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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00088
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: November 4, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00088
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAI2ESVILLE, FL. 32611


Discuss
Underage Drinking
With Kids

Editorial, Page 4


Elizabeth Baptist
Installs
New Pastor

Photo, Story, Page 6


Bees Down
Baby Rattlers
34-24

Story, Page 9


ACA
Fall Festival
Winners

Story, PhotosPage 10


Friday Morning





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.88, 50 CENTSr .


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

S FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2005


City Mandates Graybar: Repair



internet System, Or Remove it


tract, which called for the equipment
LAZARO ALEMAN to be installed at the Fourth Street
Senior Staff Writer water tower.
It further claims that it can't prop-
After months of negotiations, the-erly test the validity of the system,
City Council on Tuesday night gave given this breach of the contract.
Graybar Electric Company an ulti- As for the test, Graybar claims
matum: either fix the Internet sys- that it's required to determine ex-
tem by Nov. 15 or remove it from actly why the signal isn't getting
city property. through to 80 percent of potential
The action came after City Attor- customers, as the contract calls for.
ney Bruce Leinback reported to the The question Leinback and Gray-
council the latest developments in bar's 'attorney were supposed to re-
his ongoing interactions with Gray- solve was which entity was to pay
bar's attorneys. for the test and the movement of the
Leinback said he had told the equipment from one to the other wa-
Graybar attorneys in no uncertain ter tower.
terms that the city would not pay for Bottom line, Leinback said, "We
the movement of equipment from have spent two months wrangling
.the Water Mill Road water tower to with them to get them to prove that
the Fourth Street water tower, nor the system works; and so far, noth-
would it pay for the test to deter- ingis happening.",- .
mine the viability of the systern. Meanwhile, he added, the leaves
Graybar claims that the equipment were falling from the trees due to
at the Water Mill Road water tower the advent of fall, and the area was
was installed without its consent and experiencing a period of dry
outside the requirements of the con- weather.


The importance of the latter two
considerations is that broad-band
service experts have posited that the


problem with the system -- the fact
that its signal reaches only a small
percentage of potential customers --


COUNCILMAN BRIAN HAYES,. right, a vocal
critic of Graybar, moved Tuesday night to
give the company an ultimatum. Here, he


is due to the interference of foliage,
i.e., trees.
Remove the trees or install above-


speaks with City Attorny Bruce Leinback,
who has been negotiating the dispute with
Graybar's attorneys. (News Photo)


treetop-tall antennas at each prob-
lematical residence and, voila!, the
problem is resolved, goes the
theory.
Moisture too is supposed to affect
the receptivity of the signal. City of-
ficials worry that, absent the leaves
and moisture, the validity of any
testing that Graybar conducts will
be suspect at best.
"I have concerns how accurate the
testing. will be, given we're into fal)
and we're into a drought," Leinback,
.said.
More importantly, the consultant
the city hired to advise it and moni-
tor Graybar's testing of the system is
telling city officials that, given the
equipment that Graybar sold the
city, "trees are going to interfere
with the signal."
"He doubts that any testing will
show that it works," Leinback told
the council, relating the consultant's
initial assessment.
Councilman Brian Hayes again-
(See Fix or Remove Page 2)


City Annexes 85-Acre


Property west Of Town


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

It's official now: the city is .85-
acres larger.
On Tuesday night, the City Coun-
cil approved the annexation of the
Riley Palmer property just west of
Holly Hills, formerly known as the
Tim Braswell prop erty.
The annexation agreement calls
for Palmer to undertake the exten-
sion of city sewer and water service
to Holly Hills for an estimated cost
of $158,783.
The city, in turn, will reimburse
Palmer for the cost of the extension
from a citywide service charge it
plans to assess new customers to the
system.
One question that arose Tuesday


Water
Sewer
TO Be
Extended

night was, what would happen if the
system service charge -- multiplied
by the 80 houses that Palmer ex-
pects will comprise the development
-- failed to generate sufficient funds
to cover the cost of the extension?
Or what if the construction of the
80 houses lags for years? How long
then before he could recoup his up-
front cost for the extension?
Palmer acknowledged that risk
was inherent in every endeavor that


he undertook as a developer. But he.
remained "cautiously optimistic"
that things would always turn out
for the better, he said.
Still, he wanted some kind of as-
surance.-- a mechanism, if you will
-- that would ensure him.of the abil-
ity to recapture his upfront cost in a
timely manner, he said.
As an example, Palmer suggested
a credit that could be applied to
other of his developments within the
city.
If, in other words, the city still
owed him money after a couple of
years because the current develop-
ment didn't proceed as expected,
could he not get a break on some
other development he might be pur-
suing somewhere else within the
city?
(See 85 Acres Annexed Page 2)


Healthy Start Shows Problems Here, Seeks Solutions


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Healthy Start sponsored a com--
munity event Oct. 25, to solicit
public interest in becoming a part
of the solution for Jefferson
County's health problems by pro-
viding the county's statistics that
were both alarming and informa-
tive.
George Hinchcliff, executive di-
rector for the Healthy Start Coali-
tion compared the community
social, economic, and health indi-
cators for Jefferson County with
other counties to determine that
Jefferson County has some of the
highest rates in the state for infant
mortality, child death rate, percent
of school aged children in special
education, divorce rates, rate of se-
rious mental illness, negative job
growth, and children living in pov-
erty.
He made the point in the presen-
tation tiat the infant mortality rate


is a statistic used to determine the
health of an entire community.
Florida is ranked in the bottom
third at 32nd in the country, with
-an infant death rate of seven per
1,000 births.
Within Florida, the tri-county
area experienced an infant death
rate of 16.2 for 2004.
The focus of the presentation
turned to health disparity in that all
infant deaths in 2004 were African
American.
In Jefferson County, there is a
huge disparity in women accessing
prenatal care in the first trimester.
An average 22 percent of African
American women in Jefferson
County enter prenatal care late or
receive no prenatal care at all.
Hinchcliff pointed out that this is
closely tied to the disparity in all
other health factors, citing the ef-
forts of the Racial Disparities
Health Task Force, sponsored by
the County Health Department.
Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill added that this group ad-.,


dresses health disparity from 'a
community health perspective, in-
cluding strategies to increase out-
reach and education to the African
American population, as well as
work with community partners to
develop programs such as YMCA,
hiking trails, Health and Career
Fairs, and the like.
Hinchcliff cited the use of the
Florida Department of Health's


GIS mapping capabilities that were
used to develop the Monticello
Shuttle Route, stating that this tech-
nology could identify target groups
by various health indicators.
The direct relationship between
economic development and better
community health was discussed in
detail, as well as how growth could
be stimulated by providing services
to increase the skill level of the



workforce.
It was noted that the Health De-
partment provides extensive family
planning services and obstetrical
care; it is the only provider of the
services in the county and the
transportation issue was discussed
in detail in terms of high-risk
women encountering barriers to ac-
cessing care.
Medical Reform was discussed in


detail; members were made acutely
aware that Reform would most
likely mean that the Medicaid eligi-
ble population would be forced to
look for out-of-county services
(which are already inaccessible
with transportation barriers) be-
cause the only local provider might
lose its ability to provide obstetrical
services and primary care due to
-(See Healthy Start Page 2)


Jury Duty Scam Could Lead To Identity Theft


Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
alerts readers to a jury duty scam,
which could lead to identity theft.
Has anyone called you recently to
let you know you missed jury duty?
It could be a scam, Boatwrighl
warnris.
Clever thieves continue to deceive
innocent victims with the intention
of stealing an individual's identity,
and the jury duty scam is one of the
latest, Boatwright says.


He relates that other states are re-
porting that a person claiming to be
a Clerk's Office employee is calling
innocent people, telling them that a
jury summons in their name has
gone unanswered, and that an arrest
warrant has been issued.
The caller than suggests the he or
she can verify the arrest warrant, it
the unsuspecting person provides
some personal identifying informa-
tion, such as .a social security num-


ber, birth date, or credit card
number.
Much of this information can eas-
ily be used to commit identity theft.
"While this scam has not reached
Jefferson County, if you ever expe-
rience this type of call, hang up, and
call my office immediately," Boat-
wright warns.
He can be reached at 342-0218.
"The Clerk's Office does not call
summoned jurors. Please do not


give out information to anyone you
don't know," Boatwright states.
It is only natural that a person may
be inclined to give out personal in-
formation under the threat of an ar-
rest, but in reality, court officials
will never request personal informa-
tion over the phone.
This scam has been reported in
many states, and many more inno-
cent victims could be at risk if they
are not aware of this threat.


RILEY PALMER addresses the City Council
Tuesday about his proposed development
just east of Holly Hills. Palmer will finance


4- .


the City's extension of sewer and water serv-
ice, and the City will reimburse him later.
(News Photo)








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005


Fix Or Remove System


(Continued From Page 1)
expressed astonishment that Gray-
bar, a national company with a long
history in the field, would be igno-
rant of the trees' effect on the
system.
"I can't believe they didn't know
that their signal wouldn't go through
foliage," Hayes said, somewhat fa-
;etiously.
"There's a lot of questions," Lein-
back agreed.
Mayor Julie Conley opined that,
given everything that had happened
so far, plus the consultant's advice,
she was reluctant to pursue the mat-
ter any farther.
"I don't even want to pay our con-
sultant to go with Graybar to check
the equipment." Conley said.
It was at this point that Hayes
move to give Graybar an ultimatum,
a measure the council approved
unanimously.
As to what the city will do about
the monthly fee of $2,060 it is pay-
ing AT&T for the Internet service
connectivity, that matter remains to
'1be resolved.. .


AT&T next," Leinback said. Mean-
ing if Graybar couldn't resolve the
signal problem and the equipment
had to be removed by Nov. 15.
A small group of city officials
and staff spearheaded the effort to
get the city to offer Internet service.
The group held a series of work-
shops and meetings with Graybar
representatives during a period of a
year or so before recommending the
project to the City Council.
At least one member of the com-
mittee has apologized for his part in
the affair.
"Forgive me, I should have never
gotten you into this," Charlie
Colvin, the city's technical service
engineer, told the council last
month. "...I wish I had been more
diligent. But I took a lot of people at
their word for what they were say-
ing and they were being so helpful
in doing it, that it is very disappoint-
ing to me."
Other members of the committee
included City Superintendent Don
Anderson, City Clerk Emily Ander-
son and Councilman Tom Vogelge-


Sen. Rod Smith To Meet

Democrats Here Monday


Sen. Rod Smith, Democratic Can-
didate for Governor, will make a
campaign stop in Monticello 1 p.m.,
Monday, Nov. 7 at the Avera-Clarke
House.

Smith will meet with County resi-
dents on the patio of the Avera
Clarke House, 580 West Washing-
ton Street.
In other local Democratic Party
news:
*A Precinct Party for Democrats
in .Precinct 9 will be held 6 p.m.,
Tuesday, Nov. 15, at the home of
Eleanor and John Hawkins, on-
North Jefferson Street. Call 997-


SEN. ROD SMITH, Democratic Candidate for Governor vis-
its with Betsy Barfield during a recent Meet 'N Greet in the
rnt n-w /M(NwqC DPhnt*n)


2863 for information.
*A group of Democrats will pro-
vide a Holiday Dinner, noon, Thurs-
day, Nov. 17, at the Senior Center.
*A Christmas Party will be held 7
p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 13, at the
Chamber of Commerce.
*Also in December, at least eight
locals will attend the State Demo-
cratic convention in Orlando.
*In January, the Jefferson County
Democratic Party is planning a Pre-
cinct Party for Precincts 11, 12, and
13.
Rep. Will Kendrick has been in-
-vited to speak. Watch for times and
locations.


. "We're going to be addressing sang. '. 5f nx)


leaithn Department collecting Healthy Start Problems

0ood To Restock Shelves (Continued From Page 1) tion when asked for its commit-
bk-o fniindin r cu'nts m'nt tn b q a tnt bt f tho rf-. r


Much food has gone out to local
;'RAN HUNT Florida citizens for hurricane relief
Staff Writer aid, and other Floridians in need,
and the shelves need. to be replen-
* The Jefferson County Health De--ished for the Fall.
apartment has begun collecting -
:items for the Second Harvest Food- Donations can be made in the
"Drive. collection barrel in the lobby of the
Spokesperson Bonnie Mathis said Health Department until Friday,
.the event is to refill the shelves of Nov. 18.
the Second -Harvest of the Big For further information contact
'Bend with nonperishable items. Mathis at 342-0170, ext. 130.


-85 Acres Annexed To City


(Continued From Page 1)
; After much discussion and scru-
iny by City Attorney Bruce Lein-
lack, it was decided that such a
.scenario was well within the realm
o.f possibility.
,In fact, the cl" hi1t.. ly
-voted to amend the contract to in-
.clude just such a provision.
As part of the deal, the city will
pursue a Comprehensive Plan
"-Amendment to rezone the property,
,:which is currently zoned four units
:..per acre. Palmer wants to develop
,::the property at the much lower den--


sity of one house per acre.
The city also agreed to provide
sewer and water service to the de-
velopment, which Palmer character-
izes as a upscale subdivision that
will be called Crooked Creek.
Palmer's company is presently cut-
ting roads into the property and
thinning and-harvesting the trees,
preparatory to beginning the con-
struction phase.
The property, which adjoins US
Highway 90 on the south side, be-
gins just west of Holly Hills and
stretches west for a ways.


e sa xunuing cut.
With so many issues that affect
the same families in Jefferson
County, the meeting concluded
with the overwhelming realization,
- that all issues were intertwined and
directly influence, each other (pov-
erty, education, domestic violence,
workforce quality, economic,.
growth, and community wellness.)
The group was mobilized into ac-


planning component to develop
community outreach and education
and strategies to address the issues.
Attendees were asked for their
feedback on what the priorities
should be in terms of developing
strategies.
Once feedback is gathered, the
Healthy Start Coalition will facili-
tate the focus groups.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005 PAGE 3


LOCAL ARTIST Gail Valderrama, displays Down, Friday i
her pastel paintings at the Home Town Get suited to all ag

Volunteers, Donation

For Marines At Christ


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Advocate Beth Hall, of Lloyd, re- -
ports that the third rotation of Ma-
rines is underway with thousands
of Marines coming home and thou-
sands more arriving in Iraq and Af-
ghanistan.
For many of these young men
and women, this will be the first
Thanksgiving and Christmas they
will be away from home and
family.
Others will be spending their sec-
-ond holiday in a row in a war zone..
And it is an unfortunate fact that
some of these .young men and
women will not receive mail and


Power
LIFT
CHAIR
Your Choiceof Fabric
$ 95


packages from friends and family
members.
For the second year in a row, two
Marine Corps moms and many
other volunteers hope to make a
difference for our Marines through
Operation Santa USMC.
Operation Santa USMC will pro-
vide battalions of Marines with
Christmas-in-a-Box.
Battalions are made up of four or
more companies, and each com-
pany has a number of platoons with
30 or more Marines.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Elementary School
(JES) students were treated to an
educational and motivational anti-
-. drug assembly presented by the Jef-
ferson County Sheriff's Office




Third Place winners announced at



ity, unity, and performance.
highlightinEvery day there week long stickers,
eight. A variety of activities ribands, or ribbons for the stued
xes took place. (News Photo) dents; in addition, the writing
teacher, Norma Shotwell focused
theme s with First, Second, andti-




is Soughta drugtheme.

3m a stL Im e T Ray Lacy of the Sheriffs Office
S for arranging for two great deputies
Church groups, organizations, and Benji, the drug-sniffing dog, to
clubs, employer groups, and the attend the JES assembly and to
like, are needed to sponsor platoons Sdrug heeriff David Hobbs for all his on-
and fill their boxes. going support and materials.
Also needed are volunteers to Deputy Sally Cole, the keynote
sew the Christmas stockings, dowria- speaker, educated students about
tons to help with the postage, and the various kinds of drugs, gave
help filling boxes; h t hypotheticalsituations, and the ap-
Spropiate responses the students
All boxes need to be mailed by should give, in their refusal to dof
for arranging for two great deputies
Troops from all faiths are in-ill their boxes going support and materials.
eluded.


Tax deductible donations can be


sent to the Marine Corps Family
Each platoon will receive a box Foundation.
containing individual filled Christ- To volunteer to help, or to make
mas stockings for each Marine plus a donation, or for more
games, food, decorations, and treats information, contact Hall at 997-
for the Marines to share. 6873 or 445-5611.












FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, .onA IV

ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements !V


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee will
meet at
9:00 a.m. Novem-
ber 9, 2005, at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North Mulberry
...... ..... S street. '",,


She also fielded a question/an-
swer session which reinforced the
theme of "Just Say NO To Drugs."
Deputy Anthony Champion and
Benji, an energetic, three yeai old,
Golden Labrador Retriever drug
sniffing dog gave a working dem-
onstration of how he searches out
and locates drugs.
Deputy Champion explained that


Benji and he worked together as
partners and that they rewarded the.
dog when he found drugs.


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-.110 1 1 1 ft-


..O


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

R RON CICHON
IDPublisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News:
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Discuss Underage,


Drinking With Kids


While fall means students are
.again hitting the books during the
week, it also means Friday-nighl
.parties, dances, extracurricular ac-
ti'vities. and other events where
"teens may be tempted to drink alco-
'hol.
That also means it's a good time
Tfor parents to talk with their children
.about drinking, according to family
therapist Lonnie Carton, Ph.D., for-
mer director of Family Support
Services for Boston Partners in Edu-
cation, and vice president of teen
and family resources for
WARM2KIDS, a Web-based family
and school support system.
By helping their children get the
facts and make the right decisions,
parents not only help fight underage
drinking, but they underscore the
importance of personal responsibil-
ity in the many choices their chil-
dren will make. Dr. Carton offers
these tips to help parents address the
tssue of underage drinking. In talk-
ing with your teens:
Let them know that rules are
.made to protect them, not to punish
them.
Remind them to be in control of
:'themselves and to base whatever de-
*cision they make on what they know
lis right.
Tell them that if they face a
'situation they know isn't safe, to call
you immediately, no manner the time
or circumstance and assure them
that when they do, they'll be praised
for making the smart decision.
In fact, parents should begin talk-
ing with their children about drink-
ing long before their teenage years,
according to Carton. "Many times,
.eens will have heard or think
they'll have heard everything they
need to know about drinking," she
'emphasizes. "But by talking with
our children about drinking before
,their teen years, we can best prepare
them to make the right decisions
,when faced with peer pressure to
Drink asteenagers."


Carton recommends parents fol-
low' these simple guidelines:
Be a good role model. If you
drink, do so responsibly.
Be factual when discussing
drinking with your children. A
"scare" can become a "dare."
Clearly state your positions and
rules about drinking.
Practice the fundamentals of
good parenting, such as building
self-esteem and encouraging two-
way communication.
Know your children's friends
and their friends' parents.
Seek professional help if you
suspect your child has a drinking
problem.
"Parents are critical," Carton con-
cludes. "In fact, a recent Roper Or-
ganization survey found that of all
the influences we know, parents
clearly have the greatest impact
when it comes to young people's de-
cisions about drinking."
Canion is -an ad\isor-for the ".'5am-
ily Talk About Drinking Program"
which is celebrating its 15th anni-
versary of helping parents prepare
for conversations with their children
about the subjects of peer pressure,
self-esteem, underage drinking and
teen drinking and driving.
The free guidebook and video of-
fer advice to parents on how to en-
courage open, honest communica-
tion with their children on this issue.
The' "Family Talk", parent guide-
book is available in English, Span-
ish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnam-
ese, and the video is available in
English and Spanish.
This program has been distributed
by the American School Counselor
Association, Optimist International,
Association of Junior Leagues Inter-
national Inc., and the Jaycees,
among other organizations.
The "Family Talk" guidebook,
which is provided as a community
service of Anheuser-Busch, is avail-
able for viewing and downloading at
www.familytalkonline.com or by
calling 1-800-359-TALK (8255).


is Lottery Ticket

Purcha se Appropriate?


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

People say to me, "I spend a dollai-
bn a lottery ticket from time to time,
ivhat's the big deal?" And I usually
say to them, "Because it's a dollar
squandered. It's a dollar that could
have been saved, invested, or spent
on something of real value. It's a
Dollar that could have been given to
those in need. Instead, it's a dollar
given to the god of luck."
I believe gambling in all its forms
is a sin. In other words, it is intrinsi-
cally evil, whether one gambles a lot
pr a little all of which is relative by
the way.
If indeed I am correct in believing
gambling is a sin and my view is
consistent with some two thousand
years of church history than how-
ever much you gamble, you are still
doing something God condemns.
So buying a one dollar lottery
ticket and saying it's no big deal is a
bit like only going to first or second
base with a person not your spouse


and claiming your activity is not im-
moral.
The morality of a behavior is not
determined by the size of the stakes.
You cannot find moral reasoning
like that in Scripture.
I admit that, buying a lottery ticket
is not as bad as murdering your un-
cle. My understanding of biblical
theology teaches me that buying a
lottery ticket will not send me to
eternal damnation. Neither will us-
ing profane and vulgar language.
But is anyone really prepared to
argue that using profane and vulgar
language is a good thing that pleases
God?
Again, how we measure transgres-
sions against God and how He
measures them are two different
things. But an activity, if it is sin, is
sin, whether in one bite or in the
whole loaf. I don't buy lottery tick-
ets because I believe it is an offense
to God..
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., book
author and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
pens this column, which appears in
92 newspapers.)


From Our Photo File


LIBRARY STAFF dressed in costumes repre-
sentative of a Bulgarian Pawn Shop, cele-
brated Library Week, in May, 1990. L-R:


Opinion & Comment


Short Takes & Other Notions
Shor Taes &othr Noion


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

, Monticello is a relatively quiet and-
peaceful place. So far, we seem not
to have been much affected by the
sea of violence that surrounds us.
I have been a bit shocked by three
news items recently. .A man
.punched a window out of an air-
plane, a woman stabbed another
over who got to use the microwave
-first,- and the 'subje'cr of b National
Public Radio interview of a woman'
at the Waffle House in Lake City.
What could possibly make you so
mad to put all passengers in the
plane in mortal danger? This ranks
right up there with terrorist activity
in my book. The terrorist who failed
in lighting his stinky old tennis shoe
afire, was 'subdued' by a long armed



English
The Lexington Institute unveiled
the first-ever study comparing how
Florida and other states are re-
sponding to "No Child Left Behind"
(NCLB) requirements affecting'
English Language Learners. The
study found that, overall, NCLB is
having a positive effect on how im-
migrant students are taught in Flor-
ida classrooms. .
Of the seven states in the study,
Florida's English learners have made
the most progress in math and lan-
guage arts since 2002. Florida is
relatively unique because its schools
often teach English and Spanish side
by side, and emphasize teaching.
English early in students'
education's.
Overall, the study found that most
states do a significantly better job


basketball player with a fire extin-
guisher. He wound up with a big
blue knot above his eye and I'll bet it
was a result of being "subdued." The
basketball players' response is vio-
lence that I can condone. I will
quickly be a member of a
"subduing" party should anyone try
to damage a flight that I am taking..
However, I fail to see how a place.
in any microwave line merits even a
harsl, word, much less a stabbing.
There is so: -much .more, creative
ways to register your complaint.
Linda Tripp spilled the beans about
Monika Lewinsky and former Presi-
dent Clinton. I read that many peo-
ple felt that she no longer deserved
their friendship. Merited or not, tell-
ing on her former friend Lewinsky
was an act of betrayal too.deep to
.stomach. One of her former friends


said "yes. it is true she has a very we become all stirred up over
shiny coat." That is a southern put- things, we usually remain quite nice
down. I'll bet the microwave com- to each other. I know both the City
batants were not southern. Council and the County Commis-
The subject of the Lake City inter- sion have a civility pledge, and it is
view, was the new gun law in Flor- usually unnecessary to remind any-
ida. Essentially it allows anyone one of this.
who feels "threatened" to shoot the Most people wave as you pass.
offending party. Monticello has a particular wave
The woman in Lake City said that calls for extending the index
something like "I think it is a great finger of your right hand, as a friend
idea. So all you women who, are goes by. I don't know if we invented
sleeping with. someone ,else's us- t, but it is universally used here. '
band, "You know who you are!" It seems to me that this anger is
."You had better look out!" Do- It seems to me that this anger is
"You had better look out!" Do- more evident in larger places where
mestic violence is nothing new, but more ide t i larger places where
the addition of the legal fire power I know we are.poised to grow and
is pretty frightening. I hope our get larger. Lets get to know the new-
Monticello offended do not find out get larger. Lets get to know the new-
Monticello offended do not find out c e s ty e o w i
comers so they learn our ways in-
about this law. stead of changing them. Remember
For the most part, Monticellans everyone the "Monticello
are very polite people. Even when t ve
--wave."


come level.
In addition, there is another sub-
group for students with Limited
English Proficiency,. which is argua-
bly the most controversial category,
because it is largely defined by stu-
dents' test scores in the first place.
The study also critiques how
NCLB regulates the formulas that
each state uses to measure student
achievement. It reviews NCLB's re-
-quirements side by side with real re-
sults to date, pointing out which
states are likely to meet NCLB goals
in the coming years, and which are
not.
Finally the study offers policy
makers a detailed blueprint for im-
proving these formulas to make the
requirements fairer for all state.
NCLB is scheduled to be re-


done to comply with NCLB, and
how successful those changes have
been.
The study -- "Making Uneven
Strides: State Standards for Achiev-
ing English Language Proficiency
Under the No Child Left Behind
Act" -- is authored by Christine Ros-
sell, one of the nation's most promi-
nent experts on English language
learning and a professor at Boston
University.
The report focuses on a lynchpin
of the NCLB law -- its rigorous ac-
countability system for students'
academic progress. No Child Left
Behind requires schools to show
adequate results for all students, and
also for each of a number of sub-
groups broken down by such factors


as students' sex, ethnicity and in--authorized by Congress in 2007.


measuring English fluency and
tracking students' progress toward
fluency as a result of NCLB.
Further, English instruction pro-
grams are now making substantially
more progress when it comes to
teaching English than before NCLB
was passed.
This study is expected to have a
. dramatic impact on the debate over
NCLB, which has become a political
lightning rod because it places seri-
ous implications on the progress
schools making teaching English
fluency.
In addition to Florida, the paper
analyzes the six other states with the
largest populations of English learn-
ers Arizona, Illinois, California,
Massachusetts, New York and
Texas. It details in a side-by-side
comparison what each state has


Perception Leads To Tensions


The work ethic of new entrants
into the labor market is under as-
sault. Members of this group, la-
beled the "Entitlement Generation" -
those born between 1979 and 1994 -
have been described as impatient,
self-serving, disloyal, unable to de-
lay gratification and, in short, feel-
ing that they are entitled to
everything without working for it.
Wayne A. Hochwarter, an associ-
ate professor of management in
Florida State University's College of
Business, recently conducted a study
to see if the perception of entitle-
ment exists in organizations and, if
it does, how it affects employees at
work. His research, which examined
the attitudes of nearly 600 employ-
ees across a wide range of occupa-
tions, indicates that perceptions of
entitlement are alive and well in
many companies. For example,
Hochwarter found that 55 percent of


workers either agree or strongly
agree with the statement "Many em-
ployees act as if they are more de-
serving than others at work without
paying their dues."
Some comments from survey re-
spondents illustrated this opinion.
"I don't know where these kids
come off thinking they are entitled
to things it took me 20 years to get,"
a Chicago management consultant
stated.
"College grads aren't willing to do
the grunt work necessary to learn
the job but they sure want the
perks," added a vice president of hu-
man resources in Memphis, Tenn.
When employees reported that
others in their work group acted en-
titled, the following effects were ob-
served:
Job satisfaction was lower.
Employees were not able to con-
centrate fully on their work.,


Workers were less passionate
about their work.
Employees were less likely to
keep their word.
Workers acted less empathetic
towards others.
Employees were less likely to
offer social support to coworkers.
Workers reported more tense re-
lationships on the job.
Employees were more prone to
report more workplace depression.
Hochwarter's findings also indi-
cate differences across the age
groups. For example, younger em-
ployees (those ages 30 and younger)
reported more perceived entitlement
than older workers (those ages 50
and older), and attitudes reflected
these disparities. For example,
younger employee reported 600 per-
cent more job dissatisfaction than
older employees and 50 percent
more job tension when coworkers


acted entitled.
"It is clear that perceived entitle-
ment is a greater threat to younger
employees than older ones,"
Hochwarter said. "Typically, older
employees are more secure and have
gotten what they want out of their
hobs. Since many younger employ-
ees have no, they are afraid that oth-
ers are going to use manipulation to
get what they want, rather than
working for it."
Further, Hochwarter notes that the
Entitlement Generation brings a
great deal of talent, energy and tech-
nical savvy to the workplace. How-
ever, he cautions that "managers
who assume all employees have the
same needs at work are going to
have a difficult time.
"It is necessary to develop long-
term career plans for all employees,"
Hochwarter said. "However, it is in-
(See Tensions Page 5)


Cheryl Turner, Rita Barker, and Kelvin
Groover. (News File Photo)


Learners Benefiting








Ep-l.That plan, according to George,
City ,A b T A dre s consisted of a pretty inclusive docu-
Sment showing that the applicant had
Sewer inflow Proble an iscuss
lbf IS Pl followed all the appropriate investi-
gative procedures in determining the
Seer I fl w roleproblem and its causes.
-... nmong other things, the study
LAZARO ALEMAN identified all wetlands and other en-
Senior StaffWriter vironmentally sensitive areas within
S o t W tthe service area and showed how the
Phase one of the city's$1.5 mil- _inflow-and-infiltration problem im-


lion sewer rehabilitation project is
expected to get underway soon, ac-
'cording to consultant engineer Rob-
-ert George, of George and Hutche-
son Engineering, Inc.
* George told the City Council on
;Tuesday night that the bid opening
on the project is tentatively sched-
'uled for late December and the rec-
ommendation for the successful
contractor will come before the
council in early January.
He said work on the system
should begin soon after that.
After years of trying for state
funding to address the inflow-and-
infiltration problems at the wastewa-
ter treatment plant, the Department
of Environmental Protection (DEP)
finally awarded the city a $1.5 mil-
lion grant for that purpose in April.
The funding is specifically ear-
nmarked for the identification and
correction of the inflow and infiltra-
tion problems.
The problem of excess stormwater
flowing into or infiltrating the city's
sewer system and treatment plant is
particularly notable during heavy
storms.
These ,water surges ultimately en-
ter the city's wastewater treatment
plant, which then is forced to work
harder and longer to handle the in-
creased volume.
Notwithstanding these periodic
surges, it is George's assessment that
the treatment plant has never real11
operated over-capacity. That's be-
cause,, although designed for, a mil-
lion gallon capacity; it averages
about half a million gallons daily, he
says.
/He offers that a redundancy factor
built into the plant diverts the extra
water into a lined pond for a while.
Why then the urgency to correct



Tensions
(Continued From Page 4)
creasingly impo rtant toQ ,do sq,,With
employees', fresh out of school.
'These indi iduals will not put up
with the 'ambiguity that saturates
most work settings. If they don't
know n\ here they can get, how to get
there, and what it will get them, they
are not going to 'buy in' to The objec-
tives of the firm."


dpaacap on these and on the treatment
plant.
M.. Once the DEP accepted the waste-
water facilities plan, the next step is
the engineering phase, which is
*] 'about to kick in. This is where the
I u A 1- engineer floats,.television cameras
Sl| down the sewer system and pin-
S" points all the problem areas, such as
S : cracks or breaks in the pipes.
'- The engineer also evaluates the
"i existing pipe size to make sure that
S'' these are adequate to carry the nec-
S : essary flows and that they are not
S- inadvertently contributing to the
/ DEP stipulations limit the con-
ENGINEER ROBERT GEORGE, and City Superintendent Don struction or repairs to $750,000 per
Anderson discuss sewer rehabilitation project. (News vear, according to George.
Photo)
the inflow and infiltration problem? re-circulated. It's not efficient. It's
"The urgency is that you're intro- using more energy. And the long- .
during an additional flow into the term effect is that you're wearing out A .
system that doesn't need to be the equipment."
there," George explains. "So the The first step in the process to ac-
system is working longer and harder quire the DEP funding entailed the
than you want it to... The water is., formulation of a waste after facili-
also having to be re-circulated and ties plan that George's firm devel-.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4,2005 PAGE 5



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and/or Pancreatitis. As a result the manufacturer has
Announced a proposed settlement. Call us today toll free at
1-877-746-4369 to discuss your potential ZYPREXA claim.
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Zyprand/oisa reagisAstered remark of Elt Lilly and Company.





The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


Catch it here at the
Monticello News


The Jefferson County Recycling Proqram accepts
the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles., jars'etc. (clear,; brown ,& green)" J

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at,
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
*for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further'-
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call,
Don Anderson at 342-0154.




Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


h











PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005


Lifestyle


N


Copeland, Residents Attend

Community Educators Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


During the week of Oct. 12-14,
Jefferson County Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Extension Agent
Heidi Copeland, accompanied
county residents Mary Helen An-
drews and Shirley Widd to a Home
and Community Educators (HCE)
SConvention in Hutchinson Island.
HCE is a non-profit, volunteer
organization sponsored by the Uni-
versity of Florida Extension Serv-
ice.
Its mission is to strengthen fami-
lies through programs of commu-
nity leadership, continuing
education, and community service.
Local clubs perform community
service projects and assist with Ex-


tension educational programs.
Last year the HCE performed
many hours of community service.
Their many gifts of service to this
community included providing
some 100 knitted or crocheted hats
to the newborn unit at both the
Archbold and Tallahassee Commu-
nity Hospitals.
They donated 91 lbs. of can tabs,
to the Gainesville Ronald McDon-
ald House. Statewide the group col-
lected more than $1,100 worth of
the tabs.
They drove community mem-
bers to doctors' appointments and
many members donate their time
volunteering for Hospice;
They worked with various 4-H
Clubs, judged entries for 4-H Dis-
trict Events, and at the North Flor-
ida Fair .


Members meet monthly to enjoy
each others company and for an
educational program.
A few examples of their pro-
grams include: September, the FCS
Extension Agent presented an Iden-
tity Theft/Credit Report program at
the new County Library.
In October the FCS Extension
Agent present a 5-Wishes program
at Barbara Sheats' house.
In November the FCS Extension
Agent will present a Holiday pro-
gram at the Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Commerce.
Any homemaker, regardless of
race, color, sex, age, handicap or
national origin is eligible to belong.
Call Copeland at the Extension
Office, 342-0187, for a schedule of
events.


ELIZABETH BAPTIST CHURCH recently in- cus, Holbrook. Front, left, Father John Hol-
stalled its new Pastor Phillip Holbrook. brook and Mother, Lorraine Holbrook.
From left, standing, WifenMichelle, son Mar- ,, '


Church News Aucilla Christian To Host,


Annual Raffle, Dinner


Aucilla Christian Academy will
host its Annual Board Raffle, 6
p.m., Nov. 19 at the Wilmer Bas-
sett Gymnasium.
The $100 ticket not only includes
dinner for two, but a chance to win
several great prizes, which include
a four-wheeler (ATV), a white gold
diamond pennant, valued at $2,400,
a 32 inch color TV with DVD and
surround sound, a riding lawn
mower, and $1,000 cash.
Merchants also assisted in obtaining
the prizes include Steel's jewelry in
Valdosta, Badcock & More of
Monticello, Deep South Cycle in
Thomasville, and Boston Tractor in
Quitman.


. Central Baptist Church in Aucilla
celebrates its Homecoming, 11 a.m.
Sunday. Rev. Manning Hicks is the
guest speaker. Bible Study is at
9:45 a.m.. Dinner will be served
12:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall:

Greater Fellowship MB Church
will host a Baptist Women's Day of
;Prayer, 7 p.m., Monday. Speaker is
Rev. Alonzo Fudge, pastor of Hick-
ory Hill MB Church. :
,. '* ; .. ..

Springfield AME Church will host
Family and Friends Day, 3:.30 p.m,
Sunday. Willie E. Brown and con-
gregation of New Bethel AME
Church are in charge.

Monticello Church of Christ will
hold a weekend Gospel meeting be-
'ginning 7:30 p.m. Friday, and Satur-
day. Sunday service.begin at 9:30
and 10:30 a.m.. Mark Moseley from
eGainsville is the speaker.

The Virginia'West Lane Guild #25
;Order of Templer Crusaders will
hold services 3:30 p.m., Sunday, at
Memorial MB Church. Minister
4Terry Presley is the speaker.


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION
of the Big Bend
Serving Persons with Epilepsy
Community Education
Diagnosis and Treatment

Case Management
Support Groups



1108-B East Park Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777


fiiHEATHF


Those interested in assisting with
selling tickets for the event, or re-
quiring further information, can
call ACA at 997-3597.
The top ticket seller will receive
one month's complimentary tuition
for the one child of their choice.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.
MDW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717. www.mdausa.org


MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
Now ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR ENROLLMENT
(LIMITED SPACE)

997-6048


1590 N. JEFFERSON STREET


L 'oi


SHIRLEY WIDD, left and Mary Helen Andrews attended a
Home and Community Educators Convention, recently, with
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland.



Elizabeth Baptist Installs

Pastor Phillip Holbrook


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

An installation celebration was
held for Pastor Phillip Holbrook on
Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Elizabeth
Baptist Church.
Call to Worship featured com-
bined choirs of Madison First Bap-
tist and Elizabeth, with
congregational singing led by Billy
Luttrell.
% Don Self welcomed everyone, af-
ter which Pastor Holbrook ad-
dressed the congregation.
Director of Missions Rev. Gene
Stokes introduced the speaker for
the evening, Pastor Clyde Larrabee
of Madison First Baptist Church.
The high point of the evening
came when Pastor Holbrook ac-
companied by the men's quartet of
Madison first brought the house

There's a little frost
on this pumpkin!



4 "


down with their presentation of
Amen.
The service closed with all or-
dained men gathering at the front
of the church around Pastor Hol-
brook as Reverend Walter Bailey
led a prayer of blessing.
After the service a reception was
held in the church fellowship hall
where friends and family congratu-
lated Pastor Holbrook and the
membership of Elizabeth wel-
comed Brother Phill, his wife Mi-
chelle, son Marcus, and daughter
Shelly into the church family.


CARD OF THANKS

Thank you for the gifts and cards
and most of all for attending our
50th Wedding Anniversary.

f, Jilly,'Mae andtHardy ~3rumbley


Humane Society
Plans Meetings

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The next regularly scheduled Hu-
mane Society Board of Directors
and Membership meeting will be
conducted, 7 p.m., Monday, Nov.
21 at the shelter office, located at
290 West Washington Street.
The 2005 annual meeting will be
held 7 p.m., Monday, Dec. 5 at the
shelter office.
During that meeting, amendments
to the By-laws will be presented to
the general membership for a vote.
The proposed amendments will
be available for public inspection
no later than Nov. 21, 2005.


Check the Social Security Statement you receive in the mail
carefully. It contains estimates of the benefits that you may be eligible for
and it can be useful in planning your financial future.
For more information, visit your local Social Security office.
Or call us, toll-free, 1-800-537-7005; TTY 1-800-325-0778.


Happy 30th


Sonja!


In Case Of Emergency Dial 911


SFe shoW P e r dsvaibea




cl 87 .AI.R or See website for daily s ecials


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
6 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

This week's
question:
What is the
Great
Commission?
Answer next
week

Coine and hear...
*Wayne Warren, Minister







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005 PAGE 7

Camellia Garden Circle Discusses

Making Of Grapevine Wreaths


MEMBERS of the Elizabeth Baptist Church- their September meeting, and enjoyed din-
Y.E.S. Club traveled to Steinhatchee for ner at Roy's Restaurant.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Camellia Garden Circle met
at the home of Jane Davis, Oct. 16
for a program on Grapevine Wreath
Making for the coming holidays and
for the Fall General Meeting.

The members were responsible
for the Ways and Means at the
meeting and the wreaths generated
( much needed funds for the Monti-
cello Garden Club and the Circles.
Refreshments were made avail-
able for the group with each mem-
ber bringing in a little something .
special to share, including wine,
cheeses, and other light snacks.
Jean Brenner, brought in the--
-Crazy, Quilters completed North.


Carolina Lily quilt.
M embers were in awe with the
detail of the stitches and the overall
beauty of the quilt.
Brenner sold raffle tickets for the
quilt and the members were very
generous with the purchase of the
tickets. The quilt is to be raffled off
at the Christmas in Monticello
event scheduled for sometime in
early December.
Circle President Isabelle deSer-
cey discussed the Fall General
Meeting, and rioted that the Fun
With Flowers program that was
planned to open the Meeting had
been canceled due to lack of inter-
est.
The Orchid Meeting has been re


scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
6. Interested members and friends
are asked to meet at deSercey's
home, from which they will car-
pool to the home of Chucha Barber
in Tallahassee, the location for the
workshop.

Members are asked to bring their
orchids plants, if they are in need
of special attention.
On Saturday, Nov. 12 members
will travel to the O'Toole's Farm in
Madison for a relaxing and enjoy-
able day. Members are asked to-
bring snacks for a picnic lunch.
Call deSercey at 997-2170 if you
are planning to attend any of the
events so she can get a count of at-
tending members.


Church Group Dines Out


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Elizabeth Baptist Church-
Y.E.S. Club began their new year
in September with a trip to Stein-
hatchee for dinner at Roy's Restau-
rant.
Members attending numbered 28.


The October meeting was held at
the home of Nell and Bill Bellamy
where a camp fire and moonlit
night enhanced the hamburger and
hot-dog cookout.
Door prizes were won by Linda
Demott and Dora Baillie.
Plans were discussed for a trip to
Calloway Gardens in November.


Homes Of Mourning


Fae Sibley Frye
Fae Dell Sibley Frye, 93, of
o Natchitoches, LA, died Monday,
Oct. 24, 2005, in Milford, New
Hampshire.
Mrs. Frye was born June 4, 1912,
daughter of William and Mattie Si-
bley.. She was married to Jesse
Graden Frye, whom she married
September 1, 1940. Frye lived in
several regions of the country, rais-
ing her family while working -as a
teacher in all levels of elementary to
high school grades. She recently
was living in New Hampshire in the
care of her son.
She and her husband move to
Monticello in 1977, returning to her
home town of Nathitoches ini 1994.
During her staN in Montcello. .she
was a meinber of several organiza-
tions including the Methodist
Church, Lions Club Women's Aux-
iliary, and the Garden Club. Mrs.
Frye was a dedicated volunteer for
the Monticello Library. She and her
husband considered Monticello to
be their second hometown.
Mrs. Frye was predeceased by her.
husband in August 1997. She is sur-
vived by a daughter and son-in-law,
Billy Jean and Al Salazar of
Prescott, AZ; a son and daughter-in-
law, Dennis Graden and Kathleen
Frye, of Milford, NH; a grand-
daughter, Aerika De Guzman, and
four great grandchildren of Oxnard,
CA; two sisters, Bill Brumfield and
Willa Collins, and a brother-in-law,
Kenneth Brumfield, all of Natchito-
ches, LA. and numerous nephews
and nieces.
A memorial service will be held at
First Presbyterian Church of Natchi-
toches on Sunday, Nov. 13, 2005.
Interment of her ashes by the family
will be at Central Baptist Church
Cemetery, Robeline, LA.
Rosetta N. Proctor
Mrs. Rosetta N. Proctor age 92 a
retired farmer and homemaker died,
Wednesday, October 26, 2005 in
Madison.
The service will be at 11:00 am on
Saturday November 5, 2005 Rev.
Alonzo Fudge, Officiating, with
burial at Ashville Community
Cemetery in Monticello (Ashville).
Family will receive friends
r (viewing) from 2:00 p.m. to
' 8:00p.m. on Friday, November 4, at
L Tillman Funeral Home in Monti-
f cello.
"- A native of Jefferson County, Mrs.
Proctor was a long time resident of
Greenville. She was a retired self
: employed farmer and homemaker.
. Mrs. Proctor was a member of New.
f Jerusalem Missionary Baptist
Church in Ashville.,
. A loving and kind spirit she leaves
to treasure her memory her children
Daisy Gloster and husband, James
S of Jacksonville, Elnora Sipp, Green-
ville and Rosa L. Jones and husband
Lawrence and Nancy Proctor both
of Madison, Sam Proctor, Jr. and
wife Shirley, Greenville, and John
Proctor and wife, Barbara of Talla-
hassee; her sister Daisy Green of


Monticello, Lissie Copeland, Ft.
Pierce and Jane Jackson of Ft. Lau-
derdale, her brother, Junious Noble
and wife Beatrice of Ft. Pierce,
twenty-one grandchildren, 34 great
grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends,.
Preceding Mrs. Proctor in death
were her husband Sam, Sr. her sons
Roosevelt, Junious, Freddie Lee; her
daughter, Idella and Catherine and
her brothers, Shelly, Jr., Solomon,
Robert and James Noble.
David Williams, Jr.
"Big David"
David Williams, Jr. age 49 died
Friday, October 28, 2005 in Talla-
hassee.
ThieM4ick&willqat '.00;p.imn. on
Saturday, November 5, 2005 at
Shady Grove Primitive Baptist
Church #2 in Tallahassee (Micco-
sukee) with burial at the church
cemetery. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 2:00 p.m. to
8:00 p.m. on Friday, November 4,
2005 at Tillman Funeral Home.
Mr. Williams was a native and
lifelong resident of Tallahassee. He
was -a member of Shady Grove
Primitive Baptist Church No. 2.
Surviving him are his wife, Kath-
erine Johnson Williams, sons Paul
and David. Ill; daughter Margaret
Manuel and husband, Eddie; Sarah
Williams and husband Jason,
Jessica, Katrina, and Roshanda Wil-
liams; mother, Gertrude' Brown and
his step mother Laurine Williams,
three grandchildren; five brothers,
seven sisters and a host of other
relatives and friends.

-v -. -

*1( Mtrli V


CHILDREN 6 -10 years old enjoy tumbling L-R: Mikayla Fillyau, Nicole Little and Kelci
classes at Jamie's Body Works. Seated, L-R: Register. Not pictured: Abigail Morgan, Dy-
Logan Devane and Jacob Ford. Standing: lan McGrath, and Carly Joiner.


JAMIE'S 3-5 year old tumbling class in-
cludes, L-R: Abby Boyd, Riley Hamrick, Mor-
gan Fillyau, Mylie Rogers, Auburne Mobley,


Taylor Knecht, Anna Key. Not pictured:
Grace Beshears, Megan Schofill, Lindsey
Davis, and Olivia Walton. (News Photos)


School Menu
Monday
Pizza, Potato Wedges, Fruit, Cookie,
Milk.
Tuesday.
Turkey & Cheese On Bun, Lettuce
& Tomato, Carrot Sticks, Fruit,
Milk.
Wednesday
Chili, Peanut Butter or Pimento
Cheese Sandwich, Salad, Fruit,
Milk.
Thursday
Hamburger on Bun, French Fries,
Fruit, Vookie, Milk.
Friday
VETERANS' DAY. Oven Fried
Chicken, California Blend Vegeta-
bles, Creamed Potatoes, Hot Roll,
Milk.




U.S. Dpartm nt of nergy


"I'm very playful, but somewhat shy, and I get along fine
with other dogs. If you take me home, I'll be the best
friend you ever had," Lissie.


'Lissie' Named Pet Of Week


"Lissie" has been named
adoptable canine Pet of the Week,
by the Humane Society.
When she came to the shelter, she
was one of a litter of four. Now,
she remains the only one of the lit-
ter that has not yet been adopted.


Lissie is a spayed female black
lab mix, with all of her vaccina-
tions up to date.

Her date of birth is 10-15-04 and
she has resided at the shelter since
December.


Jamie's Offers

Classes For

Adults, Kids


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jamie's Body Works is conducting
tumbling classes for children ages
3-10.
In addition to tumbling classes at
the studio on Cherry Street, Jamie
Cichon Rogers teaches tumbling at
Little Angels Preschool and at Lit-
tle University.
A tumbling recital'is planned for
the students on Saturday, May 6 at
the First United Methodist Church
fellowship hall.
Students will wear costumes for
the recital.
Rogers also offers classes for
adults.

A cardio/conditioning class is
taught 5:30 p.m., Mondays and
Wednesday.
This class emphasizes cardiovas-
cular fitness and strength condi-
tioning. ..
A body conditioning class that
emphasizes toning for all the major
muscle groups of the body is con-
ducted 9 a.m., Tuesdays and Thurs-
days.

Pilates exercises are also included.
in this workout.
All classes use a variety of equip-1
ment including stability balls, bal-
ance trainers, resistance bands,
weights, and steps.

Personal training services are also
available.
Rogers is a CPR/First Aid Certi-
fied Instructor. She is also a Certi-
fied Group Fitness Instructor and
personal trainer with the American
College of Sports Medicine.
For information about the classes
and prices contact Rogers at 997-
4253.


STEAK DINNER

Wacissa United Methodist Church


November 4, 2005
Adults $12.00


5:30 7:30 p.m.
Children 9 and under $6.00


Raffle A Beautiful Hand-Made Quilt
Quilt Tickets: $5.00 Donation
Enjoy Christian Fellowship and Great Steaks
Open Hearts Open Minds Open Doors


I


You're Holding On To A Precious Freedom


Information Is Vital!


Get It Here.






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005 PAGE 9


. HMS Downs Baby Rattlers 34-24

in Final Game Of season


, FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The HMS Bees stung the FAMU
Rattlers, 34-24, 'in their final game
of the season.
It was an exciting come-from-
behind victory for their last swarm
at the hive.
"This is another display of great
middle school football," said Coach
Willie Saffo. "When you are down
and can come back with the inten-
sity that the Bees came back with,
that really tells me that this team is
the real deal.
Offensively, the Bees had well
over 400 yards rushing and quarter-
backs Marquice Dobson and De-
Vondrick Nealy each scored two
touchdowns.


The varsity Warriors face Bell
Friday evening in their final game
of the regular season. ACAs record
is 6-3.
Coach Dave Roberts said that Bell
is a well-coached team, however,
ACA's players tend to be a little bit
faster.
"We have to come out with our
heads on having to fight to win this
one," said Roberts. "If we keep our
minds on proper defense and play-
ing good offense like we have been
doing, we should come out OK."
The game is not a district or con-
ference game and will not affect
the fact that the Warriors' will go to
the District play-offs for the first
time in 12 years, and were named
the Panhandle Conference Champi-
' ons for the first time ever.
Principal Richard Finlayson
stated: "I'm extremely proud of our
Skids and Coach Roberts, of all their
hard work, and for getting the Au-


Demontray Johnson and Shaquan
Plunkett each scored one touch-
down, and fullback Keyron Bel-
lamy had well over 100 yards rush-
ing.
"When I look for running power,
I look to Bellamy," Saffo said.
"Defensively, the Bees did a very
good job adjusting to the Rattlers
-attack after the half," he said.
"In hopes of beating us, FAMU
ran a very different attack than the
one they used before and defen-
sively, we were able to contain that
attack.
"High praise goes out to the offen-
sive and defensive units. There
were no turnovers, good blocking,
and we were able to accomplish
our goals," said Saffo. "I commend
my entire squad."
He reports that the Bees end their


Bankers Down Millers;

Farmers Beat Builders

in Park Flag Football
Jared Jackson scored a touchdown
FRAN HUNT on an 18 yard run, and the two-
Staff Writer point conversion failed again. .
In the second game of the day,
Farmers and Merchants Bank the Farmers scored 14 points in the
downed Monticello Milling, 22-12, first half, while holding the Build-
and Jefferson Farmers Market de- ers scoreless, and both teams
feated Jefferson Builders Mart, 22- scored eight points in the second
Q half.


In the first game of the day, FMB
Scored 16 points in the first half to
the Millers 12, and FMB scored six
'points in the second half while
holding the Millers scoreless.
For the Bankers, Colby Scarbor-
ough scored a touchdown on a 19
yard run, but the two-point conver-
Ssion failed.
He scored a touchdown on a two
yard pass reception from Brandon
Holm. Holm ran in for, the two-
point conversion.
SHolm scored a touchdown on a
Four yard run, but the two-point
conversion failed.
" For the Millers, Keondre Parker
scored a touchdown on a 19 yard
Srun, and the two-point conversion
failed.



Local Semin

Tailgate At

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Seminole
Club has the opportunity to tailgate
at Dick Houser Stadium in a sky-
box, before the NC State game,
Nov. 5.
The food, catered by Uptown
Cafe, is expected to be great and
the Boosters will be able to listen to
the Marching Chiefs get ready for
the game with their "Skull
Session".
There are only 40 spaces avail-


For the Farmers, Treveyon Ed-
wards scored on a nine yard pass
reception from Steve Mann, and
the two-point conversion failed.
Edwards scored his second
touchdown on a 56 yard run and
Revonte Robinson ran in for the
two-point conversion.
Robinson then scored a touch-
down on a three yard run and Nick
Matthews scored the two-point
conversion run.
.For the Builders, Trevon Youman
scored a touchdown on a 33 yard
run, and Nick Matthews received a
pass in the end zone from Youman
to score the two-point conversion.
Saturday games resume when
the Bankers and the Builders play
at 9 a.m. and the Farmers face the
Millers at 10 a.m.



oles May

NC Game
able and spots are filling fast:
To reserve a place for the tailgate
party and have the opportunity to
watch the Noles in their final home
game of the season, contact Katrina
Guerry at 997-4904.
In related news, the last general
membership meeting of the Boost-
ers will be held at the Jerger Farm,
Nov. 17.
All attendees are asked to. bring
their own steaks and all of the trim-
mings will be provided.
The speaker will be James
Colzie, cornerbacks coach for FSU
and former Seminole (1993-1996).


season with a 5-3 record.
"Make no mistake about it, we
still have plenty of work of do, but
these kids are the team of the
future," said Saffo.
"With continued work on disci-
pline, academics and basic funda-
mentals, you will see what we are
trying to build here at Howard
Middle School. We will continue
to work on those things that make
us successful."
Saffo added that he and his
coaching staff, coaches Charles
Washington and Corbin Huggins, 1,
thank the parents, fans and staff
that continue to support the Bees.
"We have made great strides in
our goals for the 2005 season. We
have plenty of work ahead of us,
but we aren't finished yet, so you
can rest assured that Bees football
is on its way back," he added.


JAVANTE GODFREY was
dressed as Dracula at the
Family Fun Night at the Naza-
rene Church. (News Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The varsity Tigers take on the
Taylor County Bulldogs Friday in
their Homecoming and final game
of the regular season.
JCHS goes into the game with a
3-6 record.
"Taylor County is a 3-A school
and we're a 1-A school," said
Coach Harry Jacobs. "So we're a
real big step down for them."
The Tigers have been working
hard all week on passing technique;
running patterns, passing, proper
offensive and defensive techniques,
and building that Tiger Spirit up to
full strength, all week.
"We have got to represent Tiger
Homecoming," said Jacobs. "We
are going to unleash that Tiger
Fury and show them that Tiger
Pride, to bring home the victory."
The Homecoming Queen will be
crowned at half time, as is
tradition.
The game is at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
here.


Your Hometown Newspaper
Monticello News
Keeping You Informed
Of Our
Growing Community


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W i

BOYD FAMILY Team took part in the NFCC
Clay Shoot, raising $12,000. From left Cissy


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Boyd family team was one
-of about 75 teams competing in the
NFCC Foundation's First Annual
Clay Shoot which raised more than
$12,000.

The Boyd family team consists of
Cissy, Erin, Janegale and Heather
Boyd, and Linda Heller.

NFCC Executive Director of Col-
lege Advancement Trish Hinton
said the action began as the early
morning mist began lifting from the
hollows among the hills Mikey and
Bryan Wilson's farm in Madison.


Boyd, Erin Boyd, Janegale Boyd, Linda
Heller and Heather Boyd.


Foundation planners report the fi-,,.
nal tally was $12,432, the most
ever raised in a single day Founda-
tion event. -
It was 'also an impressive meas-
ure of community support with 19,
teams of shooters, 34 sponsors and '
scores of volunteers who set up and-
coordinated the complex shoot,,
plus feeding and entertaining the
sportsmen and women.
NFCC receives gifts and funds to-
support college programs and es-
tablish scholarships for NFCC stu-.
dents.
'Last year, the Foundation
awarded 150 scholarships valued:
at $64,118.


By noon, it was all over and hun-
dreds of pieces of clay pigeons lay
scattered in the fields, with the win-
ners taking home trophies and
prizes too numerous to count.
"For the first time event, the clay
shoot was enormously successful.
We plan to continue this event and
for it top be an annual affair.
Hopefully, it will grow each year
and become a major source of reve-
nue for the NFCC Foundation,"
said President Morris G. Steen, Jr.


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ADVERTISEMENT

Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic

Introduces the Portal Gravity System.

New Technology to Determine the

Cause of Your Backpain.
In the United States, Lower Back Pain (LBP) is one of the most common problems for which people visit a
doctor. Worldwide, 60 to 80 percent of people will have LBP during their lifetime and 2 to 5 percent will
have it at any given time. Annually, nearly 20 percent of American adults experience LBP symptoms. For
most, it's a temporary problem, but for many sufferers, the symptoms are severe and will have a major, life
altering impact. Financially, the annual cost in the United States for health care and lost productivity
associated with low back pain is nearly $100 billion, with approximately 10 percent of the patients accounting
for 90 percent of the cost. Management of back pain and its impact on our workforce are a major drain on
the American economy with about 175 million lost workdays every year. It's the most common reason for
worker's compensation claims and the second most common cause of worker absences. About one percent
of the U.S. population is chronically disabled by back problems and sadly, it's the most common cause of
disability for people younger than 45.
When to see your Doctor about LBP
If you suffer from low back pain, when is a visit to the doctor necessary?
There is probably no need to run to your doctor for every little ache and pain; however, significant problems
should not he ignored. Any of the following circumstances are good reasons to see your doctor.
Pain that is present for more than a month without improving, or occurs at rest,
or is worsening.
Advanced age, unexplained weight loss, or past history of cancer.
Long-term steroid use, which can weaken the bones and increase
susceptibility to osteoporotic fractures.
Recent urinary tract infection or unexplained fever.
Trauma capable of causing a fracture, such as high-impact auto accident
or a serious fall.
In the elderly, minor trauma, especially if the person has osteoporosis.
Severe weakness or numbness a leg, the genital area or the buttocks or
change in the ability to urinate or have bowel movement, these are signs
of possible impairment of spinal nerves.
What method will be used to determine the problem?
After carefully evaluating your condition, your physician may decide you need a MRI. Magnetic
Resonance Imaging is the imaging study of choice to evaluate the low back because it allows the doctor to
see the entire lumbar (low back) spine in a single image. A MRI can reveal conditions that may be the cause
of your back pain, such as a herniated disc (the gel like cushions between each vertebral body), spinal nerve
impingement, and spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal) and annular tears. The MRI procedure is
painless and takes about 30 minutes to complete. Images may show a disk pushing against the spinal canal
and possible pressing against a nerve, which could be the source of your pain. An additional benefit to MRI
is that other conditions such as tumors can be seen, but are far more rare than disk related problems. The lat-
est development in management and diagnosis of low back pain is weight-bearing MRI. The weight bearing
Portal Gravity System is now in use at Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic MRI Department. This weight-
bearing device provides additional information regarding low back pain that increases when the patient is
standing or sitting and decreases or is relieved when the patient lies down. In typical MRI scans, patients are
scanned lying down, a position which can cause the severity of the underlying condition to be underestimat-
ed. Weight Bearing was developed to simulate the pain of standing or sitting. It places an axial load (head
to foot pressure simulating weight) on the patient's spine during the MRI procedure so a physician can
assess spinal pathologies under weight-bearing conditions.' Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic is very proud
to add Weight Bearing MRI to our list of medical services for Tallahassee. The aging of America is happen-
ing here as well and better ways to diagnose and monitor treatment are necessary. We're glad to be able to
offer this option. The detail provided by MRI is remarkable and allows us to often pinpoint the root cause of
the pain, and select the right course of treatment for the patient. The advancement of weight bearing MRI is
a huge benefit to our patients who suffer more when sitting and standing, patients that were previously hard-
er to diagnose and monitor. A low back MRI with and without weight bearing images takes about an hour to
complete. The radiologist will carefully evaluate and compare these images and send a report to your
doctor who will use the findings to decide your treatment plan. Weight-bearing studies can also be
performed utilizing the Portal Gravity System for knees and other areas affected by weight or position.
Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic MRI Department is the exclusive provider of the weight bearing
MRI in Tallahassee using the Portal Gravity System. If you have back pain that is worsened by
standing or sitting, ask your doctor about weight-bearing MRI.

TC 3334 Capital Medical Blvd, SOite 700


C (850)-219-1940


Boyd Family Competes

In NFCC Clay Shoot


Tigers Take On Bulldogs In

Homecoming Game Friday


ACA To Face Bell Friday In

Last Regular Season Game








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005

ACA Fall Festival Draws


Good Crowd; Winners Told


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The crowds attending the Aucilla-
Christian Academy Fall Festival
last week set record numbers, still
in the process of being tallied, as
did the tremendous response from
volunteers.
Adults and children took part: in
the many activities and games, with
many of the children in costume.
Princesses, fairies, super heroes,
cowboys and even a giraffe, to
name of few, laughed and scurried
through the crowds, running from
game to game and activity to activ-
ity.
Favorite attractions this year in-
cluded the cake walk, which had
three, full, long tables of every kind
of baked goods imaginable, the
theme basket raffle, which had
huge baskets, overfilled witl good-
ies pertaining to its theme, and of
course, the dunking booth, which
gives students a chance to dunk the


teachers, said, though the tallies were not fi-
Two of the names of winners of nalized as of press time, she
the bastes were unavailable before thought that the biggest attraction
press time. during the Fall Festival was the
- Themes and basket winners in- cake walk, which brought in nearly
cluded, K-3 games, unavailable; K- double what it did last year, $4,000.
4, kitchen, Paul Majors; K-5, Other attractions at the Fall Festi-
"Jafra", cosmetics, Kenny Barker, val included the costume parade for
and K-5, FSU, Lamar McDonald. elementary, students, face painting,
Other themes and winners were: large inflatable slide, duck pond,
Grade one, Gators, Cindy football toss, needle in the hay
Hamilton; Grade one, Christmas, stack, candy in the jar, treasure
Rachel Bush; Grade two, hunt, go fish, star, Cub scout Pine-
hunting/fishing, Lucy Hughes; wood Derby, and milk bottle.
Grade three, pamper yourself, Also, pumpkin turnover, gold
Karen Newberry; Grade four, rainy fish, skeet ball, and obstacle
day, Pat Miller; Grade five, course.
coffee/tea lovers, unavailable; and Principal Richard Finlayson
grade six, store gift cards, Joe stated: "The Festival was a tremen-
Turner. dous success. I would like to thank
There were five volunteers taunt- Leslie Wilkinson, and all the many
ing the crowds at the dunking other volunteers who made this
booth, daring them to purchase a event possible.
chance to bring them down into the "It was an entire school commu-
cold water; they included Dan nity effort, a great crowd and the
Nennstiel, Paige Thurman, Prateen amount of volunteers we had was
Patel and Perry Marsh. ___ unreal. The kids had a ball and this
PTO President Leslie Wilkinson was a great blessing for us."


FACE PAINTING was a popular activity at the face of Casey Strickland, while onlook-
the Fall Festival. Artist Hallie Jones paints ers observe off camera.


REED HARVEY enjoyed his
Christian's Annual Harvest


visit to Aucilla
Festival Friday,


as he played in the duck pond. There were a
variety of games available for all ages.


CARTER GRANT, holding Jared, buys raffle
tickets for one of the theme baskets at the


FalL, Festival. Classes each devised, their
own baskets.


4 4
+



(I~
(I)


Al


AI ETIO9


pirates costume for the contest at


ICN "

I jsr












JENNY JACKSON was dressed as a fairy at the ACA Fall
Festival, Friday. (News Photos)


Celebration and Open House!



SLooking for something different
in your child's Sunday School experience?
Come to First ,United Methodist Church
and see what we're all excited about!

)oin us at 9:45 a.m. on Suncay, November 13th
ps we kick off our new rotation-style Sunday School
for children in Pre-K through 5th grade.

Explore the 6 learning stations in "Sunday School Express"

Drama Depot
Creation Station
Whistle Stop Cafe
Computer Station
Movie Junction
i Grand Central Station


If you can't make it for our Open House, join us any Sunday at 9:45.

:(Nursery, Adult & Youth classes are available too!)

First United Methodist Church, 325 W. Walnut Street, (997-5545)
/N


p


U,~,'.


JUSTIN WELCH chose a
ZACAs Fall Festival.


i









Make Le
Move over flash cards and number
drills. Another way to encourage
your children to love numbers is to
show them how math is part of eve-
ryday life.
Once you help make this connec-
tion, children will be eager to learn
more once they start school. Here
are some simple projects to do with
your child.
Music and singing help children
remember information better. Ac-
cording to the National Association
for the Education of Young Chil-
dren, researchers have found that
music can help children learn multi-
plication tables and improve early
literacy skills.
One study found that using famil-
iar melodies helped five-year-olds
learn phone numbers at a faster rate
than using no music or unfamiliar
melodies.
One good way to get started is to
sing counting rhymes and songs to


warning Math Fun


your child. When getting your child
dressed in the morning try singing,
"One little piggy went to market."
This works great when you are put-
ting on those socks and shoes.
Be on the lookout for books, CDs
or cassette tapes that feature songs
about counting for your home play.
"Cheerios Counting Songs" is a new
book for toddlers that matches fa-
miliar melodies with five simple
counting songs, which help increase
children's awareness of numbers,
colors, letters, and shapes.
Children can "interact" with this
latest book by placing a piece of
Cheerios on the page to complete
each illustration. .. '
Go on a number hunt. When you
are in the cat have your child look
for numbers on street and store
signs, and on license plates.
Say the numbers aloud when you
find them. Your child should be able
to recognize numbers up to ten be-


fore kindergarten.
Make a phone call. Write the
phone number of a friend or relative
down on a piece of paper. Have
your child read the phone number
before he dials the number.
Making a recipe with your child is
an easy and delicious way to in-
troduce concepts such as volume
and weight. Let your child measure
out the ingredients with measuring
cups and bowls while you read the
directions out loud.
Turn snack time into a game. Help
your child count out four slices of
banana. After they eat one, count
again.
Pick a shape such as a triangle.
Point out things that are triangle-
shaped all day long and every place
you go, from the living room to the
store. Later on ask your child to
identify something that is shaped
like a triangle.
Play with shape puzzles and-


blocks. Working with three-
dimensional objects playing with a
shape-sorter box, for example will
help develop fine motor skills and
spatial reasoning while introducing
your child to basic geometry.
These simple games help children
discover that math is all around us
and understand its importance to
things we do every day. Teaching
simple mathematical concepts early
will help pave the way for a smooth
transition in school and set the foun-
dation for lifelong learning.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005 PAGE 11

Do you need a loan?
If you are searching for the best home At Honey Mae Home Loans, we don't
equity loan, ask these 3 questions: let a computer tell us what to do. We
1) Will you guarantee the low- can give you a loan when others say
est rate? We promise the lowest rate no even if you have a low credit score.
in writing. If we can't beat it-even af- 3) What are the chances my
ter you've gone through the entire loan loan will be approved? We approve
process with us-we will pay you $250. 6 out of 7 applications. And some of
2) Will my interest rate in- these people have credit scores below
crease, if I have a low credit 530. We can give you a quote over the
score? To other companies, you are phone, in complete privacy, without
a faceless credit score. The lower your obligation-no matter your financial
score, the higher your interest rates. situation. 1-800-700-1242, ext. 288
Open 7 days to serve you. Honey Mae Home Loans is licensed by the Florida Deparntent of Financial Servces



Sff TIHE FUTURE

Please volunteer
today.



S Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
0 www.mdausa.org


BUSINESS


DIRECTORY


Septic Tank & Land Clearing 1I


Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


Register 's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997-2535


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


997-0039 Lic. & Insured ,


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717

, Debra Liggin ~ REALTOR
2365 Centerville Road
-.s. Tallahassee, Fl 32308
First Realty
Business (850) 383-6451
Mobile (850) 509-8284
Fax (850) 383-6400
E-Mail dliggin@manausa.com
Web Site www.manausa.com
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

I CHASE
Jena Fernandez
Senior Mortgage Specialist
17 Years Of Service
850-224-2427
FHA/VA/CONV.
Self Employed ~ New Construction/Land
Credit issues OK


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


1-10 Chevronl
Timberwolf Long Cut Wintergreen
2 for $3.25
(Supply Limited) (Special Pack)


Pepsi Cola 12pk $3.59
Limited to supply on hand

32oz Pepsi Fountain Beverage .99
Good thru Nov. 27, 2005


We have another order of leather purses

Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes- r cigars.
We accept all manufacturer coupons.




Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


j Gene Hall

County

S Commissioner

(850) 321-6673 (cell)

"PLEASE REMEMBER

THE HURRICANE

VICTIMS DONATE

To YOUR FAVORITE

CHARITY .


Residential & Commercial Lic.#cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383

*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic Tack Contractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lic. #SR097126'
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


BORDE 2 BODE GARDENS~l~~RIEE


Lawn & Landscaping
r- --------------- --- I
I '. I
| Mention This Ad & receive ,
I A 10% Discount I
11025 East Mahan -- 877-4550
11025 East Mahan 877-4550


U I


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100



B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing
., "

Brad McLeod
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091
10534 South Sall Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
*Tuorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Kelly-Plain


Construction, Inc.
State Certified Underground Utility and
Excavation Contractor Florida
Contractors License# cuc 1223722


All Residential and Commercial Site
Work, Including Building Pads *Roads
*Drainage *Ponds *Land Clearing
*Laser Grading *Excavation *Fill Ma-
terials *Sanitary, Storm and Portable

"The State Certified Site Work Professionals"

(850) 528-8051


Dwyl Hall. Owner


1412 E. Base Street
Madison, Florida 32340
(850) 973-3026
BEST PRICES IN TOWN
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLDt


am Bowling
broker Associate


J
i


SS' 997-4789
1-888-701-2205
www.pamb@nettally.com


I'


'I) ,vne Davis
Sales Manager


Ultimate


Soa ge Auto

877-7222
4 Very large selection to choose from
A All trade-ins are welcome
4 Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
Dprag OOD (PDoiT M (PEDT,

,Oe iT DOESNT MAATTEP


3


www.TimPeary.com


Mr. Merchant

This Space Could Be

Your For Only

$10 Per Week


Cal YRN, e',akngi

hapenTheU ti.teWa


w


I


Affordable Business Communications, LIX
Specializing in Meridian and Norstar Telephone
SN'stellis and Voice Mail
*Licensed and insured. Nortel trained and certified.
Telephone installations, moves, adds and changes
New, remantifactured and used pliones/systenis
NN"alter & Dana Nloxley
1025 S. Mulberry St., Monticello, Fl, 32344-1205
IN'lobile Phone: 8-5,0-264-9455
email: AW"Fele(a netscape.net
Yotii-('oiiiiectioii'I'OSaNiiigs







'PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005


WIANTEDI. HELP WANTED


Come join our growing learn. If ou
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want' above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,







DREAMER (PG)
Fri. 4:25 7:20 9:40 Sat.
1:35 4:25 7:20 9:40 Sun.
1:35 4:25 7:20 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:25 7:20
NO PASSES

SAW 2 (R)
Fri. 5:40 7:55 10:15 Sat. -
1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55 10:15
Sun. 1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:40 7:55
NO PASSES

LEGEND OF ZORRO
(PG)
Fri. 4:20 7:15 10:10 Sat.
1:20 4:20 7:15 10:10
Sun. 1:20 4:20 7:15
Mon.- Thurs. 4:20 7:15
NO PASSES

THE FOG (PG13)
Fri. 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sat. 1:50
4:40- 7:25 9:55 Sun. 1:50 -
4:40-7:25 Mon.-Thurs. 4:40 -
7:25

THE GOSPEL (PG)
Fri. 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sat.
2:00 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sun.
2:00 4:45 7:35 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:45 7:35

CHICKEN LITTLE (G)
Fri. 5:15 7:30 9:45 Sat.
12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 9:45
Sun. 12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30
Mon. Thurs.
5:15 7:30
NO PASSES

JARHEAD (R)
Fri. 4:00,- 7:00 9:50 Sat. 1:00
4:00 7:00 9:50 Sun. 1:00 -
4:00 7:00 Mon.':-Thurs 4:00
7:00
NO PASSES


Burns toast.


dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Kennel help needed. 5 days a week, 6
hrs a day. MUST love animals, take
pride in your work & be dependable.
Must have own transportation. Call
the Jefferson County Humane Society
at 342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
10/12, tfn, c
Department of Health: Jefferson
County Health Department LPN
Position #64028334 Annual
$24,979.50 $39,551.72 State Benefits
Licensure as a Practical Nurse in
accordance with Chapter 464, FS Fax
App to (904) 636-2627 Or Mail app to
State of Florida People First Staffing
Administration PO Box 44058
Jacksonville, FL 32231-4058 Contact
People First @ 1-877-562-7287 or
(850) 342-0170, Ext. 121 Closes
11/11/05 Fingerprinting Required
EEO/AA/VP Employer.
11/4, 9, c
EPI Ombudsperson/Lead Instructor
wanted at NFCC. This Full time grant
funded position will serve as liaison
between NFCC,- the local school


I


HELP WANTED
districts, and the FL Dept. of Teacher
Certification; teach a minimum of
three courses each semester; serve
on College Committees; participate in
College activities. Teaching may be
night courses on NFCC campus
and/or at satellite locations.
Qualifications: Master's degree with a
least eighteen hours of graduate level
courses in Education and/or Reading
plus classroom teaching experience.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application
packets considered. A complete
packet includes: letter of interest;
resume and application; copy of
transcripts (unofficial okay).
Application and full job description
available at www.nfcc.edu. Questions
call 850-973-9491. Application packet
must be received by 11/15/2005. EOE
11/2, 4, 9, 11, c
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses.Be part of a team working side
by side with other health care
professional. RN/PRN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in


FALL 2005


Group Fitness Schedule


MONDAY


The new Medicare Part D is designed to help people with Medicare pay
for their prescription drugs as well as offering other benefits and options
Bedfore6TheNovember 15 enrollment date, be sure to talk to oneof our
pharmacists about your specific needs and which program options are
best suited to your situation. We're here to help explain the program to
you and to assist you in making an informed decision.



Jackson's Drug Store

"Your Medicare Store"


850-997-3553 AP&,
ruiirmtft,=miinuntli


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


*Limerock
*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil


Portable Toilets

Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
family reunions, parties
Events and Types



Mr. Merchant

This Space Could Be.

Your For Only

$10 Per Week


J 7./i'e J /o9 werj

Allyn Sikes
Owner
1830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL, 32303

(850) 224-3473 1 (800) 541-8702
www. abbiesflowers. corn


Your Local Professional Painters

Interior ~ Exterior
Lic & Ins. #4676


i a-


BETTER BODIES


AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY' REPAIR.



FREE ESTIMATES [ FREE PARTS
LOCATION SERVICE

ROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION!


LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO
966, N. BARBER HILL RD. LAMONT, FL


ATI;


ANDY & TINA AMES, OWNERS
From Dent Repair To Complete Restoration


U U


1. 24 hour Service, 7-days sh) wait when you don'l have to" Cail now
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired nghl by skilled. nea lechliicians
3. Free Energy Survey for new systems can save you big
No obhgation!
4. Two-year repair warranty Most slop at 30 days! Benson's
repairs slay repaired!
5. 10-Year warranty on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy financing to suit you! Just call.
7. Free Air Quality Check Let us check whail's
mi your sir for your healthsh.
8. Up front pricing -No surprises, just honestly -
the way it should be.
For over 20 years, thousands have chosen
the caring comfort of enson s.
Your 24 hlir Service Hotlhine:
iur sll dI we'll Ipply p "" 5 2-3132
-BensonTc n T e I


D.L. 's Gun & Pawn Shop, Inc.
Cash in a flash!
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
Guns ~ Diamonds -TV's VCR 's Stereos -
* Radios Gold Guitars Silver Tools
Mon.-Sat. 9-6 575-7682
1511 Jackson Bluff *Tallahassee


*3 -


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

lIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS CO.

997-4150

Residential & Commercial
C l*am *Mirrors *Window Glass *Window Repair
*Insulated Glass furnituree Tops *Cuistom
MifV'll fOf Tub & Shower Enclosures *Replacement
M r i Glass For Fogged Windows and
i'O1V1 10i1. Patio Doors *ETC.

142 OLD BUZBEE RD
MONTICELLO. FL 32344
(Sam MCgKown OFFICE: 850 3853308
MOBILE 850 509 0015
Locally Owned & Operated FAX 850 997 2845
FREE ESTIMATES LICENSED AND INSURED


3:30-4:15 p.m. 9:00-10:00AM Little University 9:00-10:00AM
TUMBLING Preschool Tumbling
3-5 yr. olds Pates/Toning 8:45-9:15 a.m. iates/Toning


4:15-5:00 p.m. Little Angels
TUMBLING Preschool Tumbling
6-10 yr. olds 10:00-10:30 a.m.


5:30-6:30PM 5:30-6:30PM
Card to/Toning Cardrio/Toning





All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers, Certified

Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor. Call

997-4253 for more information. Personal Training

services also available.


Craig

Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337


997-6788


HELP WANTED
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance ~ Vested Retirement after
six years ~ Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefit Package. If your
prefer per diem, rather than career
service, we also have OPS
(non-benefited positions). RNs $29-31,
LPNs $19-22. For additional
information contact Sharon
McKinnie, R.N. at 850-922-6645,
email:
mckinnie.sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11,
16, 18, 23, 25, c
Site Manager PT 15 hrs/wk Heritage
Manor, Monticello, FL Resume to:
Flynn Mgmt. Corp., 516 Lakeview
Rd. Unit 8, Clearwater, FL 33756
Fax: (727) 447-5516.
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, c
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,


HELP WANTED
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Florida Department of
Transportation has a vacancy in
Madison County for the following
position: Position Number: 55004540
Broad Band Title: Highway
Maintenance Workers Level 1
Working title: Highway Maintenance
Technician Last date to apply:
September 16, 2005 For more job
information call 850/838-5800. To
apply online go to

https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logo
n.htm or call People First at
1-877-562-7287. The Department of
Transportation is an Equal
Employment Opportunity,
Affirmative Action and Drug Free


HELP WANTED.
Workplace employer.
9/7, tfn
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales

Wanted
Great Stylists
Now hiring full and
part-time stylists
Great Clips Offers:
Competitive Wages
Paid Holidays
Capital Health Plan
Mgmt Opportunities
Please call one of our
Tallahassee locations
402-9300 Vineyard Center
574-9400 Bradfordville Center

I P,


Jamie S'.







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines. Two editions \ednesda and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: NMonday Noon for Wednesday y
\\ednesdam Noon for Frida;
Call Our Classiried Deparnment at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello Fl.
8/10, tfn, c
The Jefferson County Teachers
Credit Union, 1500 W. Washington
St., Monticello, FL. 32344, is now
accepting application for a full time
teller/loan processor clerk.
Competitive wages and great benefits
package included. Employment
applications may be picked up at the
Credit Union office between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. All
applications must be received by
November 18, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
11/4, 9, 11, 16, c
Genesis Engineering & Constructors
Corp. Position: Equipment Operators
for clearing land Must know how to
operate Front end Loader, Dozer,
Excavator, Dump Truck, and grading
Tractor. At least two years experience'
required. Great Pay. Call:
850-385-5563.
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4, pd
Waitress/Cashier part-time. Apply in
:person to Court Yard Cafe, 110 East
Dogwood Street.
11/2, tfn
GARAGE SALE
Saturday November 5, From 8-12, At
-Monticello Mini Storage, across the
'street from Monticello Milling. TV,
'Cookware Items, Jewelry, Clothing
:all sizes, coats, sweaters much more.
-Come check us out.
11/4, pd
--Garage Sale Saturday 11/5 8 am
;til???, 129 Indian Hills Rd.
: (997-5147). US90 West from
:Courthouse follow the signs. Antique
SFurniture and glass, computer desk,
computer w/monitor, fire king and
Pyrex glassware, antique radios and
phonographs, 78 RPM records,
pictures,' table lamps, round oak
coffee table, Christmas Decorations
and more!
11/4, pd
BUSH BABY wants to buy old things
like: chandeliers, electronic games,
costume jewelry, wall pictures,
wrought iron chairs and tables,
photos, radios, record players, quilts,
doilies, floor & table lamps, clocks,
331/2 records, postcards. BUSH
BABY is open Saturdays only 10-5 at
280 N. Cherry St. Monticello,
997-2560.
11/4, c
10/28, 11/2, 4, pd
Two Family Garage Sale:
Miscellaneous items and Stanley
Products. Friday and Saturday, 7 am
Until, 997-3339. 1387 S. Waukeenah
St.
Cleaned out big shed & spare room!
Grills, tools, heaters, spray paint, tool
box, old bottles, projector, tiger
sharks items, books, antiques, 0 reck
iron, jewelry, Lg. Raggedy Ann &
Andy, horses, pigs, king feather
pillows, coats, blankets, work boots,
Christmas decor., trees, lighted yard
figures, AND MORE! Fri. & Sat. 8 to
6. One Mile 90 West in Montivilla
Subdivision.
11/2,4, pd
Saturday, Nov. 5 at the Monticello
Woman's Clubhouse 975 Pearl Street,
inside and out, rain or shine. Call
997-4553 for pick up.
11/2,4, pd
1521 Spring Hollow Dr., Coopers
PondUS 19 & SR 259,Waukeenah
Hwy, Nov. 5 Saturday,8 am 5pm.
Misc. Items, including Microwave,
Almond Range, Black Locking Tool
SBox for truck and two bikes.
1/2,4, pd
SCommunity Yard Sale Nov. 5
S.is|iiridav 8 am 1pm Ashville
Voluntfeer Fire Department 10 miles
Se'ast of Monetiello on Hwy. 146 just
, past Jefferson Landing Airstrip.
v Evything from furniture to clothing
Sand al priced to sUll!
S10/28,1 11/2,4,pd
Wilkinson Warehouse Sale, We are
SMOVINGO; Eveything must go!
Saturday, Nov, 5, Doors open 8 am -
:12 noon 17O West Gordon Street -
1Valdost, Ga, Call for ilriet'on'
- o/2,4,Cr
* Gara't: ShAlr biLi i rfInP sN > .11n1
uutil- Solid Oak table & chairs and


other furniture, lamps, tools and
more ,267 Ashvlile Hwy. 997-0143
1 I1/2,4,pji
1e,;3or(a '- giiflf S l(ilril)In,. Nip i'lflh -'"
5th 8;00 a.1rn, il 1'00 at ROYAL
MINI STORAGE, U.S. Hwy, #19
SouthFunioture And l/H I items.


GARAGE S ALE: AUTOMQOR _
.. ... .... .. -... .... T. ....._. ....g.g.. .e-, :_d _. --g ...


Community Yard Sale Saturday 8
AM to 1 PM Ashville Volunteer Fire
Department 10 miles east of
Monticello on Hwy 146 just past
Jefferson Landing Airstrip.
Everything from furniture to clothing
and all priced to sell!
Multi Family Yard Sale Sat. Nov. 5, 9
- until South Jefferson 2689.
11/4, pd
Multi family Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 12,
Monticello Family Medicine Parking
Lot, Hwy. 19 South.
11/4, pd
Multi Family Saturday, November 5,
9-1, 95 Nacoosa, 997-5258, Lots of
Good Stuff, Cheap.
1114, pd
Friday November 4 & Saturday
November 5, 8 am until? 1525 East
Pearl Street, 342-1486, Lots of canned
paint.
114, pd

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
9/28, tfn, c
2 or 3 bedroom $450 -' $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
2 Bedroom, 1 bath Mobile Home on 1
acre Ashville Hwy. $400 per month
Pets OK. Call Pam 997-4789.
10/21, tfn, c
2 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, new
carpet, no pets, no children $550
997-6653
11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23 & 25 pd
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath on I acre
Subdivision- Dr., Lloyd, $700 per
month. 997-2640.
11/4, 11, pd
Nice home in historic district. 3
bedroom, 2 bath, LR, DR,
eat-in-kitchen, sun room, utility room,
fireplace, central heat & air, 2 car
carport. $950 per month available
Dec. 1, 997-2640.
11/4, 11, pd .
REAL ESTATE;. ,. '
3 bedroom, quiet neighborhood, close
to town in park like setting. Recent
heat pump and kitchen appliances.
City water and sewer. $149,900.00
Sabor Real Estate 459-4864.
11/4, c
Spacious, lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home. Large private lot. Peaceful
neighborhood (Montavilla). New
Roof, HVAC, more reduced to
$154,900. For details 591-0085, Doris.
11/4, c
SERVICES -,: _:__
Local representative for: Stanley
Home Products, Watkins Products,
Tidings of Love and angel pins,
Happy Home Flavoring & Knives, at
your service. Call 997-3339.
11/4, pd
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
China Painting Lessons. Call Mrs.
Rush 850-894-0265
10/21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names, creeds
,or practices? Jesus established His
church called the church of Christ
and you can be a member of it. We
are ready to help if you are ready to
learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home health Care Equipment -


Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs, 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806
10/21, tfn, c
1999 Ford Contour, silver, automatic,
tinted windows, AC, $3,800. OBO.
11/4, c
FOR SALE
Whitney Spinet Piano $800; Love
:Seat, earth tone colors $100. Both in
excellent condition 997-3105.
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, pd
Rat Terrier puppies 9 weeks old, vet
checked and health certificates,
3-girls, 1-boy. Call Tom 997-1866.
11/4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Wheelchair lift never used,
997-2209.
11/2,4, pd
Louie & Margaret Mills have shelled
pecans for sale. 1276 Clark Rd.
997-2106.
11/2, tfn
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
11/4, fcan


MEAT GOATS

BUCKS

50 to 90

Pounds

(850) 997-6599

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT



Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Nov. 14t'
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


We need 2' chain link fence sections
that can be donated to the Jefferson
County Humane Society. Call the
Jefferson County Humane Society at
342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
Man to repair my tin roof. Must be
licensed. Call anytime after 6pm
997-5081.
11/2, 4, pd.
Someone to graft pecan trees, medium
size to small, from a Desirable to an
Elliott, at least 100 trees. Call
997-4854.
Pecan harvesting equipment,
specifically a Shaker, Harvester,
Cleaner. Call 997-4854
10/28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30,
c
WANT TO BUY
Want to buy real cheap used good
condition large storage shed. We will
pick it up. Call the Jefferson County
Humane Society at 342-0244. Leave a
message we will call you back.


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lie. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957




.vw proven track racork. see-dealer lot tarls Peomcfl rc Onveo
Florida's Fastest Growing
Chevrolet-Buick Dealership is
in need of
Automotive Salespeople
Finance & Insurance Manager trainee
$90,000. Ilia's wa our tlop sal eple lastyeara
lugc Inamtory A vse Aduiswing
FJI .A li'-u4 l .d l -vU ,,i iL nji 4l.. .,ur'u ,
wr..i- ot \JLN Lqlenei.c N.4 NctAwsu1
Previous Reail Experience (Appliance, Eecstroni, niture)
COME TRIPLE YOUR SALARY!
We offer-
Health Insurance 401K
Profit Sharing
Call Mr. Bo Bodiford today for
a confidential interview.

7 54200
CHEVROLET BM
AYl.I:lMi ll I Slter e l.Deer h. Detls


MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

Now Hiring 4th and 8th

Grade Qualified Teachers

CALL: 997-6048



Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715- 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


Aw t*850-509-5004


www.DonnaHazlewood.com
250 S. Jefferson St Monticello, Fl 32344
* 5.07 ACRES away from the hustle
& bustle. Abundant wildlife. $36,500


S560 ACRES with Hwy 19 frontage.
Wooded wlcreek. $6,000 per acre.

+ MONEY MAKER, Towing business
w/real estate on 4.50 Acres. On FL
Rotation list. $259,000


* FARMHOUSE on 10 acres with 3500sqft
Barn. More acreage available. $749,900
r-


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L,lntil You maLc it a Home

.WWW. cbkk. oi1


Rabon
Road
Spacious 3,402
Square foot home.
4Br/ 21/2 baths.
Don't forget the
Refreshing
pool!
$385,000


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jeffersnn
(850) 997-5516


a Own a Piece Of History: Built in 1832.
Original trim work & mantels. Some work
started. Needs a renovator! $163,000
* Country Living: 4BR/4BA 3600+ Sq Ft, all on
11 gorgeous acres $374,500
*New Construction! Charming 3 Br/2Ba with
open floor plan, great for a family, good
neighborhood. $164,900


A Simply the Best!


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REALTOR


(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's


Pond Area cleared and ready to building
on, nice trees, paved road $27,500 each
Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
What a Deal! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3
bath home on five fenced acres w/ guest
cottage/playhouse with bath, big shop, 2
car garage pasture, 100 pecan trees and
a nice pool a real dream for a growing
family $400,000
Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St.
$155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe-Under Contract
off Bassett Dairy, Road in Bellamy Plantation
10 commanding acres with a beautiful view,
lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000 .
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, roind pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County-Under Contract
10 mostly open ac, corner of Paul Thompson
and Julia Road only $150,000
. Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town-Under
Contract on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000
Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
Check Out This One! Under Contract8
acres with big doublewide and small house
on a pretty old hillside close to Leon County
off Julia Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
HUNTING CAMP Lease Available, rent
by the season call for details

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340


See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours


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We have qualified buyers!
AAre you interested in selling?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!

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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., NOVEMBER 4, 2005
V a V Va aa a a a *a arV a _________ V V V V V V '-V V -


Property Owners


This Concerns


Our family has owned Property in Jefferson County for over forty years.

My mother contracted multiple sclerosis several years after we moved
into the County. She could not tolerate the cold weather, so our family
moved to south Florida. We always returned during our school breaks.
During this time we built a farmhouse from scratch. It was made of pecky
cypress, the inside paneling was beautiful. We didn't use contractors. My
father and a group of kids ranging from eleven to fifteen years old did all
the work. My friends have said the pride they had in that achievement has
helped them to grow up straight and true.



I have been assaulted by a sad and depressing set of circumstances over
the last year. First I found out a survey stripped seven acres of land from
our forty-nine acre farm. The legal description on the survey was not
even accurate. According to this survey our farmhouse was no longer on
our land. Months later, our farmhouse burned to the ground. Several
months after that, I found out that a group of developers planned to put a
high-density development behind our farm. On closer scrutiny it became
apparent that they had limited access to Highway 19 because of a
wetlands area that separated their lands from the road. The strip of land I
stand to lose would give them a dry land access to Highway 19. If my
neighbor had not told me there were survey markers running through my
property, I never would have known. Later I found out there was an
application to amend the Comprehensive Land Use Map re-zoning the
property from one unit per five acres to one unit per one acre. I was
informed of this, not by the County, but by Don and Cindy Lee. So
conceivably I could have come up to find a road and houses on my
property. Don't take any long vacations folks!

After Don and Cindy forced the issue, I was informed of a County
Commission meeting to determine the merit of the application. I sent a
letter to the County Commission contesting the acreage. They knew I was
going to be there as I called Mr. Arredondo, the Planning Official,
informing him to that effect and that I intended to be there. I arrived at
the meeting an hour early and waited in the courtroom. I was appalled by
what I heard. Do not be mistaken I was not eaves dropping, you could
not be in the same room and not hear what was being
said. It was very loud, like a flock of crows fighting over a piece of
bread. The Commissioners were not talking about County business. They
were talking about how much money they had made off of this piece of
land and that piece of land.


Mr. Sutphen loudly proclaimed that he got the lower thirty and
Mr.Wainwright got the upper thirty. (Mr.Wainwright bought property
from Mr. Bird in the 90's, which was involved in a similar high-density
type application. It did not survive legal challenge. It brought to light
through the DCA many error re-zonings done illegally by the County).
Only Danny Monroe looked embarrassed and ashamed. Later Mr. Tuten
came up to me, looked me right in the eye, shook my hand, and told me
he had some good news. He told me the application had been withdrawn.
I would not have to return for this, as it could not be resubmitted again
for at least two years. Several months later the same application was
resubmitted without any changes.


To date, I have driven nearly four thousand miles to attend the County
Commission and Planning Board meetings. During that time I have
witnessed a pattern of discrepancies and deletions that bespeak collusion
if not out right malfeasance.


You


I live in West Palm Beach so I have seen it all before. In West Palm
Beach, County Commissioners have done very well. for themselves.
Their accumulated assets range at the high end from forty-eight million
dollars to the new guy, who only has less than seven million dollars. You
see, letting land speculators control the future use of land is kind of like
letting a fox guard the hen house. You can't help seeing the feathers stuck
in their teeth as they mouth the usual platitudes. I understand Mr. Joyner
has lost land to development. That's an interesting way to phrase it, in
light of what has happened to me and some of the other property owners.


I am sure a look at the tax records would shed light on how much this loss
has put in his bank account. Speaking of losing land, less then ten miles
from my home, the biggest imminent domain seizure is now under way.
Four thousand seven hundred and fifty families are having their homes
taken to make way for the Viking harbor project. The biggest imminent
domain seizer is happening since 1954. These people are being paid "in
good faith value" for their homes. That's when the County Commission
and developers decide what to pay you for your land. These people who
are losing their homes will have to leave south Florida as they can no
longer afford to live here or purchase land at the higher price.




The people that will be moving into Jefferson County, living in these
high density exclusive communities, will vote 'in blocks and quickly
overwhelm the thirteen thousand voters who now live in the County.
Your property rights will be in jeopardy. What is happening now is a
good thing as this can still be nipped in the bud. Watching the Commis-
sioners operate is like watching a keystone cops movie.



Only instead of tripping over their own feet, they keep tripping over the
Sunshine Law, their own covenants, the will of the people, and the advice
of the chairman of the planning board. Just wait till you get a bunch of
slick New Yorkers like we have in the Palm Beach County Commission.



Harry Truman said it aptly "Any one who leaves office with more money
then they had before they entered is a crook as there is no profit in public
service".


When these people are thrown out of office, responsible members of the,
community whose sense of ethics is stronger then their personal ambition
need to step forward to fill these positions. Allowing these people to
complete their terms of office would be catastrophic to the values and life
style that the people of Jefferson County have come to take for granted.
It is time to turn outrage and frustration into political action. If supplied
with enough security at the taxpayers expense, perhaps Mr. Joyner would
be immune to such efforts and feel more comfortable in his betrayal of
the public's trust. However, considering the cost of litigatioti pay outs to
environmental lawsuits and degradation of quality of life perhaps it
would be cheaper to buy him a one way ticket to a South American
Country where his political style would meet the status quo and be
welcomed.


(Vv


John Marshall Dewey


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