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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00085
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00085
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text









Management
Jobs May Go
Begging

Editorial, Page 4


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HIlSTORY
4i;4 LIBRAtRY WEST
UNIVLE>RTY OF FLORIJDA



Refuge House
Sponsors Domestic
Violence Program

Story, Photos, Page 7
7


Information
Sought About
Veterans Honor Roll

Story, Photo, Page 9


Wacissa PH Church
Harvest Festival
Set Saturday

Story, Page 10
IIo


Wednesday Morning


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.85, 50 CENTS


Io0


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 20052


Comp Plan Change Gets OK


TWO of the many who spoke against the
Comprehensive Plan amendment on Thurs-
-day night were Bill Tellefsen, center, and,
Cindy Lee, here discussing their concerns


Property Rights Trump

All Other Considerations


with Commission Chairman Skeet Joyner
prior to the commencement of the public
hearing. (News Photo)


Missing Child Triggers


Search Early Saturday


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The reported disappearance of a
three-year-old city boy early Satur-
day morning triggered a search that
involved several law enforcement
agencies and that ultimately may put
into jeopardy the mother's custody
of the child.
Sgt. Roger Murphy, of the Monti-
cello Police Department (MPD), re-
ported Monday that the child was
found unharmed in another part of
town several hours after the initial
report.
But not before officers from the
MPD, the Sheriffs Department, the
,;Florida Department of Corrections,
the Florida Highway Patrol, and the
Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment got involved in the matter, he
said.
As Murphy related it, the MPD re-
ceived a call at 3:48 a.m. Saturday
reporting that a 3-year-old boy was
missing from a residence on Water
Street.
The boy's mother told responding
officers that she had awakened


Boy Found
Unharmed

around 3 a.m. to find her front door
ajar and the child missing.
The MPD requested assistance
from the Sheriffs Department K-9
unit and police officers and
deputies, along with dogs, began an
immediate search of the neighbor-
hood.
At the same time, MPD investiga-
tors conducted a search of the miss-
ing boy's house and interviewed his
mother and others who had visited
the residence during the evening.
"The MPD investigators contacted
the Florida Department of Law En-
forcement (FDLE), which offers as-
sistance to local agencies in missing
children investigations," Murphy
said"' "Several FDLE investigators
arrived to assist. The Florida De-
partment of Corrections also sent
K-9 units to assist, and the Florida
Highway Patrol had a trooper on
scene and an aircraft in the area of-
fering assistance if needed.
While the officers conducted


neighborhood searches, investiga-
tors continued doing interviews and
putting together information packets
for a nationwide law enforcement
alert, along with media and general
information releases to assist in
looking for the missing child.
Then about 9 a.m., a woman
called the police department to re-
port that a small child had wandered
to the residence of her elderly
mother during the wee hours of the
morning and was still there.
"The residence where the child
was located was on Mays Street, the
opposite side of town from where
the child was reported missing,"
Murphy said. "The Mays Street resi-
dent said she had been awaken by a
knock at her door during the early
morning hours.
"The resident found a small child
at her front door. There was no one
with the child. The resident let the
child in. She made the child a place
to sleep. Later that morning, the
resident called her daughter and
asked what should she do about the
child. The daughter notified the
MPD."
(See Missing Child Page 5)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Property rights trumped all other
considerations Thursday night in
commissioners' .4-1 decision to
approve a 73-acre rezoning
application.
After 3-1/2 hours of hearing
residents voice overwhelming
opposition to the proposed
Comprehensive Plan amendment,
the majority voted to approve the
measure, with a stipulation.
That stipulation was that
developers Steve Andris and Don
Joiner reduce the number of planned
houses from 50 to 25. Alan Saucier,
the developers' representative,
agreed to the request on behalf of
his clients.
Commissioner Danny Monroe,
who cast the nay vote on the com-
mission, echoed the concerns of
,,'.1 when he said. the approval
would set a precedent.
"I've done a lot of thinking on this,
since I sat on the Planning
Commission since 1975," Monroe
said. "The Comprehensive Plan says
change should be for a need, not to
help somebody. There are others
* waiting to see what we do with this.
I've heard nobody call me and say
this is something we need to do, that
this is good for the county. This is in
my district, and all I've heard is
fdlks say they don't want it. I'm con-
cerned about the change. I think
we're setting a precedent."
It was a meeting reminiscent of
the heyday of the Texaco and
Colonial Pipeline Company
controversy in the 90s, when crowds
packed the courthouse in vocal
opposition to the then proposed fuel
terminal and petroleum pipeline and
attorneys for the people issued legal
threats.
At least 19 individuals spoke in
opposition to the rezoning, with sev-
eral more foregoing their allotted
three-minute speaking time so that
Attorney Thomas Davis -- repre-
senting three of the adjacent prop-
erty owners -- could expound on his
arguments.
Others speaking against the rezon-
ing included Planning Commission
Chairman Bill Tellefsen (speaking
as a concerned citizen); Neil Fleck-
enstein, a Red Hills planner' with-


Tall Timbers Research Station; and
Susan Anderson, an adjacent prop-
erty owner, former Planning Com-
mission member, and current
planning analyst with the Depart-
ment of Community Affairs (DCA).
The speakers cited a variety of rea-
sons why the 73 acres -- currently
zoned agriculture-5 (one-house-per-
acre) -- should not be rezoned
residential-1, or one house per acre.
Those reasons included legal, aes-
thetical, environmental and eco-
nomical considerations.
A sampling of the speakers and
the concerns expressed:
Tom LaMotte: "I hate to see wells
and septic tanks in this area when
we have other areas that are already
designated for higher density. I don't
think we need to rush to judgment
on this particular site."
Marcie Hamilton: "I don't feel this
zoning change is compatible with
the area. Other areas in the county
are better suited fotr th." :
Tellefsen: "The Comp Plan is a
road map; it shouldn't be changed
until the pressure is there to change
it. In the future, as the need for den-
sity comes, you'll want to do it from
the middle out. That's what urban
sprawl laws are for."
Davis: "There's a very good
chance this rezoning is illegal. Cities


and counties must comply with the
state Comp Plan. It's not a discre-
tionary matter. This is a perfect ex-
ample of urban sprawl. It's not only
illegal, it's, illogical."
(He also alluded to legal and po-
litical consequences, should the
commission proceed with a yes
vote.)
Fleckenstein:' "The concern is the
precedent it will establish. While
this is a small parcel, the larger per-
spective is that it will establish a
precedent for future Comp Plani
amendments."
Anderson: "I work for the DCA
reviewing amendments like this one
and I can tell you this amendment
will not stand up under DCA scru-
tiny. You are leapfrogging every-
thing that should be developed.
You're putting us in the position of
having to fight you and we're going
all the way. We have no options. It's
not right."
Others spoke eloquently of their
experiences in once lovely places
such as Tampa, Orlando and Bonita
Springs, now gone the way of total
development. Did commissioners
want the- same clings to happen
here?
They pointed out the potential for
water quality contamination from
septic tanks; the effect of runoff on
adjacent property owners; and the
fallacy of economic benefit, given
that for every dollar of taxes raised
by a development, it costs the
(See Comp Plan Page 2)


ATTORNEY DAN PASCALE, left, here talking with Planning
Official Bob Arredondo, substituted for Attorney Scott
Shirley on Thursday night. Shirley normally advises the -
commission on planning and zoning matters. (News Photo)


Commissioners Hire New


Grants Director For County


ROY SCHLEICHER, the county's new grants
director, gets congratulations from Exten-
sion Office Director Larry Halsey, who over-


saw the restructuring of the Grants Office.
Standing on right is Schleicher's wife, Senta
M. Goudy. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The county's new grants director
is Roy Schleicher, a longtime resi-
dent of central Florida who moved
into the Tallahassee area not long
ago.
"We have lived in central Florida
for the past 33 years and recently
moved here so that my wife could
accept a statewide position in alco-
hol and drug prevention programs,"
Schleicher wrote in his introductory
letter to commissioners. "She had
- deferred numerous times for my ad-
vancement and it was time for me to
step back and give her the opportu-
nity to enhance her career."
Commissioners selected Schlei-
cher over six other candidates, based


Resume Shows
Wealth Of
Experience
on what they said was his extensive
background in local government.
Schleicher's resume shows that he
has been a city manager, an elected
county official, and owner and op-
erator of his own consulting busi-
ness, among other things.
His most recent employment, per
his resume, was president and owner
of Flowing Well Associates Inc., an
organization that provides strategic
planning, marketing and public rela-
tions for local governments. .
Prior to 2000, his resume shows
that he was city manager for the
City of Deltona for slightly over a
year and also served six years on the


Volusia County Council, between
1984 and 1990.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin alone
voted against Schleicher's hiring.
"His resume presents itself well,"
Sutphin said. "I've just got a gut
feeling that he won't stay in Jeffer-
son County."
"He's retired and building a house
in the county," Commissioner
Danny Monroe said. "I don't see
him going anywhere."
"I too rated him up there," Com-
missioner Junior Tuten said. "I
never downgrade a candidate be-
cause he may use this as a stepping
stone."
The grants director answers di-
rectly to the County Commission.,
His job will be to pursue and admin-
ister grants for all county operations.


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED.. OCTOBER 26, 2005


Mark Slik Named

Air Force Unit Top

Field Grade Officer


JCHS STUDENTS board bus for a reward
trip to Wild Adventures, Monday. This is an
annual reward for students who passed the


grade 10 FCAT, and/or made significant
gains on the test. (News Photo)


JCHS Homecoming Week's


Activities Begin Monday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School-
will celebrate its annual Homecom-
ing Week Oct. 31 through Nov. 4.
AP'e Stepping High In '05".
,Yestivities begin Monday, Oct. 31
Nvith Halloween Dress-Up and
TIcky Day.
-Tuesday is Camouflage and Hat
Day, and at 6 p.m. in the new gym,
the varsity volleyball team will take
on the staff from the Teen Center at
the first game hosted in the new
gym. Admission is $1 per person.
Wednesday is Rat Day and
Faculty/Senior Dress-Up Day and
Thursday is Spirit Day, when stu-
dents and staff dress in the Tiger
colors of orange and blue. It is also
Class Competition Day.
SSpokesman Bill Brumfield said
that there will be many games and
activities with grades 9-12 compet-
ing against each other.
A pep rally, during which the
Homecoming Court will be intro-
duced is also planned.
During lunch, a DJ will provide
music.
There is no school Friday, but ac-
tiv, ities begin with the annual pa-
rade through town. The Grand
Marshall is George Pittman, Sr.
:Participants will lineup along
Rocky Branch Road in front of the


elementary school. They will
travel west to Railroad Street, turn
left on Railroad and head south.
They will turn right on Dogwood
-Street, cross over North Jefferson
Street and walk down to Supervisor
of Elections Marty Bishop's office
and end at the old high school gym
parking lot.
Spectators are invited to sit on the
grassy knoll in front of Bishop's of-
fice and enjoy the parade.
There will be a reception begin-
ning at 6:15 p.m. for the senior
football .players, cheerleaders and
their parents, the homecoming
court.

Kickoff for the Homecoming
game against Lafayette is at 7:30
p.m.
Former queens are invited to con-
tact Brumfield at JCHS so they can
be introduced during the half time
festivities.
"We want to get a military
Humvy for them to ride in during
-the parade," said Brumfield.

Brumfield is also seeking all
county residents who served in ei-
ther,pesert Storm and Iraq to con-
tact him.

"At half time the JROTC and the
JCHS band will perform, and the
Homecoming Queen and her court
will be introduced.
This year, each class will also
have male representatives. Mr. and


Comp Plan Change


(Continued From Page 1)
county $3 in services.
Commissioners focused narrowly
oni economics and property rights.
:Commissioner Gene Hall alluded
to: the loss of agricultural activities
such as the pecan and watermelon
crops that once provided employ-
ment and economic benefits here.
His point appeared to be that devel-
opments would provide jobs and cir-
culate money in the community
once again.
Commissioner Junior Tuten de-
nied that the change would set a
precedent. Each proposal stood or
failed on its own merits, he said.
But more important, "any time we
limit property rights, we limit your
rights also," he said. "...I don't en-
courage development; I don't dis-
courage it. A lot of people want to
kdep their land for their children and
that's good. But those who can't, I
cannot restrict them."
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin men-
tioned being threatened by oppo-
nents of the rezoning. Meaning that
hq would pay the political conse-
qqences if he voted for the rezoning.
'I will not sell my soul for the
ndxt four years just to be reelected,"
Siitphin said. "If you don't like me,
you can vote me out in the next
three years. But right now, I'm do-
ing what is best for Jefferson
Cpunty."
SBesides, the commission's deci-
sibn was only one small part in a
long and involved process that in-
clided state and federal permitting
requirements, he added.
?"We're just a small spoke in a big
wheel," Sutphin said.
-Commissioner Skeet Joyner like-
wise said he had been threatened by
opponents of the rezoning. But "po-
litical repercussions mean nothing to
me," he said.
:"I have heard it said, do what the
people 'want," Joyner continued. "I
have talked to people on the street,
on the sidewalk and in the stores. I
have listened to my constituents.


< But there are 14,000 people in this
county, not just 100."
The real issue, however, was
property rights, he let it be known.
Joyner said he presently owned a
piece of land that developers were
constantly approaching him about.
He had no plan to sell the parcel,
which represented "an insurance
policy", he said.

But should his personal circum-
stance change and necessity dictate
that he develop the property one
day, "I want to have that right," Joy-
ner said.
It was at this point Tuten offered a
compromise, asking if the develop-
ers were willing to limit the devel-
opment to 25 houses. The limitation
essentially changes the request from
residential-1 to agriculture-3, or one
house per three acres.
It was not clear at the conclusion
of the meeting if the compromise
was acceptable to the opponents of
the rezoning, especially those adja-
cent property owners who had
threatened legal action.


American Heart e
Association-y
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke

A Call to Arms:
Check Blood
Pressure.


Miss freshman are Jemaria Cuyler-
and Arsenio Bright.
Mr. and Miss Junior are Carmen
Skipworth and Kevin Hill.
There will be two Miss Sopho-
more, Jazmaun Hall and Karlissa
Miller, their escort, two JROTC ca-
dets, as yet unnamed.
The Homecoming King is James
Skipworth and the candidates for
Homecoming Queen are Cashanda
Coleman, Alexia Huggins and.Ta-
bitha Smith.


Of-mm-


i~
1%


Darlene J. O'Brien


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

US Air Force Captain Mark Slik,-
son of Sheila and Ron Slik, of Mon-
ticello, was recently selected as
Number One Field Grade Officer in
his unit for the year 2005.
He is a 1985 graduate of Jefferson
County High School, and enlisted
into the Air Force in 1986.
He was President of the first Jun-
ior Class in the state of Florida to
have a 100 percent pass rate on the
State Achievement Test.
He believes the reason for the
good grades was because the kids
mentored kids through the Flying
Tigers Computer Program.
He remembers having lunch with
the Governor at the Governors Man-
sion and receiving a certificate
signed by the Governor to take back
to his classmates.
Slik is recognized for his ability
to delegate, encourage, and
motivate.
Six years ago his Major urged him
to enroll in Officers Candidate
School, and work on his college
education while in the service.
His 3.85 GPA has earned him
rank advancements..
When he retires from the Air


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Force his plan is to move back to the
County area and teach ROTC at
Florida State University.
He hints that retirement might also
bring on a political career.
At this time Slik readies for a
transfer to Delaware from
California. He also continues to
work on his Masters degree.


SLIK


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005 PAGE 3


ACA Fall Festival


Planned Friday


&


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy cele-
brates its annual Fall Festival 3 to 6
p.m., Friday.
A costume parade for the chil-
dren begins at 3:30 p.m., and
games, prizes, inflatables, theme
basket raffles, face painting, food
booths, and the dunking booth are
planned.
Spokesperson Leslie Wilkinson
said that this year a larger crowd
than usual is expected.
New to the festival this year, are
the Cub Scouts and their "Pine-
wood Derby Track," a game that
gives children the opportunity to
race cars made by the scouts.
All games are homemade, and
each offers prizes. As usual, one of
the booths will give gold fish as
prizes.
The games require from one to
three tickets, which are available on
site at four for $1.
Students began selling tickets for
the basket raffle last week and the
tickets can be purchased until 5:45
the day of the event for $1. Win-
ners need not be present to win.
Each class, K-3 through six, cre-
ates its own theme basket. Basket
themes include: K-3, games; K-4,
kitchen; one K-5 class, "Jafra" cos-
metics; and the other K-5 class cre-
ated an FSU basket.
Other basket themes are: Grade
one, Gators; Grade one, Christmas;
Grade two, hunting and fishing;
Grade three, pamper yourself;


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Humane Society Plans


Trail Ride, Family Fun Day


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Plans for the annual Trail Ride
and Family Fun Day, were revealed
at a recent meeting of the Humane
Society.
President Caroline Carswell ad-
vised that the event begins 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Nov.: 19, at Hay Pond
Farm, off Dills Rd.
She said that a good crowd was
expected and 700 members of the
Southern Trail Riders have been
notified of the event, as well as the
Fox Hunters Association.
"I don't know how the Fox Hunt-
ers will respond, but the Trail Rid-
ers are very interested and love
riding in areas where they have
never been before," said Carswell.
Dinner selections include Al's
Gourmet chicken dinners, and Bos-
ton Butt Barbecue pork
sandwiches, both served % ith all of
the fixings for $8 each, including
either a canned drink or bottled wa-
ter.
All proceeds will go to the Hu-
mane Society.
The trail ride begins at 10 a.m.
and continues until noon. The en-
try fee is $10 per horse, and riders
are asked to bring their own horses
because rental horses will not be
available.
Also, it is mandatory that entered
animals have proof of a negative


Coggins test.
Family Fun Day activities begin at
approximately 1:30 p.m., and in-
clude pony rides, hay rides, horse-
shoes, egg and spoon races on
horseback, horseback musical
buckets, croquet, badminton, sing-:
a-longs and contests for the coolest
horse, and best ,turned out, just to
name a few. Prizes will be
awarded. '
Carswell said there may also be
carriage rides available,.
Raffle tickets will alsobe avail-
able for $1 each or 22 for $20. The
prize is a Bay yearling.
Barn related door prizes will also
be awarded, including halters, lead
ropes, feed and other horse-related
items.
"For those who come out and
don't want to participate in the trail


ride, we will have a large TV set up
in the barn for the guys who would
rather view the big FSU game,"
said Carswell.'
She added that games will also be
conducted during the trail ride for
smaller children and those who can
not ride.
Carswell stressed the importance
of volunteers for the event.
"We are going to need prize gath-
. erers, food setup and cleanup
crews, and food servers," Carswell
said.
She added that if by chance all of
the food is not eaten, what re-
mained would be donated toa non-
profit organization, such as a senior
center.
For further information, or to
RSVP for lunch so sufficient food
can be prepared, call Carswell at
997-4000.


Opera House Sets Auditions

For December Radio Show


The Opera House Stage Company
will hold auditions for a Live Radio
Theatre production of the Christmas
Classic "Miracle on 34th Street," 5
p.m., Sunday, Nov. 6, and 7 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 7, at the Opera
House.
Peformance' dates is Saturday,
Dec. 10.
No previous experience is re-
quired and there are no lines to
-learn, as the script is read for the ra-


dio audience.
For additional information, con-
tact the Opera House at 997-4242.
In other Opera House news, the
Ghost Run Car Rally takes place 1
p.m, Saturday. Call for additional
information.



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Grade four, rainy day basket;
Grade five, coffee and tea lovers;
Grade six, a store gift cards basket.


Baskets are large and contain a-
variety of items relating to the
themes.
Grade 10 will sell hot dogs;'-
Grade 11, chicken dinners; Grade,
12, hamburger dinners.
There will be at least 18 games,
including the obstacle course, and.
the cake walk, which will offer-.
many home baked items as prizes. '



a..


THE EASY WAY TO SELL, PLACE YOUR AD IN
THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THE: u
MONTICELLO NEWS 997-3568


Thomasville Ducks Unlimited

2005 Fall Events


NOTICE OF PUBLIC IVlAa.a:aNG

The District School Board Of Jefferson
County Announces A Workshop To
Which The Public Is Invited


Date: November 1, 2005
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

Subject: Possible Uses of "A" Building Pur-
chasing & Bidding Policies 6.101 Surplus
Land, Kim Barnhill (YMCA) Set Time for
Reorganization


DUCKS

UNLIMITED


DU Event fo~rkidt. of a,1 ages!
Sunday, Oclob-ar 234'
Seminole P131itnflon
Registrationi. 1 :OUpem.
Speci~d Guzst: Tom ~Kna~pp,
Exhibition sh-ootcr for BcrbcIik&- FedmW P 1rerniuni!
For morc in~fimation,
Coniact Kevlin's at 22&1-7766

Main FP#quet
Thiufsday, Novemfber 3"'
Exchange Club Fairground-,
Lar~gesX Gun Rafic tE vcr!
Cocktails,. 6:0()PM

Tic6kew $ 60 before (he event
Or 171)at the door
For more i n fo~rmati on
Contad Tom HarHson


B rynwood Center

L4 |1^ 21656 Souti Jefferson
MonticelTo, florida 32344
(850) 997-1800


ATTENTION FAMILY AND FRIENDS

OF OUR STAFF AND RESIDENTS:


THERE IS A NEWI GIRL IN TOWN!

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO THE FAMILY COUNCIL MEETING
ON OCTOBER 26, 2005 FROM 5:30 P.M. UNTIL 6:30 P.M. THIS is
YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO MEET OUR NEW ADMINISTRATION,
BRENDA LACY! YOU WILL ALSO MEET THE NEW DIRECTOR OF
NURSING, DONNA ELLIOTT! COME OUT AND ENJOY AN EVENING
OF RELAXATION, GREETINGS AND LAUGHS WITH YOUR FAMILY,
FRIENDS AND THE STAFF. IT'S TIME TO EXPERIENCE THE NEW
BRYNWOOD CENTER! REFRESHMENTS WILL, BE SERVED. AN
RSVP IS APPRECIATED, BUT NOT REQUIRED.

Sincerely
'Toni D. Jenk ins-Flavien
SociafServices/'iidm issioins,'Alarketing 'Director

fMl ia^lil@ MMUl mrlEl-ll|^|^|^| [ @|I^I|UMfE-(MIM|MI^IM@l lIMMl-|lj IMflnlM l5l^l^^l-lilrl|


UNUNED


Travis Bryant al' 226-JX320









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN'0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

: -q .-. RON CICHON
EMEPublisher


: RAY CICHON
.! Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Management Jobs

May Go Begging
Within the. next decade, 'baby Fortunately, motivated profession-
-boomners who presently hold the als still have time to learn the skills
% asi majority of senior management they need to succeed in the coming
positions in America's companies years.
.- ll. begin retiring, setting off a In "Bring Your 'A' Game: The 10
?chain reaction where workers are Career Seciets of the, High
rapidly promoted to corporate lead- Achiever'" (Sourcebooks,' $14.95),
ership positions to fill the vacancies Rob McGovern, founder and former
an occurrence never.before seen on CEO of CareerBuilder.com, lays out
:such a scale in the U.S. job market. a proactive plan to set professionals
The problem is 'one that can be on the right track for business lead-
traced to the "dot-com" boom of the ership.
19I9 McGovemrn draws on his expertise
That freewheeling period led to a as a successful entrepreneur and a
generation of talented professionals professional skills developer to dis-
unprepared to take over. cuss the top, 10- must-have skills for
Many of these startup companies, tomorrow's business leaders:
failed, but the ones that made it 1. Formal self-developed career
-Through were the product of ingen- plan:
'" .ou- business models and savvy en- 2. Ability to do the easy "stuff'
Strepreneurs. well.
During the "bubble" economy," 3. Willingness to be coached.
C(EOs and executives were told to 4. Action-oriented curiosity.
'"make their own rules" and "'be. free 5. Ability to communicate clearly.
.agent" instead of laying a true 6. Superior people skills.
toundanon foi a solid career in cor- Ability to handle corporate com-
porate America ,, ', I
A decade or ,so later, what's brew- .Abili,;, .5 learn by observation.
'in is a perfect storm where millions 9. Resourceful problem solving
o1f management job openings are va- skills.
:. cant with few qualified candidatesto 10. Ability to. make sound career
-oo\e in. choices.


From Our Photo File


I


IN AN EARTH DAY celebration at Howard
Middle School, in April, 1990, Forester
Mike Humphrey planted a tree at the


school, assisted by students from various
classes. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment



Diehard Smokers Not Deterred


Back when I smoked cigarettes,
most everybody else smoked so no-
body noticed the blue cloud that'
hung over the newsroom.
Fact is, when new staffers came to
work you were sure to have an ash-
tray on their desk. It was standard
equipment..
That was back in 1964 when I had
my last cigarette.
These days, you almost feel sorry
for smokers 'cause they are. not
wanted in most places. Stores, malls,
restaurants, buses, cabs, planes, and
trains don't allo\% siiokin,. .


Publisher's

Notebook


.Ronz C/iefon


pretty ripped at government warning
So you see smokers behind build- about cigarette smoking.
ings and in alleys puffing away. She joined some kind of organiza-
They stand out, in the cold or swel- tion for smokers and wrote letters to
tearing heat. And there are fewer and her Senators and Congressman ask-
fewer of them doing it. ing them to quit picking on smokers.
That's because we're told smoking f you v'.. nted ;i .:'A od jar.iument,
causes, cancer, heart attacks, and ul-" ail i,'. laid Lt do was suggest, she
cers. I read somewhere it causes cut back on heri smoking. That was
wrinkles too. like waving a red flag in front of a


The diehard smokers are a pretty
feisty group. They're gonna smoke
no matter what.
I knew one woman who was


But she's gone now. She was a
cancer victim.,
Some time ago when I read about


smoking causing wrinkles, I told a'
couple of cigarette smokers what I
learned.
Boy, did they pounce on me!
One told me she was afraid of get-
ting fat if she quit smoking so she
v would continue-smok-in,, thank.k ou
\i'..'tlI I id m e : I didni I L.ilc ii
she was wrinkling her face. She en-
joyed her cigarettes.
I didn't tell anybody else about
smoking causing wrinkles!,
These days it's full court press


when it comes to smoking. Tobacco
companies are paying big bucks in
settlement to states and some of that
money is going to pay for anti-
smoking education aimed at young
people.
Not too long ago, there was a bill
in Congress to levy a 50 cent per
pack tax on cigarettes, but it was de-
feated.
The tobacco 'companies spent
nearly $50 million to defeat the tax.
And, the battle is not over.
Clearly, the tobacco companies are
under siege.
Meantime those who. wish to
smoke must find some place to do it.
You'll find them in the most un-
likely places sneaking a smoke.
Me?' I don't say anything to ciga-
rette smokers anymore. They get
prett.i.lostile...
And:. I"nir getting' too old for liosil-
ity.
If you smoke cigarettes and don't
like this column, that's okay with
me.
If you are not a smoker and like
this column, that's okay too.


From Our

TEN EARS AGO
October 18, 1995
c Circuit Court Jtid-e Nikki Clark
SlastI "week denied the Jeferise's re-'
:quest for appoinirimeni of an expert
t,:, le% iet' the composition of the Es-
'Scambia County jury that found John
"'Bilk Joe" Crunitie g-uilt, ofminur-
'- der in the British tourist case.
The Jefferson Couint Ambulance
Serve ice took delivery of, a new.
.i emergeciL vehicle on Friday after-'
I lc.n
The District Court of Appeal last-
, week reaffirmed in writing its earlier
ruling overturning Circuit Court
Judge Nikki Clark's decision to
deny .bail to 18-year-old: Roy
Kirkland, charged in the Fti st degree
murder of Montee Johnson.
TWENTY YEARS' AGO
October 16, 1985
;^ Law, enforcement officials have
,,had their hands full the last few days
,'responding to reports of.theft.
Jefferson County teachers are
waiting for a decision from the leg-
'islature on the governor's veto -of
,"their new statewide teachers' certifi-
,cation law.
County Commissioners have re-
:,cently received a pay' raise that is
about twice :as much as the pay raise
lihe', approved for county
'eln ployees.
5 THIRTY YEARS AGO
October 16, 1975
Aucilla's defense shut down high
,scoring Mike Pollock and got a pair
'of touchdowns from Kenny Russi in
beating Sneads 15-0 at Aucilla Fri-


Letters to theE
: 500 W6or


Letters i

I

,,1 ii ,,e1 i,1
F'~ lm llPI qn i :"'' :' l,


Files
day nih r
E:el';n Brnnen,. Monticello resi-
dent, has announced that she is a
candidate for election as City Clerk.
Leroy Judah has announced his
candidacy for election as City Mar-
shall arid Tax Collector.
Wally Dunn, prominent Monti-
cello golfer won the annual George
Tapper tournament at St. Joseph's
;Bay Country.Club iq Port St. Joe.
Jane and Jimmy Pafford who are
attending Auburn University spent
the weekend with their parents, Mr.
and Mrs. James Pafford.
Jefferson County High School
held its first assembly program in
the'"new auditorium last Friday.
The Marching Tigers went to Port
St. Joe last Friday .night. They were
back on the road Saturday ignoring
for the Pine Tree Festival in Perry.
FORTY YEARS AGO
October 15, 1965
Judge and Mrs. S.D. Clark on his
retirement as senior warden of Epis-
copal Church of Monticello was,
honored with a dinner at the Jeffer-
son Country Club.

Franklin Smith, county office
manager for the Agriculture Stabili-
zation and Conservation Service fin-
ished 30 years of service in the local
office on October 5th.

Employees of the Farmers and
Merchants Bank, and their wives
and husbands enjoyed a fish fry last.
Thursday evening at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. L.C. Griffin Jr.


Testing Is Educational Tool


BY MICHAEL H. KEAN.

As testing becomes a major part of
states and federal school improve-
ment efforts, parents are seeking as
greater understanding of the role. of
testing..
Parents also want to know how
they can best help their children..
Much of what parents need to know
about testing can be found by asking
10 key questions.
Question: Why should my child
take this test? .
Answer: Tests provide objective
and consistent methods to measure
what students have learned and what
they need to learn. Equally impor-
tant, tests provide teachers ith
valuable information* about ho'\
they can target instruction to. best
help.children achieve.
Question: What do tests measure?
Answer: Tests can be designed tc
measure any number of things: read-
ing skills, the ability to solve prob-
lems, mathematical concepts, spell-
ing and so on. Many states have es-
tablished testing programs that are


closely aligned with state education
standards specifying what students
should know and be able to do at
-each grade level enabling parents
to monitor a child's progress.
Question: Can my child be ad-
vanced a grade or held back -
solely on her performance on a test?
Answer: Altlough some states are
linking test results to "uigh stakes"
decisions such as promotion and
graduation, test scores typically are
not the sole determining factor. The
vast majority of states use multiple
measures including other types of
tests, course grades, attendance re-
cords and individual evaluations
made by teachers and specialists in
making high stakes decisions.
Question: What about criticisms
concerning "teaching to the test"?
Answer: Since tests are designed
to determine what children know,
teachers are expected to teach the
general curriculum content that will
be. measured. Providing instruction
linked to curriculum standards is ap-
propriate and desirable. However,'
teaching the same questions that ac-
tually appear on the test prior to the"


test administration invalidates the
test and is considered unethical,
Question: How do we know that
the test is accurate?
Answer: The major standardized
tests undergo extensive and rigorous
research and development phases to
ensure that they are valid, fair and
reliable.
Question: Who will help me un-
derstand and interpret .my child's
scores?
Answer: Test scores are used in a,
variety of ways. Tl,ey, pro't ide feed-
back to teachers and parents about a'
child's performance so that instruc-
tion can be targeted to specific areas
where help is needed. School dis-
tricts and states may also use test re-
sults to help evaluate instructional
programs and. individual schools to
ensure that they are effective.
Question: Are today's tests differ-
ent .from those used in the 1960s and
1970s?
Answer: Today's test are more en-
gaging and interesting through their
use of color, stories and
illustrations: That's not all. The tests
themselves have changed. While the


"fill in the circle" type test is still
commonly used, new types of tests
include short essays, experiments
and even team projects.
Question: Will my child learn any-
thing from the test?
Answer: Most likely, yes. Over
the past 10 years, many standardized
tests have been redesigned to make
test items more instructional in na-
ture. Children will also learntime
management and discipline, as most
tests provide a finite amount of time
'to answer the questions, preparing
the student for real life situations
with time-senritive tasks and prob-
lem solving.
Question: How can I help my
child prepare for the test?
Answer: First and foremost, sup-
port all aspects of your children's
education. Monitor their progress,
and make sure they are getting the
help they need to succeed. Get to
know their teachers.
Have an ongoing dialogue with
your children, asking questions
about the subject matter of their
tests, and help them establish a
(See Education Page 5)


Pollution Hurts National Parks


BY THOMAS C. KIERNAN

* Recently, my two sons and I hiked
Old Rag in Shenandoah and camped
on the ridge of the mountain an
event that has become an annual rit-
ual for us.
Every year, millions of Americans
venture into national parks across
the country, seeking relaxation and
inspiration in these treasured places,
- my family among them.
We look forward to enjoying the
fresh, clean air of the national parks.
Unfortunately, more and more it
seems as though we'd get cleaner air
if we stayed home.


Dozens of outdated power plants
that have operated for decades with-
out modem emissions controls spew
-millions of tons of pollution into the
air surrounding our parks each year.
Regrettably, this pollution can re-
duce visibility in parks like Shenan-
doah to only a few miles.
Once, visitors to Shenandoah
could see the Washington Monu-
ment approximately 70 miles
distant. Today, average summer
views extend only 25 miles, ob-
scured by a grayish haze.
Besides marring scenic views and
harming plants and wildlife, air pol-
lution also. threatens the health of
'park visitors and nearby communi-


ties.
On some days, air quality is so
dirty that visitors to Shenandoah and
other parks must check to see
whether it's safe for them to hike or
bike in the park.
The story is repeated from coast to
coast. Parks such as Great Smoky
Mountains in Tennessee and North
Carolina, Sequoia and Joshua Tree
.in California, the Grand Canyon in
Arizona, Rocky Mountain in Colo-
rado and Acadia in Maine are all af-
fected by air pollution.
For too many Americans, a visit to
a national park during some months
can include chest pain, shortness of
breath, coughing or even an asthma


attack all triggered by air
pollution.
Filthy air is not what Congress had
in mind when it began setting aside
America's treasured places.
In 1916, Congress established the
National Park Service to "...con-
serve the scenery and the natural
and historic objects and the wildlife
therein...as will leave them unim-
paiied for the enjoyment of future
generations."
Congress made its intentions even
more explicit in the Clean Air Act
Amendments of 1977 where it de-
clared "...as a national goal the pre-
(See Pollution Hurts Page 5)







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...


Writer Says Commissioners


approved Illegal Rezoning
TDear Editor: Let me state first that Commis- property rights of the neighbor
I I attended the County Commission sioner Danny Monroe responded'to landowners? Do neighbors not ha
meeting, Thursday, Oct. 20. the occasion with great dignity, hon- the right to expect protection fro
The central topic was a proposed esty, and common sense. I wish I such problems as runoff from ov
r change in the Comprehensive Plan, could say the same for the rest of flowing septic tanks, pollution
regarding the rezoning and develop- the panel, their wells, and similar public hea
ment of 73 acres on Hwy 19. The others, obviously under great issues? Evidently not, according
It was a heated meeting, which in- stress, responded with what can only these commissioners.
5 evolved several hours of public com- be described as "pious hogwash." Quite clearly, the commission
ment, all of which opposed the re- Here is a summary of their argu- are selectively applying their "prc
zoning request. ments: erty rights" argument to develop
S Essential arguments were that the The sanctity of property rights. but not to the average homeowner
; proposed changes were illegal; that With trembling lips and thumping of My second reaction is even ma
they would negatively impact the chests, several commissioners basic. How can the commission su
neighboring property owners; 'and avowed the rights of owners/devel- port, a proposal that, on the face
that they would set a poor opers to do whatever they wanted it, is arguably illegal? Shifting
: precedent, which would affect fu- with their land. sponsibility to a State agency is
ture land-use decisions in the whole So what if the development is ille-, moral cop out.
county. gal? That problem, they suggest, There is nothing wrong with ma
Towards the end of the evening, can be handled by the appropriate ing money. Several commissioner
each County Commissioner ex- State agency, when the project is re- asserted this obvious principle, a
plained his viewpoint on the issues, viewed, later down the road. then with a wink and a nod, su
:.and this part of the meeting was I have two reactions to this line of gested that it was also alright
most enlightening. -reasoning: First, what about the stretch the rules to get as mu


Dear Editor:
I have been critical in several let-
ters to the editor, of most of the
County Commission, and Planning
Commission, not qf all, but of most.
Today, I'm not complaining and
instead want to acknowledge some
'elected and non-elected officials
who are doing a good job for us, in
my opinion.
The following officials and their
staff members have always treated
me with courtesy and professional-
ism, when I have dealt with their of-
fices: Mary Bishop, supervisor of
elections; David Ward, property ap-_


praiser; Lois Howell-Hunter, tax
collector, and Dale Boatwright,
clerk of court.
Also I have always found County
Commissioner Danny Monroe, will-
ing to listen and act like a
gentleman, even though he does not
represent my district.
Planning Commission members:
Bill Tellefsen, Bud Wheeler, and Pat
Murphy listen to citizen input, and
do their best to make responsible
recommendations.
Thanks to all of you.
Sincerely,
Wayne Searcy


MDA Thanks 'News' For

Boot Drive Coverage
!Dear Editor: Association.
On behalf of the Muscular Dystro- Every dollar raised will assist in
phy 'Association, and those we the payment or repair of leg braces
serve, we would like to thank the and wheelchairs, provide a fun-
Monticello News for the exposure filled week to MDA summer camp
given to Jefferson County Fire Res- for children with muscular dystro-
cue and their bootdrive would not phy, and continue the much needed
have been successful \ itliout the research, which one day will result
coverage. in finding a cure for these devastat-
With the help of the paper, Jeffer- ing diseases.
son County Fire Rescue was able to
raise $2,798 for the Muscular Dys- [ We would like to thank the Mon-'
'trophy Association. ticello News again for its coverage
Funds raised' will go towards of the event, and look forward to
many services to children and adults working with the paper in the com-
in the'Noirthwest Florida and South- ing year.
em Georgia communities, that are Sincerely,
diagnosed with one of the 43 neuro- Crystal Lee
muscular diseases covered by the Program Coordinator


Call Senior Center If

Attending Free Dinner


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Senior Citizens Center is
sponsoring a free dinner, 11 a.m.,
Thanksgiving Day, for anyone who
comes 'out to the Opera House, the
use of which has been donated, for
the day.
The Center requests that citizens
who plan to attend, call Gloria at the
'Center, 342-0242, as soon as possi-
ble, to help determine how much
food to prepare.
Likewise the Center seeks volun-
teers to help with the dinner, as well
as donations towards the dinner.
Volunteer Gloria McGhee notes
that some people can not, or do not


want to cook a holiday dinner for
one.
Recognizing that the holidays can
be devastating for the single,
elderly, homeless, and working
poor, McGhee said: "I am hoping to;
make this a true community
project.",
By serving dinner at 11 a.m., vol-
unteers may still enjoy the afternoon
with family and friends, she added.
Donations are now sought for tur-
keys, salad fixings, cornbread dress-
ing, cranberry sauce, potatoes,
gravy, vegetables, rolls, desserts,
and iced tea.
Paper products, or cash donations
are also sought and can be delivered
to the Senior Center at 1155 North
Jefferson Street.


/1


ng
yve
om
er-
of
lth
to

ers
>p-
rs,

ore
ip-
of
re-
Sa

Ak-
ers
nd
ag-
to,
ch
I


money as one could from a develop-
ment.
They also assured the public that
they had no personal financial inter-
est in the matter, since they had no
current plans to sell or develop their
own property.
But then came the slip: One com-
missioner mentioned that in the fu-
ture, family fortunes might force
him to sell. Here is the rub: If he
can set a precedent now for loosely
enforced rules about development,
doesn't he stand to make an extra
profit on his own property. in the fu-
ture?
I won't be threatened. One com-
missioner gave an impassioned ora-
tion that he had been threatened by
phone, by letter, and on the, street by
opponents of the proposed change in
zoning.
But he assured the audience that he
would not be intimidated, and would
vote his conscience.
I was stunned, as were many
others, I am sure. Later, he ex-
plained the nature of the threats:
Citizens had told him that they
would not vote'for him at the next
election.. All '' can' say is "C'mon
buddy. This is America, and it's a
democracy."
Beyond this, no further comment
seems required for this commis-.
sioner's pathetic argument.
Overall, at this critical time in the
history of our county, I worry about
the quality of ieadLrship in our
elected officials.
I hope that the offending Commis-
sioners can put aside their personal
biases and begin to otver't for the
general betterment of our county.
Sincerely,
Jack Hokanson

Missing Child
(Continued From Page 1)
Subsequent interviews revealed
thut the child, had been left alone at
the family residence at least once
during the previous evening, accord-
ing to Murphy.
He said investigators contacted' the
Department of Children and Family
Services and the child was placed, in
the temporary custody of a relative
while police continue investigating
the incident..


Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not
natural. Help keep
, our wildlife safe.


RESIDENT DON LEE, dressed a fluorescent
pink shirt with appropriate lettering carried


THIS vehicle was parked near the court-
louse at noon last Monday, with its posted


Education
(Continued From Page 4)
healthy study pattern. Helping chil-
dren p'epare long before a test is a
critical factor to their doing well on
the test. When test time comes, be
positive and supportive.

.-. don't encourage yourchildren to
"cram" for a test. Standardized tests
measure cumulative skills that can-
not be improved by cramming. Chil-
dren should get a good night's rest
and eat a nutritious breakfast before
a test.


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


his sign on US 19 south, last week, urging
motorists to vote no on rezoning issue.


sign encouraging citizens to vote against the
rezoning issue. (News Photos)


r-' 6 1I VALUE, SERVICE & SELECTION IN TALLAHASSEE
WEDDING 'HIMOREN'SPARTIES ANNIVERSARIES BIRTHDAY




Supplies
850-325-DORA ,
9q DORA CRAIN Owner (3672)
|' 2~"2 Fax:850-325-3673


3048-B West Tharpe St.-Tallahassee,


FL 32303;


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong comm/717Unity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844 I


(Continued From Page 4)
vention of any future, and the
rcmedying of any existing, impair-
'ment of visibility in [national parks
'and'wilderness areas] which impair-
meht results from man-made air pol-.
lution."
But nearly 30 years after setting
'the,course to end dirty air in Amer-
ica's national parks, the haze and
smog- remain. Our national parks
and the nearly 300 million people
who visit them each year deserve
better.


Enforcing the Clean Air Act
would go a long way toward allevi-
ating the problem.
I may not see the day when the air
in our national parks in unimpaired
by pollution, but if our elected offi-
cials act today to protect our parks
and the health of our families, my
children just might see the Washing-
ton Monument when they take their-
children up Old Rag.
(Thomas C. Kiernan is president
of the National Parks Conservation
-Association.)


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005


Lifestyle


'A


4-H Dairy Show Set At

North Florida Fair


Nathaniel Gallon Feted

At Retirment Party


DEBBIE SNAPP.
Staff Writer

The North Florida Fair 35th An-
nual Dairy Show takes place 1 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 6 at the dairy barn.
Its purpose is to teach the funda-
mientals of good dairy husbandry, to
emphasize quality in dairy cattle,
and to demonstrate an exhibition.
In addition, it provides a suitable
environment where youth can be-
come better acquainted with other
youth and ai-ults, an compete for
recognition in an ever growing com-
plex society.
4-H members are asked to make
sure that all entries and record
books are posted and sent directly to


4-H Council

Determines

Year's Goals


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
New officers of the 4-H County
Council met recently to discuss their
goals for the 2005-2006 year.
Among the goals are: Stay dedi-
bated; Conduct seasonal projects;
Conduct more community service;
Outreach to other ethnic groups;
Provide preparatory workshops for
County Events and 4-H Congress;
and Follow Parliamentary Proce-
dures.
Any interested person 13 years of
age and older is welcome to join.
The New Officers include: Alex
Farmer, president; Alana Chambers,
vice-president; Aressa Blackmon,
secretary; Merrial Keaton, assistant
secretary : Michelle Keaton, treas-
urer: Kevin, 'Hill, sargent-at-arms;
with Arsenio Bright, Chambers, and
Farmer as delegates.

Brynwood Sets
Family Council
Meeting


Brynwood Center will hold a
Family Council meeting, 5:30 p.m.,
WVednesda,., Oct. 26 and encourages
family and friends to attend.
This is an opportunity to meet the
new Administrator Brenda Lacy,
and the new Director of Nursing
Donna Elliott.
"Come out and enjoy an evening
of relaxation, greetings, and laughs
With family, friends, and staff. It's
time to experience the New Bryn-
vwood Center," states Toni D.
Jenkins-Flavien, social services, ad-
missions, and marketing director for
,thde Center.
Refreshments will be served.
The Center is located at 1656
South Jefferson Street.


4-H Coordinator John Lilly at the
4-H Office.
Cattle are to be brought to the
show between the hours of 1-5 p.m.
on Friday, Nov. 4.
The premium money will be di-
vided within limits of availability as
follows: First Place, $25; Second
Place, $20; Third Place, $15; Fourth
Place, $10; 'Fifth Place, $5.
All animals will be released im-
mediately after the Dairy Show.
4-H members are asked to indicate
on their registration form if they will
be showing a fresh senior yearling
heifer as a two year old cow.
Do not wait until the day of the
show to give this information.
Dairy Show Show entrants should
contact Lilly at 342-0187.


Monticello native Nathaniel (Nat)
"Meatman" Gallon retired after 43
years of service to the community
as a commercial food salesman for
C & W Food Service in Jefferson
and Leon Counties.
Long time coworker at Monti-
cello Provision Mary Helen An-
drews, along with family and
friends, recently gathered at the
Opera House to celebrate the occa-
sion.
Archie Gallon served as the mas-
ter of ceremonies, and music was
provided by the CUP Band.


He was commended for his dedi-
cated service to the food service in-
dustry, by Mary Blow Whatley
and -Roger Champion, along with
customers and coworkers.
Additional program participants
included Dennis Gallon, Rev.
James Williams, Eddie Gallon, Jr.
and Candice Childress.
Attendees enjoys a dinner con-
sisting of ham, roast beef, tossed
salad, gravy, yellow rice, rolls,
cakes and pies.
Gallon and his wife, Tracy, plan.
to travel during their retirement.


NATHANIEL GALLON


Homes Of Mourning


MOORE
LLL Observes

Pastor's

Birthday


Members of the Triple L Club met '
at :he First Baptist Church for their
September meeting and to celebrate
the birthday of Pastor Rev. Thermon
Moore.
Mona Mackenzie lead the pro-
gram and introduced the Senior
Adult Choir of the First Baptist
Church. They entertained with a
musical medley, orchestrated by
Sissy Kilpatrick.
Hostesses for this meeting were:
Ethel Strickland, Mary Lee Christie,
Carmela Naranjo, and Mary Helen
Andrews.
Sheriff David Hobbs will be at-
tending, as guest speaker, the Octo-
ber meeting.
He will speak to the group about
home security and safety.
Mary and Ken Connell are Pro-
gram Chairs for this meeting.


Thelma Sasser Day
Thelma Sasser Day age 62, a retail
sales person, died Sunday, October
23, 2005 in Monticello, Florida.
Funeral Service will be Wednes-
day, October 26, 2005 at Calvary
Baptist Church beginning at
2:00p.m. Monticello, Florida. Inter-
ment will follow the service in Be-
thel Cefnetery. Family will receive
friends Tuesday, October 25, 2005
at Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Do-
nation may be made, to Covenant,
Hospice: 1545 Raymond Diehl
Road Suite 102 Tallahassee, Florida
850-575-4998.
Mrs. Day was a native of Monti-


cello, Florida. A former resident of
Thomasville, Georgia before mov-
ing back to Monticello in June of
2005. She was a member of Victory
Baptist Church of Thomasville,
Georgia.
She is survived by her husband
Joe Day of Monticello, Florida. Two
sons Chance Faircloth of Tampa and
JP Day of Hallsville, Missouri, two
daughters Lynn Jackson of Dawson-
ville,. GA. and Janell Frederick of
Flora, IL. and one brother Ken-
neth Sasser of Monticello and three
sisters Frances Bishop and Boots
Padgett of Monticello, and Sarah
Koon of Mayo and six grandchil-
dren.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005 PAGE 7



I iq~ ,Jtl



lp 16r, I wit


LT. FRED MOSELY, with City Police Force,
discusses the effect of Domestic Violence
on children, from a law enforcement point of


view at the Refuge House Awareness Pro-
gram.


GERROLD AUSTIN, City Councilman, left,
spoke about his experience with domestic
violence, as it affects children, and Pastor


Marvin Graham of Harvest
Ministries, offered the invocation,
Refuge House event. (News Photos)


Speakers Detail Howu


Violence Affects Chi


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Domestic-
and Sexual Violence Task Force
sponsored an event at Malloy's
Nursery in recognition of October
as Donesiic Violence month.
The e ent \\as designed to recog-
nize the effects of domestic .violence
on children.
Dessie Harvey, MSW, Jefferson
County Counselor for Refuge
House, offered the, opening remarks,
and presented the speakers .
Three speakers enlightened the
group with facts and personal stories
related to the effects of domestic
violence on children.
Speaker Maureen O'Neil, an early
childhood professor at Tallahassee
Community College, served as as-
sistant director of Refuge House for
eleven years and is now married.
with two children.'
She described how an abusive fa-
ther was; a part of her and her sib-
lings early years.
She claims he missed out on so
much of their youth and lives. She


remembers having so much fun with
her mother and siblings when he
wasn't around. They were always so
happy to see him leave.
She had'to use a sense of humor to
be able to cope with her situation.
She'd say something like "He's
gone, let's celebrate and go see a
movie," or the like.
She lived in fear of him all the
time. She grew up always wonder-
ing "If Ionly I had of done this better
or, If only I had of done that differ-
ently." Now she realizes that she
wasn't the problem, he was.
Her mother's reasons for not leav-
ing him are so common: she was
afraid of .losing their children and
she feared her friends and neighbors
would judge her wrong and accus-
ingly.
O'Neil now works with shelters,
celebrates with children, and does
volunteer work.
Because of his abuse she has had
trouble coping in her adult live. She
has problems with trusting. But, she
did marry a wonderful person, she
says.
City Councilman and Monticello
Vice Mayor Gerrold Austin, Sr.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Church of the
Nazarene w ill host its annual Fam-
ily Fun Night from 6-9 p.m. Satur-
day.
There \ill be a'variety of games,
food, prizes and fun activities, in-
cluding regular hay rides during the
event,
The games will be conducted in
the MCA gym and each time chil-
dren play a game, they can chose
candy or a prize.
Food will be provided in the din-
ing hall, including hot dogs, chips
and soda, free of charge.
Costumes are not required, but co-
ordinators encourage those attend-
ing to dress up.

WILD Board
TO Meet
the Wilderness Coast Public Li-
brary -(WILD) Governing Board will
meet 2 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14, at
the Wilderness' Coast Public Librar-
ies Adminsitartive Office, 3240,
Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville,
For additional information, call
(850) 926-4571.


Hay rides will be provided all
evening around the property.
Small children require supervi-
sion while on the hay ride.


They will be taking care of us one
dI day," he says. "If you are not a part
of the solution, you are part of the
Id re problem. If you see abuse or know
Cdre n of abuse, make that call to' the
spoke about how domestic violence authorities, or you are part of the
in his childhood caused alcohol and problem," he concludes.
drug abuse to occur among him and Harvey said that Mosley is a "be-
his ten siblings. hind the scenes kind of guy and has
He has experienced problems wit been a tremendous help to her and
He has experienced problems with the Task Force.
relationships and also lack of trust.
His remembers his father leaving Underscoring the speakers of the
home when he was just a young lad. event, the meeting place was deco-
He, made it through these years rated with five little T-shirts hanging
thanks to hard w6rk, strong people, on a clothesline. f ,
and learning to block out the bad ages two mo represented five .children
memories. ages two months to five years that
His mother always blamed herself were killed due to domestic
for the domestic violence and the violence.
death of four of his siblings but, 'it Harvey took a few moments to
ewathefr alcohol abused t, i read the words on the T-shirts much
He made a vow to teach his chil- tthe sadness of the grouP.
dren differently. Posters, made by the girls at Mon-
dren differently. ticello New Life, decorated the
When he sees signs of domestic watiell New Lfe decorated the
violence he feels that it is his duty to The posters depicted the lives of
get involved. these abused children, Some were
Lieutenant Fred Mosley is a po-- filled with poetry, some just disturb-
lice officer with the Monticello Po-
lice Department. He has more than ing picture Crawford, LCes.
20 years of service with the City of Martha Ann Crawford, LCSW
2 lof servi ththe C outreach program director for Ref-
Monticello, with 14 years on the po- uge House thanked the speakers,
lice force. uge House thanked the speakers,
lice spoke of domestic violence and invited everyone to help them-
He spoke of domestic violence selves to the literature and to the
from a law officer's point of view.
-pens, note pads, whistles, and the
He says that since 1992 and the O.J.ikpens note pads, whistles, and the
-,. like on the tables. '
Simpson incident the way people There was also assortment of
look at domestic violence has Te. w .
changed. food arid drink items donated by the
changed. local Winn Dixie store.
He is a county native with two Crawford left the ,uee
children and is comm ini ed to ihe v ,ic-, ., r. f r l f li
timsof domestic violence. He likes this thought: "Children learn fin-
being a father figure to children. their parents and by example. No
TV remote can turn it off."
He believes in teaching them TV remote can turn it off."
early to not be afraid of the police She supervises the counselors in
officer and his uniform when offi- the eight county area, and noted that
cers show up for a domestic dispute no one died of domestic violence
cers s how up for a domestic dispute this year in Jefferson County.
call to the home.
"These children are our future.


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Conference hosted by North Florida
Community College, Oct. 12.
Phil Barker, superintendent, Dr.
Kelvin Norton, executive director of,
operations and human resources,
Elias. Norton, Jr. director of voca-
tional adult and community educa-
tion,. and Sherry Heyen,. executive
director of school improvement,
represented the Jefferson District.


Dr. Phillip Mantzanas, grants and,.,.
community initiatives coordinator
and Douglas Brown, vice-president,
coordinated the conference, which
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NFCC Instructors Cissy Adleburg;",
Andrea Oliver, and Jay Welch gave
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PAGE 8. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005


Sports


NO Competion For ACA

At Cross Country Meet


ACA To Run in Cross

Country District Meet


'FRAN HUNT
'Staff Writer

The Lady Warriors Cross Coun-
1try team had no competition during
'the JCHS Invitational, and thus
took first, second and third places.
There were four schools slated
for the meet, ACA, JCHS, which
has no girl's team, Madison, which
called and canceled at the last min-
ute, and North Florida Christian
which never called to cancel and
never showed up.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said- that
,the day was hot and the course was
long, so the girls' times were not
'reflected in the finish, but were
over their normal times by at least
two minutes each.
"There was no competition and


no one here to cheer for them," said
Nennstiel.
Olivia Sorensen came in first
with 24:14, Tristan Sorensen came
in second with 24:26 and Sarah
Sorensen came in third with 25:33.
Nicole Mathis finished fourth
with 25:33; Courtney Connell fin-
ished fifth, with 26:38; Alex
Searcy, 26)46; Tori Self, 27:45;
Keli Dollar, 28:17; and Michaela
Roccanti, 28:37.
Elizabeth Riley finished with
29:25; Angela McCune, 32:01; Jes-
sica Hagan, 32:59; Rikki Roccanti,
36:10; Taylor Baez-Pridgeon,
44:49; and Ashley Evans, 52:05.
This is the official end of the JV
girl's season, however, a few of the
girls will continue to compete in
the post-season competition as sub-
stitutes for the varsity runners,
when needed.


JESSICA HAGAN


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Warriors cross country
team has been working daily, run-
ning hard, and readying for the
District Championship, 10 a.m.,
Thursday, at Orange Park in Jack-
sonville.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said that
the girl's are going to be at a disad-
vantage during the meet because
three of his seven starters, would
not be able to be there, and three
JV's will take their places on the
team as substitutes.
Scheduled to compete in the
championship, are: Olivia, Tristan
and Sarah Sorensen, Courtney
Connell, Tori Self, Kelli Dollar and
Michaela Roccanti.


Each team must have a minimum
of seven runners.
"It's time to get down to the nitty-
gritty," said Nennstiel. "In the
post-season meets, if you don't fin-
ish the race in the top five or six
(five if there are under 15 teams,
and six if there are more thanl5),
the season is over, so it is definitely
time for the rubber to hit the road.
"Last year, we were in a different
district and won second place. This
year there are two schools which
are going to be there, that'll be our
real competition,"said Nennstiel.
"When we ran against those two
schools before, they beat us."
He added that their goal is to fin-
ish in the top five to be on the safe
side. "It'll be a real challenge, and-
the JV's will have to step up, but I
think they'll do OK and run
strong."


:Lafayette Blanks

Tigers 21-0 Friday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Lafayette blanked the Tigers
21-0, Friday, on Tiger Field.
Lucious Wade was named the of-
.fensive player of the week, and
: Desrick Jones was named the de-
f. en i e player of the week.
Neither team scored in the first
_quarter. and Lafayette scored one
..[ouchdo".n in the second and two
in the fourth.
'Quarerback Jitavian Bennett had
fi e pass completions of eight at-
Sempts for 27 yards, and threw two
4, interceptions.


Lucious Wade had nine carries
for 68 yards, and Daryl Young had
two carries for 40 yards.
Jon Dady had one reception for a
12 yard gain, and Jones had one re-
ception for eight yards.
Defensively, Jones led the Tigers
with nine tackles, five assists, four
tackles for a loss, three sacks, one
forced fumble and one fumble re-
covery.
Dondre Tyson had seven tackles,
six assists and one tackle for a loss;
Frederick Mitchell, eight tackles,
one assist, two tackles for a loss,
and one sack; and Antwan Tims
had, seven tackles, two assists and
three tackles for a loss.


ACA Warriors Blank

Carrabelle 14-0


-; .






TAYLOR-BAEZ PRIDGEON


Lady Chargers Win Three

Over Trent In Volleyball


IUned


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Varsity Warriors blanked
Carrabelle last week, 14-0, bring-
ing them to a 5-3 season.
Coach Dave Roberts named Ca-
sey Gunnels as the offensive player.
of the week, and Jason Holton as
the defensive player of the week.
Gunnels had 26 caries for 123
yards; Holton, six carries for 64
yards; Daniel Greene, 10 carries for
58 yards; and quarterback Stewart
Williams, two pass completions, of
five attempts, for 15 yards.

On the defensive side of the field,
Holton had five tackles and two as-
sists; Kyle Barnwell, four" tackles
and one interception; and Gunnels


five tackles and one interception.
Ben Grantham had five tackles,'
and Wade Scarberry and Colby
Roberts each had three tackles.
Warriors' final home game of the
season is Friday against John Patil
II. Roberts said it was a very im-
portant game for the Warriors.
"It is a district game and whoever
wins will go to the district
play-offs, as the second runner up,"
said Roberts.
He added that the winner of the
game will also be named the Con-
ference Champions.
It is also Senior Night, when all
ACA seniors will be recognized.

"It's important that we get a lot of
fans out there and cheer the Warri-
ors on to the \\ in," he concluded."
The game is at 7:30 p.m.,


-FRAN HUNT
-Staff Writer

Monticello Christian Academy
Ladies won a three game volleyball
sweep against Trent.
Games scores were: 25-23, 26-24
'and 25-20.
Lady Chargers now stand a 2-2
'season.
Pastor Mike Burke said this was
,the best performance of the year for
the Lady Chargers.
, Katlyn Burke had eight kills, two
:assists and two digs; Lindsey Mat-


]FRAN HUNT
, Staff Writer

The Monticello Christian Acad-
emy flag football team was de-
.2feated 40-6 loss by Trent last week,
making MCAs record 0-4.
Quarterback Ian Morrow had three
2 pass receptions, of 13 attempts for
17 yards, three interceptions, and
'two carries for 26 yards.
Running back Phillip Payne had
13 carries for 83 yards, not a good
day for him, as he usually averages

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thews, eight kills, three assists and
one dig; and Rachel Ward, one kill,
one ace and three assists.
Schuylar Furrow had one digs
and two assists; Sarah Parrott, one
dig and three assists; and Loren
Lesperance, four aces and four
assts.
In their final game of the season,
the Lady Chargers will face off
against West Meadows, the best
team in the League, there, Friday.
The game scheduled against
Family Christian Nov. 4, was for-
feited to the Lady Chargers.


about 200 yards per game, and a
kickoff return of 58 yards for the
Chargers, the only touchdown of
the game.
Payne had two receptions for 15
yards, and Chip Gallon had one re-
ception for 'four yards and one
kickoff return for eight yards.
In their final game of the season,
the Chargers will face off against
West Meadows, the best team in
the league, Friday, there.
The game scheduled against
Family Christian Nov. 4, was for-
feited to the Chargers.
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED.. OCTOBER 26. 2005 PAGE 9


Londeree Offers Pilate Classes

At Jamie's Body Works


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Terry Londeree, certified Pilates
Instructor, offers employee dis-
counts to various local businesses,
among them Farmers and Merchants
Bank.
Classes are taught 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, at Jamie's Body Works,
on Cherry Street.


Pilates is a wellness program, con-
sisting of a group of exercises, de-
signed to strengthen and readjust the
spine and abdomen for positive pos-.
tural realignment.
This helps with ones balance and
helps to ease back pain.
The result is an exercise program
that leaves one refreshed and alert,
with a feeling of physical and men-
tal well-being.
In addition, the Pilates Method is a


INSTRUCTOR TERRY
the Pilates at Jamie's
works with students,


LONDEREE teaches
Body Works. Here he
Diane Johnson, left,


and Peggy Leight, in a
(News Photo)


beginner's class.


VA Officer Seeks Information

About Old Veterans' Honor Roll


Jim Sledge said that all of the Anyone who k
FRAN HUNT names listed were that of WW, II of the work or s(
Staff Writer veterans, listed as they entered the how to restore
service from the then Monticello tact Bishop at 34
What appears to be an Honor High School, now JCHS. The Honor Ro
Roll of World War II veterans was He was not aware when the piece Bishop's office
found recemih and officials are was made. Sledge did determine Management O0
seeking additional information, that two of the missing names were the Dunn Build
Several months ago, while clear- that of Herman, and Hill Hughes. ferson.
ing out the former JCHS Guid- Former Superintendent Bill
ance Office Building, on Water McRae knew nothing of the piece,
Street, the Honor Roll was discov- nor did Sissy Kilpartrick, -previ- ,-,
ered hidden away in a closet. ously married to Kelly Kilpatrick,. '
School Board Member Fred Shof- longtime JCHS Principal
ner located the piece and began Sissy suggestedcontacting Max
searching for its history, Bilinksi, who was a good friend of
Shofner believes that the original her former husband.
piece, titled "Our Honor Roll", Bilinski didn't know the origin of
which measures approximately two the piece, but said it hung in the
and a half feet by two and a half main hallway of the old A-building
feet contains three sections, each and had not been updated since
covered with glass, is a list of 1952.
JCHS students who left school to He theorized that it may have
join the military service during been a class project or a club pro-
WW.I.I (12/7/41-12/31/46).,o. jett,,such as the Beta Club. ,. -
Some of the-nameshave a self- Bailey Brinson, whose name also '
adhesive old fashioned gold or sil-n the list, said he did not
believer star before them, which is know the origin of the piece. THIS Honor R
believed to be the names of those Bishop continues to seek the his- ww II veter
who were killed in the line of duty. ory behind the ine of duty. try behind the work and wishes to High School
In the center of the original sec- have it restored to its original con-
tion, is an old photograph of the edition.
American Flag. _________
Topping the roll is a carved,
painted American Eagle.
'All of the names are apparently As see
written in the same handwriting
and listed alphabetically on both FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T1
the original piece, and on an addi- ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

Each name was written on a piece f800) 794 7310
of paper and wrapped around a (800) 7944 310
small wooden slat and placed in the J.., Wentworth means CASH NOW
frame.
Three of the,names in the original for Structured Settlements!
piece, believed to begin with either ....-
the letters H or I between the
names Thor Howerton and Edgar Homeowners with money w
Ingram, are missing in the third may qualify for low-interest
section. The glass covering that LOANS: Direct lender loosens its req- ments? Financial prob]
uirements for homeowners who neeT bills? IRS liens?lt does
section had been broken. money now. meowneyowhonu are a hoeown
When he could find nothing, he Haw5 you been tIued down fora loan? equitythere's an excel
turned it over to Veteran's Affairs esyou more th you paying m$10,00ore than 10 uaifforaoan-
intereaston? you paying more thand10% hours.
Officer Mike Bishop. interestonan other lens orcreditcarsds? You can find out over
n i r If you area homeowner and answer- ee of charge-if you
Seeking information, some of ed'es"to anyof thesequestions, they freeofcharge-if youi
those listed were contracted to see can tell you over the phone and without the MLD eitofFinancia
what they knew of the piece. obligaon if u qualify, days a weekfor you
S HighcrditciddeW Less-than-perfect 7days a week for you
credit? Self employed? Late house pay- 1-800-700-124


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nows of the history
someone who knows
it, is asked to con-
42-0211.
ll can be viewed in
in the Emergency
operation Center, in
ing, on North Jef-



Iowa&-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

"Buttons" has been named canine
Pet of the Week at the animal shel-
ter.
Buttons is one of the many ani-
mals rescued and practically pulled
back from the brink of death.
He was found, a victim of dump-
ster dumping, when he was ap-
proximately six weeks old.
He was starving, badly emanci-
pated to the point of being a small
pack of bones, had lice, mange so
bad that all of his hair had fallen
out, ring worm and was badly flea
infested..

"He wouldn't have lived-another
hour out there," said Shelter Care-
taker Cheryl Bautista.


!oll is thought to be a listing of
ans who attended Monticello
and entered the service. Infor-


After medication and much TLC,
Buttons is healthy and now has all
of his hair back.
He is a male German
Shephard/Chow mix, brown, with a
black muzzle, neutered, with all of
his vaccinations up to date.
His approximate date of birth is
2-14-05 and Bautista describes him
as being extremely sweet, with ex-
cessive energy, gets along well
with other dogs, and he is ex-
tremely active.
He likes to jump to greet people,
and will have to be trained not to
jump on people.
"He would be great for a older
kid to run and play with," said Bau-
tista. Because he is so very active,
he will require a fenced yard.
To adopt Buttons or any of the
other many animals at the shelter
call 342-0244.


mation is sought about the roll.. (News
Photo)


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Linda Meeks, RN., Whitson Boyd, PA-C., Lourdes Mosley, MG., PA.

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series of controlled movements en-
gaging the body and mind, per-
formed on specifically designed
exercise apparatus and supervised
by extensively trained teachers.
Dancers such as Martha Graham
and George Balanchine, were
among the first to use the Pilates
Method.
Londeree will also teach private
classes and can be reached at 591-
0724 to make arrangements.
Cost per class is $8.
Londeree came to the Monticello
area from New York City, where he
was certified as an instructor from
the PowerHouse Institute.
Londeree wanted a change from
city life and learned about Monti-
cello from friends. He wanted some-
thing more rewarding and different.
He has a BS degree in Physical
Education and is an ESE Teacher at
the Greenville Hills Academy.
He especially enjoys working with
handicapped children and young
adults. He is serious when it comes
to his work with kids. He says there
are many trials with these kids but
there are so many more rewards.
"Some of the boys I work with are
troubled or abused. Some have cere-
bral palsy, some are blind, and some
are autistic. I love them all. We
work well together," he adds.


ELIZABETHTOWN
(PG13)
Fri. 4:25 7:10 9:55 Sat.
1:35 4:25 7:10 9:55 Sun:
1:35-4:25 -7:10 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:25- 7:10
NO PASSES

FLIGHT PLAN (PG13)
Fri. 5:40 7:55 10:05 Sat. -
1:15- 3:30- 5:40- 7:55- 10:05
Sun. 1:15 3:30- 5:40- 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:40 7:55

WALLACE &
GROMIT (G)
Fri. 4:15 7:15 9:35 Sat.
1:40 4:15 7:15 9:35 Sun.
1:40 4:15 7:15 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:15 7:15

THE FOG (PG13)
Fri. 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sat. 1:50.
- 4:40- 7:25 9:45 Sun. 1:50 -
4:40-7:25 Mon.-Thurs. 4:40 -
7:25
NO PASSES

THE GOSPEL (PG)
Fri. 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sat.
2:00 4:45 7:35 -10:00 Sun.
2:00 4:45 7:35 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:45 7:35

DOOM (R)
Fri. 4:35 7:00 9:30 Sat. 1:45
- 4:35 7:00 9:30 Sun. 1:45 -
4:35 7:00 Mon. Thurs.
4:35 7:00
NO PASSES
THE FOG (PG13)
Fri. 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sat. 1:50
- 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sun. 1:50 -
4:40 7:25 Mon. Thurs.
4:40 7:20
NO PASSES

NORTH COUNTRY (R)
Fri. 4:20 7:20 10:10 Sat.
1:20 4:20 7:20 10:10 Sun.
1:20 4:20 7:20 Mo. Thurs.'
4:20 7:20
NO PASSES


'Buttons,' High Energy

Canine, Needs Home









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005

Wacissa PH Church


Harvest Festival


Planned Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

;' The Wacissa Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church will celebrate its Sec-
eded Annual Harvest Festival,
beginningg at 11 a.m. Saturday, at
he new Wacissa walking track, at
R 59 and CR 259.
R Spokesperson Connie Boland
?aid there would be many activities
;n hand, including booths, games,
fce painting, horse rides and a
Ioon Walk for the children to en-
jVy.
' A "God's Garage" sale, where
.erything from collectibles to junk
c^n be located, will be on hand.
' The Share The Blessing Walk-a-
Ahon will begin at 11 a.m. and
children and adults will obtain
pledges and walk the track.
"All donations must be turned in
that day," said Boland. The funds
raised will go toward Hurricane
Itelief.




Agent CopelI

How To Impr


ERAN HUNT
Staff Writer
..
. With the advent of fall and ex-'
pected cool weather to come, Ex-
tnhsion Agent Heidi copeland
advises how to improve one health,
in an article published in "Living
Well," the Extension Office news-
letter.
,tIn her article, Copeland notes that
that cooler weather is a good time
to become more physically active,
as well as a time to enjoy the out of
doors.
She also notes that October is
Children's Environmental Health
Month. "Please remember to be
mindful of safety," said Copeland.
.ou only need to read the news-
papers on most, any day, to knoi'.
why."

.Copeland also describes the new
MyPyramid For Kids, released by
the US Department of Agriculture
(UJSDA) Food and Nutrition Serv-
ices, last month.
.According to the new pyramid,


An outdoor concert will be in
process during the festival. The
Hammondtrees from Jacksonville
along with local singers will enter-
tain.
All residents are invited to bring
a crock pot of chili and enter the
Chili Cook-off. The winner will be
determined by popular vote and all
who purchase a ticket are eligible
to vote.
Tickets for Chili and hot dogs can
be purchased for a $2 each.
There will also be homemade egg
rolls for sale at the Teen Booth.
All arts and craft vendors are
welcome to participate. There is no
fee for booth space.
Anyone wishing to participate in
the Walk-a-thon can contact Pam
Fendrick at 878-8392.
Those wishing to be involved in
the concert can contact Pastor John
Cain at 997-4636.
To reserve a booth space contact
Boland at 997-5270.




and Tells

ove Health
there are six basic recommenda-
tions for children to follow. These
are:
*Be physically active every day.
*Children need to eat foods of
every color every day.
*Some stripes on the pyramid are
wider than others. This reminds
children to eat more food from the.
food groups with the widest stripes.
*The colored stripes are wider at
the bottom of the pyramid because
every food group has foods within
the group that should be eaten more
often than others.
The healthier foods in each group
are at the bottom of each pyramid
strip.
*Take one step at a time. Chil-
dren do not need to change over-
night; but just start with one new,
ecQdi-thfir'. and. add- a .new one
every day.

A good example is walking and
eating fruit instead of candy.
,MyPyramid.gov is a web site
that will give everyone in'the fam-
ily personal ideas on how eat better
and exercise more.


Every two minutes a woman is diagnosed
with Breast Cancer.


We here at Gerry Medical Center
encourage you to do your monthly
breast self exams.


Our Medical Staff Includes:
James T Brown, Jr., M.D. *Jacquelyn A. Davis, M.D.

We are currently welcoming new patients.


LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY. FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 05-255-CA
IN RF. The Marriage of DANNY LEE
DAV'S, Petitioner/Husband, and
BAR8ARA J. DAVIS, Respondant/WVife
NOTICE OF ACTION To" BARBARA J.
DAVIS Address Unkinown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED) ;; .an action for Dissolution
of Marriage has been filed against you and
vou are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN, petitioner's
attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 41,
Monticello, FL 32345, on or before
December 15, 2005, and file the original
with the clerk of this said court either
before service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. Dated on October 20, 2005 CARL
D. BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of Court. Jeri
B. r zc.rson Deputy Clerk.
'0/26, 11'2, 11/9, 11/16, c
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Jack
Hamilton the holder of the following cer-
tificates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificates num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and thile names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
152 Year of Issuance 1999 Description or
Property. Property lying South of Ease-
ment per survey for Steve Walker III
dated November 6, 1987 and sketch of
description of centerline of easement dated
May 7, 1991: Commence at a concrete
monument marking the Southeast corner
of the North Half of the Southwest Quar-
ter of Section 15, Township 1 North,
Range 3 East, Jefferson County, Florida
and thence run South 89 degrees 30 min-
utes 30 seconds West 1441.34 feet, along
the South boundary of the north Half of
the Southwest Quarter of said Section 15
to a concrete monument for the POINT
OF BEGINNING, thence from said
POINT OF BEGINNING continue South
89 degrees 30 minutes 30 seconds West
5.91 feet to an iron rod, thence North 36
degrees 02 minutes 18 seconds West
182.07 feet to a concrete monument,
thence South 89 degrees 57 minutes 20 sec-
onds West 209.79 feet to a concrete nionu-
ment, thence North 36 degrees 02 minutes
52 seconds West 89.7 feet to a point,
thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 33
seconds cast 144.06 feet to a concrete
moniuLnment, thence North 00 degrees 02
minutes 18 seconds East 299.86 feet to a
concrete monument, thence North 89
degrees 56 minutes 40 seconds West 145.0
feet to a concrete monument, thence South
00 degrees 04 minutes 57 seconds West
298.42 feet to a point, thence North 36
degrees 02 minutes 52 seconds West 76.35
feet to a point, thence North 36 degrees 02
minutes 52 seconds West 76.35 feet to a
concrete monument, thence South 75
degree 45 minutes 43 seconds West 182.66
feet to a concrete monument on the East-
erly boundary of a county graded I t,,.'
thence North 35 d.i.e, 43 minute, 34
seconds West-31.46 feet, along said East-
erly boundary to a concrete :itiiiiiieiil.,
thence North 74 degrees 00 0Iinut., 145
seconds East 180.76 feet to a concrete
monument, thence North 36 degrees 01
minutes 35 seconds West 130.77 feet to a
point in tile cnciiterline of a 60 foot ease-
mient ;run thence North 23 degrees 24
minutes 59 seconds East along the center-
line of said easement a distance of 267.83
feet; run thence North 73 degrees 01 min-
utes 30 seconds East along the centerline
of said easement a distance of 380.91 feet
to a point in the ceniterline of said ease-
ment; ruin thence South 03 degrees 37 miin-
utes 59 seconds East a distance of 30.83
feet to the margin of said easement; run


LEGALS

thence South 3 degrees 40 minutes 03 sec-
onds East a distance of 747.55 feet and to a
concrete monument marking a point
which point is the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. South to a 60 foot easement as
recorded in Official Records Book 151,
Page 410 of the Public Records of Jeffer-
.son County, Florida. Name in which
assessed 1-10 Corporation. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such certifi-
cates or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 9th day of November, 2005, At 11:00
a.m. Dated this 29th day of September,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
10/5, 10/12, 10/19. 10/26, c
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS. Older
Americans Act Title III-E- Family
Caregiver Support Program: Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
announce grant opportunities for sources
interested in' providing services to
caregivers under the Federal Older
Americans Act Title III-E National Family
Caregiver Support Initiative in Bay,
Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Golf.
Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty,
Madison, Taylor, Wakulla, and/or
Washington Counties. Prospective sources
must be established and have current or
previous experience in providing services
to older adults and caregivers. If a
contract is awarded for this effort, the
'Area Agency on Aging for North Florida,
Inc. anticipates duration of not more than
one year with two, one year renewal
options pending continued funding
availability. Programs must be capable of
providing new, innovative, or continuing
services to caregivers meeting the
following eligibility criteria: (1)
Individuals providing informal in-home
and community care for a person age 60
or older; or (2) Grandparents or
step-grandparents and relatives
caregivers, age 60 or older of children not
more than 18 years of age, or (3) Older
individuals, age 60 or older, providing
care and support to persons with mental
retardation and related developmental
disabilities. All services must be provided
in accordance with established guidelines
set forth by the State of Florida
Department of Elder Affairs Client and
Services Manual and contracts betivecn
the Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. and State of Florida
Depiiiminnli of Elder Affairs. Interested
parties may request a proposal by
contacting: Lisa Bretz, Planning
Administrator, 2414 Mahan Drive
:'Tallahassee, Florida 32308, telephone
(850) 488-0055, fachi:-!:i, (850) 922-2420,
or e-mail at aaanf@elderaffairs.org
Written proposals :Jue .Jc to the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
'no later than 4:30 p.m. EST on November
7, 2005. Only written responses will be
accepted. The Area Agency on Aging for
N,. Ill Florida, Inc. reserves ihic l ili I,,
cI a i amind all propWsa s.
10/26, e
!N TH'Il CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 05-232-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of REGINA A. BUTLER,
Petitioner/Wife, and JERRY. W.
BUTLER, Respondent/Husband. NOTICE
OF ACTION TO: JERRY W. BUTLER
Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, oni Clerk of Court,
whose address is Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, FL


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Offer void where prohibited by law.


LEGALS

32344 on or before September 14, 2005,
and file the original with the clerk of this
said court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on 10/14/05 Clerk of Court As Clerk
of the Court.
10/19, 10/26, ptd
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:
05-27PR IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY
LORENA BEVIS Deceased. NOTICE TO
CREDITORS The administration of the
estate of Dorothy Lorena Bevis, also
known as Lorena S. Bevis, deceased whose
date of death was February 10, 2005; is
pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division; File
Number 2005-27-PR; the address of which
is Probate Division, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, FL
32344. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons, who have claims. or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or-
unliquidated claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST.
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors
of the decedent and other person who have
claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including uumatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims
with this court WITIIIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS: August 1, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Curtis B. Ilunter Florida Bar No. 0884243
Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa, P.A.
2075 Centre Pointe Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850)402-4100
Personal Representative: Kenneth Bevis
295 North Hickory Monticello, Florida
32344 (0"', 097-2063
10/19 10/26, c
IN l.T CIRCUIT COURT OF TIllE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORII)A
Case No.: 02-266-CA IN RE: ESTATE OF
.MACK POLK, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ACTION TO: Mack Polk, Deceased,
Chatherine Polk, Minnie Mills, Amos
Polk, Marie Polk, Shelly Ammons,
William Ammons, Geraldine Ammons,
Ollic I'ik',,Wlson, Doinna Edwards, Oscar
'Polk, and Lelia Polk,--Kafltherine Ford;,-
Patsy Polk, Lcelia Anderson, Randolph
Ford, Josephine Miller, Yvonne. A.
Johnson and Rachel Ainmons, living and
deceased and any and all of their known
or unknown heirs, jointly and severally,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition to
Determine IlHeirs and Partition Property
was filed October 16, 2002, File No:
02-266-CA, Second Judicial Circuit in and
for Jefferson County, Florida,
encumbering the following real property
located in Jefferson County, Florida,
Sto-wit: Commence at the Southeast corner
of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter of Section 34, township 2 North,


LEGALS

Range 4 East, Jefferson County, Florida
and run South 89 degrees 40 minutes 23
seconds East, along the South boundary of
said Section 34, 568.91 feet for a POINT
OF BEGINNING, thence from said Point
of Beginning run South 88 degrees 56
minutes 29 seconds East, along the South
boundary of said Section 34, 392.28 feet to
a point on the Westerly boundary of the
Howell property as described in the Public
Records of Jefferson County, Florida in
Official Record Book 147, Page 260,
thence North 41 degrees 51 minutes 57
seconds West, along the Westerly
boundary of said Howell property, 615.49
feet to a point, thence North 23 degree 33
minutes 58 seconds West, along the
Westerly boundary of said Howell
property, 14.80 feet to the Southwesterly
corner of Lot I I of Sprinfield Subdivision
(an unrecorded subdivision), thence North
26 degrees 33 minutes 58 seconds West,
along the Southwesterly boundary of said
Springfield Subdivision, 474.28 feet to a
point on the Southwesterly right of way
line of County Road 158-A, thence South
52 degrees 00 minutes 29 seconds West,
along said right of way line, 186.71 feet to
a point, thence South 26 degrees 33
minutes 58 seconds East 210.00 feet a
point, thence South 52 degree 00 minutes
29 seconds West 210.00 feet to a point,
thence North 26 degrees 33 minutes 58
seconds West 210.00 feet to a point on the
Southwesterly right of way line of said
County Road 158-A, said point being on a
curve concave to the South, thence run in
a Southwesterly direction along said right
of way line and curve having a radius of
4533.75 feet, through a central angle of 07
degrees 16 minutes 32 seconds, for an arc
length of 575.71 feet, chord of said arc
being South 48 degrees 22 minutes 13
seconds West 575.33 feet to a point, thence
South 78 degrees 01 minutes 53 seconds
East 676.00 feet to a point, thence South 89
degrees 40 minutes 58 seconds East 326.35
feet to a point, thence South 03 degrees 39
minutes 40 seconds West 120.42 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Containing 10.74 acres
more or less. has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any, to T.
BUCKINGHAM BIRD, Plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 247,
Monticello, Florida 32345, on or before
November II, 2005, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint or
Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 6th day of October,
2005. CARL D). BOATWRIGHT, CLERK
OF THE CIRC'!T COURT.
10/12, 10/19 10/26, 11/2, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE Jefferson
County Commission will have a public
hearing on the following proposed land
development code change on November,
17, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of
the Jefferson County courthouse located at
thi inidi li..ii of U.S. Highway 90 and
19. ill, iimcciim maiy be ec,.ntinuicd as
necessary JEFFERSON COUNTY
FLORIDA BOARD OF COUNTY Y
COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO.
AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; AMENDING THE LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION
9.02.07, NOTICE REQUIREMENTS;
CHANGING NOTICE REQUIREMENTS
FOR PRIVATELY INITIATED
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
'AMENDMENTS; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY: PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR


B US INESS SC-a;997..5







_______ DIRECTORY ___ __


BURNETTE PLUMBING &

1 WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
rPumbing Repairs -- Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections,~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


GbPaCI AnIo
t I I


l-Z Global Private Client Group


215S. A


IoNROE ST., ,Suite 300


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32301
850-599-8956
." 800-937-0663

robertmazur@ml.com


Robert A. Mazur, Jr., CFP
Financial Advisor


I


mS b ELEGANT WOODEN FURNITURE
SGun Cabinefs, Hu+ches, Tables, ,
Chairs, Media Cenfers, Headboards
(choose door styles, color, sizes, ekc.)
ilso-Anliques and Gifts
lOam 430pm Tues t.
Hucddabarry's Cronsm, LLC
210 W Wg&ngon 4 (or by appointent)
Mon"cal FL 32344 850/997-3400


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.

Pickup & Delivery Service Available

562-2962


m5 II


NEED A DIVORCE OR A WILL?

Affordable legal services provided by female attor-
ney in Tallahassee with 9 years experience. Caring
and personalized service guaranteed.

850-566-4826


'.7--'------I- I-I-


Register's


Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"





Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


BETTiLER BODIES
I AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BOD REPAIR I


fR EE ESTIMA TESJ


OCATIONSERVICvccc1


FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATIONMI
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH Of MONTICELLO AT:
966& N. fARER HII.L. R0. I.AMONT, Fl.
| 997-4160 I
ANDY & TLNA AMES. OWNERS


2+ Acres Deepwater Marsh Lot
$149,900

3+. Acres Oversized Deepwater Lot
$224,900

45 min from Jacksonville/15 min from St. Simon's
Call today for appointment Excellent Financing available


J~'I1~ ~Lz:


I


0







MONTICELLO. (FL. NEWS. WED., OCTOBER 26, 2005 PAGE 111


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATESS
3 Lines, Two editions -aWednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
INCORPORATION INTO THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The
information regarding the proposed
ordinance is available at the Jefferson
County) planning office 277 N. Mulberry
St., MNonticello, FL. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state or of
any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or
agency,. conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
w':::;. :ni .ipeal is to be based.
0/26, c
ATTENTION: Jefferson County Road
Department will be accepting bids for a
2005 or newer tandem dump truck.
Maximum allowable miles on the
odometer can not exceed 20,000 miles. All
interested companies can obtain a
specifications sheet at our office or call
and we will fax it to you. We will accept
sealed bids for the remainder of this
month, October 2005. Bids will be opened
November 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m. at the
road department office. Our office phone
number is 997-2036. Our location address
is 1484 S. Jefferson St. Monticello,
Florida.
10/12, 10/14, 10/19, 10/21, i U/ 10/ 28, c

HELP WANTED
Genesis Engineering & Constructors
Corp. Position: Equipment Operators
for clearing land. Must know how to
operate Front end Loader, Dozer,
Excavator, Dump Truck, and grading
Tractor. At least two years experience
required. Great Pay Call: (850)
385-5563.
10/26, 28, 11/2, 4, pd
Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to- talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 99i7-3568.
Kennel help needed. 5 days a week, 6
hrs- a day. MUST love animals, take
pride-in-your work & be dependable.
Must have own transportation. Call
the Jefferson County Humane Society
at 342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
10/12, tfn, c
Site Manager- Pt. 15 hrs/wk. Heritage
Manor, Monticello, FL. Resume to:
Flynn Mgmt. Corp., 516 Lakeview
Rd. Unit 8, Clearwater, FL 33756
Fax: (727) 447-5516.
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, c
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses Be part of a team working side
by side with. other health care
professionals. RN/LPN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance, Vested Retirement after
six years, Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefit Package. If you prefer
per diem, rather than career service,
we also have OPS (non-benefited
positions). RNs $29-31, LPNs $19-22.
For additional information contact
Sharon McKinnie, R.N. at
850-922-6645, email:
mckinnie.sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11,
16, 18, 23, 25, c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake.
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, FI.
8/10, tfn, c
Florida Department of
transportation has a vacancy in
aylor County for the following
position: Position Number: 55004473
road Band Title: Truck Drivers,
-leavy and Tractor-Trailer Working
fitle: Senior Heavy Equipment
operator Last date to apply: October
8, 2005 For more information call
50/838-5800. To apply online go to:
mttps://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/Iogo
.htm or call 1-877-562-7287. The
department of Transportation is an


SERVICES
Rush 850-894-0265.
10/21. 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11, 16, pd
Combining Faith and Reason,
Tradition and Tolerance. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N. of
the, courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
10/19, c
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. 'We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn

Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil., Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of 'South Africa.
Unsurpassed as 1 an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
We extend a special invitation to
sinner, doubters, lost sheep, the
confused or merely curious. Christ
Episcopal Church, three block N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
,0/26, c
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Repnnses. ,
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
FOUND
FSU's man's Class Ring found in
downtown area. 997-4022.
19/26, 28, nc
boxer Call Humane Society @
342-0244.
10/26, 28, pd


WANTED
We need 2' chain link fence sections
that can be donated to the Jefferson
County Humane Society. Call the
Jefferson County Humane Society at
342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
WANT TO BUY
Want to buy real cheqp used good
condition large storage shed. We will
pick it up. Call the Jefferson County
Humane Society at 342-0244. Leave a
message we will call you back.

FOR SALE
Blue Sofa and love seat Rank Baldwin
Organ, music household furniture
Great shape. 997-1063
10/5, 7, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd
Whitney Spinet Piano $800; Love
Seat, earthtone colors $100. Both in
excellent condition 997-3105
10/26,28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11 16, 18, pd
Dining room table, seats 8 w/buffet.
Excellent condition. 30 years old,
never been moved. $500 997-2028.


Housing Vo

We accept all
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 ~-4/1
SPool & Youth A

575-65


FOR RENT
2bed/2bath, new paint, new carpet, no
pets, no children $550.00 997-6653.
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd
Two plantation tent ho' for rent.
20 minutes from T' ,ville, 15
minutes from Morp _C j. Dirt road.
Central H/A, Varoom, 1 bath.
Smaller hou' iath" deck, $300 per
month. L house $400 per month.
$300 .mage deposit, rental
references and criminal background
check required. 1-229-225-5454.
10/26, 28, c
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
2/1 Mobile Home on 1 acre Ashville

Hwy. $400 per month, pets ok. Call
Pam 997-4789
REAL ESTATE
New 3 and 4 bedrooms w/land Pick
your own plan owner financing
available call now to set appointment.
850/445-1838.
10/19, 21.226, 28 pd


uchers

vouchers
2 $895 ~ $50 dep.,
Activities

571


You'll be Glad You Did

B's 850-509-5004

www.DonnaHazlewood.com
250 S. Jefferson St Monticello, Fl 32344

* HOME ON 2 ACRES. Pole barn and
Fenced pasture. $72,500

+ NEW CONSTRUCTION. Brick home on
6 acres. Quality thru out. $365,000

* 5 ACRES in the country. Wooded with
Many Deer sightings. $36,500

* .50 to 100 ACRES. Wooded with Creek.
Great location. From $6,000 per acre.


NOTICE OF HEARING ON
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE 2005-09

The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following entitled
ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
ANNEXING PROPERTY CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 85.01 ACRES
LOCATED ON WEST WASHINGTON STREET (U.S. 90 WEST) TO THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO; REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF THE CITY OF
,MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. This property is further identified on the map below. A complete
metes and bounds description, as well as the entire text of the4ordinance may be inspected
at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. A public hearing will be held on the
adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday, November 1, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall.


,qual Employment Opportunity,
affirmativee Action and Drug Free
workplace employer.
0/19, 21, 26. 28, c

SERVICESS
'hina Painting Lessons. Call Mrs.


Hunters Ridge- Beautiful
3Br/2Ba home on 3 acres with
bonus room. Great views of
golf course and creek.
............$249,900

Hickory Hollow- 7 gorgeous
acres with crystal clear creek
makes this 4Br/2.5Ba home
complete...........$260,000
(additional 5 acres also available)


Brick home on
5.58 acres-
Tons of new
renovations to
this already
beautiful
4Br/3Ba home.
Call us for all
the details...
$329,900


KELILY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 997-5516

Lloyd Acres- very
roomy 3Br/2Ba
home on 2.44
acres. Detached
carport and addi-
tional workshop
........... $165,000


I __________________ ________________________________


SSimply the Best!


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REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


www.TimPeary.com

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's
ih Pond Area cleared and ready to building
on, nice trees, paved road $27,500 each
A Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
What a Deal! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3
bath home on five fenced acres w/ guest
I cottage/playhouse with bath, big shop, 2
car garage pasture, 100 pecan trees and
a nice pool a real dream for a growing
family $400,000
Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
A home in town ato East Anderson St.
$155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe-Under Contract
A off Bassett Dairy Road in Bellamy Plantation
10 commanding acres with a beautiful view,
lovely home site
A in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County-Under Contract
10 mostly open ac, corner of Paul Thompson
A and Julia Road only $150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
A tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
A .Choice Buildinq Lots in Town-Under
Contract on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000
A Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
S Check Out This One! Under Contract8
acres with big doublewide and small house
on a pretty old hillside close to Leon County
off Julia Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
A South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
. east side of town high and dry in quiet '
location with lots of game $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
HUNTING CAMP Lease Available, rent
4k by the season 'call for details

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340

See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours

I~ We have qualified buyers!
I Are you interested in selling?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS. WED.. OCTOBER 26. 2005


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