaming jungle
df Viet Nam, the water of the Per-.
sian Gulf, and the sands of Desert.,
Storm.
""I was conceived in freedom and,
,od willing, in freedom I will
spend the rest of my days. May I
always 'possess the integrity, the
courage, and the strength to keep
myself unshackled, to remain the
citadel of freedom, and the beacon
of strength to the rest of the world.
This is my goal, my hope, my
prayer.
"I have been soiled, burned, torn
and trampled on in the streets if
countries that I have helped set
free, and, sadly, in my own
country. And when its by those I


At Veterans Day Program


--. ... .. .-.---
_- '. ., ... .- .

.,. "-; ,wrr ,tat,


-PRESENTING THE COLORS at HMS Veter- Smith, Charles Pitts, Geneva Miller, Thomas
ans Day Assembly, L-R: Alan Kent, Tabitha Smith.


have given the freedom to express
their rights, it hurts-but I shall over-
come, for I am strong.
"I have slipped the bonds of Earth
and from my vantage point on the
moon, I stand watch over the un-
charted new frontier of space.
"I have been a silent witness to
all of America's finest hours. But
my finest hour comes when I am
torn into strips, to be used as ban-
dages for my wounded comrades
on the field of battle, when I fly
half mast ,to honor my soldiers,
when I lie in the trembling arms of
a grieving mother, at the graveside
of her son or daughter.
"I ,am proud. I am free. I am
brave. My name is Old Glory.
Long may I wave, Dear God, long
may I wave."
A loud burst of applause erupted
from the. crowded Toom.-: t'-'*
'he choir began ti:-'sidrlgCaissols
(Arrrmy);"'Off VWe Go -(Air- F6ord),
Marine Hymn (Marine) and An-
chors Aweigh (Navy).
When the song of the service in
which they served was heard, vet-
erans of that service.
The chorus sang Light A Candle
and five students performed the
_candle lighting ceremony. One stu-
dent lighted a candle for each-
branch of the military: Devondrick
Nealy, Air Force, Sara Macdonald,
Army, Paris Littlejohn, Marines,
Gerrold Austin, Navy, and T., J.
Murphy, Coast Guard.
JROTC Sgt. Mjr. Dwight Mack
was the guest speaker.
He spoke of How Veterans Day
came to become a national holiday.
;He gave a brief personal history
and asked everyone in the room to
turn to those to the right and left of
them. "Show them appreciation.
Shake their hand and tell them you
appreciate them. If you see a vet-
eran, thank him or her.
Mack introduced area veterans in
the room and thanked them for
their service to the country.
"When they take the oath of serv-
ice, a veteran promises to defend
this country to the best of their abil-
ity, even if it means making the ul-
timate sacrifice of giving their lives-


to defend this country and our free-
dom. .
"Many have made that sacrifice
previously, many are making it,
now and many will make that sacri-
fice in the futuree" said Mack.
He then told the group his Christ-


mas wish, "I wish to find Bin
Laden in Afghanistan, rid Iraq of
all terrorists and would-be terrorists
and most of all, to bring all Ameri-
cans home. God bless all, of you
and God bless America," he con-
cluded.


Local Boys, Girls Clubs To

Attend Tallahassee Event


Leaders of local Boys and Girls event is Dr. Willia
Clubs will attend the "Reach For Law, now in h
the Stars" 13th Annual Kidz Soiree community college
Dinner and' V.I.P Reception of the passionate advoca
Boys and Girls Club of Big Bend, with a strategic vis
5:30 p.m., Friday at the University Since he beca
Center Club. Tallahassee Comrn
Local Students from' the St. he has dedicatedI
Phillp's Club choir, under the di-. such as workfor
reaction of Anthony \\illianms"l'. l student success an
,beamong-the-entertainersis ot ,A,.), itmunity outreach z
Keynote' Speaker f6r th~'yeaf"s-' Icapital campaign.
a ....au


m D. Law, Jr.
is 18th year as a
e president, and a
ite for education
sion for success.
ame president: of
amunity College,
himself to issues
rce development,
id retention, com-
and the first-ever


SGT. MAJ. Dwight Mack was the guest speaker at the How-
ard Middle School Veterans Day Assembly. (News Photos)
















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North, South County To Offer

Community Thanksgiving Services-


)EBBIE SNAPP
itaff Writer

, Community Thanksgiving Serv--
ices have been scheduled for the
North and South parts of the county
Sunday, Nov. 20.
The North County Ministerial
Association Community Services
will be held 6 p.m. at the First
Methodist Church in Monticello.
Speaker is Rev. Ron Cichon,


with other ministers participating
in the service.'
"This Service is open to every
person who wants to share'in prais-
ing God for all His blessings to-
ward us this year," Rev. Thermon
Moore, pastor of First Baptist
Church, relates.
"With all the hurricanes this year,
we have been blessed that none
have even been a threat to this area.
"God has blessed us all with


.^i"^ 4*W
"DON'T You think I'm cute? I could be a real asset to your
home, and I'm really quite lovable to. have around." (News
Photo)

'Dusk' Named Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has named -
"Dusk" as their adoptable feline
Pet of the Week.
Dusk is a female domestic short
hair' cat and is black with some
white markings.
She is spayed and her date of
birth is June, 2004. All vaccina-
tions are.up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes her as being extremely,
lovable and playful and she does
get along well N% ith other cats.

Internet
(Continued From Page 1)
Notwithstanding the present sys-
tem's problems, city officials believe
the idea of the city becoming an
Internet provider is a good idea.
Even if things don't work out with
Graybar, they are hopeful that'an-
other system can be installed.

Houses
(Continued From Page 1)
Development and are funneled
through the Florida Department of
Community Affairs. The monies are
competitively, awarded to eligible
local governments' for housing,
commercial and neighborhood revi-
talization projects.


It is not known how she gets
along with dogs.
To adopt Dusk or any of the
other many. adoptable pets at the
.shelter.call 342-0244.


more than any of us deserve, and
we have this opportunity to come'
together and thank Him as the giver
of life.. We live in a country where
we have freedoms that are taken for
granted, yet they are coveted by
many people in our world."
All pastors are encouraged to
urge members of their congrega-
tions to attend the service.
Churches which normally have an
evening service, are encouraged to
transfer that service to the Commu-
nity Thanksgiving Service at First
Methodist Church
Refreshments will be served af- ,
ter the service.
The South County Ministerial
Association Community Services
will be held 7 p.m. at the Cody
Pentecostal Holiness Church.
Pastor Richard Jones, former pas-
tor of Waukeenah UMC, will give
the welcome.
Opening Prayer will be offered
by Pastor Joseph Love, Union Hill
AME Church.
Cody Pentecostal Holiness
Church will offer congregational'
singing by Jody Connell; Praise
and Worship by Ken Maddox; and
Pastor Phillip L. Cook will intro-
duce the evenings speaker.
Scripture and Prayer of Praise
and Thanksgiving will be offered
by Pastor John Cain, Wacissa P.H.
Church.
Pastor Joseph Henderson, Cele-
brate New Life Tabernacle, will
bring the Message and Special:
'Singing by Minister Omega Forbes.
The Lighthouse Children's
Home Girl's Choir, will also offer
Special Singing.
Pastor Betty Hodges, Lloyd
United Methodist Church, will
oversee the Offering.
The Offering this year will be
designated for the Lighthouse Chil-
dren's Home, to purchase Bibles
for a Missionary trip to Spain, and
to supplement winter, heating for
the elderly in the community,.
Pastor Sophie Meusa, Macedonia
MB Church, will conclude the eve-
ning with the Benediction.,
Other churches'and pastors par-


ticipating in the Service include:
Abundant Life Harvest, Pastor
Chris Peterson; Chaires United
Methodist, Pastor Bill Ingram; Beth
Page M.B., Pastor Isaac Manning;


MONTICELLO, (FLL). NEWS. WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 3
Lamont United Methodist, Pastor St. Phillips A.M.E., Pastor Julian
George Potter; Lloyd Baptist, Pas- Tisdale; and. Wacissa U.M., Pastor
tor George Smith; Mt. Ararat Jack Tilk.
A.M.E., Pastor T.R. Houston; Mt. Refreshments will' follow the Serv-
Zion A.M.E., Pastor Edward Scott; ice in the Connell Fellowship Hall.


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENT



JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ORDINANCE NO.
AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF THE CURRENT
FUTURE LAND USE MAP; PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION OF A NEW
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
PROVIDING FOR NO SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT;
PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN;
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.



The Jefferson County Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed future land use map change that will
amend the county wide Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan.









-,--









JEFFERSON COUNTY


The public hearing on the proposed comprehensive plan amendment ordinance will be held on December 15, 2005 at
7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the county courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The
hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary. Information concerning the amendment is
available at the Jefferson County Planning Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill Street, Monticello, FL 32344, telephone
850-342-0223. From the Florida 'Government in the Sunshine Manual' Each board, commission, or agency of this
state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or
hearing isrequired, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or shewill need a record of thb proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she m ay
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record includes thtestimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
deidstapelaydcsomaebteboraecoco isinwhrepctonymtecosdedt
suchmeeingor earig, e, n sew'l ned arecrd fth6proeedngs an tha, fr sph urpoe, e o sh ma


THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A
SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD MEETING TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED:

Dated: November 22, 2005
Time: 4:15 p.m.
Place: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building

Recommendations:
1 Permission to Take the GED
2 Personnel
3 School Board Members Salaries for 2005-2006
(Proposed $23.386)
4 Attendance Outside the District
5 Approve Contract with CRA (Clemons
Rutherford & Associates)
6 Approval of Interagency Criminal History
Record Check Local School Districts


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


NEVR CEAN YOR GTTESAAI!c


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844 [


OMMMMOI







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O, Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax, 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Medicare Part D


Offers Choices


There has been a lot of talk lately
about Medicare Part D, the new pre-
scription drug benefit that begins
Jan. 1, 2006.
With so much information, it can
be overwhelming and difficult for
seniors and their families to under-
stand the significance of this new
coverage now available to them.
"For the first time, America's sen-
iors will have access to affordable
prescription drug coverage," said
Jackie Kosecoff, Ph.D., executive
vice president of PacifiCare's Pre-
scription, Solutions, which is offer-
ing three Medicare Part D plans.
"There are lots of new choices out
there for them to review, and it may
seem complicated at first. But
knowing a few basic facts can help
people understand the benefit more
clearly."
In order to assist seniors in mak-
ing the right choice for themselves
on prescription drug coverage, she
offers the following facts and tips on
Medicare Part D .. **.
* 1. All 42 million Medicare benefi-
6iaries are eligible for the new pre-
icription drug coverage, and enroll-
iient in Part D is voluntary.
2. Part D plans are being provided
solely through private health care
plans. This is different from current
Aiedical coverage options, in which
seniors can choose between tradi-
tional Medicare and private health
insurers (HMOs) that offer Medi-
dare Advantage plans.
3. Seniors can sign up for Part D
plans as of Nov. 15. The opening
enrollment period for the program
Will last until May 15, 2006, but in
drder for coverage to start on Jan. 1,
2006, seniors must sign up by Dec.
31.
4. Part D coverage will be offered
through two types of plans. A stand-
alone Prescription Drug Plan, called


a PDP, will offer drug coverage
only. Hospital and outpatient costs
would be covered by separate plans.
An MA-PD plan is a Medicare Ad-
vantage Prescription Drug plan that
offers medical, hospital and drug
coverage.
5. All plans that offer Part D cov-
erage have to meet basic require-
ments. For example, each plan has
to offer at least two drugs in every
drug class except those that are ex-
cluded from coverage, such as those
used for weight loss, weight gain or
cosmetic purposes or those sold
over the counter.
6. If you already have prescription
drug coverage, it may still be avail-
able after this year. Seniors should
compare their current plan's 2006
coverage with the Part D plans that
will be available in their area next
year.
7. The standard annual deductible
will be $250. .Medicare estimates
that the average fionthly premium
will-beabou$3- ... '----......
8. For low-income beneficiaries,
premiums and deductibles may be
reduced or eliminated. Copays will
be as little as $1 for generic drugs
and $3 for brand name drugs.
9. In most cases, seniors who join
a Medicare Part D plan can change
their coverage at the beginning of
the following year. There are excep-
tions for ,seniors who reside in a
nursing facility or are eligible for
both Medicare and Medicaid.
10. Further information can be
found by calling 1-800-MEDICARE
or visiting www.medicare.gov.
"Understanding your drug cover-
age options is the first step in mak-
ing the right health care choice,"
said Kosecoff. "This is an important
time for our nation's seniors that
will pave the way for a healthier and
a happier future for many."


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
November 8, 1995
For John "Billy Joe" Crumitie and
Deron "Lowlife" Spear, two of four
juveniles charged with the, fatal
shooting of British tourist Gary Col-
ley in September, 1993, Friday was
the long-awaited day of reckoning.
Monticello's three candidates for
police chief agree that drugs are the
number one problem facing the,
community.
Three juveniles were arrested over
the weekend by the Sheriff's De-
partment stemming from the Ash-
ville Highway Oct. 29.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
November 6, 1985
The Benny Bishop family of Mon-
ticello are being honored this week
at the North Florida Fair as the 1985
Outstanding Farm Family of Jeffer-
son County.
Emerald Greene' and Mina
Krishnamurthy were crowned Miss
ACA and Jr. Miss ACA respectively
Friday night at the school's annual
pageant.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
November 6, 1975
In a homecoming game played last_


Friday night at Aucilla Christian
Academy field, the Warriors domi-
nated Panama City Christian by
record-score of 50-10.
Kathy Roberts of Waukeenah won
second place in the Farm Bureau
Talent Find Contest held last Satur-
day evening in Orlando.
FORTY YEARS AGO
November 5, 1965
Jefferson County Future Farmers
of America exhibit at the North
Florida Fair was awarded 2nd place
in over all competition last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wilder have re-
turned from a visit with their son
Freddie at the Coast Guard Acad-
emy in New London.
Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Hughes spent
several days last week in Nassau.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
November 4, 1955
Ben H. Floyd of Waukeenah has
been transferred from assistant
county agent of Escambia County to
the State Agricultural Extension
staff at the University as assistant


-state Boy's 4-H agent.


From Our Photo File


/

I -










~w.f U


CASA BIANCA Youth Club sponsored this
parade on North Jefferson Street to under-


Opinion & Comment


Booze Derailed Military Career


Anybody who has had military
service knows a man like Paul.
Paul was a guy who had been
busted more times than he could
count. Fact is, he was a Master Ser-
geant at one point but when I met
him he was slick-sleeved.
His problem was he couldn't stay
away from the bottle. Oh, he'd:
straighten up enough to avoid being
kicked out of service, but he had dif-
ficulty staying on track.
I saw Paul at his best when he was
clear-headed and sober and I sawv
him when he was a raging drunk.
He had a deep voice and a bearing
which commanded authority. Trou-
ble is in the military' authority rests"
with rank which Paul no longer had
I walked him to his barracks ..oii1
',IL hri tl '.'1hen I -1 n 1 t~| OO luith'
'tId Tfiii baj c [ecr l,-ll ",-\cLn lln [ l
sort of propped him up when he
swayed a little too far one way or
the other.
At breakfast the next morning he
was sober and thanked me for help-
ing him get home.
That began a friendship that lasted
a couple of years.


Publisher's .

Notebook VI
1.1 1 iiiiin iiiiiii ii iium .


Ron Cicfon


Aside from booze, Paul was an in-
teresting man. He was bright and ex-
tremely well read.
Once he said to me, "Read de
Tocqueville, young man. That
Frenchman has a lot to say about
America."
I took him up on his suggestion
and later we discussed de
Toqueville's observations.
Paul didn't have a car, in fact, he
didn't even have a driver's license.
*He lost both to booze.
So every now and then I would rF
fer to drive him to town and I
readily accepted my offer.


Once we went to an art gallery and
he dazzled me with what he knew
about abstracts, surrealism, and pop
art. He could name and comment
about the great artists with amazing
,ecall : 1'
The only problem 1 li.id \\niih riv-
ing Paul' to town was Ieeping hlin
out of bars. They were like magnets
to him.
"Just one drink," he would say,
"and then we'll go." One drink be-
came two and two became three and
three became four and Paul was
slipping into a happy drunk.
Giving up on him one Saturday af-


Scare Tactics For Power?


What if we had to move whole
BY TOM DEWEESE .populations in case of some toxic or
Columnist n, nuclear attack?
There's only one answer, accord-
In typical fashion, the federal gov-, ing to the Bush Administration. We


ernment is .using a real disaster to
scare us into giving it more power in
case an unrelated, perhaps man-
made (terrorist-related), disaster
might possibly occur.
President Bush has announced that
he wants to federalize emergency
responses. When does it stop?
Katrina was the worst natural dis-
aster to ever hit the United States.
As a result, all levels of government
were caught off guard.
Some elected officials were most
certainly inept at dealing with the
situation. People suffered as a result.
So, accept it for what it was. Katrina
was a once in a life time experience.
Now, clean up. the mess and move
on.
But no, according to President
Bush, Katrina showed us what
would happen if there was a terrorist
attack in a large population center.


must prepare by putting the military
in charge. There's that excuse again.
Terrorism. Oh, please!
'What President Bush is really tell-
ing us is that, in our next disaster, he
wants to immediately declare Mar-
tial Law. How far is he willing to go
to enforce it?
First, he wants the Pentagon to
serve as the nerve center where the
response is organized.
What are locally elected officials
to do while the military prepares for
war on their city? Are they to be in-
volved? After all, local officials
know the territory best. They know
ithe people and their needs.
Moreover, the military is trained
to blow things up not gently deal
with citizens.
The first thing the military was as-
signed to do in New Orleans was to
get rid of all the people.


They pulled people from their
homes, even though they didn't
want to leave. Some of those people
wanted to stay to protect their pos-
sessions from looters. Some of those
possessions, in the historic city, date
back to before the Civil War.
Anyone can understand that citi-
zens who have had such property in
their family for generations would
want to stay and protect it.
Others, the very poorest, wanted.
to stay because that land was all
they had in the world. Regardless of
the dangers, they wanted to stay. It
was their choice. It was their land. It
was their life.
Local leaders would understand
this. Soldiers following orders
would not. Today, in our cocoon-of-
safety mentality, such considera-
tions aren't acceptable.
So, udder the proposed Martial
Law, will the President be able to
suspend Habeas Corpus?
That means that the rule of the law
is thrown out the window. It means
there is no due process. No fair


ternoon while he nursed drinks at a
watering hole, I left. Three days
later he got back to the base. How in
the world he wasn't discharged as
AWOL is a mystery to me!
I really think his commander liked
him and overlooked many things.
My enlistment was nearly up and I
told Paul I'd be leaving the base for
a job at a newspaper.
I'll never forget the advice he
gave me. He said, "When you're my
age I don't want you to be doing
what I'm doing."
What he was doing was working
at base headquarters as an orderly or
in civilian parlance, a janitor.
The day I got my separation or- '
ders I went over to the headquarters
building to say good-bye to Paul.
I spotted him down the hall as he
was leaving an office with a waste
basket in each hand.
I caught up with him and said I
was leaving and wished him well..
He put the waste basket down and
shook hands with me. "Good luck to
you, too," he said.
I turned to leave and Paul said,
Keep making friends with books."


trials. No bail.
That would be a valuable tool to
the military in dealing with those
bothersome holdouts who were just
trying to protect their property.
They would just be swooped off
the streets and out of their houses
and locked away until someone in
power decided to let them out.
But, some would argue, the news
media wouldn't allow such abuses.
With all of our twenty four hour ca-
ble news breathing down the necks
of politicians, rights and security
would certainly be safeguarded.
The military would just be an effi-
cient tool to help. It's an
emergency!!
Really? Under Martial Law, the
president has the power to suppress
the media. Let an article or editorial
say a discouraging word about the
government's actions, and they can
be shut down and jailed for interfer-
ing with the emergency effort.
And remember, with the suspen-,
sion of Habeas Corpus, they would-
(See Scare Tactics Page 5)


Get in Shape With 10,000 Steps


When did life become a numbers
game?
The day kicks off with a radio re-
cap of travel times that sounds like a
fourth-grade math problem.
Meal planning is expressed
through calories, points or fat
grams.
Rarely a day passes that does not
require at least one access code, pin
or password.
And while numbers have always
played a large role in fitness 30
minutes of activity per day, three
sets of 15 reps, etc. a new number
has emerged that can simplify ef-
forts to stay in shape.
When in doubt, aim for 10,000.
Ten thousand steps, that is.


Experts in fitness and weight man-
agement say that walking 10,000
steps per day can provide enough
physical activity to achieve average
weight-loss goals and increase fit-
ness.
With a basic pedometer that tracks
the number of steps taken, a normal
day one that involves a few er-
rands, a walk with the dog and per-
haps a sprint for the bus takes on
the importance of a regular workout.
While 10,000 steps sounds like a
huge number, consider that the aver-
age city block is approximately 200
steps long. Ten thousand steps
equals approximately five miles.
The best way to get started is to
figure out how many steps you nor-


mally take per day. This number can
be anywhere from 700 to 3,000 on
average and it's surprising how
much un-tallied walking a day con-
tains.
A few laps around the office can
be all in a day's work, but if the of-
fice covers the entire floor of a
building, the steps add up.
Any mom who pushes a stroller
around knows that qualifies as exer-
cise, but she may forget that chasing
the toddler around the playground -
or the grocery store counts, too.
Dixie Thompson Ph.D., director
of the Center for Physical Activity
and Health at the University of Ten-
nessee, Knoxville, recommends in
"Shape" magazine that you wear a


pedometer for a week (it can cost
less than $30) while going about '
your normal routine to determine
the number of steps you take on av-
erage every day.
With an idea of your normal day's
activity, it will be easier for you to
add more steps gradually.
Park further away from a destina-
tion or store and walk the rest of the
way; get off the bus or out of the
taxi a few blocks early; make it a
rule to walk to any place that's less
than a mile away (if it's safe, of
course).
Steps accrued through jogging and
running count, too.

(See 10,000 Steps Page 5)


No '


score the "Just Say No To Drugs"
campaign, in May, 1990. (News File Photo)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and include phone number of writer


v







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 5,


Letters...


elected officials that are not repre-
sentative of our proud County."
This has nothing to do with other
elected officials in the County. This


statement has to do with you and the,.
County Commission Board you sit'


Don & Cindy Lee


Dear Editor:
This is in response to Commis-
sioner Tuten's letter to the editor in
the Nov. 11 edition of the M9nti-
dello News.
Junior, we are so thankful that
someone has finally gotten your at-


Dear Editor:
The scurrilous attack on Commis-
sioner Junior Tuten's honesty and
integrity by Mr. Jphn Marshall
Dewey in his November 4, 2p05 ad-
vertisement in the Monticello News
was an unwarranted cheap shot.
I have known Commissioner
Tuten for more than 10 years and
have found him to be honest and


tention. It took a full-page ad from
Mr. Dewey that was quite expensive
to finally get it. Mr. Dewey spoke
his true feelings and of his experi-
ences.
Concerned citizens and profes-
sionals, along with your senior plan-


hard working. In my dealings with
him I have always found his word to
be his bond.
He also takes his responsibilities
as a county commissioner seriously,
and I do not for one minute believe
the accusations about him as stated
in Mr. Dewey's advertisement.
Sincerely,
Carlton Jackson


Scare Tactics For Power?


(Continued From Page 4)
n't even get a trial. Soldiers 'with
guns and orders to enforce would be
the rule of the day.
So how far is the President willing
to go in using the military as the
central force in dealing with disas-
ters? His words: "it may require a
change of law."
What law needs to be changed to
give him the power to put the mili-
tary in charge of undefined
disasters? Posse Comitatus, of
course.
The 1878 law that says the mili-
tary must never be in charge of ci-
vilian law-enforcement activities.
There are specific reasons why



10,000 Steps
(Continued From Page 4) .
If daily demands make it difficult
to add enough steps, consider in-
vesting in a home treadmill. A
treadmill in front of the TV can
make the goal an easy one to reach.
Aiming for 10,000 steps per day
can bring unexpected benefits. Add-
ing a short walk at lunchtime will
accrue steps, and some fresh air,
which can lead to a better night's
sleep.
Leaving the car behind to run er-
rands on' foot can make that very ex-
pensive tank of gas last longer. Best
of all, walking is a terrific stress
management tool, and with a clear
mind it will be a snap to remember
all those other vital numbers you
need everyday.


wise lawmakers of the past forbade
'such activity. They feared the crea-
tion of a totalitarian state.
Using military force that was cre-
ated to bring mass destruction on
our nation's enemies was considered
extreme overkill and dangerous to
the civil liberties of the citizens of
this nation.
The history of that justifiable con-
cern can be traced back directly to
George Washington when he sur-
rendered his military power to the
civilian government after the Revo-
lution.
Washington knew it had to be
done to prevent the creation of a


ner spoke or signed a petition
against the re-zoning of agricultural
lands to a higher density.
It fell on your deaf ears along with
three other members of the County
Commission.
Only Commissioner Monroe had
the insight to vote against this re-
zoning amendment. At the meeting
no one in the audience spoke in fa-
vor of your action except the devel-'
oper.
Now, we hope we still have your
attention to bring forward a few
items that you addressed in your let-,
ter. The citizens have put their faith,-
in you and the other elected Corn-
missioners to represent them in criti-
cal matters concerning this County.
You are suppose to listen and repre-
sent these people.
We agree the Comp Plan is a very
serious issue in Jefferson County.
Some people are against it, namely
the developers. Either you didn't
take the time to read it or you don't.
understand it. ,o
Otherwise, you would not have
voted in favor of this re-zoning. The
people of this County are not against
the Comp Plan, they stand behind it.
Yes, negative attacks against hon-
est, concerned and good intentioned
people do result in less productivity
for the County. We know what it is
like to be slandered and accused.
When you disagree, you are la-
beled a troublemaker and called as
such. But intimidating and dismiss-
ing the citizens speaking out against
an issue is also a negative attack.
The difference is if you are willing
to stand up for what you feel is right
for the County or for a certain cho-
sen few. Unfortunately, you dis-
agreed with the majority of the
people.
We find it strange that you came
up with a suggestion of a compro-
mise proposal at the Oct. 20 meeting
to the applicant.
Imagine, a Commissioner request-


ing a compromise to an application
for a land use density change on be-
half of a developer. Of course, the
applicant was very much in favor of
this change. The audience, how-
ever, was not given the opportunity
for their input concerning this com-
promise.
You mentioned there is more than
one issue. What are the other
issues?
The last sentence in your letter
states "What we are left with is


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Southeast Pegional Cancer Center. a member of The North Florida Can-
cer Netwvorl-.. s pleased- t.o l:.ung pro en. state of the art treatment to the
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C St.-: No. 6 :- S0:0 .m ]


Residents Respond To Tuten


Letter In Friday's Paper


Writer Says Dewey's Attack

On J. N. Tuten Cheap Shot


INTRDUCORYQKCAL.


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


QEE DEALER
FOR PETAILQ


Community

THANKSGIVING

Worship Service

Sponsored By the Jefferson Ministerial Association


6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20

First United Methodist Church

324 W. Walnut St., Monticello


Special Music: First UMC Choirs

Message: Rev. Ron Cichon

Offering: Benefits Fund For Needy Transients

Rev. Thermon Moore, Ministerial Assoc. Chair


Come And Worship Together!
Refreshments Follow The Service
., .b


C










Lifestyle


LkAUJE (, U INI -E1AV I-), n z w 3 'vv r,". a JJV"Ik ,[IU


First Baptist Ladies

Create Gift Boxes


DEBBIE SNAPP
'ta ffWriter

Monticello/Jefferson Boys and-
.G 's Club Director Gerrold Austin
explains the offering of CLUB-
Service, a TEENSupreme/Ameri-
forps Education Awards Initiative.
AmeriCorps is the national serv-
ice movement that engages Ameri-
cans of all ages and backgrounds in
service to address critical problems
,n our nation's communities.
, In exchange for service, Ameri-
Corps members earn education
awards to finance student loan re-
payment or higher education.
The Education Awards Program
expands opportunities for young


)EBBIE SNAPP
5taff Writer

Cox's Soul Food will once again
provide a full course Thanksgiving
dinner 11 ta.m. to 1 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Nov. 24, Thanksgiving Day.
The meal will include turkey,
ham, col lards, macaroni and
cheese, candied yams, combread
dressing, cakes and pies, and a cold
drink.
"This community has been so
wonderfully kind and thoughtful in
helping, us to make. life a little bit
better here for our friends and
neighbors," says Gloria Cox-Jones.
"Thank you again and again for
your generosity in giving food,
'clothing, money, and supplies.
With your help we have given
,successful Thanksgiving and
Christmas dinners, feeding more
than 200 each time in 2004.
And, you helped us supply three __
clothing giveaways in 2005," she
continues.
The dinner is especially for the
senior citizens, the sickly, the dis-
labled, and for anyone who needs
help this holiday season.
Donations are still needed and
can be dropped off at the restaurant
,490 South Railroad Street, or con-


SHomes of
IMourning
Norma Jean Maxwell
Norma Jean Maxwell, 77, died
Friday, November 11, 2005 in Tal-
lahassee. She was a member of the
First United Methodist Church in
Monticello. A memorial Service is
being planned.
Survivors include a daughter and
on-in-law, Pam and Deane Bowlihg
of Monticello and her sister, Caro-
lyn Bartmess. She was preceded in
death by her husband, Richard Max-
well.
; Culley's Meadow Wood Funeral
Home 700 Timberland Road, Talla-
hassee is handling arrangements.
1.


people to serve their communities
and earn financial help for further
education.
Boys and Girls Clubs of Amer-
ica's CLUBService program is the
link between AmeriCorps Educa-
tion Awards and Boys and Girls
Club members and alumni.
The initiative, administered
through the TEENSupreme pro-
gram, provides AmeriCorps Educa-
tion Awards to Boys and Girls
Club alumni ages 17-24 from an
eligible Club program.
A part-time award, worth
$2,362.50 requires 900 hours of
service over a two year period.
Full-time positions are also avail-
able by special request.


tact Cox-Jones at 997-2359 or 997-
4572.
Cox's Soul Food has partnered
with Saints Tabernacle COGIU and
Harvest Center, in an effort of
reaching and helping more people.
A special thank you to Margaret
Levings and Great Adventure Out-
fitters, and Jackson's Drug Store
for their generous donations.
: Also, thanks in advance to Cold-
well Banker Kelly and Kelly Prop-
erties, Greater Fellowship Baptist
Church, Bethel A.M.E. Church,
and Memorial Missionary Baptist
Church for their commitment to
help. --


IN MEMORY
Indiana McKee Earl
Indiana (Indi) McKee Earl, 94,
former resident of Monticello died
Nov.3, 2005 in Thomasville, GA.
She is survived by a son Gavin
McCammon and wife Marianelia of
Marysville, TN, four grandchildren,
several nieces and nephews and a
devoted caretaker, Brett Winchester
of Lloyd, FL.
She was predeceased in death by
her daughter Emily and her husband
Dean Earl.
Memorial Services are 2 p.m.
Nov. 19, 2005, at Plantation Manor,
220 Park Avenue, Thomasville, GA.


Christmas Child.
FRAN HUNT Trudy Stokley, Aneita Home and
Staff Writer Betty Moore surpassed their goal,
completing 228 boxes by Friday af-
Three ladies at the First Baptist temoon.
Church coordinated an effort to The endeavor encompassed
create 180 boxes for Operation some three weeks.


Holiday Gift Classes Set
At Chamber Of Commerce


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Heidi Copeland, Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Extension Agent,
Jefferson County Extension, will be
presenting a Holiday Program at the
Chamber of Commerce, 2 to 4 p.m.,
Tuesday, Nov. 29
The Holiday Program, entitled
"Homemade For The Holidays And
For Health," will include some new
and interesting ideas for smart holi-
day cooking and gift giving.
The cost is $5 and the event is
--open to the public.
Reserve a seat by calling Cope-
land at the Extension Office 342-
0187.

Humane Society
Shelter To Close
For Holiday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Humane
Society Shelter will close for holi-
day beginning on Saturday, Nov. 19
through Wednesday, Nov. 30.
An instructional message will be
left on the recorder should further
information be needed, 342-0244.
The next meeting of the Society is
set for 7 p.nri., Monday, Dec. 5, at
the Shelter Office.


There will be door prizes, holiday
books, and surprise tokens.


Club members can receive an.
AmeriCorps education award for,
up to two terms of service.
This award can be used .to help
pay student loans, to finance col-
lege, graduate school or vocational
training.
All Title IV institutes or federally_
backed loans are eligible.
"Getting Things Done" is the
motto for AmeriCorps members.
CLUBService members are get-
ting things done in Clubs.
Contributions made by CLUB-
Service participants are as diverse
as the services provided by the
Boys and Girls Clubs.
CLUBService members serve in
the following AmeriCorps priority.
areas: Educational Support Activi-
ties; Public Safety; and Member
Development. ,,
Participating ,n Club program
such as Junior Siaff Career Devel-
opment, Keystone, Sports Leader-
ship Club, and the like, a
CLUBService participant might:
coach members; lead community,
service activities; assist in games-
room or library; restore community
parks/playgrounds; help people
with disabilities; assist crime vic- i
tims; or, be a teen mentor.
Austin can be reached at 997-
1180 for additional information
about the program.


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Each shoe box filled with an as-
sortment of items, wrapped as
Christmas gifts.

The items were transported to the
Tallahassee Methodist Church
Tuesday, from where they will be
added to others collected in the
area.
"The 228 will be added with
thousands more and when they ar-
rive overseas, :there will be
millions," said Pastor Thermon
Moore.
The Christmas boxes are part of
the the Franklin Graham Crusade to
give children overseas spirit of
Christmas.


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LADIES at First Baptist Church prepared
some 228 Christmas gift boxes for children


overseas, as part of the Operation Christ-
mas Child Program. (News Photo)


Boys, Girls Club Service


Provides Education Awards


COX'S Soul Food To

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 7


Nan Baughman, David Hobbs

Co-Chair United Way Drive


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School -
JROTC and Key Club will conduct
its annual door to door collection for
the United Way 6-7 p.m. Thursday.
Residents are asked to leave their
porch light on. Students will carry
identification as collectors for the
United Way.
The goal for the county has been
set at $35,000, and to date $5,450


has been collected.


IMC Rnviie I


Monies collected in the county given a gift certificate from a local
stay here to help local agencies, vendor.
serving local adults and children. Remember to RSVP by Nov. 26
Donations may be designated for for the Leadership Dinner.
-the donor's agency of choice. Local United Way volunteers
Local youngster Dylan McGrath held their first committee meeting
issues a challenge to all other stu- Oct. 25, at the Library, to plan for
dents in the county to give whatever the new year.
they can. She recently donated the Nan Baughman, co-chair with
contents of her piggy bank. David Hobbs in this year's cam-
paign for the JCUW, underscores
.A tally will be made at the end of the importance of the campaign slo-
the campaign and the top class or gan, "A United Way To Serve Jef-
elub will be treated with a surprise. ferson County."
- The top individual student will be "There are so many ways for one
to help. Consider giving through.the
preferred method, payroll deduction;
i I I I 1 or the Leadership Giving program,"


Officers Announced


she said.
This program is a gift of $1,000
or more either from one person or
from couples. $500 is considered a
major gift in Jefferson County;
"The Community Care Fund is
another way to contribute. If you
choose this method you will be sup-
porting all 18 agencies in the
county.
"This is the best way to do the
most good in your community. Put
trusted volunteers to work for you,
who put your gifts to use here,":
Baughman said.
Last year the county raised
$24,000 for local agencies while the.
agencies requested $98,000 in
return.
To plan an event to help raise
funds for the United Way, contact.
Baughman at 997-3825. ,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Local animal groups have joined-
forces to assist the four legged vic-
tims of recent hurricanes. .
Food, monetary donations and
empty water containers are being
collected by local members of Big
Dog Rescue, Jefferson County Hu-
mane Society, Citizens for the Sup--
port of Animal Welfare (CSAW)
and the Responsible Pet Owners of
Jefferson County.
The first of weekly vehicles with
animal food and supplies, recently
left the county en-route to St. Fran-
cis Wildlife Refuge in Tylertown,
where an organization called, "Best
Friends" has pulled many animals
out of the devastated area.
Donated' food and supplies will
be distributed to the areas which
need them most.
Spokesperson Cay Curtis reports
that there are many needy animals
that were separated from their own-
ers.
The food is delivered to Gulf Port
through the National Guard, where
it is distributed through several
small towns in the area.
Curtis said donations of food,


Opening

the door

to hope

Call our
lifeline.
It's toll-free.
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org Muscular Dystrophy
Association


water containers. towels and blan---
kets, as %well as monetary donations,
are being sought.
Collection boxes for donated
items are, located at Monticello
Milling, Waukeenah Fertilizer and
Winn Dixie.
"We are primarily looking for
dog' and cat food and materials,
said Curtis. "There are national or-
ganizations that are gathering items
for horses and farm animals."
Monetary donations can be made
at Animal Medical Clinic.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


DAVID HOBBS, left, Nan Baughman are' co-chairs for the
County United Way Drive. (News Photo) :


Wilson Joins Westbrook

Real Estate Team,

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer ,


Local resident John P.. Wilson has
recently joined the team of Buddy
Westbrook Real Estate as a Sales
Associate.
Wilson is a retired electrical engi-
neer and has resided in Florida for
45 years, with the last five years in,
Jefferson Counrt.
He has been a licensed realtor for
30 years.
Prior to retiring, Wilson owned
Controlled Technology Company, a
manufactures Representative Dis-:
tributor business selling, industrial
control products throughout the state
of Florida.
His pri,:'r employers have included
IBM. Honeyx\ell, Collmns Radio, and
Taylor Instruments. _


~' '~i~7
~'. ~


S WILSON -

Wilson is a Navy veteran with six
years of submarine duty, a Mason,
and a Shriner.
He can be reached at 997-6806
for real estate inquiries.


Jefferson Elementary School 4-H-
Clubs reports its officers for the
2005-2006 year.
Officer's in Mary Robert's third
grade classroom are: Keondrae
Parker, president; Ashley Bennett,
vice president; Sha'Von Youman,
secretary; Danella Potter, assistant
secretary; and Stefan Roberts,
Sgt.-at-arms.,
In the Adventures 4-H Club the
officer's, are:. Cydney Hastings,
president; Shatavia Roberts, vice'
president; Monique Colson, secre-
tary; Breawnna Haugen, assistant
secretary; Tameika Jordan, Sgt.-at-
arm; Kynsey Thomas, reporter; 'and
Shayla Koonce, photographer.
Judith Carney and Terri Clark's
third grade classroom officer's are:
Robert Holmes, president; Nakota.
Hawkins, vice president; Tamia.
Young, secretary; Quabryss Crumi-
tie, assistant secretary; and Denijay
Maxwell, Sgt.-at-arms.
Linda Butler-Stewart's third,
grade classroom officer's are:
Charlene Austin, president; Ladar-
ian Smiley, vice president; Ja'Cory:
Maxwell., secretary; Robert Counts,
assistant,, secttary; and Tearra,.
Scott, Sgt.-at-arms., ., ..',.,. ,
In Theresa Stubbs' fourth grade
classroom Roxie Bellamy is presi-


Of-


dent: LaSheba .Greene, vice presi-
dent; Gerardo Cazares, secretary;'
Robert Williams, assistant
secretary; and Revonte Robinson,
-Sgt.-at-arms.
Judy Jones' fourth grade class-
room officer's are: Keyunshay
Demps, president; Tarneisha
McCray, vice president; Sarah An-
tes, secretary; Charlette Carter as-
sistant secretary; and Darius Pleas,
Sgt. -at-arms.
Martine FanFan's fourth grade
classroom officer's arc: Calvin
Crumitie, president; Tyshonda Jor-
dan, vice president; Raeisha Bel-
lamy, secretary; Shay Dunlap,
assistant secretary; and Eric
Adams, Sgt.-at-arms. ,
Beulah Brinson's fifth grade
classroom officer's are: Shereka
Bennett, president; Brenda Guer-
rero, vice president; Palas Norton,
secretary; LaKedra Siplin, assistant
secretary; and Cody Bell, Sgt.-at-
arms.
Annie Gervin's fifth grade class-
room officer's are: Lenorris Foot-
man, president; Ramez Nealy, vice
president; Cydney Hastings, secre-
tary; Nathan Shiver, assistant secre-
tary; and Kass brooks, Sgt.-at-arms.
Wanda Wilson's sixth grade
classroom officer's are: Emily
Howell, president; Simone Wil-
liams,- v ce preti'deit, KaDesjah
Norton,, secretary; Latiesiya Mas-'
sey, assistant secretary, and Bran-
den Hill, Sgt.-at-arms.


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THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A
SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD MEETING TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS .INVITED:

Dated: November 22, 2005
Time: 4:00 p.m.
Place: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building
Recommendations:
1. Reorganization of District School Board of
Jefferson County Florida Statutes 230.15


LSodNursr y ,














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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005
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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA Falls To Graceland


Ending Post Season Play


WARRIORS varsity team in at a recent prac- 42-8, Friday ended ACA post season p
tice session prior to their first game in Dis- (News Photo)
trict Play in 12 years. Defeat by Graceland,



Lady Warriors Beat Chiles


FRAN HUNT,
Staff Writeir

The Aucilla Christian Academy-
varsity girl's basketball team won
the first pre-season game against
Chiles last week, 43-34.
Coach Daryl Adams said the
Lady Warriors played. very, well'
and made a lot of good shots.
ACA shot at 61 percent from the
free throw line,.going 16 for 24.
Lindsey Day led the scoring for
the Lady Warriors. She had 15
points, six 'rebounds and two
blocked shots.
Mallory Plaines scored six points,
went six for eight at the free throw
line, nine rebounds and three steals.
Bethany Saunders had six points,
went four for four at the free throw
line, two rebounds and three
assists.
Rikki Roccanti, scored six points-
and fi\e reboundsand Caitlin Mur-
phy, five_ points, three rebounds
and two assists.


Brittany Hobbs had two points,
three assists and two blocked shots;
Lisa Bailey, two points, two steals


and one blocked shot, and Corie
Smith had one point, five rebounds
and two assists.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Chrisitan Academy fell to
Graceville 42-8, Friday, bringing
its post season play to a screeching-
Shalt.
Coach Dave Roberts named Ca-
sey Gunnels offensive player of the
week, and Daniel Greene was
named defensive player of the
week.
Quarterback Stewart Williams
completed 9 passes, for 89 yards,
13 attempts.
Gunnels had 20 carries for 101
yards, setting an all-time schoQl re-
cord in rushing.
Going into the game, he was just
26 yards shy of matching the
school record, and surpassed it by
75 yards, giving him a total of
1,397 yard rushing for the season.
Greene had four carries for 15
yards and Jason Holton had five
carries for 14 yards.
The Warriors were held scoreless


ACA Middle School Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Mac Finlayson has deter-
mined the. roster for the Aucilla
Christian Academy girl's middle
school basketball team.
There are three eighth graders
and nine seventh graders on the
team this sear


Eighth graders include Tiffany
Brasington, Sydney Plummer and:
Dana Jane Watt.
Seventh graders include Taylor
Baez-Pridgeon, Taryn Copeland, :
Anna Finlayson, Nikki Hammrick,,
Kaitlin Jackson, Lisa Kisamore,,
Caroline Mueller,. Elizabeth Riley.
and Sarah Sorensen.
The. assistant coach is Richard
Watt.


ACA Basketball Girls Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Daryl Adams has reports
the roster for the Aucilla Chnstian
Academy varsity girl's basketball
team.
Lady Warriors include senior.


Corie Smith playing guard, and
juniors Lisa Bailey, guard, Rikki
Roccanti, forward, Caitlin Murphy,
forward, and Brittany Hobbs,
guard.
AlsoIon the team are sophomores."
Lindsey Da), center, Bethany
Saunders, guard and freshman,
Mallory Plaines, forward.


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until the fourth quarter when-
Greene made a fumble recovery,
running it into the end zone for the
touchdown.
Gunnels scored on the two-point
conversion.
Defensive statistics were not
available at press time.
The Warriors ended their regular
season with a 7-3 record, which
climbed to 7-4, after the post sea-
son loss.
ACA began the season on a three
loss losing streak, falling to Florida
Deaf, Apalachicola and Cotton
Dale.


Then the Warriors came to life
defeating Panama City Christian,
Munroe, and Oak Hall at Home-
coming;
They also defeated Carrabelle,
John Paul II, and Bell.
The Warriors ended the season -
on a strong note, defeating Munroe
for the first time in eight years,
with Gunnels setting the all-time
school record in rushing.
Warriors made it to the district
playoffs for the first time in 12
years, and won the Panhandle Con- 4
ference Championship for the first
time.
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NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND USE
CHANGE



Jefferson County Commission will have a public hearing on a proposed comprehensive plan land use
change in the Waukeenah area The proposed change is from Mixed Use Suburban-Residential and
Agriculture 3 to the Residential 1 land use category. The subject property includes parcel numbers 08-1S-
4E-0000-0550-0000 and 17-1 S-4E-0000-0020-0000 and contains approximately 377 acres. The location of
the proposed land use map change is indicated on the map below.



















259












A public hearing on the proposed land use change will be held on December 8, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at the
courtroom of the Jefferson County courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The
meeting may be continued as necessary. The application material may be reviewed at the County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill Street, Monticello, FL. From the Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


bp

Or


Morris Petroleum, Inc.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005

Councilman Gerrold Austin


Veterans Day Speaker At JCHS


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Friday brought the Annual Veter- -
ans Day Program to Jefferson
County High School, held on the
front lawn.
JROTC CSM Tabitha Smith led
the Pledge of Allegiance, and the
JCHS Chorus and band performed
the Star Spangled Banner.
JROTC LTC Charles Pitts deliv-
ered the occasion, Thank a Veteran
and JROTC 1st LT Alexia Huggins
gave the dedictory prayer.
Major Eugene McKinney gave a
review of wars and the JCHS Cho-
rus performed the | service songs.
with veterans standing during the
song of the service in which the3
served..
Speaker Councilman Gerrold
Austin explained the difference be-
.tween Memorial Day and Veterans
Day.
"On Memorial Day we honor
and mourn those who have given
their lives while serving our coun-
try.
"On Veterans Day, we honor
those, both living and dead who
have served in the armed forces
"Veterans Day, formerly Ar-
mistise Day, began in 1919, when
President Wilson set aside Nov. 11,
as Armistice Day, to honor and re-
member the sacrifices of the veter-
ans of W.W.II.
S"Congress in 1938 voted to. make
that day a federal holiday. Ar-
mistise Day observation until 1971
when President Nixon declared the
second Monday in November a
.federal holiday to be known as Vet-
:erans Day.
"We are here today to honor the
millions who served in our armed
servcies.
"Some for whatever reason gave a
few days or a few months; others
gave years to their country. Some
volunteered others were drafted."
Austin gave a partial listing of
number of those serving in con-
flicts and wars; W.W.II ,
16,535.000, Korean Conflict,
6,807,000,V "iet Nam, 9,200.000.
Gulf War, 3,800,000, peace
keeping in t.imer Yugoslavia,
3,000,000 estimated in Bosnia and
Kosovo.
"/'Including those who are pres-
entl) in the military the total since
the 1940's is probably in excess of
40 million.
"Most of our veterans were native
born. Some however, were emi-
grants from Europe, Asia, the Car-
ibbean, South America and
Mexico.


AUSTIN-


"And now, since Sept. 11, 2001,
we are at war again. And- again, it
is a war not of our choosing. Our
men and women in uniform are
again entitled to the honored desig-
nation of veteran, whether they are
guarding an air terminal in Texas,
guarding the nation's capitol,
guarding a nuclear plant in Arkan-
sas or engaged in 'directing artillery
and air support or flying air strikes




KrId Crida
KidCare


in Afghanistan.
"This designation also applies to
the cooks, mechanics, mail clerks,
fork lift drivers, steam fitters, fire-
men and hundreds of other military
specialties which are necessary to
the successful operation of our
armed forces, be they here in the-,
United States or far overseas in the
other combat zone."
JROTC Maj. Geneva Miller re-
cited the Soldier's Final Inspection
and the JROTC performed a Flag
Presentation Ceremony saluting the
flag and passing it from one to the.'
other, each saluting in turn,.
SGT. Mack, reading the names of
all of the veterans from the county
who were killed in action, fol-
lowed by the lowering of heads and
the playing of Taps by Eugene
McKinney, Jr.
Superintendent of Schools Phil
.Barker gave closing remarks.
"I was asked by a woman why
are we conducting school on Veter-
ans Day and I respond to that, it is
our job and our responsibility to
honor our veterans and pay tribute
to them by giving them these pro-.
grams at the schools and providing
them with lunch as a small indica-i
tion of our great appreciation for'
them and their service. It is part of
our responsibility.
"These songs and these words
spoken by the students, though I.
am not a veteran, filled my heart
with pride and joy. It is the responsi-
bility of each of us, to teach the
students of the sacrifices that are
made by veterans and stress the im-
portance Veterans Day."
Concluding the program, the
JROTC Color Guard retired the
colors.:


VETERANS were in attendance at Jefferson Friday. Programs were held countywide to
County High School Veterans Day Program honor veterans. (News Photo)


American Heart -f
Association ro
Fighting Head ODiea.
and Stroke

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LEGALS.
In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction December 17, 2005 @ 10:00 am.
1987 Toyt. Vin #JT4RN67SXH5086466;
1993 GEO Vin #2C1MR2462P6777344;
1983 Pont. Vin #1G2AN69H2DB218912;
1991 Caddy Vin #1G6CD53BOM4287787
To be sold as is for Towing & Storage
charges. Conditions & Terms at Auction.
Dave's Towing -7261 East Washington St.
Monticcllo, FL 850-342-1480.
11/16, c


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: The City
of Monticello is accepting proposals for
towing and storage services for the Police
Department and other City departments.
Proposals should-include the following: 1.
Fee for, towing City vehicles 2 Fee for
towing and secure storage of impounded
vehicles 3. Proof of the following insurance
coverage: Workers Compensation with
statutory limits; Employer's Liability with
limits of $100,000; commercial General
Liability and Garage Keepers Legal
Liability, with the following coverage:
-- Premises/Operations, Physical Damage,
Bodily/Personal Injury and Medical
payments Combined single limits for
property damage and Injury of at least
$100,000; 1 Commercial Automobile
Liability for owned/leased autos,
non-owned autos. Combined single limits
per accident for property damage and
personal injury of at least $100,000. 4
Response time of vehicle towing/storage
Proposals must be received no later than
Tuesday, November 29, 2005, at City Hall
245 S. Mulberry'Street, Monticello, FL
;32344. ..-Proposals .must 'be .-marked
"'"SE"AbED l) 'B97'i' 'FOR''" TO%%ING'
STORAGE SERVICE".
I 1/16.23, c


Notice of Public Hearing: The Jefferson


DREAMS COME

TRUE











With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
m "My kids" have big dreams, too.
Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.

P Muscular Dystrophy Association
o 1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


LEGALS '
County Planning Commission will review
and make a decision to approve or not
approve a site plan development proposal
from the PS Art Company for a building
addition to the business located at 156 Too
Long Keen Road on parcel number
12-1N-4E-0000-0068-0000. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Planning Commission
meeting on December 8, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.
in the courtroom o the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344 The meeting
may be continued as needed. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required of such board; commission or
agency conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which,the appeal is to
be based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning Department at 850-342-0223 or
write the Department at P.O. Box 1069,
Monticello, FL. 32345. and provide
..commeons. The deselopmeni proposal may
be reviewed during business; hours at the
Department office located at 445 West
Palmer Mill Street, Monticello, Florida
32344.
11/16, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA:
Case No. 05-276-CA KIMBERLY M.
BELLAMY-MORRELL Petitioner, and
RICKY V. MORRELL Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO:
Ricky V. Morrell, 718 Lake Rd.,
Monticello,' FL 32344 YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that an.action has been filed
against you and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if any to it
on KIMBERLY M.
BELLAMY-MORRELL, whose address is
P.O. Box 489, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before November 16, 2005, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court at
Clerk of Court Jefferson County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida before
service on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition. Copies of all
court documents in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request. you must
keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's


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CELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00 :
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
11ednesdaN Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
office notified of your current address.
(You may file Notice of current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved Family
Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office. WARNING:
Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in sanctions,
including dismissal or striking of
pleadings. Date November 10th, 2005
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT.
11/16, 23,30, 12/7, pd
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 05-255-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of DANNY LEE DAVIS,
Petitioner/Husband, and BARBARA J.
DAVIS, Respondant/Wife NOTICE OF
ACTION To: BARBARA J. DAVIS
Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution .of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN, petitioner's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before December 15, 2005,
and file the original with the clerk of this
said court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on October 20, 2005 CARL D.
BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of Court. Jeri B,
Pearson Deputy Clerk.
10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, c
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING: Jefferson
Clerk of the Circuit Court is seeking
applicants for DEPUTY CLERK I. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Room 10, County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida. Salary range is $8.87
to $11.10 (hourly rate) This is a part-time
(32 hours per week) position. Minimum
qualifications are: Ability to learn court
practices, procedures and rules in a timely
manner. Knowledge of business English,
spelling, grammar and punctuation.
Knowledge of data entry, typewriting and
use of other business machines. Ability to
understand and follow through on written
and oral instructions. Ability to establish
and maintain working relationships with
the public, staff, judges and attorneys.
Ability to operate a CRT and PC-using....
current programs and software. Typing
skills. Telephone courtesy and
information-gathering skills. Education
and experience needed: Graduation from
an accredited high school or possession of
an acceptable equivalency diploma. One
year typing and clerical experience. (A
comparable amount of training, education
or experience may be substituted for the
above" minimum qualifications.)
Applications will be accepted until 5:00
p.m., November 21, 2005, at the Office of
Clerk of Circuit Court, address above.
Equal Opportunity Employer. Applicants
with a disability should contact the above
office for accommodations.
11/9, 16, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed: NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Gene
Barfield the holder of the following certifi-
cates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
593 Year of Issuance 2002 Description or
Property: Exhibit "A" One acre in a
square form in the North West Corner of
the South East Quarter of the North West
Quarter (SE1/4 of NWI/4) of Section
Twenty One (21) Township One (1) North
of Range Five (5) East, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the
North West Corner of the South East
Quarter of the North West Quarter of Sec-
tion Twenty One (21) Township One (1)
North of Range Five (5) East thence East
Two Hundred Eight and Seven Tenths
(208.7) feet thence South Two Hundred
Eight and Seven Tenths (208.7) feet, West
Two Hundred Eight and Seven Tenths
(208.7) feet to point of beginning, and con-
taining One (1) acre, more or less. And be-
ing the same land conveyed to Thompson
Valley Baptist Church by Dave and Mar-
tha McKinney and of record in the office
of the Clerk of Circuit Court in Deed Book
"X" page 164. Name in which assessed
John Hundley, HRS. All of said property
being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or certifi-
cates shall be redeemed according to law
the property described in such certificate
or certificates will be sold to the highest
bidder at the court house door on the 20th
day of December, 2005, At 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 14th day of November, 2005.
Carl D> Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
11/16,23,30, 12/7,c
HELP WANTED
The Jefferson County Teachers
Credit Union, 1500 W. Washington
St., Monticello, FI. 32344, is now
accepting applications for a full time
teller/loan processor clerk.
Competitive wages and great benefits
package included. Employment
applications may be picked up at the
Credit Union office between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. All


applications must be received by
November 18, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
11/4, 9, 11, 16, c
Aucilla Christian Academy is
currently accepting applications for a
bus driver position. Must have (or be
willing to obtain) a CDL class B with


HELP WANTED
P and S endorsements. Also, must be
a positive, Christian role model. For
more information or to apply, please
contact the school at 997-3597.
11/16, 18, c
Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses Be part of a team working side
by side with other health care
professionals. RN/LPN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance, Vested Retirement after
six years, Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefit Package. If you prefer
per diem, rather than career service,
we also have OPS (non-benefited
positions). RNs $29-31, LPNs $19-22.
For additional information contact
Sharon McKinnie, R.N. at
850-922-6645, email:
mckinnie.sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 1J,
16, 18, 23, 25, c-
SERVICES
Handyman painting Int/Ext,
Gutters, Sheetrock, and house
cleaning, free estimates, call Billy &
Lidieth @ 997-5631.
11/9, 11, 16, 18, pd
Like other churches we have our
hypocrites, but hypocrites have to go
somewhere. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 am. 997-4116
11/16, c
China Painting Lessons. Call Mrs.
Rush 850-894-0265.
10/21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tin
'Backhdoe. :Service-5.drive.ways, -roa4s,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in .rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
FOR SALE
Whitney Spinet Piano $800; Love
Seat, earthtone colors $100. Both in
excellent condition 997-3105
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11 16, 18, pd
Louie & Margaret Mills have shelled
pecans for sale. 1276 Clark Rd. Phone
997-2106.
10/31, tfn
Love Seat, Earth tones, like new,
$250. Student desk with chair, $25,
Area Rug, 63" x 94" $25, Beige
Carpet Remnant, 6' x 12', $15. 2


PVC Chairs with cushions, $10 for
pair. 997-8809.
11/11, 16, pd
Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limousine bull, 14 months
old, asking $ Call 997-0901, leave
message.


FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, new
carpet, no pets, no children. $550
997-6653
11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, pd
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
2 bedroom, I bath Mobile Home on 1
acre Ashville Hwy. $400 per month.
Pet OK. Call Pam 997-4789.
10/26 tfn

REAL ESTATE
10 acres- 1,750 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2:
bath house with 800 sq. ft.
mother-in-law suite ,(cypress) stables,
workshop. Very private, beautiful
property with huge oak trees and
pasture. $350,000 850-997-4040.
11/16, 18, 23, 25, pd

LOST
Bro%%n/Blonde Cocl.er Spaniel spayed
female 4 years old. Black collar with
blue registration tag. Last seen on
1-10 near Lloyd Exit. Call 510-7583 or
303-237-2500 or 720-480-1647 or
656-9170.
11/16,18, 23,25, pd


FOUND
Black and White, male, miniature
Collie. Approximately 35 lbs. Found
on West Washington Street. 342-0153

WANTED
Someone to graft pecan trees, medium
size to small, from a Desirable to an
Elliott, at least 100 trees. Call
997-4854.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,
pd
Pecan harvesting equipment,
specifically a shaker, harvester,
cleaner. Call 997-4854.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,


MEAT GOATS

BUCKS

50 to 90

Pounds

(850) 997-6599


MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
Now ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR ENROLLMENT
LISTEDD SPACE)

997-6048

1590 N. JEFFERSON STREET


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571

MR w f jJJ J^ f V r f W nfaV'


"You'll be Glad You Did"

bjM 850-509-5004

www.DonnaHazlewood.com
250 S. Jefferson St Monticello, Fl 32344

HUNTING TRACT 50 rnol acres of woods
Creek. Hwy 19 frontage. $6,000 per acre

* HORSE FARM. Home on 20 acres w/barn
Pasture. Will divide. Leon County $922,500

* DAVE'S TOWING. Be your own boss. Business
w/home & outbuildings on 4.50 acres. $259,000

* HOME ON 2 AC. 4BR/2BA with Pool.
Covered back porch. End of cul-de-sac.
Leon County. $139,900


i A A |i
Immediate openings for mechanically inclined individuals in TALLAHASSEE. Please apply online
at:
www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.
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RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.
Work.. orECEPTI O


Monticello and Perry Florida
(850) 997-5516 or visit www. cbkk corn


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BAN KER


Kelly & Kelly Properties


k Simply the Best!



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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com
Choice Buildina Lots in Cooper's
Pond Area cleared and ready to build
on, nice trees, paved road $27,500 each
A lot for the Money Comfortable 4 bed-
room 3 bath home on five fenced acres
w/guest house/playhouse w/ bath, big
shop, 2 car garage, pasture, 100 pecan
trees and a nice pool a real dream for a
growing family $400,000
Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
Traditional House in Town bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St.
$155,000
Magnificent Acreace-Sold Peary
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000 r
Near Leon County-SOLD Peary
Does It Again 10 mostly open ac, corner
of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Too of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool,, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR,59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Townt on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road .only $22,500
Check Out This One! _8 acres with big
doublewide and small house on a pretty old
hillside close to Leon County off Julia Road
$160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza 'Hut Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
3/2 brick home w/pool, barn, 5 acre pas-
ture $1500 mo

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340

See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours

We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?


Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


-0


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PAGE 12. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 16, 2005


LEGION POST 49 Commander Fred Shofner REV. THERMON MOORE was .the guest
spoke at the Legion Breakfast Friday and speaker at the Legion Post 49 Program Fri-
encouraged veterans to attend local pro- day. (News Photos)
grams.


Post 49 Holds Veterans Day

Breakfast; Rev. Moore Speaks


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the American Le-
gion Post 49 held its annual Veter-
ans Day Breakfast, 7 a.m. Friday.
Ladies of the Auxiliary prepared
scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage,
pastries, fruit salads, grits, and bis-
cuits.
Post Commander Fred Shofner
welcomed the group, and recog-
nized a uniformed veteran in the
crowd, Greg Atherton, who was
presently at home on leave from Ku-
wait.
He introduced guest speaker
Rev. Thermon Moore, pastor at
First Baptist Church.
"The concept of our freedom and
the reality of liberty began in the
mind of God. The seed of liberty
lies in truth. It was God who
planted freedom's dream in the
hearts of our forefathers leading
them to abandon the servitude of
their homelands, and sail to this
new world in quest of God-given
liberty...," Moore said.
"On July 4, 229 years ago, the
Liberty Bell in Philadelphia rang
out the news of the signing of the
Declaration of Independence, de-
claring the greatest time and place
of freedom ever experienced by the
human race.
"Along the journey of freedom,
'Americans have adopted many
symbols of patriotism, such as the
Liberty Bell, our Flag, the Image of
Paul Revere on his midnight ride,
the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,
the planting of Old Glory on Iwo
Jima, and the Statue of Liberty.
"Today, however, Lady Liberty is
weeping. See her as she stands in
New York Harbor, her torch of
freedom held high.
"She has unfailingly welcomed to
our shores, the downcast, the out-
cast, those driven from their home-


GREG ATHERTON, home on
leave from Kuwait, attended
the Legion Post 49 Veterans
Day Program. (News Photo)

lands by tyrants. She has taken in
the poor, the homeless, the helpless
and those seeking a fresh breath of
freedom and a new beginning in
the land of the free and the home of
the brave.
"Lady Liberty has harbored men,
women and children from every
continent, every culture, every race
and every religion. But now,
worldwide enemies are out casting
her from both far and near. Many
of those whom she has welcomed
and sheltered beneath her wings her
wings of love, now hate her and are
determined to destroy her and all
for which she stands.
"From every direction enemies
rise up to cut her throat, drain out
her life's blood and bury her at the
bottom of the salt sea from which
she has beckoned scores of ship-
wrecked seamen and received in
love so many wayfaring pilgrims.
"Yes, my fellow Americans our
Lady Liberty is weeping because
saboteurs of all that is sacred h4ve
declared Jihad against her. Her
enemies have declared her an infi-


del and have sworn to annihil
her from the face of the Earth."
Moore spoke of the first enemy
the offspring of Ishmael, who w
then and is now, a constant soui
of conflict and the instigator of v
lence, and he spoke of the desti
child, Isaac.
"The entire Bible and newspapi
of today and tomorrow record t
tragedy of the conflict between t
destiny child, Isaac and the devils
child, Ishmael. The conflict of t
Middle East between Fundamen
Islam and Israel is the latter-d
continuation of a battle that beg
long ago.
"Why so we assert that the o
spring of Ishmael are the enemi
of Lady Liberty? Because it is t
descendants of Ishmael who ma
up the majority of today's terrorism
These are they who hate Christia
ity, western civilization, and
who reject their perverted philos
phy...
"Today, fanatical, radical follow'
ers of this deceived desert sna
are flawed foals destined for t
fires of hell, but on their way, th
are determined to spread as mu
hell on Earth as possible. They
on a demonically empowered si
cide mission and their major targ
is Lady Liberty."
The audience applauded, under
standing the need for veterans
fend off the invaders in this count
and to help defend other country
of the world, rid their lands of te
rorism, enabling them to enjoy a
prosper from the freedoms of a D
mocracy, through the efforts of v
erans.
Concluding the program, Isabe
de Searcy addressed the veteran
on a personal note, "I just wished
say thank you for coming and hel
ing us when we were attacked
the Germans." her words we
heartfelt and greatly appreciated
the veterans.


57 D

/\ ,December

3&4

North Florida Fairgrounds
Over 300 Artists and Craftspeople




Tickets Available At:
The Carriage Shop My Favorite Things
1441 Market Street 1950 Thomasville Road


Elinor Doyle Florist
111 East College Avenue


It's

amazing what
kids pick up
at the
beach.


Tallahassee Junior League
404 E. Sixth Ave. 10 a.m. 2 p.m.


Phoe rdrs*Cll 55-68


/


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Homeowners with
money worries
may qualify for
low-interest loans


"Smar Aloney by Kimberly Ross
LOANS: Direct lender
loosens its requirements for
homeowners who need
money now.
Have you been turned down
for a loan? Do you need more
than $10,000 for any reason?
Are you paying more than
10% interest on any other
loans, or credit cards?
If you are a homeowner and
answered "yes" to any of
these questions, they can
tell you over the phone and
wi/,out obl/gatio'n if you
qualify.
High credit card debt?,Less-
than-perfect credit? Self em-


played? Late house pay-
ments?Financial Problems?
Medical bills? IRS liens?//
does ? matter/
If you are a homeowner
with sufficient equity, there's an
excellent chance you will qual-
ify for a loan- usual//y wi/,n
24Vhow. I
You can find out over the
phone-and f ee of charge-
if you qualify. Honey Mae
Home Loans is licensed by
the Florida Department of
Financial Services. Open 7 days
a week to serve you.
1-800-700-1242ext. 223


in-
all
so-
w-
e Jefferson County Humane Society, Inc.
he
hey Annual Trail Ride
ych
are and
ui-
get Family Farm Day

er At
to
try Hay Pond Farm
ies
ier- Monticello, Florida
ndr
:e- Saturday, November 19, 2005
10:00 a.m. Trail Ride begins
Ille 12:00 p.m. Al's Gourmet Smoked Chicken & BBQ
ins 1:30 p.m. Horseback games and activities
to
lp-y $10.00 entry fee per horse
ere $8.00 lunch (includes a can drink or bottled water)





Attention all non riders!!!
0, Join us for lots of fun stuff including:
Hay Rides*Horseshoes*Activities

Buy your raffle ticket for the beautiful bay yearling
$1.00 each or 22 for $20.00

Barn Door Prizes
Please call and let us know if you are
having lunch with us

997-4000



All' proceeds go to the Jefferson

County Humane Society, Inc.

Bring your own horse,' no rentals available
Negative Coggins Required



From the Court House in Monticello, go one mile on HWY 19N. Take a right on
Boston Hwy (CR149). Go 1.8 miles. Take a right on Dills Road (CR 149-A). Go A
j 2.8 miles; take a left into Hay Pond Farm

-I -


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717