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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00089
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: November 9, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00089
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text




LIBRARY OF FLORIDA H-IST~ORY
404' LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FL~ORIDA
G.1 !,, SVI LLF', FL. 32611,


Small City
Tackles
Health Care Costs

Editorial, Page 4
IO


Progress Energy
Donates $500
For Club Festival

Story, Page 6


Sunday School
Express At
First Methodist

Story, Page 7


Cost Share
Applications
Now Accepted

Story, Page 12
IMI


Wednesday Morning )





Monti


137TH YEAR NO.89.50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2005


Code Enforcement



May Become Next



Big Issue; Maybe...


Commissioners To Take Up

Matter At Nov. 17 Meeting


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials are wondering about
some of the proposed developments-
they approved a year and more ago
developments that now appear to
be going nowhere.
Councilman Brian Hayes made
the point last week that some of
these same developers were in a
rush to get their projects approved
when they came before the council.
It was imperative that the projects
be approved as quickly as possible,
the developers argued. They were
anxious to start on their projects as
soon as possible. Time was of the
essence.
Why all the rush? Hayes ques-
tioned.
He cited as one example the pro-
posed commercial plaza that was to
go up on US 19 opposite Capital
City Bank. That property was now
up for sale, he noted.
Then there was the large housing
development slated for a large par-
cel on South Waukeenah Street.
That development now appeared to
be stalled, he said.
He wondered if the high prices of
building materials and gasoline were
having a chilling effect on the mar-
ket.


in the commissioner's district. Arredondo's
response was that he couldn't do it, absent a
citizen's complaint. (News Photo)


of trees in new developments,
among other things.


City Adopts

New Map

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council last week
adopted a map that more accurately
and realistically represents its
boundary lines.
The more accurate map, which
was developed by Property Ap-
praiser David Ward's office, corrects
the sometimes arbitrary and seem-
ingly capricious boundaries of the
earlier city map.
The new map also clarifies the
classification of parcels, some of
which were assigned contradictory
zoning designations in the earlier
map.
The new map is based on legal
and other descriptions in the city
and county's archival and historical
records.
The new map not only provides a
more accurate depiction of the on-
the-ground reality, it also allows for
(See New Map Page 2)


Developer Riley Palmer offered
that possibly, some of the delays
were being caused by permitting
-complications. It was his belief, he"
said, that the effects of the hurri-
canes and .the higher fuel costs
wouldn't be felt for another six
months.
"That's called cautious optimism,"
Palmer said.
Meanwhile, he urged the council
not to give up on the tree ordinance
that he and members of the Local
Planning Agency and city officials
had drafted last year.
"My concern is that the tree ordi-
nance seems to have disappeared,"
Palmer said. "As long as you don't
have an ordinance on the books, it's
a blank check for anyone."
Palmer said his concern arose both
as a developer and as a member of
the community. On the one hand, he
didn't want to see the community
denuded of its trees. On the other
hand, he -didn't want arbitrary stan-
dards applied to his projects.
City Clerk Emily Anderson as-
sured Palmer that the ordinance was
not forgotten. As a matter of fact, it
would be coming up before the
council in the near future, she said.
The proposed ordinance sets re-
quirements for the types, number,
placement, maintenance and spacing


public discussion in the near future. From
left, City Clerk Emily Anderson, Steve Riss-
man and Riley Palmer. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Code enforcement -- like animal
control -- is one of those issues that
elected officials would rather avoid,
unless forced to do so because of
citizen pressure or circumstances.
In the case of animal control, it
was a combination of citizen pres-
sure and circumstances that forced
commissioners to tackle the issue. A
revised version of the animal control
ordinance, by the way, is scheduled
for discussion and expected ap-
proval next Thursday.
But back to code enforcement,
which came up unexpectantly at last
Thursday's commission meeting,
thanks to Commissioner Jerry Sut-
phin.
Sutphin started by seeking clarifi-
cation on the code enforcement or-
dinance, which states that action
may be initiated by the appropriate
county officer any time this individ-
ual deems that a violation exists.
That officer, as matters presently
stand, is Bob Arredondo, who also
doubles as the planning official, as
the Planning Commission doubles
as code enforcement board.
As he read the ordinance (and as
he understood the commission's
authority to be), Sutphin said, not
only did the ordinance authorize
Arredondo to act, but as a commis-
sioner he could order Arredondo to
act.
Here, however, was the situation,
he explained. He had brought a cer-
tain potential code enforcement vio-
lation to Arredondo's attention and
had asked that the latter look into
the matter.
Arredondo's response, Sutphin
said, had been to inform him that,
absent a citizen's complaint, no code
enforcement action could be initi-
ated. But nowhere in the ordinance,
Sutphin pointed out, did it say any-
thing about a citizen's complaint be-
ing needed to initiate a code
enforcement action.
What's more, as his boss, he or
any other commissioner should be
able to order Arredondo to take ac-
tion, Sutphin said.
Arredondo wasn't at the meeting to
answer for himself, and as some-
times happens at such discussions,
the .commissioners appeared to be
on different pages, if not on differ-
ent wavelengths.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner informed Sutphin that the solu-
tion was simple enough. All Sutphin
had to do, Joyner suggested, was to
bring the issue up before the Plan-
ning Commission and have that
body revise the ordinance to include
language that a commissioner's con-
cern, as well as a citizen's
complaint, could serve to trigger the
action.
Sutphin's repeated reading of the
ordinance (nowhere did it mention a
citizen's complaint being necessary
to initiate action; rather, it left it up
to the discretion of the code enforce-


ment officer) did not appear to make
any impression on his fellow com-
missioners.
Neither did his argument that as
an elected official, he had the
authority by virtue of his office to
order Arredondo to initiate the code
enforcement action.
Joyner kept insisting that the
proper way to address the issue was
to revise the ordinance via the Plan-
ning Commission. That was the
proper and logical procedure to fol-
low, heinsisted.
..In one of the telling ironies of such
discussions, Joyner related how lie
himself had had a potential code en-
forcement violation in his district
and had mentioned the matter to
Arredondo. All it had taken was for
Arredondo to approach the individ-
ual and the matter had been
resolved, Joyner said.
His point being that many times
these matters could be resolved sim-
ply enough, by virtue of the code
enforcement officer merely talking
to the potential violator.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Almost exactly two years after
city officials approved a near
$12,000 expenditure for the update
of the city's code book, the product
will soon be in their hands.
City Clerk Emily Anderson in-
formed council members of the
completion of the update recently.
City officials plan to have copies
of the new code book available at
the public library, as well as putting
the document online so that citizens
can easily access the information.
The council approved paying the
Municipal Code Corporation
$11,425 for the update of the code


It apparently didn't occur to Joy-
ner -- nor did Sutphin seize the op-
portunity to make the point -- that
what Joyner had accomplished via
Arredondo was precisely what he,
Sutphin, was asking to do.
Asked for his interpretation of the
ordinance, County Attorney Buck
Bird preferred to have Planning At-
torney Scott Shirley interpret the
ordinance's, intent. It was this take,
however, that the language of the
ordinance left room for interpreta-
tion.
Sutphin finally opted to defer the
discussion for a later day. Mean-
while, he wanted to talk about a
related issue, he said, the dual role
of the Planning Commission.
Rather than having a 10-member
Planning Commission that fre-
quently failed to reach a quorum,
why not split that body five and five
and establish a separate Planning
Commission and Code Enforcement
Board, Sutphin suggested.
"The way it is now, we have no
code enforcement procedure in this
county," Sutphins said.
Joyner found problems with Sut-
phin's suggestion.
"It's going to be tough to find peo-
(See Code Enforcement Page 5)


book in 2003. That expenditure
called for the work to be done in
phases, so that the city could spread
out the payment over a two-year pe-
riod.
The codification entailed integrat-
ing all the city's pertinent
ordinances, from the city's begin-
nings in the early 1800s to the pre-
sent.
It also entailed eliminating all ob-
solete, inconsistent and contradic-
tory information in the code book, a
task the experts described as being
long and tedious.
The last time the city's code book
was updated was in 1990, meaning
that the existing book contained no-
ordinances, rules or amendments'
(See Code Book Page 6)


CITY ATTORNEY Bruce Leinback and City Clerk Emily An-
derson were instrumental in the update of the city's code
book. (News Photo)


. 7


COMMISSIONER JERRY SUTPHIN, left, tried
to get Planning Official Bob Arredondo, who
doubles as code enforcement officer, to look
into a possible code enforcement violation


City Council Discourses On

Tree Law, Delayed Projects


City Code Book


Finally Updated


MEMBERS of the city's tree committee
worked on revising the city's tree ordinance
last year. The document the committee
drafted is supposed to be coming up for
I j


,f








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005


Donations Sought

For Annual County

Christmas Drive


I:



K '
j ~. 'p ~-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School
'celebrated its annual Homecoming
Week last week, which saw the
crowning of Alexis Huggins as the
Homecoming Queen, Tabitha Smith
as Senior Representative, and
Cashanda Coleman as the JCHS
Princess, at half-time during the
Homecoming Game with Taylor
County.
This year, each class also had
male representatives including: Mr.
and Miss Freshman Jemaria Cuyler
and Arsenio Bright; Mr. and Miss
Junior, Carmen Skipworth and
Kevin Hill.
There were two 'Miss
Sophomores, Jazmaun Hall and
Karlissa Miller, escorted by two
named JROTC cadets.
: Homecoming King was James
Skipworth.
This years theme was "The Ti-
gers Are Stepping High In '05".
: Festivities began Monday with
Halloween Dress-Up and Tacky
Day.
Tuesday was Camouflage and
Hat Day and at 6 p.m. in the new
gym, the varsity volleyball team
took on the staff from the teen cen-
ter at the first game hosted' in the
gym.
. Lady Tigers won two of the thiee
games, winning the first 25-21, los-
ing the second, 21-25 and winning
the third, 25-18.
Wednesday was Rat Day and
Faculty/Senior Dress-Up Day and
Thursday was Spirit Day, where
students and staff proudly dis-
played the Tiger colors of orange
and blue, and Class Competition
Day.
The "Rats" were numerous with
many of the boys dressed in girls'
clothing, and some sporting wigs.
Spokesman Bill Brumfield said
that there were many games and
activities with grades 9-12 compet-
ting. against each other.
A pep rally and the Homecoming
Court was introduced and Tiger
Spirit was high.
DJ George Pittman was. spinning
tupes for students beginning at
iunch.
And though there was no school
Friday, activities began with the
'annual parade through town. Grand
Marshall was George Pittman, Sr.
There was a reception for the sen-
ior football players, cheerleaders
and their parents and homecoming


County High School Homecoming Parade
Friday afternoon. (News Photos)


court, before the homecoming
game against Taylor County.
"At half time the JROTC and the
JCHS band performed at the usual
introduction of the homecoming
court and the crowning of the
2005-06 Homecoming Queen.
,The activities for the week was
quite successful," said Brumfield.
"Mr. (Chalmus) Thomas also pro-.
vided students with hot-dogs, ham-
burgers and lots of ice cream,"
Bumfield said.
He added that the parade went
really well and they were quite
pleased with the turnout of specta-
tors and fans from the community.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Volunteers are preparing for the-
annual County Christmas Drive, and
encourage residents to respond.
Coordinating the Drive this year
are Gladys Roann and Lucille
Hunter.
Last year the community was able
to assist more than 80 families, and
approximately 132 children, as well
as some dozen senior citizens, with
gift certificates, food, articles of
clothing, and toys.
The combined effort of civic
groups, religious organizations, and
private citizens, help the less fortu-
nate enjoy a more joyous holiday,
Roann relates.
Volunteers are sought to help with
the collection, organization, and dis-
tribution of gifts, again this year.
Likewise, help is needed in sorting
and wrapping gifts. Anyone who
can spare an hour nor two or a day is
asked to contact Roann at 342-0115,
or Hunter at 342-0178.


New Map
(Continued From Page 1)
the overlay of additional informa-
tion.
The city may, for example, now
pinpoint fire hydrants, manholes,
underground utilities or historical
preservation information on its map.
The potential for the information
that can be recorded, in fact, is al-
most limitless, according to the ex-
perts.-
Additionally, the city may update
its map as annexations and rezoning
amendments take place.


"We also want to thank Nancy
Wideman, David Cash, Denise Vo-
gelgesang and Ray Fosky for the
use of their vehicles, as well as
Chief Frisby for working with us
and the people of the community
who helped us," said Brumfield.
The winners in the float contest
were Prettiest Float, HMS; home-
coming court, second place; the
homecoming senior class horse and
buggy; third place sophomore
class; and fourth place, juniors.
Professional photographs of the
queen and court were promised to
the Monticello News, but had not
arrived at press time.


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.


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850-997-5553 ,
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Funeral Directors and Embalmers
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Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
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(850) 875-4075


Monetary donations can be made
out to Jefferson Christmas Drive,
and mailed to P.O. Box 45, Monti-
cello, FL., 32345.
Donations of gifts for all ages
from infants to teens, to the elderly
are requested, as well as cash dona-
tions.
"Each year our list of needy indi-
viduals has grown, and we usually
run out of gifts before we run out of
children," Roann laments.
All donations go to Jefferson
County residents. There are no ad-
ministrative costs, and all workers
are volunteers .
To adopt a family, a child or an
elderly resident during the drive,
contact Roann or Hunter at the num-
bers printed above.


MEAT GOATS

BUCKS

50 to 90

Pounds

(850) 997-6599


SPianist
Teresa
Walters

Internationally acclaimed
pianist Teresa Walters
performs works by Boulanger,
Liszt, Brahms, Gershwin and
Rachmaninov while giving
insightful and entertaining
keynote comments about the
musical selections.

Monday
Nov. 14, 2005
7:00 p.m.
Van H. Priest Auditorium
Madison, Florida

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Celebration and Open House!



Looking for something different
in your child's Sunday School experience?
Come to First United Methodist Church
and see what we're all excited about!

Join us at 9:45 a.m. on Sunday, November 13th
as we kick off our new rotation-style Sunday School
for children in Pre-K through 5th grade.

Explore the 6 learning stations in "Sunday School Express"

Drama Depot
Creation Station
Whistle Stop Cafe
Computer Station
Movie Junction
Grand Central Station

If you can't make it for our Open House, join us any Sunday at 9:45.

(Nursery, Adult & Youth classes are available too!)

First United Methodist Church, 325 W. Walnut Street, (997-5545)


BOYS, GIRLS CLUB members march down
North Jefferson Street in the Jefferson


Parade, Game Conclude


Homecoming Week At JCHS


'4^


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005 PAGE 3

Ghost Trackers Plan

Club Fundraising Tour


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Big Bend Ghost Trackers.
will team up with the employees of
Intuition Solutions to raise funds
for the Boy's and Girl's Club of the
Big Bend with a December tour.
BBGT will conduct the Haunted
Walking Tour of Monticello, 8
p.m., Dec. 2.
For the fundraiser, BBGT mem-
bers will be in full dress of the era
and leading the way by lantern


light as they do during the October
weekend tours for Mainstreet.
The tour will begin at the Monti-
cello Chamber of Commerce, and
the cost is $10 for adults and $5 for
children 10, and under.
BBGT will also provide the
Haunted Cemetery Tour in the
1827 cemetery following the tour
around the streets of Monticello,
for an additional $10.
To make reservations call 562---
2516 or 997-5050.


IRV %M


ATTENDING the Big Bend Hospice Leadership Class II are,
L-R: Tracey Christian, Sally King, Betty Echols, Mary Pow-
ell, Bob Smith,.Tami Thomas, Pat Law, Karle Gordon, Sa-


Leadership Class Visits

Local Hospice Office


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of Big Bend Hospice-
(BBH) Leadership Class II visited
the Jefferson County Hospice Of-
fice at 205 North Mulberry Street,.
Oct. 21, to learn about challenges
of delivering Hospice care in rural
communities.
J. Cooper, clinical support spe-
cialist for the local office, greeted
the participants who had a first
hand opportunity to meet field staff
and learn about issues specific to
Jefferson County.
"Learning. about the challenges of
delivering hospice 'care to our rural


areas, and meeting the local staff is
an important orientation for this
Leadership Class.
For the staff to develop effective
leadership capacity they need to
fully understand the broad scope of
all of our commUnifies," said
McElligott.
The BBH Leadership program
provides employees selected for the
leadership class, a stronger under-
standing of the internal and exter-
nal challenges to. attaining
excellence in the delivery of hos-
pice services, and offers each mem-
ber. training for leadership
development. .
Annually employees are selected '
to participate in the BBH Leader-


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Will Be Closed

Friday,

November 11th

In Observance of

Veteran's Day


Regular Banking Hours Will
Resume On
Saturday, November 12



In Case Of Emergency Dial 911


bra Foreman, Joey Williams,. John McElligott, Sandy
Higham, Karen Kinser, June Berlinger, Karen Byers, Jul-
ian Solohub, Linda Knesch, and Gini West.


ship.
There were 17 employees se-
lected to participate in this fiscal'
year's leadership class, represent-
.ing a cross section of BBH opera-
tions from clinical to
administrative.
The tour was planned to co er.


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BBH offices in Jefferson,' Gadsden,
Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla.
As part of BBH quality improve-
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year to provide leadership develop-
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mnent


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At The Villages
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SAT OCT. 22 WINE TASTING 11a.m.-4 p.m.

THuS. OCT.27 FAR EAST WINE DINNER

SAT.OCT.29 KARAOKE COSTUME CONTEST
Mon., Wed.. Thurs. & Fri. 11 a.m. 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday
Saturday 8 a.m. 10 p.m.- Sunday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.



850.219.1440
2777 Miccosukee Road, Suite 3
.^Ancftdlior .%..lj- rt'a'laU o. Tallahassee, Florida 32308
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Doug Mishler4 Realtor
850-933-8844 Cell
850-219-1445 Fax
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850-545-2514 Cell
850-219-1445 Fax
lindat@florida-beach.com,


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9,2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


From Our Photo File


DEPUTY DAVID CARROLL, discussed traffic
control, in Mady, 1990, with members of


to protest the state's helmet law. (News File
Photo)


Sm all City Ta I ABATE, preceding their ride to the Capitol


Health Care Costs opinion & comment


As the debate over health care
costs continues, a new figure has
come to light: Only 10 cents of
every health care dollar is spent on
prescription medicines. Yet, accord-
ing to statistics provided by Pharma-
ceutical Research and Manufactur-
ers of America, the cost of people
not taking their medicines can be
more than $100 billion per year.
According to leading pharmacists,
failing to take medicines as pre-
scribed may lead to more doctors'
visits and the need for more rtedi-,
Oines. It can also result in missed
ivork or long-term health problems.
The findings led one small city to
take a health care approach that may
6ave national implications.
Asheville, North Carolina lowered
is medical costs by more than 30
Percent by simply helping people
vho needed medicine take their
inedicine. '
j Diabetes was-a particular problem
in the city (as it is in the rest of the
nation). Half of people with diabetes
fail to keep their blood sugar in
check and, according to the Diabetes
Journal, costs for patients with un-
checked diabetes can run more than


$13,000 a year.
Pharmacists met with Asheville.
patients once a month, helping them
monitor blood sugar levels and mak,
ing sure they were following their
prescribed drug regimen.
In less than a year, the. city says,
patients were healthier, missed
fewer sick days and showed fewer
signs .of the complications that de-
velop from unchecked diabetes.,
Before the plan, the city was aver-
aging about $6,000 per year in
health care spending per patients.
The cost dropped to about $3,000
within one year of the campaign.
"We know that when disease is
treated, health is stabilized and costs
are reduced significantly for every-
one. That means putting the empha-
sis on the preventivenot the more
expensive curative care," said Chris-
topher Viehbacher, president, U.S.
Pharmaceuticals,'GlaxoSmithKline.
:Several American cities are now
replicating Asheville's model. One
campaign -is aimed at getting people
to take their medicines properly.
It's thought the effort will help im-
prove overall wellness and long-
term cost control.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
November 1, 1995
The Florida Fall Convention of the
Florida Pyrotechnic Arts guild will
be hosted by Wallace Bullock this
Weekend, Nov. 3-5. The convention
has attendees from all over the
country, with companies as well as
individuals, coming to town for a
gathering of pyro minds.
Jefferson County runners did the
county proud on Sunday, running 12
of the 150-mile route from Gaines-
ville to Tallahassee in celebration of
Florida's 150th anniversary of state-
hood.
City Police continue their investi-
gation into the shooting of a local
resident in his home early Sunday
morning.
A fire at Johnston's meat locker
on W. Washington St. early Sunday
morning resulted in more than
$2,000 of damage to the building.
Two county residents were injured
in a one -car accident Saturday night
on CR-259, just north of Wacissa.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
October 30, 1985
Administrative wheels have been
set in motion which may result in
the city and county receiving over
one million dollars worth of grant
money.
In an all-out attempt to end sales
of alcoholic beverages to underage
young adults, the state is starting to
use teenage "decoys" to catch busi-
ness people in the act of making ille-
gal sales.
A Kentucky firm starts work next
week o the installation of a series of
informational "logo" signs along a
140 mile stretch of Interstate 10


from Monticello to Ponce Deleon in,
Holmes County.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
October 30, 1975
The deal was finalized Tuesday
for CBS News to begin filming in
Jefferson and Leon Counties on Fri-
day, October 31st.
Mr. Forrest Brown and son Dale,
Mr. Fred Naughton and son Bubba,
Mr. Charles Jackson and sons
Danny and David, were a group
who enjoyed the Globetrotters at
Tully gym Wednesday night.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Floyd spent
the weekend in Cross City. They at-
tended the Homecoming football
game in Gainesville..
FORTY YEARS AGO
October 29, 1965
Mike Boland attended a regional
Phi Theta' Kappa, conference with
four other students from NFJC.
County Commissioner W.W. Bul-
lock was named as a member of the
Board of Highway Secondary Fund.
Mrs. Franklin Smith left last week
to visit her daughter, Mrs. Fred H.
Rosey and family 'in Merrit Island.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
October 26, 1955
The Fred Boyd Family of Ashville
have been chosen as the Farm Fam-
ily of Jefferson County.
Edwin Faglie has been a awarded
a trip to Chicago as the winner of
the state 4-H corn contest.
2nd Lt. Hans Adolph G. Sorenson
has arrived in Korea for a 11 month
tour of duty.
John Finlayson has sailed for
Naples, Italy to visit with his brother
Marine Major and Mrs. Ed Finlay-
son Jr.


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include
phone number or writer


'Get Downs' Good For Our Town


Here are some random thoughts
on the passing parade.
DOWNTOWN GET DOWN: A
very good thing for Our Town with
attendance growing month to
month. Kudos to the downtown
merchants who've spearheaded the;
Get D6wns.
POLITICS: Our country is way
too polarized. Time was folks could-
disagree without being disagreeable..
Now the modus operandi, especially
in Washington, is to slime the peo-
ple who disagree. My guess is the
public will grow tired of this stuff at
some point.
IRAQ WAR: Raising questions
about the war, the way it was sold to
the American people, the way it is
being conducted. etc. is not unpatri-
otic. It is patriotic. ..... '" -'
SHOPPING: My wife and I have
a very good plan. She shops I stay
home.
PUBLISHER'S CLEARING-
HOUSE: Do you know anybody
who received money from these
folks? I regularly throw their stuff in
the trash.
WHO'S WHO: Ah, here's one of


Publisher's

Notebook
_-__,j


Ron Cicfion


my favorite targets. You pay money
to be listed in a fat book with thou-
sands of other people. I'm already in
Who's Who. My name is in the
Mbhticello'phonie bbok. \' ..,, .'
LOCAL POLITICS: [ongues'
are wagging as to who's running and
who is not. Many times, people
whose names are bandied about
never qualify for office.
LOCAL POLITICAL PARTIES:
Republicans and Democrats here are
energized and that's a very positive
thing.
WEATHER: We need some rain.


DEVELOPMENT: Our county
has been discovered. The issue is
how will it be developed?
-PUBLIC.SERVICE: This.is,.a
tough business and I applaud .those)j
who are willing to offer themselves
for public service.
CITIZEN INITIATIVE: There
are a host of good things in Our
Town that came to fruition because
citizens got involved and worked for
a cause.
HALLOWEEN: We had close to
400 kids at our door Halloween
night and that was fine. I do wish,


however, some of them would not1
have thrown candy wrappers up and
down the streets.
GHOST TOURS: My gosh they
are popular. ,
BIKE TRAIL: I was glad to see it,1
was named for former Mayor Ike
Anderson. Ike used to tool around
town on his red bike never meeting,
a stranger. 3
OPERA HOUSE: The historic 2
structure is sporting a new roof
which cost $50,000. Donations are
needed.
CITY'S INTERNET SERVICE: -
Looks like Graybar can't get it done K
and the Council is fed up.
RED HATS: These gals have the,
rightidea, i.e. have fun and laugh.
-jEAiLnTJH-EPARTMENT: CDi-pi
rector Kim.Barnhill;has this agency ,
cooking' with all manner of good pro- q
grams for the community.
MOUTHY ATHLETES: Shut up
and play. '
EXTREMISTS: Whether they be
on the left or right, they are Archie
Bunkers marching in lockstep un-'
w killing to consider other points to
.view.


IRough Riders' Lead The Way


As the Coalition's role in Iraq has
gradually shifted towards supporting
Iraqi security forces, American sol-
diers continue to battle terrorist in-,
surgents in the streets of Baghdad.;
Fallujah and beyond.
As seen in the recent attacks on;
military personnel, members of the
new Iraqi government and civilian
contractors, convoy operations, re--
main a constant target of terrorists
as they look to disrupt supply lines
and damage the Coalition's recon-
struction of Iraq.
In an effort to reduce attacks on
crucial supply convoys, the Army
has created an elite convoy security
unit, nicknamed the Rough Riders,
specifically designed to provide top-,
notch force protection for personnel,,
equipment and assignment teams
traveling in and around Baghdad's
often volatile International Zone.
Just as Teddy Roosevelt's Rough
Riders stormed San Juan Hill in lib--


rating Cuba from Spain, these
modern-day Rough Riders are doing
their part to keep the roads safe and
supplies moving to help win the
peace in Iraq.
"Our mission is to provide convoy
security throughout the whole coun-
try of Iraq," said Rough Riders con-
voy commander, Army Reserve Sgt.
1st Class Steve Davis. "We're out
here for one goal: to make sure eve-
ryone makes it home safely, every-
body does their job and the bottom
line of it is that the mission gets ac-
complished."
Each day, Army soldiers transport
thousands of pounds 'of supplies
such as food and water, ammunition
and fuel to U.S. forces, in highly
volatile areas and isolated outposts
throughout. Iraq. Troops receive
ptate-of-the-art training in convoy'
operations before deployment so
they can remain safe in-theater
while accomplishing their missions.
The Army has made convoy train-


ing a key aspect of its basic training
regimen for all soldiers so they can
be prepared to successfully com-
plete convoy operations under any
circumstance.
For example, Ft. Sill, Okla., oper-
ates a state-of-the-art convoy train-
ing program for soldiers that utilizes
real-time lessons learned from Iraq
and incorporates the latest in Army
technology to simulate, as close as
possible, enemy attacks on Ameri-
can military conyoys.
Before actual live-fire training, Ft.
Sill trainers take visiting Army units
through extensive training, complete
with classroom lessons and battle
drills before taking them out onto
the live-fire convoy range.
"This convoy exercise is about as
realistic as we can get it within the
safety restraints," said 1st Lt. Joe
Miller, Ft. Sill Observer-Controller.
"The exercise teaches them how to
shoot from a moving vehicle, react
to explosives and maintain convoy


intervals."
Soldiers face a number of simu-
lated, terrorist attacks while firing "
machine guns at targets placed spo- '
radically along the route. In addition
to live-fire target practice, soldiers a
learn other important lessons: how
to deal with a disabled vehicle, navi- f
gate check points, handle anti-
American protesters and manage an
enemy prisoner-of-war situation, in-
cluding a focus on Geneva Conven-1i
tion rights.
Each unit is taught how to deal ,
with these varied situations, is a
graded. upon its performance, and
given every opportunity to eliminate -
any weaknesses to ensure unit suc-
cess. and cohesiveness during in-.
theater operations..:,
Through such stateside training, as.,
well as through lessons learned in;i
theater, the Rough Riders are pre-
pared to successfully complete con-
voy missions throughout Iraq safely
and securely.


Alzheimer's Awareness Month


In 1983, Ronald Reagan declared
the month of November National
Alzheimer's Awareness Month.
Today, more than 4 million
Americans have Alzheimer's
disease, and experts predict that
number could double in the next 25
years.
Designated both as National Alz-
heimer's Awareness Month and Na-
tional Family Caregivers Month,
November presents an opportunity
to recognize the progress made
against the disease and to acknowl-
edge and support the millions of
caregivers devoted to, looking after-
their loved ones.
Alzheimer's is a progressive, neu-
rodegenerative disease characterized
by memory problems that eventually


lead to serve cognitive, functional
and behavioral impairment.
Nearly half of Alzheimer's patients
are first diagnosed in the moderate
or severe stages, when signs and
symptoms become more pro-
nounced and behavioral problems
can occur. According to the Na-
tional Institute on Aging, signs and
symptoms of moderate Alzheimer's
disease can include.
Increased memory loss
Difficulty recognizing familiar
people
Problems with language
Restlessness, agitation, anxiety,
and wandering
Repetitive statements or move-
ments
.* Hallucinations, delusions, suspi-


ciousness, or paranoia.
Dr. Martin Farlow, professor and
vice-chairman for research in the
department of neurology at Indiana
University School of Medicine, ad-
vises patients and their families to
learn as much as possible about the
disease and what to expect as it pro-
gresses. Following are answers to
some commonly asked questions:
Q: Can treatments help individuals
with Alzheimer's disease?
A: There is no cure for Alz-
heimer's, but there are treatments
available that may help patients
maintain their mental capacity and
ability to perform basic activities
longer than if they were not treated.
Q: When should a patient start
treatment?


A: Treatment should start as soon)
as a patient is diagnosed. If you
think a loved one has Alzheimer's,')
make an appointment to see your
doctor right away. The sooner the"
diagnosis, the sooner treatment can.,
be started to slow the progression of
symptoms.
Q: If someone is already taking
one medication for Alzheimer's is
there anything else can be done?
A: There are multiple medications
available to treat Alzheimer's dis-.
ease which work differently and canb
be used alone or in combination,
with one another. For more informa-,
tion, you can visit
www.Alzheimersonline.com or ask
(See Alzheimer's Page 5) ,


U-,


I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005 PAGE 5 !


Letters...


Commission Should Reflect

Voice Of Residents, Writer Says


Dear Editor:
The Jefferson County Commissior
met Oct. 20, to supposedly listen tc
the citizens of the county on the re-
zoning of property on South 19.
After the vote was taken, it sud-
denly dawned on me that I had been
here before.
I had attended many School Board
meetings, with 75 to 100 people
speaking for certain decisions and
they were politely (sometimes)
heard, and then ignored when the_
vote was taken.
The same action occurred at the
meeting Oct. 20. At least 75 people
strongly encouraged the commission
to. vote against the rezoning, with
only one person, the developer, ask-
ing for this change.
Once again, everyone was politely--
listened to, and then cast aside.


I can't help but ask the question of
what happens to a person once they
have been elected to office.
A person who decides to seek po-
litical office will visit you, shake
your hand, and then ask for your
vote, and the privilege to represent
you the voter.
It was very disheartening to know
that nothing I said or could say
would make any difference. It was
obvious to all that it was a pre-
planned event.
SI have seen this many times at the
School Board meetings, and now the
same attitude prevails at the County
Commission meetings.
It is apparent that the County com-
missioners no longer reflect the
wishes of the voters. They represent
only themselves.
Will the public stop attending and
exercising its right to speak because


of the futility of the effort, or will
they continue to speak, knowing a
decision has already been reached
and they are just politely being lis-
tened to, only to be brushed aside
later.
The only valid reason given for
voting on this issue was given by
Commissioner Monroe, who said he
could not vote yes on this because
he had talked to no one who wanted
this zoning change to pass.
Thank you, Mr. Monroe, for stay-
ing true to your oath of office tc
represent the people.
Maybe next time other commis-
sioners will stay true to their man-
date of office and that is to represent
the people.
The score now stands: developers
1, citizen 0.
Debbie Craig


RAT DAY at Jefferson County High School
brings forth outlandish costumes as stu-
dents exercise their creativity. L-R: Quiene-



Space Remains F

Sponsored By Hu


1. .



















skka Leonard, Shanice Brooks, Quaneshia
Franklin, Mario Scott. (News Photo)




or Fun Day


imane Society .


Atty. Questions Commissioners'


Definition Of 'Property
Dear Editor: As for the substance of the article,
Re: "Comp Plan Change Gets OK," I have only two comments:
Monticello News, Oct. 26, 2005. First, the term "property rights,"
This is a brief letter in response to as it was considered and relayed by
the above referenced article, the Commissioners voting for the
I represented several landowners change, should have been contained
whose property is adjacent to the in quotation marks.
property that was the subject of the The hearing was supposed to first
Highway 19 South rezoning debate. consider "if" the plan even abided
First, I would like to compliment by the requirements of the Compre-
the citizens who took the time and hensive Plan.
effort to attend the County Commis- Only if the request fit within the
sion meeting and voice their Cdmprehensive Plan could the focus
opinion., turn to a yes or no vote on the other


All of the citizens who spoke
seemed to be very well-informed
and educated about the application
of the comprehensive plan to zoning_
issues in Jefferson Countv.
I would like to thank my clients
and others who gave mietheir allot-
ted time ini6rderithat I might lay out
our entire argument against the pro-
ject.


merits and characteristics of the pro-
posal.
The Commission focused on the
"property rights" of a few individu-
--als to the exclusion of the property
rights of all the other citizens of Jef-
ferson County, especially the ad-
joining landowners.
The landowners seeking the re-
zoning had full knowledge of the
Agricultural-5 zoning of the prop-


I felt that we did all that we could erty when they bought it.
to prevent the proposed change. The rights attached to, and associ-


Rights'
ated with Ag-5 zoning, are the only
rights that they purchased. Any
other rights or possible uses of the
property were nonexistent, or specu-
lative, at best.
Denying the rezoning would not
have taken anything away.
In one breath the Commission was
saying that if this was denied the
County could come and take away
any citizen's property rights and tell
them what to do with their land.
This was just not a complete or
fair consideration of the issue at
hand.
My second point is that the writer
of the article misspelled my last
name.
As you can see, my name, which
Chairman Joyner read and an-
nounced correctly, is Thomas A.
("Tad") David.
Whether youi consider this letter of
publication or not, I would appreci-
ate a correction as to, my name.
Very truly yours,
Thomas A. David, Esq.


Commissioners Don't Realize


Growth Can Destroy County


Dear Editor:
Last month, the people of Jeffer-
son County came before the Board
of County Commission, voicing
their concerns on a Comp Plan
Amendment re-zoning of 73 acres.
The outcry of the adjacent land-
owners, concerned citizens, and
field professionals asking for a vote
against the land use change fell on
the deaf ears of four of the Board
members.
These Commissioners are allow-
ing for growth and development to
destroy this County. Growth and de-
velopment need to be planned for
and managed.
They can't take care of the de-
mands and needs of the people
within this county now and yet they
are adding to the density. They are
opening the floodgates of a sleepy
county to become a developer's
paradise.
Maybe these Board members don't
comprehend the impact this decision
will have in the future, or maybe
they are more interested in their own
agenda whether it is for personal or
business gains.


So what did our Board of County
Commission.suggest and decide for
the future of Jefferson County? A
compromise!
We didn't know it was up to a
Commissioner to recommend,
change, or make suggestions for the
applicant. After all, they said this
would, not set precedence in the
County.
Mr. Tuten suggested changing the
-density to one unit per three acres.
The applicant was very much in,
agreement. Almost like they knew
it was. coming. Unfortunately, he
only asked the applicant, not the
people of the county.
Mr. Joyner seemed very con-
cerned for property owner rights.
Remember the developer bought
this property in April 2004 and
asked for the re-zoning less than two
months later.
Where are the concerns for the
property rights of the adjacent land-
owners and others in the county?
Mr. Sutphin stated "we are just a
small spoke in a large wheel". So,
we just pass the buck and let some-
one else be the bad guy? That way,
the Board doesn't have to deal with_


the repercussions of the good ole
boys.
Mr. Hall thought these types of re-
zonings would bring jobs to the peo-
ple like roofing and changing light
bulbs. Within reality, most labor
comes from outside the county.
Mr. Monroe was the only Com-
missioner that made any sense at all.
He listened and heard the adjacent
landowners, concerned citizens, and
field professionals.
He had the insight of the land, the
infrastructure, densities, and the
problems that are associated with it.
He took into consideration the comp
plan, land development code, future
land use map, and state statute.
SThank you Danny for voting
against this and looking out for the
good of the county, not for a certain
few.
This Board meets the first and
third Thursdays of the month. Make
sure to mark your calendars. Come
see the way your elected officials

conduct business. You may find it
to be cheap entertainment at the tax-
payers expense.
Don and Cindy Lee


Code Enforcement May Become issue


(Continued From Page 1)
ple willing to volunteer for a code
enforcement board," Joyner said.
"Code enforcement issues can get
real nasty."
Commissioner Danny Monroe
opined that reducing the Planning
Commission to five members --
with the potential that any three
could decide issues -- made for a
disturbing possibility.
"Three people might want to take
this authority and run with it and
abuse it," Monroe said.
Commissioner Gene Hall sug-
gested that commissioners
themselves take on the code en-


forcement responsibility, given that


elected officials were answerable to
the people. Opening
That was a quick and certain way
to assure a short stay on the com- the door
mission, Joyner said.
"If you make the board a code en- to hope
forcement board, you will be a
county commissioner one term," Call OurP
Joyner said. "I'm telling it like it is."
In the end, commissioners sched- If eline.
uled the issue for further discussion i's toll-free.
at their next meeting. It appeared to
be the reluctant consensus that, like 1-800-572-1717
animal control, code enforcement www.mdausa.org
might be an issue whose time had
come.


I


Muscular Dystrophy
Association


FRAN HUNT
H Staff Writer


Space remains for the Annual and
Family Fun Day, sponsored by the
Humane Society, Nov. 19 begin-
ning at 10 a.m., on the Carswell
property, Hay Pond Farm, off Dills
Rd.
Society President Caroline Car-
swell advised that the menu will in-
clude: Al's Gourmet chicken
dinners, and Boston Butt Barbecue
pork sandwiches, both served with
all of the fixings for $8 each. -
The cost will include. either .a
canned drink or bottled water.
All proceeds will go to the Hu-
mane Society.
The trail ride begins at 10 a.m.
and lasts until noon. The entry fee
is $10 per horse and riders are
asked to bring their own horses be-
cause rental horses will not be
available.
Also, it is mandatory that entered
animals are to have propf of
negative Coggins test... ,, ,
During the Family Fun QDyayb;,
ginning at 1:30 p.m., activities will
include pony rides, hay rides,
horseshoes, egg and spoon races on
horseback, horseback 6 musical
buckets, croquet, badminton, sing-


Alzheimer's
(Continued From Page 4)
your physician about all available
treatment options.
Q: I feel overwhelmed as a care-
giver. Is it common to feel this way?
A: Among all caregivers, those
who look after Alzheimer's patients
tend to report the highest levels' of
stress. That's why it is important for
caregivers to take time out for them-
selves, to turn to family and friends
for assistance, and to join local sup-


port groups.

The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision ,


Monticello News
Classifieds


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


a-longs and contests for the coolest
horse, and best turned out.
Prizes -Will be awarded.
Raffle tickets will also be avail-
able for $1 each or 22 for $20, with
the prize, a beautiful Bay yearling.
Barn related door prizes will also
be awarded, including halters, lead
ropes, feed and other horse-related
items.
"For those who come out and
don't want to participate in the trail
ride, we will have a large TV set up
in the barn for the guys who would
rather view the big FSU game,"
said Carswell.


She added that games will also be
conducted during the trail ride for
smaller children and those who can
not ride.
For further information or to
RSVP for lunch so sufficient food
can be prepared, call Carswell at
997-4000.
To get to the Hay Pond Farm,
from the Courthouse, go one mile
north on US-19 and take a right on
the Boston Highway, AKA, CR-
149 or Country Club Rd.
Take a right on Dills Road (C-
149A) and go 2.8 miles and take a
left on Hay Pond Farm.


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
S Great Pay, 'Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susanr or John at'(866) 413-3074 EOE


Arts & Craft Show


November 12 & 13, 2005
Saturday 9 am 5 pm Sunday 9 am 4 pm

Over 400 Booths of Handmade Arts & Crafts
Inside & Outside Exhibits Food Vendors
Clogging Performances
Spence Field Moultrie, Georgia
I (Sunbelt Expo Site)
4 miles SE of Hwy 319 on Hwy 133
$5 per Person
Children 12 and Under are Free with an Adult.
Free Parking No Pets Allowed
Information: 229-985-1968
Sinfo@ca Iicocrafts.com
www.ca l icocrafts.com


When you invest in our community,
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. ft c' a dividend that builds a


strong con immunity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844











PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005


Lifestyle


Covenant Hospice of Big Bend
will host special Veteran's Recog-
nition Celebrations in the area to
honor Jefferson County, and area
veterans for their years of service
and sacrifices.
Veterans Programs are planned
for 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1.0 at
the Jefferson Nursing Center; and
S 10 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 11 at the,
. Brynwood Center.
Other Ceremonies will be held in
assisted living facilities and at pri-
- vate homes.
Community Educator Leonia


Progress Energy

Donates $500 For

Club's Fall Festival


HAUNTED HOUSE at the Jefferson Elemen- make final preparations and, check to be
tary School Boys, Girls Club was a popular sure all works as planned. (News Photo)
spot on Halloween. Here, club members


Covenant Hospice To

Recognize Veterans


Parker can be contacted at 575-
4998 for the scheduled locations.
The community is invited to at-
tend any of these planned events.
Veterans will be presented with a
Hospice and Veteran's Partnership
pin and a certificate expressing
gratitude for their years of service
to our country by Covenant Hos-
pice staff and local military person-
nel.
Covenant Hospice saw a need to
recognize veterans who will not be
able to attend or participate in the;
traditional Veteran's Day events,
held in their communities .because.
of life-limiting illness, so Hospice
volunteers will visit them.


Dog Washers Needed Prior TO

Pet .Adoption Booth ,Events


SAWYER WIDER tries his
hand at the football toss dur-
ing the recent Aucilla Chris-
tian Acadermy Fall Festival.
(News Photo)



Homes Of

Mourning
Florence E. Willis
elorence E. "Berr." 'W.Ihs, age 80,-
a homemaker died Saturday, No-
vember 5, 2005 in Tallahassee, Flor-.
ida.
,Funeral Service will be at: 2:00pm
Wednesday, November 9, 2005 at
Central Baptist Church in Aucilla,
Florida. Family received friends
Tuesday, November 8, 2005 from
4:00 to 6:00 at the home.of her
daughter Darla Willis. Interment
will follow the services at Emory
Cemetery in Aucilla, Florida.
A native of Atco, New Jersey, and
a former resident of Penns Grove,
New Jersey. She has lived in Monti-
cello, Florida for the past 20 years.
She was a retired homemaker and a
member of Central Baptist Church.
She is survived by three sons,
Walter Willis of Toccoa, Georgia,
Warren Willis of Thomasville,
Georgia, and Steve Wisenbaker of
Brooksville, Florida, Five daughters,
Darla Willis of Monticello, Florida,
Susan Walker of Lamont, Florida,
Gail Bishop and Gloria Hatfield,
both of Tampa, Florida, and Gigi
White of Toccoa, Georgia, one
brother David Spacone of Tampa,
Florida, two sisters Martha Smith of
Bushnell, Florida and Margaret
Floyd of Old Town, Florida, Four
grandchildren Jason Grafals, Scott
Walker, Bethany Walker, and Angie
Woodruff, and 19 great grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in death by
her husband, Walter G. Willis.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

During their regular meeting, Hu-
mane Society members were ad-
vised that volunteers were
desperately needed wash dogs be-
fore each adoption booth at
Petsmart.
The booths are conducted every
other Sunday at Petsmart in Talla-
hassee and the volunteers, at least
three or four. for each booth, are
needed for either two or three hours
to wash dogs on the Saturday prior
to the booths.
Dates for the adoption booths
are: .Oct. 29, Nov. 12 and 26 and
Dec. 10.
Volunteers are also being sought
to conduct an adoption booth dur-
ing the Miccosukee Uniled Meth-
odist Church Bizarre, Nov. 26 from
10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Code Book
(Continued From Page 1)
adopted in the intervening years.
These later records were kept in
cardboard boxes in City Hall, re-
quiring that city staff manually sort
through the piles of documents
every time a pertinent question
-arose.
Not only was this process cumber-
some and time consuming, it was
fraught with the potential for error,
according to city officials.
The agreement with the Municipal
Code Corporation calls for the peri-
odic update of the book, thus ensur-
ing the information remains relevant
and accurate.
What's more, each council mem-
ber is expected to get a copy of the
book. Previously, only two copies of
the code book existed, making it dif-
ficult for officials and citizens alike
to research information.


Call Carswell at 997-4000 for ad-!;i
ditional information and/or to vol-.
unteer.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Gerrold Austin, director of the
Monticello/Jefferson Boys and
Girls Club, recently received a
check in the amount of $500 from
Progress Energy Corporation.
Progress Energy is a sponsor of


Legion Fish

Fry Friday

American Legion Post 49, will
host its annual Veterans Day Fish
Fry, 4-6:30 p.m., Friday, at the Le-
Sgion Hall on South Water Street.
The meal includes fried grouper,
cheese grits, coleslaw, hush pup-
pies, dessert and drink. Cost is $8
per meal.
Because of the recent hurricanes,
a. limited amount of fish is
available.
Only 150 dinners will be pre-
pared, so residents are encouraged
to purchase their tickets from an
American Legion member while
they are still available.


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the Fall Festival, a combined effort
of the three local Clubs.
The money was used to purchase
hot dogs, hamburgers, drinks, and
the like for this free festival for the
members and the children in the
community.
There was also face painting,
bobbing for apples, and more for
the children.


The event was held Friday after_
the JCHS Homecoming Parade.
"We are happy to support the
2005 Fall Festival at the Boys and
Girls Club and wish you much suc-
cess with this event," said Larry
Watson, Community Relations
Manager for Progress Energy.
Also, some of the money will be
used to purchase Walmart gift;
cards for the Club's Honor Roll
students, A/B and Good Conduct
students, and for the Youth of the
Month honorees.
A haunted house was set up for
the enjoyment of the children on
Oct. 31, using a few dollars from
these donated funds.


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DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


J g







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005 PAGE 7

Sunday School Express New


Program At First Methodist


FOUNDERS GARDEN CIRCLE members the hat "most representative of the Garden
took part in a hat decorating contest at the club. Linda Caminez is at right. (News
Monticello Garden Club fall general Photo)
meeting. Gloria Brown, left, won a prize for


Imbrunone Discusses Floral


Design At Club Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Garden Club held
its Fall General Meeting on Oct.
20, with Erica Imbrunone of Gel-
lings Floral Design as guest
speaker.
-Members .of the Camellia, Foun-
ders, Magnolia, and Mignonette
Garden Circles ere present. witrh
Club President Dianne Braren pre-
siding. ,
The Founders Garden Circle
decorated : the Center in colorful
Fall colors and flowers. Pumpkins
and baskets filled with fruits, vege-
tables, candles, and flowers made
for creative festive table center-
pieces. .
The Camellia Garden Circle was
in charge of Ways & Means, and
provided ;teins for purchase. Eve-
rything sold making a tidy profit
for the Garden Club and helping to
make a successful Fall General
Meeting.
Most everything for sale' was-
handmade; by-- Circle-' members.
Among the items, :ere, bird
feeders, decorated grapevine
wreaths, totes of flower bulbs, and
other items pertaining to gardening.
Imbrunone spoke about flowers
now in season, and which ones
hold up best in arrangements.
She brought with her a Black
Alocatia plant to offer as a gift to


the Club.
The plant has a natural waxy
shine making it a beauty for any
room in the house. 'It brought a nice
piece of change at auction, for the
treasury.
Imbranone also passed out a list-
ing of her favorite "Floral Quotes"
to the group ,-.
Braren introduced the past presi-
dents of the MNIGC and Circles and
'asked them to stand and-be reccg-
nized as the\ are. honored'for their
hard work and.diligence.
SMention was made of the passing
of. this year's vice president Sue
Reed. ""She will be fondly remem-
bered arid sadly missed by all: of us.
Our thoughts and .prayers are with
her family," Braren said.
Braren then took a moment to
thank Jan Wadsonrth for stepping
into Reed's position.
A Decorated Hat contest took
place during the Meeting with five
category winners chosen.
Winners were: Linda Demott,
Original or Handmade; Judi Per-
i.sQs, l Most Colorful: Jan Rickey,
'Most .' Extravagant: Jacque
Langford, Most Sophisticated, and'
Gloria Brown, Most Representative ,
of the, Garden Club.
Their gifts were the table center-
pieces.
Wadsworth thanked Braren, for
all the hard work and diligence she
has put into the making of the'


Sff TfHE FUTURE.

Please volunteer
today. : -



Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
S www.mdausa.org


MGC directory.
Braren was given a $50 J. C.
Penneys gift certificate.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Wacissa Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church will celebrate its Sec-
ond Annual Harvest Festival,
beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday, at
the new Wacissa walking track, at
SR 59 and CR 259.,
Spokesperson Connie Boland
said there would be many activities
on hand, including booths, games,
face painting, horse rides and a
Moon Walk for children to enjoy.
A "God's Garage Sale", where
everything from collectibles to
junk, can be located, will be on
hand.
The Share-The-Blessing Walk-a-
hpo.Q,.\ill begin at I I a in. and chil-;:
dren and adults will obtain pledges
and walk the track.
"All donations must be turned in
that day," said Boland. The funds
raised will go toward Hurricane
Relief. ,
An outdoor concert will be in pro-,
gress during the festival. The
Hammondtrees from Jacksonville,
along with local singers will enter-
tain.
All residents are invited to bring
a crock pot of chili and enter the
chili cook-off. The winner will be
determined by popular vote and all
who purchase a ticket are eligible
to vote.
Your Hometown Newspaper
Monticello News
Keeping You Informed
Of Our
Growing Community


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A celebration and open house to
introduce the Sunday School Ex-
press at the First United Methodist
Church is planned 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day, Nov. 13.
Sunday School Expressis a rota-
tion program, and innovative ap-
proach to Sunday School, where
children are grouped by' age and
move to a different. station, or class,
weekly for six weeks.
Stations include: a movie theatre
with theater seats and a popcorn
machine; a drama station where the
children will dress in costume and
act out the story; arts, and. crafts
with workshops that become excit-
ing places to learn; a learning cen-
ter using puppets to tell the stories;
computers with dedicated secure
space and equipment; and cooking
where e children learn to bake
angel cookies and the like.
After each six week rotation, a
new one begins with a new key Bi-
ble verse and Bible story.


Tickets for chili and hot dogs are
$2 each.
There will also be homemade egg
rolls available for sale at the Teen
Booth.
All arts and crafts vendors are
welcome to participate. There is no
fee for booth space.
Anyone wishing to participate in"
the walk-a-thon and contact Pam"
Fendrick at 878-8392.
Those wishing to be involved in
the concert can contact Pastor John
Cain at 997-4636 and to reserve a
booth space contact Boland at 997-
5270.


This Workshop Rotation is a vol-
unteer not-for-profit program spon-
sored by Workshop Rotation
churches and individuals who be-
lieve in freely sharing their ideas,
enthusiasm, and lesson materials
with others.
The program was originally cre-
ated by Neil MacQueen one of the
original developers of the Model.
There is a Board of Directors that
oversees the program's content,
funding, and creative direction.
It is aimed at children in Pre-K
through fifth grade.
The Sunday School Express, at
First Methodist, was created by the
adult Leadership Team.
Their objective was to stimulate
more interest in Sunday School
and stories of the Bible.
This came about when it was
discerned that the old Sunday
School approach was not reaching
today's children.
Some of the problems seem to be
bored children and teachers; declin-.
ing attendance; lack of Bible liter-
acy; and drab, uninviting
classrooms.
In addition, teaching has become
sedentary. The expensive curricu-
lum was only half used.
It was difficult to recruit teachers


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and they were often poorly pre--
pared.
All of these underscored the
need to reach new children and ex-
cite the others, and sparked the
development of the new program.








DREAMER (PG)
Fri. 4:25 7:20 9:40 Sat.
1:35 4:25 7:20 9:40 Sun.
1:35 4:25 7:20 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:25 7:20
NO PASSES

SAW 2 (R)
Fri. 5:40 7:55 10:15 Sat. -
1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55 10:15
Sun. 1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:40 7:55
NO PASSES

LEGEND OF ZORRO
(PG)
Fri. 4:20 7:15 10:10 Sat.
1:20-4:20-7:15- 1.0:10
Sun. 1:20 4:20 7:15
Mon. Thurs. 4:20- 7:15
NO PASSES

THE FOG (PG13)
Fri. 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sat. 1:50
4:40- 7:25 9:55 Sun. 1:50 -
4:40-7:25 Mon.-Thurs. 4:40 -
7:25

THE GOSPEL (PG)
Fri. 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sat.
2:00 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sun.
2:00 4:45 7:35 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:45 7:35

CHICKEN LITTLE (G)
Fri. 5:15 7:30 9:45 Sat.
12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45
Sun. 12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30
Mon. Thurs.
5:15 7:30
NOPASSES

JARHEAD (R)
Fri. 4:00 7:00 9:50 Sat. 1:00
4:00 7:00 9:50 Sun. 1:00 -
4:00 7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:00
7:00
NO PASSES


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Muscular Dystrophy Association
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:PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9,2005


Sports


Tiger Boys Post

Basketball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


- :Jefferson County High School re-
p1rts the schedule for the boy's var-
stty basketball team.
: All games following the Tip-off
-Tournament are at 7:30 p.m.
7Hoop action begins at the Tip-off
Tournament in Live Oak, 6 p.m.,
Nov. 17 and 19.
-Action continues at Lincoln, Nov.
28, there; West Gadsden, Dec. 1,
there; FAMU, Dec. 2, there; Mayo
Lafayette, Dec. 5, here; Maclay,
Dec. 8, there; Wakulla, Dec. 9, here
ai)d Suwannee County, Dec. 12,
here.
: The Elks Tournament at Lincoln
High, time to be announced, Dec.


16, 17 and 19 and the Reebok-CNS
Holiday Hoopfest, times to be an-
nounced, Dec. 26, 27 and 28.
New Year action begins against
Florida High, Jan. 3, here; Liberty
'County, Jan. 5, here; West
Gadsden, Jan. 6, here; NFC, Jan. 9,
there; Wakulla, Jan. 12, there;
Madison, Jan. 13, here and Maclay,
Jan. 17, here.
Mayo Lafayette,, Jan. 19, there;
Florida High, Jan. 24., there; NFC,
Jan. 26, here; Madison, Jan. 27,
there; FAMU, Jan. 31, here; Su-
wannee, Feb. 2, there; and Liberty
County, Feb. 3, there.
The season wraps up with the
District Tournament, 7:30 p.m.,
Feb. 7 and 7 p.m. Feb. 11, here.
Coaching the Tigers are Omari
Forts assisted by Quentin Adams.


'- ..
-. ," ' "


.. "


y^
. ^


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy girl's
cross country team finished fourth
overall in the Regional Champion-
ship over the weekend.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said that in
order to compete in the State
Championship, the girls had to
place in the top six teams, so they
surpassed their goal.
He added that it was a warm day,
the Lady Warriors running at high
noon. Though the course was hilly,
the girls ran strong.
Finishing in 10th place overall
was Olivia Sorensen with 20:58;
Tristan Sorensen came in 15th with
21:48; and Sarah Sorensen finished
at 17 with 21:59.
Nicole Mathis finished at 40 with
23:19; Tori Self, at 49 with 24:00;
Alex Searcy, at 58 with 24:43; and
Courtney Connell, at 59 with
24:48.
The Lady Warriors will compete
in the State Championship 8 a.m.,
Saturday in Dade City.
Nennstiel said there would be a
total of 24 teams there, the top six
teams from four regions.
"The highest we've finished at
State is 17th," said Nennstiel. "I
would like us to finish mid-pack
this year."
He added that the goal of the
Lady Warriors is to finish in the top


TIGER Jonathan Dady readies to kick the ball during a
JCHS practice session. (News Photo)



ACA Warriors


Blank Bell 30-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tigers won their Homecoming
game 10-7, over Taylor CounLy,
Friday, JCHS is now 4-6 on the sea-
son.
Lucius Wade was named the of-
fensive player of the week, and
Desrick Jones was named the de-
fensive player of the week.
The Tigers came out fighting,
scoring all 10 points in the first
quarter, and holding Taylor County
right down to the wire in the fourth
quarter when Taylor scored its only
touchdown.
LBreon Parker had a one-yard run


yards, just 26 yards shy of beating
the school record.
Stewart had six pass receptions of
nine attempts for 145 yards; Barn-
well, four receptions for 120 yards;
and Daniel Greene, five carries for
40 yards.
Defensively, Grantham had nine
tackles and two assists; Jason Hol-
ton had seven tackles and one inter-

- The Warriors go into post season
in Graceville Nov. 11 for the Dis-
trict Championship playoffs.


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Offensive


Jefferson County H.S
.... .


Lucius Wade!
Offensive


Desrick Jones
Defensive


to score the Tiger touchdown and
six pass attempts, with one comple-
tion for 15 yards.
Jonathan Dady kicked the 36
yards field goal.
Wade had 15 carries for 74 yards,
and Lamarkus Bennett, one carry
for 15 yards.

On the defensive side of the field,
Jones had 14 tackles, one assist,
four tackles for a loss and three
sacks.
Tim Crumity had three tackles,
four assists and one pass breakup;
Marcus Brown, four tackles; and
Demetrius Hicks, six tackles and
one assist.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy var-
sity football team wrapped, up its
regular season last week with a
30-0 victory over Bell, making the
season record 7-3.
Coach Dave Roberts named Kyle
Barnwell and Stewart Williams the
offensive players of the week and
Ben Grantham as the defensive
player of the week.
The first half remained scoreless
for both teams, but ACA came to
life in the third quarter scoring 14
points and 16 points in the fourth
quarter, while holding Bell to zero.
In the third quarter, Barnwell re-
ceived a 22 yard pass from Stewart
Williams for the touchdown, and
Casey Gunnels ran in for the sec-
ond touchdown of the quarter.
In the fourth, Gunnels scored on a
six yard run and Chris Tuten scored
on a pass reception from Williams.
Tuten also had an interception for
a 45 yard return and touchdown.
Gunnels had 20 caries for 70


Lady Bees

Basketball

Schedule Told

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School has re-
leased the schedule for the girl's
basketball team.
All game times are at 4 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
Action begins against Madison
Central School, Dec. 1, here; Tay-
lor County Middle School (MS),
Dec. 6, there; Trinity Catholic,
Dec. 8, there; Suwannee MS, Dec.
13, there and Crossroad Academy,
1:30 p.m., Dec. 14, here.
Havana MS, Jan. 5, here; Taylor
MS, Jan. 10, here; Crossroad Acad-
emy, Jan. 11, there; Trinity Catho-
lic, Jan. 12, here; Madison Central
School, Jan. 17, there; Suwannee
MS, Jan. 19, here and the final
game of the season, Havana MS,
Jan. 24, there.
Coaching the Lady Bees is Cor-
inne Stephens.


RAN HUNT
StaffWriter

Monticello Christian Academy
has begun gearing up for the bas-
ketball .season.
Basketball Coach John Dodson
said the boys began practicing the
basics of basketball last week, in-
cluding passing, dribbling, shoot-
ing and defense.
"Ten boys tried out and most
seem to be really enthusiastic," said
Dodson.
He added that though the boys
haven't played organized basket-
ball before, he has high hopes that


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the team will look good on the
court when the season starts.
"I'm really enthusiastic," said
Dodson. "I think they'll be good
and we'll be competitive."
There is only a boy's team be-
cause there was not enough interest
involved for the girls. They, how-
ever, will be learning cheerleading.
Tryouts for both the cheerlead-
ing squad and boy's basketball
were held last week.
Making the Chargers basketball
team were Phillip Payne, Ian Mor-
row, Ethan Morrow, Jared Bailey,
Brendon Hamilton, John Lacy,
Samual Lingle, Chip Gallon, R. J.
Lacy and Josh Baker.


JCHS Tells JV Boys

Roundball Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School JV
Basketball Games are at 6 p.m., un-
less otherwise specified.
Action begins at Lincoln, Nov.
28, .there; West Gadsden, Dec. 1,
there; FAMU, Dec. 2, there; Mayo
Lafayette, Dec. 5, here; Maclay,
Dec. 8, there; Wakulla, Dec. 9, here
and Suwannee County, Dec. 12,
here.
New Year action begins against

Florida High, Jan. 3, here; Liberty
County, 5:30 p.m., here; Jan, 5,
here; West Gadsden, Jan. 6, here;
NFC, Jan. 9, there; Wakulla, Jan.
12, there; Madison, Jan. 13, here
and Maclay, Jan. 17, here.
Mayo Lafayette, Jan. 19, there;
Florida High, Jan. 24., there; NFC,
Jan. 26, here; Madison, Jan. 27,
there; FAMU, Jan. 31, here; Su-
wannee, Feb. 2, there; and Liberty
County, Feb. 3, there, in the season


wrap-up.
Coaching the Tigers are Quentin
Adams assisted by Omari Forts.


Lady Tiger

JV Schedule

Lady Tiger JVs Basketball
games are at 5 p.m., unless other-
wise specified.
Action begins against Wakulla,
Nov. 15, there; Taylor County,
Nov. 17, here; Maranatha, Nov. 21,
here; Maclay, Nov. 22, here; and
Chiles, Nov. 29, there.
December games include: Wa-
kulla, Dec. 1, here; Maranatha,
Dec. 12, there; and Maclay, Dec.
13, there.
Action continues at NFC, 5 p.m.,
Jan. 5, there; and wrapping up the
season, Madison, 3 p.m., Jan. 13,
here.
Coaching the Lady Tigers is
Nikki Cooks assisted by Bill Brum-
field.


; ACA Girls Finish 4th In

i cross country Regionals


It'll be difficult, but this is their
final race of the season, so that has
them all charged up," he
concluded.


Bees Post Boys
Basketball
Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School has re-
leased the schedule for the boy's
basketball team.
All game times are at 5 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
Action begins against Madison
Central School, Dec. 1, here; Tay-
lor County Middle School (MS),
Dec. 6, there; Trinity Catholic,
Dec. 8, there; Suwannee MS, Dec.
13, there and Crossroad Academy,
2:30 p.m., Dec. 14, here.

Havana MS, Jan. 5, here; Taylor
MS, Jan. 10, here; Crossroad Acad-
emy, Jan. 11, there; Trinity Catho-
lic, Jan. 12, here; Madison Central
School, Jan. 17, there; Suwannee
MS, Jan. 19, here and the final
game of the season, Havana MS,
Jan. 24, there.'
Coaching the Bees is Steve Hall.


Tigers Beat Tayor

10-7 At Homecoming


Monticello Academy Posts

Roundball Roster, Schedule


NEED A LOAN $6,000 OR MORE

BAD CREDIT ACCEPTED CALL

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1-800-931-1168

INSTANT APPROVAL


Ben Grantham
Defensive


You're Holding On To A Precious Freedom


Information Is Vital!

Get It Here.


recommei BP..





:' )D/ EtTHHI




. .... .


ONE of the many posters on display at JCHS
during Spirit Week, stresses the power of


Tiger Pride. Tigers defeated Taylor County
at Homecoming and showed their pride.


WEDNESDAY was Rat Day during the Spirit
Week at JCHS. From left, Curtis Hightower,


:; .=. -- s s ;,j-,: .. "*. _-.- _-
pregnant girl; Kimyrian Kirksey as ghetto,
booty; Torrence Tucker as a cheerleader.
(


ASSURANCE CREDIT & LOANS
ASSURANCE AND TRUST, WE ARE ON YOUR SIDE. ARE
YOU IN NEED OF A PERSONAL OR BUSINESS LOAN TO GET
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WE CAN HELP!!
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Hurricane Season Is Coming!!!


"' T f rric-yon.t-
Don't wait till your left in the dark. Call Robinson's
Electrical Services for your Generac or Kolher Standby
Generator set and have on-demand power whenever you
need it. Get turned on and STAY turned on
Call 524-4162


JROTC Cadets lead the
High School Homecoming


Jefferson County
Parade Friday af-


ternoon. The event reportedly drew the
largest turnout in recent years.


1."..A:,.7"

4.A


V..;'.I

,,iN-


JONATHAN HOWARD turned out in his Sunday best for
jCHS Rat Day, Wednesday. (News Photos)



Catch it here at the

Monticello News


DUNHAM BODY SHOP

100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Point Work Frame Stroi htening


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005 PAGE 9





I'f


*


Neuromuscular


disease can say
no running,
walking
even
breathing.
Help MDA
help
people.

IvWW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


ANTWAN YOUNG, goes all out adding this curly wig to his
fancy dress on Rat Day.

Animal rights extremists would have us ignore human
deaths and maimings by cougars. Support wildlife management
programs involving sportsmen.


A-.

Y


WE TAKE THE
DVNTS OUT OF
- -ACCIDENTS


ILI -
, 1630 E..,JACKSON ST.-
(Cocated behind Langdale Auto MaW









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005


LEGALS
STAL OF I LORID\ lIEP\R1MlNINT
OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS NOTICE
OF INTENT TO FIND THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 05-1-NOI-3301-(A)-(I) The
Department gives notice of its intent to
find the Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for Jefferson County,
adopted by Ordinance No(s). 05-2 on


LEGALS
September 15, 2005, IN COMPLIANCE,
pursuant to Sections 163.3184, 163.3187
and 163.3189, F.S. The adopted Jefferson
County Comprehensive Plan
Amendments) and the Department's
Objections, Recommendations and-
Comments Report, (if any), are available
-for public inspection Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays, during


-, ~A~,aR


- ----... --


'4-
)


MALCOLM NORTON wears
JCHS Rat Day.


I



~


Jinn!


L all


this dramatic creation during


CHANDRA TUCKER is a
Day. (News Photos)


no nonsense housewife on Rat


S Chappell .
SChild Development Center : ,,'
1989 Commonwealth Lane (off C;p Cir N'/ rn', i-101 Z
89 Tallhassee, Florida
(850) 514-1200
Call for a tour!
7, *: iv^wwvv.chappellschools.con .
Ages 6 weeks to II years
Breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack provided
1 Open Monday Friday, 7:00a.m. to 6:00p.m. *
SBreakfast, Lunch and afternoon snack provided
V Free.Pre-Kindergarten Program for 4 year ol
Before and After School Program .



\ (

...B2. .... ..-..
r___---- --- --_----------- ---------
Bring in this / 1

coupon for 0 f
e_ i.------------------- --------,..a----


GlI JANE? No, Tyree Richard piling on the bling on JCHS
Rat Day. Check out the shoes for a fashion crime.




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Call Andy Rudd For


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Pickup & Delivery Service Available

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"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"





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(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0'717


I I I


Register's


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315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


)-ETTE-,R',B-)ODIES-
AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODYl'REPAIR~


frREE ESTIMTS4A


k REl--*P AR I-
OCATION SERVICE


FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATIONj
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
966 N. BARRER HII.I RD. LAMONT, Fl.
S 997- 416o ]
ANDY & TINA AMES. OWNERS


I I S -


Merill


LEGALS

normal business hours, at the Jefferson
County Planning Department, 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. Any affected person, as defined in
Section 163.3184, F.S., has a right to
petition for an administrative hearing to
challenge the proposed agency
determination that the Amendment(s) to
the Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan.
are In Compliance, as defined in
Subsection 163.3184(1), F.S. The petition
must be filed within twenty-one (21) days
after publication of this notice, and must
include all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201,
F.A.C. The petition must be filed with the
Agency Clerk, Department of Community
Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100, and a
copy mailed or delivered to the local
government. Failure to timely file a
petition shall constitute a waiver of any
right to request an administrative
proceeding as a petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a petition is
filed, the purpose of the administrative
hearing will be to present evidence and
testimony and forward a recommended
order to the Department. If no petition is
filed, this Notice of Intent shall become
final agency action. If a petition is filed,
other affected persons may petition for
leave to intervene in the proceedings. A
petition for intervention must be filed at
least twenty (20) days before the final
hearing and must include all of the
information and contents described in
Uniform Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A
petition for leave to intervene shall be filed
at the Division of Administrative
Hearings, Department of Management
Services, 1230 Apalachee Parkway,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060. Failure
to petition to intervene within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiver of any
right such a person has to request a
hearing under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S., or to participate in the
administrative hearing. After an
administrative hearing petition is timely
filed, mediation is available pursuant to
Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), F.S., to any
affected person who is made a party to the
proceeding by filing that request with the
administrative law judge assigned by the
Division of Administrative Hearings. The
choice of mediation shall not affect a
party's right to an administrative hearing.
-s- K. Marlene Conaway Chief of
Comprehensive Planning Division of
Community Planning Department of
Community Affairs 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard Tallahassee, Florida
12399-2100.
11/9, c
In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction December 10, 2005 @ 10:00am.
1996 Niss. Vin #1N4AB41D7TC807776;
1992 Toyt. Vin #.JT2SKI2E6N00 7239;
1987 Chev. Vin #1GCBSI4EXH2251994;
To be sold as is for Towing & Storage
charges. Conditions & Terms at Auction.
lDave's Towing 7261 East Washington St.
Mouticello, FI 32344 /(850) 342-1480.
11/9, c
NOI ICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday,
November 15, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the
NFCC Student Center Lakeside Room,
NFCC, 1000 Turner Davis Dr., Madison,
FL. A copy of the agenda may be obtained
by writing: NFCC, Office of the President,
1000 Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL
32340. For disability-related
accommodations, contact the NFCC Office
of College Advancement, 850-973-1653.
NFCC is an equal access/equal
opportunity employer.
11/9, c
IN IHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 05-255-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of DANNY LEE DAVIS,
Petitioner/Husband, and BARBARA J.
DAVIS, Respondant/Wife NOTICE OF
ACTION To: BARBARA J. DAVIS
Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN, petitioner's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before December 15, 2005,
and file the original with the clerk of this
said court either before service on


LEGALS
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on October 20, 2005 CARL D.
BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of Court. Jeri B.
Pearson Deputy Clerk.
10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, c
The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a Workshop at
2:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 15, 2005 at
the Jefferson County Public Library, 375
S. Water Street, Monticello, Florida, to
review the county's H.M.O. contract and
at 4:00 p.m. to conduct interviews for the
position of Ambulance/Fire Director. Felix
"Skeet" Joyner, Chairman.
11/9, c
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING: Jefferson
Clerk of the Circuit Court is seeking
applicants for DEPUTY CLERK I. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Room 10, County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida. Salary range is $8.87
to $11.10 (hourly rate) This is a part-time
(32 hours per week) position. Minimum
qualifications are: Ability to learn court
practices, procedures and rules in a timely
manner. Knowledge of business English,
spelling, grammar and punctuation.
Knowledge of data entry, typewriting and
use of other business machines. Ability to
understand and follow through on written
and oral instructions. Ability to establish
and maintain working relationships with
the public, staff, judges and attorneys.
Ability to operate a CRT and PC using
current programs and software. Typing
skills. Telephone courtesy and
information-gathering skills. Education
and experience needed: Graduation from
an accredited high school or possession of
an acceptable equivalency diploma. One
year typing and clerical experience. (A
comparable amount of training, education
or experience may be substituted for the
above minimum qualifications.)
Applications will be accepted until 5:00
p.m., November 21, 2005, at the Office of
Clerk of Circuit Court, address above.
Equal Opportunity Employer. Applicants
with a disability should contact the above
office for accommodations.
11/9, 16, c
I'be Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular monthly
meeting on November 10, 2005 at 7:00
p.m. The meeting will be held in the
Courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
US Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. Information
concerning the meeting is available at the
Jefferson County Planning Department,
277 N. Mulberry St., Monticello, FL.
32344, Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
heairing,.if notice of meeting or hearing is'-
required of such board, commission or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for' such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
11/9. c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR JEFFERSON
COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.
05-196-CA; MIDFIRST BANK Plaintiff,
vbs. KEITH R. CUNHA, AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is
hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment
of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this
cause on October 25, 2005, in the Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Jefferson
County, Florida, I will sell the property
situated in Jefferson County, Florida
described as: DESCRIPTION
(OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 116, PAGE
665) LOT 9, BLOCK "A", LLOYD
ACRES, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005 PAGE 11I


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION
18, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN' THENCE SOUTH
00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 49
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 18, A
DISTANCE OF 2154.77 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE
SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE
300.00 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF
INTERSTATE 10 (STATE ROAD NO. 8),
THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY 2397.13 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 04 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 46
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY AND A PROJECTION
THEREOF, OF A PROPOSED 60.0
FOOT ROADWAY, A DISTANCE OF
90.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE
SOUTH 04 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 46
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
PROPOSED WESTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY 240.0 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 02
MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 490.92
FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES
27 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 300.0
FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED
60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE
SOUTH 85 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 14
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
PROPOSED SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY 460.0 FEET TO A
POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT,
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY AND
SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID
PROPOSED RIGHT OF WAY CURVE
WITH A RADIUS OF 30.0 FEET,
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90
DEGREES FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF
47.12 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. and commonly known as:
50 Wild Turkey Run, at public sale, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are
held at the north door of the Jefferson
County Courthouse, on December 1st at
11 o'clock a.m. Dated this 28th day of
October, 2005 Michelle Garcia Gilbert,
Kass, Shuler, Solomon, Spector, Foyle &
Singer, P.A., P.O. Box 800 Tampa, Fl
33601-0800. If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this proceedings,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please
contact David N. Berrien, Leon County
Courthouse, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(850) 48h -1357 within 2 working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
11/2,9, c
HELP WANTED
The Jefferson County Teachers
Credit Union, 1500 W. Washington
St., Monticello, Fl. 32344, is now
accepting applications for a full time
teller/loan processor clerk.
Competitive wages and great benefits
package included. Employment
applications may be picked up at the
Credit Union office between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. All
applications must be received by
November 18, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
11/4, 9, 11, 16, c
Dept of Health Jefferson Co Health
Dept LPN Position #64028334 Annual
$24,979.50 $39,551.72. State
benefits, Licensure as a Practical
Nurse in accordance with Chapter
464, FS Fax App to (904) 636-2627 Or
mail app to State of Florida People
First Staffing Administration PO Box
44058 Jacksonville, FL' 32231-4058
Contact People First @
1-877-562-7287 or (850) 342-0170,
Ext. 121 Closes 11/11/05
Fingerprinting required EEO/AA/VP
Employer.
11/4,9, c


Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
EPI Ombudsperson/Lead Instructor
Wanted at NFCC. This Full time grant
funded position will serve as liaison
between NFCC, the local school
districts, and the FL Dept. of Teacher
Certification; teach a minimum of
three courses each semester; serve on
College Committees; participate in
College activities.. Teaching may be
night courses on NFCC campus
and/or at satellite locations.
Qualifications: Master's degree with a
least eighteen hours of graduate level
courses in Education and/or Reading
plus classroom teaching experience.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application
packets considered. A complete
packet includes: letter of interest;
resume and application; copy of
transcripts (unofficial okay).
Application and full job description
available at www.nfcc.edu. Questions
call 850-973-9491. Application packet


HELP WANTED
must be received by 11/15/2005. EOE
11/2, 4, 9, 11, c
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses.,Be part of a team working side
by side with other health care
professionals. RN/LPN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance, Vested Retirement after
six years, Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefit Package. If you prefer
per diem, rather than career service,
we also have OPS (non-benefited
positions). RNs $29-31, LPNs $19-22.
For additional information contact
Sharon McKinnie, R.N. at
850-922-6645, email:
mckinnie.sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11,
16,18,23,25,c


Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
FOR RENT
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
2 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, new
carpet, no pets, no children. $550
997-6653
11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, pd
2 bedroom, I bath Mobile Home on I
acre Ashville Hwy. $400 per month.
Pet Ok. Call Pam 997-4789.
10/26 tfn

FOR SALE
Whitney Spinet Piano $800; Love
Seat, earthtone colors $100. Both in
excellent condition 997-3105
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11 16, 18, pd
Rat Terrier Puppies 9 week old, Vet
checked and health certificates, 3
girls, 1 boy. Call Tom 997-1866.
Louie & Margaret Mills have shelled
pecans for sale. 1276 Clark Rd. Phone
997-2106.

FOUND
Dog hound. Dumpsters on Ashville
Hwy. 997-4719.
11/9, II, nc
SERVICES
Handyman painting ,- Int/Ext,
Gutters, Sheetrock, and house
cleaning, free estimates, call Billy &
Lidieth @ 997-5631.
11/9, 11, 16, 18, pd
China Painting Lessons. Call Mrs.
Rush 850-894-0265.
10/21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 1.1, 16, pd
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19,,tfn


Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn


SERVICES

Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church oA
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
WANTED
We need 2' chain link fence sections
that can be donated to the Jefferson
County Humane Society. Call the
Jefferson County Humane Society at
342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
10/12, tfn, c
Someone to graft pecan trees, medium
size to small, from a Desirable to an
Elliott, at least 100 trees. Call
997-4854.
10/28, 11/2, 4. 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,
pd


Pecan harvesting equipment,
specifically a shaker, harvester,
cleaner. Call 997-4854.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,
pd


WANT TO BUY
Want to buy real cheap used good
condition large storage shed. We will
pick it up. Call the Jefferson County
Humane Society at 342-0244. Leave a
message we will call you back.
10/12, tfn, c


Florida's Fastest Growing
Chevrolet-Buick Dealership is
in need of
Automotive Salespeople
* Finance & Insurance Manager Thainee
* 90,000. htha our top salespeolee made yea
Huge Itoly Agressiwe merin
Our SalesManag will woru not against you.
*Autlomoe SalMes ExpeimceNot Necessary
* Prewous Reail Eence (Appliance, FRmnimcs Fumiiure)
COME TRIPLE YOUR SALARY!
We offer-
Health Insurance 401K
Profit Sharing
Call Mr. Bo Bodiford today for
a confidential interview.

87m5-d200


MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY


Now Hiring 4th and 8th

Grade Qualified Teachers


CALL: 997-6048




Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~-3/2 $715 -4/2 $895- $50 dep.
2/2 Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


"You'll be Glad You Did"

ws 850-509-5004

www.DonnaHazlewood.com
250 S. Jefferson St Monticello, Fl 32344


* IN TOWN HOME. 3BAI2BA, new 10x12
Shed. $129,900
* 100 ACRES with Hwy 19 frontage.
Wooded wlcreek. Zoned Ag. 5. $700,000
* HOME ON 3 AC. 4BRI2BA with Pool.
Covered back porch. End of cul-de-sac. Leon
Leon County. $139,900
* FARMHOUSE on 20 acres with 3500sqft
Barn. Will divide. $922,500


Simply the Best!


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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com
Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's
Pond Area cleared and ready to build
on, nice trees, paved road $27,500 each
Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St.
$155,000
Magnificent Acreace-Sold Peary
Does It Again off Bassett Dairy Road in
Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding acres
with a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County-SOLD Peary


Does It Aqain 10 mostly open ac, corner
of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
A $150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
k room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
,10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
A 59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
A Choice Buildinc Lots in Town-Under
Contract on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000
kA Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
A Check Out This One! Under Contract8
acres with big doublewide and. small house
on a pretty old hillside close to Leon County
. off Julia Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
A .South near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet
.. location with lots of game $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
k. verville Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450


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Immediate openings for mechanically inclined individuals in TALLAHASSEE. Please apply online
at:
www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers
DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.
__ DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.
Wok ora eae


3/2 mobile home Lloyd AC b$650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
3/2 brick home w/pool, barn, 5 acre pas-
ture $1500 mo

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340


See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours

We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., NOVEMBER 9, 2005


THE engine compartment of this school bus
caught fire on North Jefferson about 2:10
p.m. Wednesday. Four students on the bus

None Hurt In Schoc

Bus, House Fires H(


A school bus fire and a structure
fire kept Fire Rescue on the hop in
recent days, with no reported inju-
ries.
A school bus caught fire in the
front of the engine compartment
about 2 p.m., Wednesday, on South
Jefferson Street.
A quick response to the call rap-
idly extinguished the fire.


were unhurt and moved to another vehicle.
(News Photo)


There were no injuries and the
four students on the bus at the time
were transferred immediately to an-
other vehicle.
About 6 a.m., Thursday, a call
came in about a house fire in Mon-
tivilla.
Neighbors report the fire oc-
curred at the Rocca residence on
South Hunter Lane.


Spokesperson Leslie Hunter said
it was her understanding that two
crews of County Fire Rescue re-
sponded, the oncoming crew and
the off-going crew, but she did not
know which volunteer crews from
the county volunteer fire. depart-
ments, had responded.
She added that the woman at the
residence had saved some of her
pets from the burning structure and
firefighters were able to save the
remainder of the resident's pets..
Additional details were not
available at press time.


TODAY I-IX.E POiCX
H4IS VIRST WOERD$S.
NTOT BAD FOR
AN IX--VA-ARINE.








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or visit www.asha.org.
AMERICAN
SPEECH-LANGUAGE
HEARING
ASSOCIATION
r 92-200
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- Catch it here at the

Monticello News


Applications Taken For


Cost Share Conservation


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts


the following items for recycling:


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Land users desiring to install con-
servation practices on land they
farm may make application for fi-
nancial cost-share assistance under
the Environmental Quality Assis-
tance Program (EQIP).
Applications for EQIP are taken at
the USDA Farm Service Center lo-
cated 1250 North Jefferson Street
-year round, however, applications
received after Dec. 15, 2005 will be
held and not evaluated until next
year.
EQIP offers 2-1-0 year contracts
.that provide cost-share incentive
payments ;to install conservation
practices, that help to solve re-
source related problems.
Because funds are limited, appli-
cations are evaluated and ranked
according to environmental priori-
ties established by the Jefferson
County Local Work Group.
This year's priorities are soil ero-
sion, water quality, plant and ani-
Smal health and irrigation water con-
servation.
Eligiblity includes crop land,
range land, pasture, forest land and
other farm or ranch lands used for
agricultural purposes.
Eligibility is limited to persons
who are engaged in the production
of food, fiber and other agricultural
commodities including trees and
other field-grown ornamentals.
Some of the practices eligible for
cost-share in traditional row-crop
agriculture include: Conservation
tillage (strip-till and no-till), critical
area planting, diversion, field bor-
der, grade stabilization structure, ir-
rigation water management and
conservation of existing irrigation
systems to improvedirrigation wa-
ter efficiency, nutrient
management, pasture and hay land
planting, pest management, traces.
Confined livestock include dairy,
poultry and swine operations which
may require cost-share for animal
waste storage facilities, composer.
or mortality freezer. A Compre-
hensive Nutrient Management Plan
must be developed and followed.
Practices eligible for cost-share on
grazing-lands include: brush con-
trol, critical area planting,
diversion, fencing, livestock water
facility to include well, pump, pipe-
lines, and water troughs, nutrient
management, pasture and hay land
planting and pest management.
Cost-share payments provide up
to 50 percent ( 90 percent for lim-
ited resource farmers) reimburse-
ment for installation of approved
practices.
Total cost-share payments are
limited to $450,000 per person for
.the life of the EQIP contract. All
reservation practices must meet the
technical standards and specifica-
tions of the USDA NRCS.
For more information on EQIP,
contact the local NRCS office at
997-4058.


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

Announces the regular school board meeting
to which the public is invited. The meeting
will be held at the:
Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building on
Monday, November 14, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district office at 1490
W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL. Monday
through Friday between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. A copy of the school board packet will be
available for review at the district office.




Homeowners with
money worries
may qualify for
low-interest loans
"Smar/A money" by Kimzbery Boss
LOANS: Direct lender played? Late house pay-
loosens its requirements for ments?Financial Problems?
homeowners who need Medical bills? IRS liens?l/
money now. does ? matter/
Have you been turned down If you are a homeowner
for a loan? Do you need more with sufficient equity, there's an
than $10,000 for any reason? excellent chance you will qual-
Are you paying more than ify for a loan- usua//p w/Ai,
10% interest on any other 24V/ou4/.
loans or credit cards? You can find out over the
If you are a homeowner and phone-and free of charge-
answered "yes" to any of if you qualify. Honey Mae
these questions, they can Home Loans is licensed by
tell you over the phone and the Florida Department of
qualify. /ao if you Financial Services. Open 7 days
High credit card debt? Less- a week to serve you.
than-perfect credit? Self em- 1-800-700-1242ext. 223




WEDEIRDER.C


















WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE


11025 EAST MAHAN
877-40I Monticello *Bordoer /
A877AN4550 2Border 1-10
MAHAN


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at'the Recycle Center)

Used. Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.