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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00083
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: October 19, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00083
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
    Special: Annual Chamber Dinner
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



L
LI


Parents Can
Help Raise
Readers

Editorial, Page 4


IDRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
!4 LIBRARY WEST
'2 iR I'.C eu FiLORIDA
S-IEjVILL, FL. 32611 *
Ashville-Firefighters
Hold Membership
Drive

Story, Page 6


Annual
Chamber Dinner
Photos

Photos, Page 7


Role Of BMI
in Weight

LOSS

Story, Page 9


(f Wednesday Morning






Monti

137TH YEAR NO.83, 50 CENTS


C


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19,2005,


a .


-c P. V JA *..Nd


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FULL HOUSE -- Planning Commission meet- ing with Comprehensive Plan amendments BETTY BOLAND, one of several residents the vote to planners John Curtis Greene,
ings have been drawing sizable and lively that stand to change the zoning of several who spoke out against the Waukeenah re- center, and John Floyd Walker, both of
crowds ever since the planners began deal- large parcels in the county. (News Photo) zoning, expresses her disappointment over whom voted for the change. (News Photo)




Waukeen ah Re owning Gets Nod


LAZARO ALEN
Senior Staff Wri

The Planning
Thursday night
approval a Co
amendment that
low for a large
ment in the Waul
The Planning
vote recommend
after a long disc
developer agreed
size of the origin
The planners'
calls for the rezo
377-acre, two-p
US 27 from m
residential and a
tively to residents


Alan Saucier, project manager and
VIAN spokesman for Lifestyle Land De-
iter velopment LLC out of Sarasota, FL,
S- represented the development as be-
Commission on ing a "no net change" project.
recommended for Meaning that under the current
)mprehensive Plan zoning, the combined 377-acre
ultimately will al- property allowed for construction of
residential develop- 298 houses, Saucier said. But be-
ceenah area. cause the developers wanted to pre-
serve the natural beauty of the prop-
Commission's 6-3 erty, they were willing to limit the
ling approval came number of houses to 250, he said.
ussion and after the Planning Official Bob Arredondo
d to down-scale the disagreed with Saucier's representa-
al proposal. tion, which he called slightly mis-
recommendation leading.
ning of a combined 'It was true that the property cur-
arcel property off rently allowed for 298 houses, Arre-
aixed-use suburban dondo said. That was, provided the
griculture-3 respec- developer put in a package sewer
ial. system, he underscored. But absent


He thanked Bill Gunnels for his
DEBBIE SNAPP work as chairman of the Finance
Staff Writer Committee. "The Chamber has a
budget for the first time," he said.
New officers and directors were Membership is up and the Cham-
installed at the Annual Chamber of- ber experienced a growth serge just


Commerce Dinner held at the Opera
House Thursday.
Outgoing president David Frisby
presented the slate of officers and
directors, which were unanimously
approved.
Judge Bobby Plaines installed the
new slate including Margaret Lev-
ings, president; Gretchen Avera,
vice president; Eleanor Hawkins,
secretary; and Diane Freeman, treas-
urer.
Chamber Directors for the 2005-
2006 year are Buck Bird, Ron Ci-
chon, Stella Ellis, Carl Hanks, Tim
Peary, and Albert Thomas.
On hand to represent the City of
Monticello was Emily Anderson.
Commissioner Skeet Joyner was on
hand to represent the County.
Directors Emeritus are Eugenia
Dunn and Carl Hanks.
Outgoing president David Frisby
gave a brief speech before passing
the gravel over to newly elected
President Margaret Levings.
He reminisced over his year at the
helm and encouraged member sup-
port during Leving's year.


last month, he said.
Commenting about the intergov-
ernmental meeting of the three
branches of local government; the
City, County, and the School Sys-
tem., Frisby said he hoped this
would not be the last of this innova-
tive concept.
He noted the "business circle pro-
ject" and the increased parking on
West Dogwood Street. Along with
the successful Junior Leadership
program.
"I am proud of these accomplish-
ments. I have full confidence that
our new leadership will build on and
surpass these successes in 2006," he
concluded,.
Accepting the gavel from Frisby,
Levings related she recently learned
that some members hav;, been on
the Board for 30 years. "This is a
long time to do something for free,"
she exclaimed.
She thanked Mary Frances
Drawdy and past Chamber partici-
pants who have worked so hard to
keep the Chamber going.
"We have an exciting year


the existence of such a system --
which was the current situation --
the property allowed for only 204
houses, he said.
"I'm using numbers based on what
is there now, not on what might be
there," Arredondo said of his calcu-
lations. "
Throughout much of ,Thursday
night's discussion, the focus was on
the subdivision that ultimately will
be on the property, even though the
subdivision rightly wasn't a consid-
eration in the Comp Plan amend-
ment process.
Comp plan amendments -- which
require state approval -- merely
change the general zoning of a par-
cel. It requires a separate and totally
different process to get subdivisions
reviewed and approved.
But typically, comp plan amend-


planned to promote our town and
our businesses.
"We plan to join hands with the
Tallahassee Visitor's Bureau "and
Chamber so that Monticello infor-
mation can be distributed at a kiosk
at the airport.
"We are going to work at getting
our billboard up on 1-10 so that
folks know we are here.
"We are going to strengthen our
retail committee within the
Chamber. To keep better tabs on
what's working in our town and
what is not, and we'll use it to spon-
sor events downtown.
"We are going to run local cam-
paigns to raise people's awareness
about doing business with members
of our Chamber.
"Some of these businesses are
service businesses that are located in
Tallahassee and serve Monticello
and many of their owners live here.
Let's not forget about them.
"The more money we spend in our
town, the more money that stays
here. Which means that businesses
will be able to make it here. With-
out businesses here, there can be no
community. And without commu-
nity, there can be no businesses. We
need each other, she stressed.
In conclusion she stated that the
(See Levings Page 2)


ments set the stage for develop-
ments. In this particular case,
moreover, Lifestyle Land Develop-
ment LLC has made clear its intent
to develop the property. Hence,
many of the concerns voiced Thurs-
day night.
Those speaking out against the
project included adjacent and nearby
property owners, as well as others in
the community generally concerned
about zoning and environmental is-
sues.
The expressed concerns ranged
from purely zoning considerations
to the potential for contaminated
runoff from the proposed subdivi-
sion's septic tanks to questions of
the legality of the developers appli-
cation to concerns about the poten-
tial destruction of the atea's
historical, natural and archeological


resources.
But in the words of Don Lee, one
of the more vocal critics of the re-
zoning, the opponents outcry fell on
deaf ears.
"You haven't listened," Lee told
the planners. "We are opening this
county to be a developers' paradise
and it's all for money. For the
record, I will ask you to vote against
this adjustment. But I don't expect
the majority of you to listen."
Another opponent, Robert Parke,
questioned the legality of the devel-
oper's application, given that it was
made before Lifestyle Land Devel-
opment was a legally recognized en-
tity.
Planning Commission Attorney
Scott Shirley's initial response -- one
supported by the developer's attor-


ney -- was that the. cited incident
posed no legal problem.
But Shirley agreed to research the
point prior to the County Commis-'
sion considering the matter.
The planners divided 3-6 on the
issue. The three who opposed the re-
zoning argued that the development
would bring little economic or other
benefit to the county; that the rezon-
ing would largely eliminate the des-
ignated commercial zones in the
Waukeenah area; and that it would
encourage urban sprawl -- rather
then concentrating developments in
areas already designated for high-
density.
The majority, however, saw the
development -- if not necessarily as
a positive addition to the community
(See Rezoning Page 2)


V


. 4 ] ,


I


MARGARET LEVINGS, incoming Chamber
President, accepts the gavel from outgoing
President David Frisby at the annual Cham-


Ne .2





Al-


.1


4


ber Dinner and Installation Ceremony,
Thursday, at the Opera House. More photos,
Page 7. (News Photo)


County Officials Fear Looming Budget Crisis


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Fearful that another budgetary cri-
sis may be looming, commissioners
are beginning to prepare the public
for a possible repeat of 2002, when
the county had to lay off 22 employ-
ees.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner raised the issue at the Oct. 5
commission meeting.


Referring to a recent newspaper
article projecting a $1.4 billion defi-
cit in the state budget, Joyner said
he wanted to put the public on no-
tice that the deficit would have a
definite local impact.
"I don't want to happen what hap-
pened three years ago," Joyner said.
"I want to start educating the public
now. This projected $1.4 billion
deficit will have a trickle-down ef-
fect on Jefferson County. I want to
put everybody on notice that it looks


like we're headed for budgetary
problems again."
Joyner cautioned fellow commis-
sioners and department heads to be
prudent in future expenditures. At
the same time, he said, the legisla-
tive committee would have to step
up its lobbying efforts.

"Every time you have a deficit at
the state level, they (legislators)
tighten the belt on local govern-
ments," Joyner said.


Levings is Named New


President Of Chamber


-A. .,..







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005


Community Groups Launch


Healthy Hearts Campaign


47, .. ..e. '



KAREN THURMAN, chairperson of the during the local Democratic Executive Board
Democratic Party, speaks to Dick Bailar meeting, Tuesday. (News Photo)



Lamont Baptist Church


Nearly Completed
"Robby lined all of the contrac-
FRAN HUNT tors up and kept them moving on
Staff Writer their individual projects," said Bai-
ley.


It's been almost 18 months since
the Lamont Baptist Church was de-.
stroyed by flames April 27, 2004,
and construction of the new church
is expected to-be completed by the
end of the month.


Contractors were used for erect-
ing the walls, roofing, air condi-
tioning, and plumbing.
"The Perrys (including Robby's-
wife, Tammy) have also put a lot of
their personal labor into the con-


LAMONT BAPTIST CHURCH is expected to be completed
by the end of the month. Crews began laying sod last week
(News Photo)


Spokesman Gerald Bailey said
the congregation eagerly awaits the
first worship service in the new
church.
"The Perrys have taken the bull
by the horns," said Bailey. The Per-
rys are the local father and son
team of Bob Perry Construction
Company and Robby Perry, project
manager.


struction. Tammy even gets out
there and swings a hammer, Bailey
said.
Sod has also been laid. "The
sheet rock started going up
Monday," Bailey said Thursday
morning.
Last minute details are presently
being hammered out, such as the


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE


11025 EAST MAHAN
% I B2onicsllo *Border -
87 7 -4 5 O5 0o Border 1-10
MAHAN J


Jefferson County Health Depart-.
ment, the Jefferson Health Dispari-
ties Committee, African American
Churches and local businesses are
partnering to spread the word about
cardiovascular disease, and high
blood pressure, through a new
Healthy Jefferson Healthy Hearts
Campaign.
The goal of the campaign is to re-
duce health disparities by increasing
community awareness- and provid-
ing testing and education for resi-_
dents.
Free healthy heart and nutrition
classes will be offered in a set of
two classes at African American
Churches, and the Learning Center
from Oct. 20 to Dec. 15.
Each set of classes provides valu-
able information about prevention
and control of high blood pressure
and cardiovascular disease.
Information is also provided about
the DASH (Dietary Approach to
Stop Hypertension) eating plan, tips
for getting started, healthy cooking
ideas, and free cookbooks.
Free blood pressure and Body
Mass Index (BMI) checks will be
offered during the half hour before
each class, so residents are encour-
aged to come early and check their
numbers.
The first class in each set of two
classes will provide information
about preventing and controlling
cardiovascular disease and high
blood pressure, and introduce the
DASH diet.
The second class will provide in
depth information about Heart
Healthy Nutrition, including more
about the DASH diet, and tips for
shopping, cooking, and eating out.
Local restaurants are supporting
the campaign by identifying heart
healthy dishes on their menus with
red hearts.
Participating eateries include:
Three Sisters, Diana's Place, The
Coffee Break, Cox's Soul Food,
Jake's Sub & Grill, Rare Door, and
the Courtyard Restaurant.


Winn Dixie Stores will have a
special display to help residents
identify heart healthy foods. These
will be marked with red hearts.
Prevention and Nutrition classes
are set at the times and locations be-
low:
The Learning Center: Class 1,
6:30 to 8 p.m., Thursday; Class 2
same day and time, Nov. 3.
Memorial MB Church: Class 1
6:30 to 8 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 27;
Class 2, same day and time, Nov.
10.
St. Phillip's AME Church, Class 1
10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Saturday,
Nov. 5; Class 2 same day, time,
Nov. 10.
Union Hill AME Church: 6:30 to
8 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 9; Class-2,
same day, time, Nov. 17.
Mt. Morilla MB Church: Class 1,


possibly of using wood floors in
the auditorium and tile floors in the
fellowship hall.
The doors which had to be special
ordered, were expected. to arrive
late last week and sheet rocking
and painting are expected to be fin-
ished soon. The pews and pulpit
were also expected to be delivered
last week.
The sign in front of the church
will be custom made from stone.
"There'll be a large opening in the
top of the sign and we're going to
put the original bell that rang in the
church 100 years ago, in that open-
ing," Bailey said..
"We're close to landscaping,"
said Bailey. "Bobby donated a
couple of real nice palm trees."
He added that when completed,
the building will be a strong enough
structure to be used as a hurricane
shelter.
"It is all happening so fast," said
Bailey. "That's because here in
Jefferson County, everyone knew
about the fire and our officials, per-
mit people and planners, have been
real good to us."


L-VIflgS
(Continued From Page 1)
natural draw of Monticello, for peo-
ple, will get them here and "we just
need to give them a reason to shop
and spend money here."
The President's Award was pre-
sented to Margaret Levings for her
outstanding contributions to the
Chamber.
The Grace and Mack Morris
Award was presented to John Ger-
ren for his outstanding contributions
and services to the community.
The Corporate Citizen Award was
given to Progress Energy.
The Fred and Velinda Williams
Awards was presented to Julie Con-
ley. This award is given to an
elected official that contributed the
most for the Chamber.
The Volunteer Awards were pre-
sented to Mary Frances Drawdy,
Catherine Arnold, and to Helen
Bently.
The Appreciation Award was pre-
sented to Fran Black, Gretchen
Avera, Dianne Westbrook, and
Jerry Boatwright.
The dinner was prepared by Jim,
Blake's Rare Door.

Rezoning
(Continued From Page 1)
-- than as the lesser ot two evils.
The property was going to be devel-
oped one way or' the other, they
noted.
Therefore, by approving the rezon-
ing, they were at least assuring that
the development was limited to 204
houses. Otherwise, the developer
could put in a central sewer system
and cram as many as 298 houses
into the same area.
The question, they said, was really
whether the 204 houses were going,
to be spread over the entire area or
concentrated on the 47 acres nearer
the highway.
The opponents' counter-argument
that the rezoning offer no real guar-
antee, as the developer could always
sell the property, failed to sway any-
one.
One of the principals of Lifestyle
Land Development LLC asked the
audience to trust the company's
good intentions. Lifestyle wanted to
do a quality community, and the
company was in it for the long haul,
the developer said.
Questioned whether he planned to
(See Rezoning Page 3)


You're Invited to the


50th Annual
Florida Forest Festival
in Perry, Florida

Carnival Open Nightly thru Oct. 22

Friday, October 21st
Bed Race Downtown at 6 PM
Gaslight Antique Car Parade Downtown at 8 PM
"Scary Stories" at the Cracker Homestead at 8 PM
Saturday, October 22nd
Festival 5K Run/Walk 8:30 AM
King Tree Parade 10 AM


World's Largest Free Fish Fry 12 noon
Classic Car Show
Carnival All Day
Arts & Crafts Vendors
Heavy Equipment Show
Forestry Equipment Competitions
Professional Lumberjack Shows (3 shows)
Professional Storytelling in the Pines
Live Entertainment on the Main Stage
Marine Band
Mollie Lynne
Rhonda Vincent & The Rage Concert
American Idol Justin Guarini

Karaoke Finals Competition
Fine Art Show
Located at Forest Capital Park in Perry,
Florida on US Hwy 19 South

For more information 850.584.8733
or forestfestival(%perry.gulfnet.com


1 to 2:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 19;
Class 2, same day, time, Dec. 3.
To sign up for classes, or for more
information contact the Jefferson
County Health Department, at ex-
tension 220.
Beginning in January, Healthy Jef-
ferson, Healthy Hearts will work
with churches to create physical ac-
tivity walking groups in the commu-
-nity.
Interested residents will have the
opportunity to receive training to
lead "Just Move for your Heart," or
"Walk for Your Heart," groups at
their churches, through this
program.
Anyone interested in receiving
this training, or in starting a walking
group, should contact the Health
Department at extension 220.


B -
Child Develupment Center
1989 Commonwealth Lane (off Cap.hCir.:NW near 1-10)
Tallahassee, Florida
(850) 514-1200
Call for a tour!
www.chappellschools.com
Ages 6 weeks to II years
1Breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack provided
Open Monday Friday, 7:00a,m. to-6:00p.m.
S Breakfast, Lunch and afternoon snack provided
SFree Pre-Kindergarten Program for 4 year olI
SBefore and After School Program





r**------------ -- -9
Bring in this %
Coupon for E of uttion'
---- -- -- -- -- -- --


The Florida Forest Festival

Board of Directors invites

you to attend the


2005 Florida Forest Festival


Oclobcr 22, 2005







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005 PAGE 3

Keri Brasington Crowned


ACA Homecoming Queen


United Way Of Big Bend


Local Goal Set At $25,000


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The United Way of the Big Bend-
(UWBB) held a Kickoff Breakfast
in September, at the Senior Center,
to begin the Jefferson County
United Way Campaign.
Volunteers met to rally for the
new board and committee members
and to volunteer their services and
time to their community.
Bobbie and Jack Krebs and Nan
Baughman organized the event, and
Co-Chairs David Hobbs and Baugh-
man welcomed and attendees and
thanked them for coming.
"I'm honored to serve, and we're
going to work hard," he said.
Volunteers were asked to remind
residents and coworkers to pledge
this year and to consider increasing
their pledge from last year.


Baughman explained that a
"Leadership Giving" of a $1000 do-
nation and above breaks down to
just $20 a week in giving.
The money stays here in Jefferson
county, and donors must designate
the county on their pledge cards.
To participate in the county cam-
paign, or to make a donation, con-
tact Baughman at 997-3825.
Mary Carol Kaney, board devel-
opment campaign associate for the
UWBB spoke a few words of en-
couragement to the attendees and
offered her help with the local cam-
paign.
County resident Susan McGrath,
vice president of resource develop-
ment for the UWBB, challenged
volunteers to "step up to the plate"
and also offered her help and assis-
tance.
"A dollar a week can do so much.
The little bit has had a big differ-


ence," Krebs stated.
,A little means a lot in Jeffersor
County. Four dollars can't buy
McDonald's extra value meal or,
movie ticket or, a box of baby dia
pers or, a co-payment on prescrip
tion drugs but, you can buy food fo
a family of four for a week or, pro-
vide CPR .or first-aid classes or
sixty dollars in federal assistance fo
safe and affordable childcare or, !
terminally ill patient a day's worti
of prescription medication, with thi:
contribution to UWBB.
Eighteen agencies serving Jeffer
son county requested a total o
$98,389.00 from Jefferson County
United Way Campaign.
Locally the goal was to collec
$25,000.00, however the total fel
short with a total of $23,854.04.
Bill Hopkins reported that he
served on the investment committee
A half hour was given to each
agrcy'''fferih'g theifre'Sevices ahi
requesting money from the county
campaign, to plead their case.
"The public needs to be mad
aware of the importance of thes.
agencies in the county," Baughmar
said.
With the help of United Way o
the Big Bend $43,831.74 was allo
cated among: 2-1-1 Big Bend, Abil
ity 1st, Area Management Coalitior
for School Readiness, Big Benc
Cares, Big Bend Hospice, Bij
Brothers Big Sisters, Boy Scouts
Elder Care Services, and Fellowshil
of Christian Athletes.
Also to Girl Scouts, Jefferson Sen-
ior Citizen Center, Kids, Inc., Lega
Services of North Florida, Red
Cross, Refuge House, Second Har-
vest, Tri-County Foster Parents, ant
We Care.
Many agencies were represented
at the Kickoff Breakfast including
Early Read Start, Senior Citizen
Center, Hospice, and Boy Scouts.
Also, Cissy Boyd and Jerry Sutphin
were on hand.
The United Way is a locally incor-
porated nonprofit organization. Thf
monies generatedd in Jeffersor
County are matched with funds
from the UWBB and stay in Jeffer-
son County.


FRAN HUNT U
Staff Writer

Paris Littlejohn and Keyron Bel-
lamy and Keyron Bellamy, were
named the Homecoming King and
Queen, at Howard Middle School,
Tuesday; and Mariah Brinson and
Deondre' Jones were named Mr.
and Miss HMS.
KaDesjah Norton and TreVon
Youman were named Sixth Grade
King and Queen and Cardrecia
Walker and Gerrold Austin were
named the Seventh Grade King and'
Queen.
The eighth grade attendants in-
cluded Tercina Jones and Tavares
Thompson and Devonna Arnold
and Harold Ingram.
HMS began celebrating its annual
Homecoming Week Monday, en-
compassing the theme: The Last
Sting in the "Bee Hive.
The theme chosen to reflect the
final year for students at the present
location before being moved to the


New Jefferson County High School
location.
The week began Monday with "It
Takes Two Day" where students
choose partners ad dress as. twins.
Tuesday was "Dress For Success
Day" where students wore their
"Sunday finest" to school.
Wednesday is "Team Wear Day",
when students wear the jerseys of
their favorite sports teams; and
Thursday is "Spirit Day" when all
students will proudly wear the
school colors of Bee pride, orange
and blue.
Wrapping up the week, Friday is
"Victory Day" with many activities
to build school spirit to prepare for
the big game when the Bees would
put the "Stinger" to the Hamilton
Trojans, 5 p.m., here..
Throughout the week, home-
roomrs conducted a Homecoming
Sigif/Poster Contest.
All signs will be placed outside
for the Homecoming game and the
entries will be judged Thursday
morning. The best sign will win a
pizza party.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Keri Brasington, escorted by-
Chris Tuten, was crowned Home-
coming Queen at Aucilla Christian
Academy, during halftime of the
game during which ACA blanked
Oak Hall.
Her court includes: Casey Handley
and Matt Poston; Suzanne Walker
and Colby Roberts.
Class representatives included,
ninth grade Mallory Plaines and
Matt Bishop; tenth grade, Ramsey.
Revell and Kyle Barnwell; and
eleventh grade, Angela Stienberg
and Justin Payne.
Grade 11 won the Spirit Week
Competition, and the seventh grade
took the title for the middle school
students. Each of the classes will
; be rewarded with a pizza party.
Winners of the Field Day game
- competitions were the seniors, and
seventh graders.
Sophomores won the scavenger
hunt.
Juniors won the float competition.
Their theme, "Roast the Eagles"
was depicted by a turkey on a stick,
over a camp fire, in front of a
Teepee.
a The ninth grade float theme was
a "Pluck the Eagles" and depicted the
a students plucking the feathers of a
bird and tossing them into the air;
and the senior float theme, "Trash
r
Sthe Eagles".
S The tenth grade theme was "Bald
the Eagles" which was depicted by
a student in an eagle costume duct
Stepped into a barber's chair.
Another student stood behind
him in a salon smock, wearing
"dreadocks" and holding clipping
f sheers, as he shaved the head of the
y.
t Rezoning
l (Continued From Page 2)
live here, the man responded that his
work and family situation dictated
h that he remain in Sarasota. But yes,
one day he might retired to just such
d a community.:.as .the. one Lifestyle
Y was planning, he said. ', ,.:
"We want to keep it special, that's
e why we decided not to maximize"
e the developer said. "We like this
n area and it's our intent to be here for
a long time. We want to enjoy a
f good reputation here. We're flexible
- and reasonable and we want your
- confidence. We want you to feel
n good about this development."


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The celebration concluded with
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during the football game.
"It was the best Spirit Week we


ever had," said Principal Richard
Finlayson.
He thanked Kim Roccanti, Mary
Hartsfied, Jamie Newberry, and the
Student Council, for organizing
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

( MEM, RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax, 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Parents Can Help


Raise Readers \


If you want your child to be a
good reader, pick up a book.
Researchers say children whose
parents read to them 20 minutes or
more a day during preschool years
have substantially higher literacy
skills when they enter kindergarten.
compared to those whose parents
didn't read to them.
Reading time with your child may
be only the first step, however. The
way you read could be important as.
well.
."We now know that parents
should read with their kids, not just
to them," says Sue Ritchie, editorial
director of Family Education Net-
work (FEN), which offers online
learning-based content for teachers,
parents, home-schoolers and stu-
dents.
That means the more the experi-
ence resembles an interactive con-
versation :- with back-and-forth
questions and .answers about the
book from all involVed the more a
child will get out of it.
One statistic consistently stressed
by education experts like FEN, an
arm of the world's leading educa-
tion publishing company Pearson
Education, is this sobering one:


Only two percent of a child's entire
life will have been spent learning to
read.
And yet, as numerous studies have
shown, mastering the skill is highly
predictive of who will succeed in
life.
That's why parents would be wise
to follow even such simple sugges-
tions as showing how much pleasure
they get out of reading books, taking
frequent library visits with their
kids, and generally encouraging
them to read almost anything around
- from cereal boxes- to road signs to
movie listings.
What's more, there are a variety of
textbooks, computer programs,
books on tape and games that let
children have fun while practicing
their reading skills. For instance,
thousands of kids now read online at
sites such as funbrain.com.
What if your child's reading skills
don't seem. to be developing?
Ritchie says not to panic, but to take
action: "Reading problems don't
magically disappear. The earlier
children receive intervention at
school and at home, the more likely
they will become good readers."
(NAPS) .


From Our Photo File
.-, .. :



*IT

S' 4


'pp
.' A n lI."iPi. ..,t^',
'-4' T-. -*.^ :7. j?
_.^ ^--X. ^ :


IN APRIL, 1990, Judge Felix Johnston, Atty
Brian Hayes, and Investigator for the Public
Defender Merry Ann Frisby, have an im-


Opinion & Commer


Toilet Paper Caper


With tongue firmly planted in
cheek, I write about the latest toilet
paper caper.
Homeless fellow down in Dade
County stole 22 rolls of toilet paper
and got 40 years in prison.
Cost- of the toilet paper is esti-
mated to be about $22.
Well, it costs roughly $20,000 a
year to keep a person in prison and
you can right away see the numbers
in this case don't make much sense.
Let's assume the toilet paper thief
serves half of his 40 year sentence,
that would cost taxpayers a mere
'$400,000.
So, the state, that's you and me,
would pay $400,000 to right a $22
wrong.
pou can. chew this over and de-
cide if this is-a good deal all around'
There are a few other points to this-
story that need to be explored. I
For example, what does a home-,
less man do with 22 rolls of toilet
paper? How did he transport them?'


Publisher's

Notebook


.Ron Cichion


And where did he transport them to
since he was homeless?
Maybe he gave a roll to his friends
on the street, I don't know.

.I'm i onderingi how the 'opa knei
to arrest the fellow, but then,,I, sup-
pose seeing a man walking down the'
street with an armload of toilet pa-
per is something that needs to be in-
vestigated.
I'd be curious to know what the


homeless man
toilet paper.
minding my ov
rolls of toilet p

i,:How,abhout:
who handled
think they wer
the precinct sta
tive person tak
toilet paper ca
hear cops do th


prompt discussion, after a bomb scare at
the courthouse. No device was found. (News
File Photo)


It


P.


interesting
You see, there are a lot of angles
to explore in this case.
Now, let's give some thought to
the person who might have reported.
the theft to police.
.. Did he or she discover the short-
age in, how shall I say it, a moment
of distress? Or, was the theft discov-
ered in a routine inspection of thel
S ,toilet paper supply?
'Oh yes, what about the judge and'r
his thinking.
Our homeless man who stole the
toilet paper was sentenced to what
amounts to nearly two years in
told police about the prison per roll.
How's this? "I was Imagine if he had stolen a pair of
wn business when 22 shoes or suit of clothes! Why, he
aper attacked me." wouldn't live long enough to serveO'
.. his sentence'!
.the, cop or 'the cops i imai'ne the judge is heanilg
the, case? Don't you: smnie jokes on the cocktail circuit
e the brunt of jokes in that don't please him. d
nation? Did some crea- Shucks, I don't have to resolve any'
:e liberty and call the of these questions, just throw theme
se something else? I out there and let you think about
iat kind of thing. 'em.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
October 11, 1995
Once again, City Attorney Brian
Hayes' contract with the city is in
limbo.
Distasteful as commissioners
found it, they had little choice but to
approve the installation of crossing
gates at several railroad crossings in
the county. It was either that or have
the railroad company close off the
county roads.
Now that the county has once
again been spared a natural disaster,
where is concern that a sense of
complacency and false security may
set in.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
October 9, 1985
The Monticello Opera House
, Board of Directors held a barbecue
'Thursday in recognition and appre-
ciation of those persons who helped
;obtain a $150,000 legislative grant
"..to further restore the 95-year-old
'building.
Jefferson County farmers who suf-
Sfered losses because of Hurricane
SElena may be eligible for emer-
'gency loans.
Tri-County Electric officials are
warning their customers .to be wary
of thieves posting as electric utility
',employees.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
October 9, 1975
Monticello Police Chief George
,Griffin has announced his candidacy
'for reelection as police chief of the
city of Monticello in the city elec-
tion to be held October 28th.
In a regular meeting held on Tues-
[day, October 7, the Monticello City
,Council tentatively accepted the
.1975-76 budget.
Monticello will be glad to know
*:we have a new business in town and
-'.the name of the business is Eddie's
T.V. Service.
FORTY YEARS AGO
October 8, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Braswell left
Tuesday for Omaha, Nebraska to at-


tend the annual convention of The
National Association of Postmasters
of the U.S.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Bassett are
spending this week in Umatilla with
her' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Collins.
Mr. and Mrs. L.C. Poindexter and
family of Jacksonville spent the
weekend with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. E.S. Blair. They all attended
the Woodward family reunion in
Pinetta Sunday.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
October 7, 1955
Kenneth Sasser returned this week
from.,spending the suminer in Fre-
deric' Wisconsin, where he has been
employed.
Mrs. Henry Holmes joined her
daughter, Miss Mary Bud in Jack-
sonville for plane trip to New York
City, Williamsburg and Richmond,
VA.
Mr. and Mrs. William Scruggs,
Sr., left for Miami to attend the Na-
tional Legion Convention.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
October 5, 1945
Mrs. O.C. Head was honored on
her birthday by the. WSCS of the
First Methodist Church.
Receiving discharges from the
Armed Services recently are: Hamil-
ton M. Mash, S/Sgt. Cleve Cooksey,
Cpl. Luther E. Ingram, Jr., Pfc.
Henry Lindsey, S/Sgt. William A.
Clark.
Henry Reams and Billy FJoyd
were named as captains for this
week's football game against Leon
High School.


Letters to the
Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less Letters
must be signed and
include phone number of


College Plan No
Florida families started enrolling Florida Prepaid College Plan today.
thotr children in the Florida Prepaid Sign up now to lock in today's tui-
College Plan beginning on Monday tion, local fees and dormitory prices
with open enrollment period con- and avoid future price increases in
tinuing through January 31, 2006. the process."
Entering its 18th consecutive year, While the need for a college de-
Florida Prepaid has given families gree has never been more important
an opportunity to provide their chil- or financially attractive a collegeever been more important
dren with a college education by graduate makes on average$1 mil-g
S financial planning graduate makes on average $1 mil-
fostering timely financial planning lion more over a lifetime than a high
to pay for future college expenses.. school graduate, the simple truth is
"By enrolling in the Florida Pre- that nine out of 10 children still do
paid College Plan now, families will ot have Florida Prepaid account.
not have to worry about tuition inI- For families college ma not
For many families, college may not
creases that will occur between now be possible without the Florida Pre-
and when their child enters college," be possible without the Florida Pre-
stand when their child enanley Tate, Chairman of paid College Plan. The cost of atten-
the F a Pe Taid Coi n B o dance at colleges and universities in-
the Florida Prepaid College Board. creases every year
"I urge families to secure the ases every year.
hopes, dreams and ambitions of "With college costs on a constant
their children by enrolling in thet rise, I can't even imagine how I


w In 18t
would have budgeted to send my
two kids to college without the Flor-
ida Prepaid College Plan," said Flor-
ida Prepaid mother Patricia
Courtois, Sarasota, Florida. "As my
kids grew up, I was happy to know
that continuous rises in tuition costs
were not going to affect my locked
in rate. I'm glad I was able to af-
fordably provide my kids with a
chance for a higher education."

The Florida Prepaid College Plan
is financially, guaranteed by, the
State of Florida, so it is a safe way
to save. This year, the tuition plan
prices start as low as $24 a month
for the two-year community college
plan and $79 a month for the four-
year university plan. The prices vary
based on the type of plan and the


:h Year
age of the child. Once enrolled, the!
plan payments are fixed and nevero
increase.
When the child is ready for col-
lege, the program covers the actual
cost of any Florida public university
or community college, or the value
of the plan may be transferred 1to
most private colleges in Florida, se-
lect technical' schools and most out-
of-state colleges. I
To qualify, the child or the child's
parent/guardian must be a Florida1
resident. Anyone, including parents,
grandparents, friends or even busi-I
nesses, can purchase a plan. 3
The Florida Prepaid College Plan1q
is the largest program of its kind in
the country with more than 1 million
plans sold.


Underage Drinking Targeted


Good news for adolescents and part of your child's life, you can
tl:eir parents is that kids can get help broaden your child's experiences
dealing with life's daily challenges ;and network of care, encouragement
and potential pitfalls, such as con-" and guidance.
suming alcohol. 2: Empowerment: Adolescents
Parents have a lot more influence;' should be active contributors inside
than they may realize and there are the home, taking on appropriate re-
many concrete, everyday actions; responsibilities for themselves, their
they can take to help youngsters, families, their communities and the
make the right decisions. organizations to which they belong.
Studies by the Search Institute .Opportunities to explore their lead-
identified the essential building. ership abilities and to serve others
blocks of healthy adolescent devel- lets them know they're valued and
opment. These building blocks form valuable.
Developmental Assets a frame- 3. Boundaries and expectations:
work that gives parents the tools Children need to know what's ex-
they need to unlock their children's; pected of them. They need clear
potential and help them thrive. rules and consequences for what
Research has also shown the more they should and shouldn't do. Start-
of these assets young people have,, ing that process early makes it easier
the more likely they are to resist un- when they have more independence
healthy behaviors, as teenagers.
There are eight categories you can 4. Constructive use of time: With
use to help your child. so many social, recreational, enter-
1. Support: Children need encour-: tainment and educational opportuni-
agement, support and love from par- ties available, most children stay
ents and others. By inviting other' busy. But "keeping busy" is not al-
caring, responsible adults to be a_ ways the most "constructive" use of


a child's or a family's time.
Shared and individual hobbies,
spiritual activities, volunteer work,
youth programs and quality time at
home play a role in healthy develop-
ment.
5. Commitment to learning: Nur-
turing a lifelong commitment to
learning begins with the belief that
all young people can learn and have
something they can teach others,
even adults. Finding opportunities
for your family to learn and to cele-
brate learning through everyday ac-
tivities helps demonstrate its impor-
tance.
6. Positive values: By talking with
your children about what's really
important to your family (such as
honesty and responsibility), you
help them develop an internal "com-
pass" to guide their choices. Positive
values begin at home but they don't
end there. Showing care, concern
and respect for your neighbors and
your community also helps instill
positive values in your children.


7. Social competencies: Every
child needs to learn how to build re-s
lationships, make decisions, resolve s
disagreements, cope with challenges.l
and get along with different kinds of
people. Those are skills children be-
gin learning from their parents. -'
8. Positive identity: A strong sense
of their own power, purpose, worth
and promise helps young people
make wise decisions. Listen to your
children talk about their sense of
purpose in life, ask what they are
passionate about and encourage
their discoveries and capabilities.
The Internet can be a great place
for you to discover Developmental
Assets. MVParents.com, for exam-
ple, provides asset-building tools
parents need to become the "most
valuable players" in their children's
lives.
Parents can also register for Eve-
ryday Parenting Ideas, a weekly e-
mail update with tips, ideas, and
encouragement.











Letters...



Citizens Urge Residents To


Attend Commission Hearing


ear Editor:
The County Commissioners will
old a public hearing 7 p.m., Thurs-
ay, Oct. 20. They will vote to ap-
rove or deny a Comprehensive
}lan Amendment on re-zoning 73
acres from Ag 5 (1 unit per 5 acre)
Rl (1 unit per I acre). The prop-
rty is located on South US 19.
Yes, this is the same application
mat has been delayed upwards to a
rear for one reason or another: Im-
roper notices, the applicant with-
|rawing in June 2005, and a dispute
the number of acreage involved
auses concern.
The developer bought this prop-
rty in April 2004, and in June 2004
plied for the re-zoning. The sur-
ounding area is mainly zoned agri-
Cultural and is used as such. It is not
where a subdivision is needed or
warranted.
The project manager has given
sugarcoated promises to allow for
this type of density, all of which are
disputed by looking at statistics and
facts. The Comp Plan, LDR, and
State Statute lists reasons not to al-
low for this type of spot zoning.
Most importantly, citizens stated


their concerns and are against it.
This is only for a re-zoning in the
land use category, not for a develop-
ment. Once the land is re-zoned, it
will allow for the maximum density
in the residential category, which is
not limited to single family homes.
Wells and septic tanks go from 14
units to the possibility of 73 units.
There are also environmentally sen-
sitive lands that need to be consid-'
ered. The property could be sold af-
ter it is re-zoned to another devel-
oper.
These types of re-zonings will
have a major impact on the County.
With a swipe of a pen, Jefferson
County will be changed forever
without regard to the future. Devel-
opers are waiting in the shadows to
take advantage of these re-zonings.
When and where will it stop?
Our county does not have the in-
frastructure or services to support
the re-zoning of these lands. Growth
and development have to be planned
for and managed.
It needs to be in the proper zoning
and areas allowing for it. There is a
reason these lands are zoned as
such.


With all this in mind, the majority
of the Planning Commission has
recommended approval for this ap-
plication. Even though the public,
adjacent landowners, and field pro-
fessionals, were very vocal in stat-
ing reasons for a denial to the
re-zoning.
We know the people who attended.
the past meetings are frustrated and
disappointed in the planners who
voted in favor of this request. Un-
fortunately, politics and personal
-agendas seem to come into play in
many decisions. We may have lost
one battle, but we haven't lost the
war yet.
Please make every effort to attend
this meeting or contact your Com-
missioners: Tuten (997-2387), Hall ..
(321-6673), Sutphin (997-3162),
-Joyner (997-4098), and Monroe
(997-5406).
Hopefully, they will have more vi-
sioning and insight in their decision.
Remember the Planning Commis-
sioners are appointed, while the
County Commissioners are elected.
They need to listen to the people
they represent and vote against these .
re-zonings.
Don & Cindy Lee


MAJ. BEN ERVIN, 3rd ID Medical Plans &
Operation Divison Surgeon Section, and
Lance Corporal in the US Marines Will Tel-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005 PAGE 5
A.. .


lefsen, share supper in an area just outside
of Baghdad, Iraq.


Writer Urges Stronger Criteria

For Appointing Planners


Dear Editor:
I want to thank Laz Aleman for his
recent article reporting on my dis-
sent and the County's approval of
the Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment changing the definition of Ag-
riculture.
.It helps to know at least someone
is hearing and presenting the heart
of what the citizens have to say
about the issues that affect them on
a very personnel level.
And the county's response.....none.
We are being bombarded by the
investors with great interest in de-
veloping subdivisions in every part
of the county.
The first step for seeking ap-
proval is at the Planning Commis-
sion level. The appointed members
of the Planning Commission, al-
though unpaid, serve an extremely
important function as drafters of our
growth management laws.
Their recommendations regarding
developments are taken very seri-
ously by our elected County Com-


missioners who depend on them to
study the laws, issues and vision of
the county citizens, in their
decisions.
There are many new members of
the Planning Commission and ex-
cept for one who came for one
meeting, they have never been seen
at a Planning Commission meeting,
prior to their appointments.,
Do they have any planning experi-
ence? Have they attended any plan-
ning seminars .on smart growth? Do
they have an in .depth familiarity
with the documents they must use to
make thoughtful decisions?
I propose the public does not
really know, and has no recourse but
to discover the extent of their back-
grounds through word of mouth, for
according to our county law, the
only qualification for their appoint-
ment is that they be resident citizens
of the county. Is this sufficient? I
think not.
These planners are public servants
and subject to the State's Sunshine


law, as explained at the recent joint
meeting of the County and Planning
Commissions.
As public servants, the citizens of
this county have the right to know
their planners' backgrounds and af-
filiations.
The Monticello News should print
this information for each newly ap-
pointed commissioner.
The County should carefully ex-
amine Article 8, and add to its quali-
fication list for the appointment of a
Planning-dommissionr member,; one,
with knowledge and experience in
planning.
At minimum, orientation meetings
on best planning practices for all
new planners should be required.
Free seminars are available from
UF for this purpose. While looking
at Article 8, the .Commissioners
would be well served to reexamine
the duties of the Planning Commis-
sion, and rescind its duty to emerge
as the county's Code Enforcement
Board, to be the arbiter on issues it
already decided on as a Planning
Commission.
Amendments to this Article,
among 7 others, is subject to ap-
proval of the County's Land Devel-
opment Code, at a second public
meeting Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005.
I hope our commissioners will take
my recommendations seriously and
act on them before the approval
deadline.
Sincerely,
Santa L. Hokanson


DAVID WARD property appraiser makes a Brittany Hobbs and Keioria Scott. (News
presentation to the Chamber of Commerce Photo)
Junior Leaders. Facing the camera, L-R:


Jr. Leadership Program

Begins Fourth Year


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello/Jefferson County
Chamber of Commerce has begun
the fourth year of its successful Jun-
ior Leadership Program.
Its intent is to keep more employ-
able young adults, who might other-
wise seek employment outside the
county after high school graduation,
in this area.
Participants this year are seven
juniors from Jefferson County High
school and six juniors from Aucilla
Christian Academy.

The Junior Leadership Program
offers six days of networking and
skill development curriculum to the
group.
The course of study will entail one
day a month, through March.
The participants will meet local


employers representing various
types of employment available in
our area.
They will also meet experts in
various skill areas who will deliver
presentations on employment readi-
ness.
Additionally, there will be oppor-
tunities to complete work exercises
and skill development projects.
This is a local Chamber program
which does not divert' resources
from any existing youth programs.
For more information about this
program contact Coordinator Diane
Freeman at 997-2519.
Students involved in this program
include: Aressa Blackmon, Joanna
Cobb, Tammy Daws, Serena
Harvin, Brittany Hobbs, Amanda
Hunt, Shaumese Massey, Tomeka
Massey, Melissa Martin, Tony Rob-
erts, Keiona Scott, Angela Scurry,
and J T Ward.


Dear Editor: -
On October 13, 2005, the Plan-
ning Commission voted to approve
the zoning density amendment ap-
plication, submitted by Lyman
Walker IV.
The vote was 6-3. Voting for ap-
proval were two of Walker's cous-
ins, although not first cousins, but
related all the same: John Greene
and John Walker.
Where is your honor; gentlemen?
Where is your virtue? By your par-
ticipation and favorable votes in this
application process, you have cre-
ated the appearance of elemental un-
fairness.
By your actions, the citizenry-
could be given the impression that
the entire planning commission


process is unfair and biased.
Because you're not first cousins
with Bubba Walker, you wee not
legally bound to disqualify your-
selves from the proceedings.
But, you should have done so as
a matter of morality and principle.
In the process, you could have
tainted the credibility and integrity
of the other commission members,
and the commission as a whole.
The citizens of Jefferson County
deserve better representation. We
deserve integrity and fairness; not
cousin voting for cousin.
Yod have lost your credibility, and
therefore should both resign as Plan-
ning Commissioners.
Sincerely,
Wayne Searcy


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620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
Z 4 Monticello, FL. 32344

850-997-5553
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Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
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Resident Calls For

Resignation Of Planners

Related To Developer


a


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St.












PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005


Lifestyle


N


Hamedani Speaker At

Meeting Of Sorority


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Xi Lambda Upsilon Chapter
of Beta Sigma Phi met 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 11 at the Jefferson County
Public Library, where Librarian
Linda Hamedani was the guest
speaker.
She gave an introduction to the Li-
brary, and a tour of the refurbished
facility.
Hamedani also invited members to
look through and purchase old
)ooks from a designated assortment.
Hostess for the affair was Betty


M\4esser.
President Connie Boland con-
ducted the business meeting, prior to
the speaker's remarks.
"The group was impressed with
the spacious library and County
residents should be very impressed
with the new facility," remarked
Mary Ann Van Kleunen.
In attendance were: Judy Carney,
Carolyn Cheshire, Ann Coxetter,
Peggy Day, Linda Demott, Elinor
Garner, Carolyn Hayse, Betty
Messer, Alice Sander, Mary Ann
Van Kleunen, Emily Walker, Ve-
linda Williams, Carolyn Wright.


Church Plans
Ladies' Night

Pastor James Leonard, Sr. and
members of the Mt. Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in Capps in-
vite all women (especially women
ministers) to "Ladies Night Out"
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21.
This program is,a part of Mt.
Pleasant's "Healing Hearts Agape
Ministry" featuring a play, "How To
Mend A Broken Heart," consisting
of real life events relating to hurtful
situations.
There will also be singing, testi-
monials, group discussions, praise,
worship, and round table discus-
sions on Biblical issues.


Refreshments will be served.
For additional information, con-
tact Minister Pattie Terrell Bennett
at 997-3612.
CARD OF THANKS
Rebecca Benjamin and family
would like to thank everyone who
had a hand in the memorial service
for Bro. John D. Bright.
Thanks also to Alphonso Hall,
Willie Sloan, Rev. Bill Hagan, Rev.
Jimmy Hill, Rev. Michael Rogers,
Jennifer Allen, Henry Cook, and
Joe, at Cap It Off Graphics.
Thanks to everyone for their dona-
tions, conversations and prayers.
May God bless all of you.
Rebecca Benjamin'
and Family


Free Trees For Donation

To Arbor Day Foundation


Five free Crapemyrtle trees will be
g'iveci to each person who joins the
National Arbor Day Foundation
during October.
The free trees are part of the non-
profit Foundation's Trees for Amer-
ica Campaign, a program dedicated
to environmental stewardship
through the planting of trees.
"Crapemyrtles were selected for
this campaign because of their ele-
gant color and form, making them
an attractive addition to the home
landscape," John Rosenow, founda-
tion president, said.
"Our members enjoy planting trees
and knowing they're participating in
improving the health of the environ-
ment."


The trees will be shipped postpaid
at the right time for planting, be-
tween Nov. 1 and Dec. 10, with en-
closed planting instructions.
The six to 12 inch trees are guar-
anteed to grow, or they will be re-
placed free of charge.
Members also receive a subscrip-
tion to the Foundation's colorful bi-
monthly publication, Arbor Day,
and the Tree Book, with information
-about tree planting and care.
To receive the free trees, send $10
membership contribution to : Five
Crapemyrtles, National Arbor Day
Foundation, 100 Arbor Avenue, Ne-
braska City, NE, 68410, by Oct. 31,
2005, or join online at arborday.org.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Ashville Volunteer Fire De-
partment (AVFD) will host an Open
House and Membership Drive 8 am
to 1 pm, Saturday, Nov. 5 in con-
junction with the Aucilla Shores
Community Yard Sale.
A percentage of the proceeds from
the Yard Sale will go to support the
efforts of the AVFD.
Anyone interested in participating
in the Yard Sale may call 997-6308,
for further information..
Fire Department personnel will be
on site to promote fire safety, give
equipment demonstrations, and to
provide membership information.
AVFD provides first response to
medical, accident, and fire calls to
the northeast area of Jefferson
County.
There are a wide variety of serv-
ices a volunteer can provide, and
citizens are asked to consider how
they can assist the Department.
Individuals are also needed to_



New Arrival
Matthew and Robyn Peters, of
Tallahassee, announce the arrival of
their daughter, Haley Madison Pe-
ters, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2005.
Paternal grandparcrts are Doug
and Sharon Peters of Monticello.
Maternal grandparents are Jack
and Debbie Stockwell of Elba, AL,
and Beverly Stockwell and Bob
Miller of Beaumont, TX.


serve on the AVFD Board of Direc-
tors, provide, training, and other sup-
port serx ices
Anyone interested in more infor-
mation about the AVFD should con-
tact Lynn Wood at 997-3677.



Poppy Donations
Benefit Veterans
Assistance
The holiday season quickly ap-
proaches and beginning next month,
area Veterans of Foreign Wars
members can be seen in front of
businesses and stores with the tradi-
tional Buddy Poppies.
The poppies symbolize the hands
which have served their country,
and donations received benefit vet-"
erans' welfare.
VFW Buddy Poppies are assem-
bled by disabled, needy and aging
veterans in VA hospitals, and domi-
ciliaries across the country, and are
distributed by VFW posts and their
ladies auxiliaries.
Thl minimal assessment ( cost of
Buddy Poppies) to VFW units pro-
vides compensation to the veterans
who assemble the poppies, provides
financial assistance in maintaining
state and national veterans' rehabili-
tation and service programs and par-
tially support the VFW National
Home for orphans and widows of
the nation's veterans.
The Buddy Poppy program has
been in existence for 75 years.


GANT DOWDY, of Tallahassee, and Kerri Kercher, of Monti-
cello, were married Friday, Sept. 16, at the home of Delo-
res and Raymond Kercher. The couple resides in
Thomasville.


Electric Wheelchairs

Available If Qualified


Wishes on Wheels makes j\ ail-
able Electric Power Wheelchairs to
non-ambulatory Senior Citizens, 65
years old and older, and the perma-
nently'disabled of any age, if they-
qualify.
Usually, there is no charge or out-
of-pocket expense for the power.
wheelchair, including shipping and
delivery to the home by a techni-
cian, who makes the final adjust-
ments to fit the individual and
shows them how to use and main-
tain it.
No deposit is required, and their is
no obligation for determining if
qualified:
Electric wheelchairs are provided
to those who cannot walk and also
cannot operate a manual wheelchair
sufficiently, or safely enough to care
for themselves in their residence.
The', do have to be able to safely
operate a joystick controller on the
armrest, and understand the basic in-


structions.
There are additional qualifications
including that a doctor approves and
recommends the need for a power
wheelchair.
The Wishes on Wheels program's
main purpose and goal is to develop
public awareness of the assistance
options that exist to allow senior
citizens and the permanently dis-
abled to remain independent in their
homes without incurring extra ex-
pense.
Without this awareness and assis-
tance, the senior and his/her family
may prematurely choose a nursing
home, or take on expensive in-home
care simply because they cannot
move safely, or quickly enough
from room to room, or get to the
bathroom, kitchen, or to answer the
phone or doorbell.
For additional information call
(800) 823-5220.


H eAl
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Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello *997-3553


gig gn~


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Monday evenings. Tuesday afternoons. Tuesday evenings.
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Call the ARCHBOLD INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE CENTER. (229) 228-7008


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S If you are uninsured, you may
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We accept Medicare, Medicaid
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Located at 1702 South Jefferson St. in Perry, Florida
850-223-1744

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850-421-7600
Call Us If You're In Need Of Care In Your Pregnancy or
For Any Women's Health Care Issues




Now Accepting Appointments
James Rentz, Jr. D.M.D.
3012 Hwy. 41 South,
Lake Park, Georgia 31636

229-559-4700









thelfo llow ncdtions:


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Residents are encouraged to bring
their carved pumpkins to decorate in
the US Postal Sevice Pumpkin Con-
test, scheduled 1-2 p.m., Saturday,
at the local Post Office.
Hershey's Pumpkin Decorating
Mix candy will be provided for
decorating. There is a limited supply
so arrive early and plan to have fun.
The contest is for children ages 6
to 12, and parental assistance is sug-
gested.
A digital camera will be awarded
to the winner.
For more detailed information
visit www.usps.com/pumpkincon-
test
Halloween is the season for fun


and The Hershey Company is join-
ing families in that fun by sponsor-
ing this exciting contest.

Newborn Care

Classes Set
Free Newborn Care classes will be
offered at the Jefferson County
Health Department from 2 5 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 7.
Topics to be discussed include:
newborn appearance, bathing, dia-
pering, well baby checkups, immu-
nizations, breast feeding and
positioning, bottle feeding, taking
care of yourself after childbirth,
child safety, and cord care.
For more information or to regis-
ter call Joyce Steele, LPN/Healthy
Start Care Coordinator at 342-
0170x107.


*) GOSPEL SING j

featuring


47 Masters From Valdosta & Monticello 4
47 October 22, Saturday at 7:00 p.m. 1



Lamont United 4

Methodist Church

Lamont, Florida 47
Join us for refreshments after the sing <4

-JS^SwJ^^^


Ashville Firefighters To

Hold Membership Drive


Pumpkin Decorating Contest

Set Saturday At Post Office


1


I1






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005 PAGE 7



Annual Chamber Dinner


NEW OFFICERS are sworn in by Judge treasurer; Gretchen Avera, vice-president;
Bobby Plaines at the Chamber Dinner: L-R: Margaret Levings, president.
Eleanor Hawkins, secretary; Diane Freeman,


OUTGOING President David Frisby presents
the Grace and Mack Morris Award to John


Gerren, at the annual Chamber of
merce Dinner.


s~Tu a
-~
~ '*~t~i~,r~ii~j~I I

~> g~T f ~iT1
.~ F
S I ~~,


:A
JULIE CONLEY thanks the Chamber of Commerce for
awarding her the Fred and Velinda Williams Award for her
contribution to the Chamber.


ACCEPTING the Corporate Citizen award
ergy is Gaye Hanna.


for Progress En-


INCOMING Chamber President Margaret Leavings enjoys
the dinner and her table guests prior to receiving the
President's Award for outstanding contribution to the
Chamber.


Photos By Monticello News


'~ '


j


FRANCES YEAGER, left, Mary Frances
Drawdy, man the registration table at the










.. :








U.S


DEEP in Conversation, at the Annual Cham-
ber Dinner, are from left, Jerry Hawthorne


Chamber Dinner, as Eleanor
to sign in.


Hawkins stops


I
i-

i *
r


^


VOLUNTEER AWARD is presented to Cather-
ine Arnold of Big Bend Hospice, by Chamber


Director Mary Frances Drawdy. Helen Bent-
ley was unable to attend the event.


i1~r


(River Graphics;) Charlene Hawthorne (Big
Bend Hospice); and Ron Smith, standing.


AMONG the. guests at the Annual Chamber
of Commerce Dinner were: L-R: Buddy
Westbrook (Westbrook Realty;) Bob Davison


(Merrill Lynch;) Joe Vandenberg (Monticello
Dry Cleaners)











A-P oR aMnrTTrCFt .n At T NP.WS WED.. OCTOBER 19, 2005


Sports


'Midnight Sun' Charity Horse

Show Set At Dixie Plantation


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Second Annual "Midnight
Sun" Charity Horse Show and Fes-
tival hosted at the Dixie Plantation
sponsored by the Quitman/Brooks
County Museum & Cultural Center
is set for the week of Oct. 31
through Nov. 6.
During the week's events, lunch
will be available for purchase from
11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Daily events include:
Monday, Oct. 31., 4:30 p.m.
through 9 p.m., the mansion will be
decorated by area designers, featur-
ing extravagant pieces and antiques.-

The works of artists and crafts-
men including a Tai Chi exhibition,
and the works of Bronze By
Cooley.
A reception will follow the events
of the day, with tickets priced at
$15.
Tickets for the tours are $10.
Tuesday at noon, a fashion show
and luncheon is planned. Tickets
are $25.
Wednesday will feature a-Coun-
try Music band at 6 p.m., dancing
and a barbecue meal. Tickets are
$25.
Thursday at 6 p.m. cocktails, a
banquet, dancing, and live auction


is scheduled.
Friday following the horse show,
there will be a Country Music party
and barbecue for exhibitors and
volunteers.
Saturday and Sunday house tours
are set from 10:30 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Arena events begin Friday at 6
p.m. with, the first night of the
horse show.
The program includes 25 classes.
Saturday, at 11 a.m., the morning
session of the second day of the
horse show begins.
The session features eight
classes, mostly for youth, but in-
cludes the weaning and yearling
class and championship.
The second night of the horse
show begins at 5 p.m., wvith 28
classes, including two stakes
classes, six championship classes
and a speed racking class.
More than $28,000 in prize
money will be awarded. Serving as
judges are Ty Irby and Terry Stone.
Another feature of the event is a
horse raffle. Nicknamed "Miss
Golden Peach" for her golden mane
and tail, the three-year old profes-
,sionally trained filly is the animal
to be raffled Saturday night during
the horse show.
"Keep This" is her official name
and her dame name is "Miss Cash"
and her sire name is Cash For
Keeps". .


Her pedigree goes all the way
back to the "Midnight Sun"
lineage. Tickets are for a donation
of $10 each or 12 for $100.
Also featured is the famous trail
ride and tour, or residents may ride
on a tractor-drawn buggy.
Three guided trail rides will be
conducted Saturday and Sunday
over the bird dog field trail paths
where nature is showcased.
Riders must provide their own.
horse, but camping is free for those
wishing to do so. Stalls will be
available or participants may tie to
their trailer.
Tickets for the trail ride are $20
for adults and $10 for children.
Tickets for all events, excluding
meal events which require pre-
purchased tickets, can be purchased
at the gate or at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce or Towne
Square Antiques.
Tickets for each night of the
show are $5, box seats for six with
meals are available for $150 for
each night and. $300 for both
nights.
Patron Tickets are avail for $100,
and cover admission to all events
throughout the week including the
Mansion tour, meals and arena
events.
To purchase raffle tickets or for
further information call 229-253-
3333 or 299-263-6000.


24:24, and improved her personal,
best record of the season by two
minutes; and Kelli Dollar, 91st,
with 25:52.
Awards were given to top 80 run-
ners, which included six of ACAs
top seven girls.


; ^ .. : ...... l, .. J4, ,
TIGER Marcus Benjamin snaps the ball to Kendall Grant runs his pattern, during a re-
quarterback Jitavian Bennett and lineman cent JCHS practice session. (News Photo)


JCHS Tigers Blank


Branford 13-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School i
blanked Branford 13-0, Friday.
Head Coach Harry Jacobs said
there was no offensive player of the
week, however, there were two de-
fensive players of the week, Rob-
ert Nealy and Dondre Tyson.
The Tigers scored in the first
quarter when Lucious Wade made
a touchdown on a 56 yard run, and
Jon Dady kicked the extra point.
The second quarter went scoreless
and in the third quarter, Desrick
Jones made a seven yard touch-
down, and the extra point attempt
failed.
In rushing, Wade had six carries
for 68 yards; Tim Crumity, eight
for 49 yards; and LaMarcus Ben-
.nett, two carries for 44 yards.


In defense, Nealy had eight
tackles, four assists, four tackles for
a loss, and two sacks, in less than
the first half, when he was injured
and removed from the game.
Tyson had nine tackles, three as-
sists, three tackles for a loss, two
sacks, one forced fumble and one


blocked punt.
Jones had six tackles and four as-
sists; and Marcus Brown had six
tackles, one assist, thr e tackles for
a loss and three sacks.
"It was a great defensive game,"
said statistician Josh Moore.
He concluded that the Tigers
were preparing for an extremely
tough game 7:30 p.m., Friday,
when they face Lafayette, the num-
ber one team in the district,'here.


Tori Self in recent ACA Girls
Cross Country Meet. (News
Photo.)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy and
Jefferson County High School ath-.
letes appear on this week's Big
Bend Leaders List.
In football, ACA's Casey Gun-
nels has been added to the list,
standing at number nine in receiv-
, ing with 15 pass receptions for 181
total yards and three touchdowns.
In girl's volleyball, Loren Cox
climbed from the number 10 posi-


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Rainfall for the County in Septetn-.
ber was 3.24 inches, below the
County average of 5.31 inches for
the month.
. The Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District (SRMWD) average
rainfall for September was 2.33
inches, versus 5.58 inches average
for the' district in September.
The district is comprised of 14
counties, including: Alachua, Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
chrest, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafay-
ette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee,
Taylor, and'Union Counties.
Of these counties, Jefferson had
the highest rainfall in.September..
Cumulative rainfall for the past 12
months is 56.23 inches, compared to
the long term average annual Dis-
trict rainfall of 55.2 inches.
Surplus for the past year has
shrunk to about one inch. September
had the lowest rainfall in the district


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Thc Aucilla. Christian Academy
'Girls' Cross County tear partici-
pated in the Bob Cat Classic in
Gainesville last week, and came in
at ninth -,place, of 30 'registered
teams, and more than 200 runners.
Olivia Sorensen came in 29th
place, with a time of 21:38; Tristan
Sorensen, 31st, with time of 21:46;
and Sarah Sorensen,. 51st, with a
time of 22:44.
Nicole Mathis, 66th, with 23:33;
Xlex Searcy,79th, with 24:18;
Courtney Connell, 80th, with


tion to the number eight position in
assists, with 191.
Shaumese Massey fell from the
number one position in blocks to
the number five position, with 45
blocks; and Keandra Seabrooks re-
mains at number nine, with 132
digs.
In girl's cross country, Olivia
Sorensen remains at 14 with an av-
erage time of 21:47; Tristan
Sorensen remains at number 18,
with:'a time of 22:23; ,and Sarah
Sorensen fell from 23 to 25, with a
time of 23:21.


since 1978.
At the Aucilla River in Lamont,
rainfall in September was at 47.89
inches, below the average Septem-
ber rainfall of 50.25 inches.
The District continues to recom-
mend that water conservation be an
ongoing activity for all water users.
Water is conserved by using the
minimum amount needed for spe-
cific applications, and by irrigating
lawns, plants and crops, only when
necessary, and in the morning be-
fore 10 a.m. and in the evening, af-
ter 4 p.m., when lower temperature
and wind velocity reduces the
amount of water lost to evaporation.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer,

The varsity Lady Tigers volley-
ball team wrapped up their regular
season last week with an 8-9
record, after splitting their final two
games.
JCHS fell to John Paul, losing the
first match, 16-25; won the second,
25-18; lost the third, 15-25; and
lost the final match, 16-18.
Shaumese Massey had three
blocked shots, four digsh and one
!kill; Keandra Seabrooks 10 digs
and two kills; Loran Cox. 12 assists
and one block; Chandra Tucker,
eight digs and :two aces; and Jaz-
maun Hall, two aces.
The Lady Tigers devoured East
Gadsden taking all three matches,
25-14, 25-16 and 25-13.
Massey had four blocks and three
digs; Seabrooks, two kills, two aces
and 10 digs; Tucker, five digs; Car-
men .Skipworth, three digs; Hall
nine service points and two aces;
Seabrooks, one, ace; and Cox, 10
assists.
'We've been playing good," said
Coach Bill Brumfield. "We've
played a lot of bigger schools this
year."
The Lady Tigers will compete in
the District Tournament Thursday
against Maclay.

Baby Rattlers
Clobber
Warriors 49-3
FAMU Baby Rattlers walloped
Aucilla Christian 49-3, Friday,
making their season record 3-4.
Head Coach Dave Roberts named
Colby Roberts as the offensive
player of the week, and Casey Gun-
nels as the defensive player of the
week.
Gunnels had 15 carries for 63
yards; Daniel Greene, five carries
for 21 yards; and quarterback
Stewart Williams completed one
pass out of four attempts for 10
yards.
On the defensive side of the field,
Ben Grantham had five tackles;
Gunnels, nine tackles; Glen
Bishop, four tackles; and Roberts
had three tackles'.


Aucilla Christian


Casey Gunnels Colby Roberts
Defensive Offensive


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Lady warriors Place Ninth

In Gainesville Bob Cat Classic


INROUCOY KCA


Lady Tigers End Regular

Volleyball Season 8-9


ACA, JCHS Athletes

Named Big Bend Leaders


HIGH SCHOOL PLAYERS OF THE WEEK


Rainfall Here Below

Average In September


FAUE 5, IVIVI-l JLJL%-Jvjj,%j, kr A'), V, JVIVV,3, vvj".,


I


zo; P.,


ro*-







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005 PAGE 9


I()IMi~iE
f fl i:


T 0


Space Remains
For Weekend

Ghost Tours


PUMPKiN PATCH
I ~amw -


AUTUMN brings thoughts of Harvest, Hal-
loween and Thanksgiving and Waukeenah


....



United Methodist Church captures the feel-
ing with its Pumpkin Patch. (News Photo)


Extension Agent Explains


Role Of BMI In Weight Loss


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In the interest of weight loss to
counteract obesity and overweight,
Consumer Science Extension
Agent Heidi Copeland, explains the
importance of Body Mass Index
(BMI) and the new Food Certifica-
tion Program.
The BMI uses an individual's
weight and height to indicate the
percentage of body fat, which in
turn, affects the likelihood of get-
ting chronic disease.
BMI is determined by the weight
in pounds multiplied by 704.5, di-
vided by height in inches, squared.
If the resulting number is below
18.5, the peson is underweight;
18.5-24.9 is normal; 25.0-29-9 is
overweight; and 30 and above is
obese.
BMI is considered a better indi-







ELIZABETHTOWN
(PG13)
Fri. 4:25 7:10 9:55 Sat.
1:35-4:25-7:10- 9:55 Sun.
1:35 4:25 7:10 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:25- 7:10
NO PASSES

FLIGHT PLAN (PG13)
Fri. 5:40 7:55 10:05 Sat. -
1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55 10:05
Sun. 1:15 3:30 5:40 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:40 7:55

WALLACE &
GROMIT (G)
Fri. 4:15 7:15 9:35 Sat.
1:40 4:15 -7:15 9:35 Sun.
1:40 -4:15 7:15 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:15 7:15
NO PASSES

TWO for the MONEY
(R)
Fri. 4:35 10:10 Sat. 4:35 -
10:10 Sun. 4:35
Mon. Thurs. 4:35
NO PASSES

THE FOG (PG13)
Fri. 4:40 7:25 9:45 Sat. 1:50
4:40- 7:25 9:45 Sun. 1:50 -
4:40-7:25 Mon.-Thurs. 4:40 -
7:25
NO PASSES

IN HER SHOES (PG13)
Fri. 4:10 7:00 9:50 Sat.
1:20 4:10 7:00 9:50 Sun.
1:20 4:10 7:00 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:10 7:00
NO PASSES

THE GREATEST
GAME EVER PLAYED
(PG)
Fri. 7:20 Sat. 1:25 7:20
Sun. 1:25 7:20. Mon. -
Thurs. 7:20
NO PASSES

THE GOSPEL (PG)
Fri. 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sat.
2:00 4:45 7:35 10:00 Sun.
2:00 4:45 7:35 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:45 7:35
NO PASSES


cator of health related risks than
weight alone.
To find out more about BMI go
to www.cdc.gov.
.- Concerning the Food Certifica-
tion Program, the American heart
Association recently came out with
a program backed by solid science.
By placing their logo, which is a
heart with a check mark, on food
products, a consumer can quickly
and reliably find heart-healthy
foods.
All products bearing the logo
must meet the association's nutri-
tion criteria per standard certifica-
tion.
That criteria includes low fat,
which means less than, or equal to
three grams of fat, low saturated
fat, which is less thaif or equal to
one gram, and low cholesterol,
which is less than or equal to 20
ml.
The foods must be nutritious,
containing at least 10 percent of the
daily value of one or more of these
Snarrall) occurring nutrients; pro-
tein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, cal-


What is your child getting
into at the playground?
Last year, a half million
kids were seriously injured
at their neighborhood
playgrounds. Learn how to
keep your child safer by
calling 1-800-824-BONES, or
by visiting www.aaos.org
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
We keep you well connected.


cium, iron or dietary fiber.
The foods must also be moderate
in sodium, which contains less than
or equal to 480 milligrams for indi-
vidual foods.
For meat to qualify, it must meet
the USDA's standard of "Extra
Lean".


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Spaces are still available for the
Big Bend Ghost Trackers (BBGT)
haunted tours that begin Friday
night.
The tours will be conducted 7:30
p.m. and 9 p.m., Friday and Satur-
day and again next weekend.
The tours begins in front of the
Chamber of Commerce and tickets
are $10 for adults and $5 for chil-
dren.
Chamber Director Mary Frances
Drawdy said that those participat-
ing in the tours may stop in before
they begin and enjoy a bowl of
chili at no extra charge.
All funds raised will benefit
Mainstreet.
To make a reservation call 997-
5552.
Members of the BBGT will be
dressed in period clothing leading
the groups by lantern light, and
participants are reminded to wear
comfortable walking shoes, bring
their cameras, extra film and batter-
ies because one never knows what
they may capture on film during
the haunted tours.

THANKS FOR MAKING US YOUR BUSINESS.

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED.. OCTOBER 19, 2005


Ladies Tennis

Rained Out

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood Swings la-
dies' A-league tennis team, was
slated to compete against the
"Sassy Smashers" last week, but
the matches were rained out and re-
sulted in splitting points, 3-3.
"That was not good for us," said
Team Captain Patty Hardy.
"Some of the women were able
to play in the league, as I guess it
didn't rain in Georgia. Having to
split points resulted in being moved-
from third place to fifth place."
There are 16 teams in the league.
The "Mood Swings" have been
building their "Attitude" all week
for their matches Thursday mom-
ing against the "Ace Kickers".

LEGALS
NOTICE 1s HEREB GIl\ EN. thai Jhicl
Hamilton the holder of the following cer-
tificates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificates num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
152 Year of Issuance 1999 Description or
Property. Property lying South of Ease-
ment per survey for Steve Walker Ill
dated November 6, 1987 and sketch of
description of centerline of easement dated
May 7, 1991: Commence at a concrete
monument marking the Southeast corner
of the North Half of the Southwest Quar-
ter of Section 15,'Township I North,
Range 3 East, Jefferson County, Florida
and thence run South 89 degrees 30 min-
utes 30 seconds West 1441.34 feet, along
the South boundary of the north Half of
the Southwest Quarter of said Section 15
to a concrete monument for the POINT
OF BEGINNING, thence from said
POINT OF BEGINNING continue South
89 degrees 30 minutes 30 seconds West
5.91 feet to an iron rod, thence North 36
degrees 02 minutes 18 seconds West
182.07 feet to a concrete monument,
thence South 89 degrees 57 minutes 20 sec-
onds West 209.79 feet to a concrete monu-
ment, thence North 36 degrees 02 minutes
52 seconds West 89.7 feet to a point,
thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 33
seconds east 144.06 feet to a concrete
monument,/ thence North 00 degrees 02
minutes 18 seconds East 299.86 feet to a
concrete monument, thence North 89
degrees 56 minutes 40 seconds West 145.0
feet to a concrete monument, thence South
00 degrees 04 minutes 57 seconds West
298.42 feet to a point, thence North 36.
degrees 02 minutes 52 seconds West 76.35
feet to a point, thence North' 36 degrees' 02
minutes 52 seconds West 76.35 feet to a
concrete monument, thence South 75
degree 45 minutes 43 seconds West 182.66
feet to a concrete monument on the East-
erly boundary of a county graded road,
thence North 35 degrees 43 minutes 34
seconds West 31.46 feet, along said East-
erly boundary to a concrete monument,
thence North 74 degrees 00 minutes 45
seconds East 180.76 feet to a concrete
monument, thence North 36 degrees 01
minutes 35 seconds West 130.77 feet to a
point in the centerline of a 60 foot ease-
ment ;run thence North 23 degrees 24
minutes 59 seconds East along the center-
line of said easement a distance of 267.83
feet; run thence North 73 degrees 01 min-
utes 30 seconds East along the centerline
of said easement a distance of 380.91 feet
to a point in the centerline of said ease-
ment; run thence South 03 degrees 37 min-
utes 59 seconds East a distance of 30.83
feet to the margin of said easement: run
thence South 3 degrees 40 minutes 03 sec-
onds East a distance of 747.55 feet and to a
concrete monument marking ,a point
which point is the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. South to a 60 foot easement as

fAlways Informative...
r MONTICELLO NEWS


LEGALS


recorded in Official Records Book 151,
Page 410 of the Public Records of Jeffer-
son County, Florida. Name in which
assessed 1-10 Corporation. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such certifi-
cates or certificates will be sold to the
highest bidder at the court house door on
the 9th day of November, 2005, At 11:00
a.m. Dated this 29th day of September,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court qo'Jeferson County, Florida.
10/5, 12, 19, 26, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold a workshop o
October 27, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. The
workshop will be to discuss subdivisions,
lot clustering, wastewater, septic tanks,
and development issues. The. meeting will
be held in the Courtroom of the Jefferson
County Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and US
Highway 90 in Monticello, FL. The
meeting may. be continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency of this
state or of any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any meeting
or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing
is required, of such board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
10419, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 05-232-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of REGINA A. BUTLER,
Petitioner/Wife, and JERRY W.
BUTLER, Respondent/Husband. NOTICE
OF ACTION TO: JERRY W. BUTLER
Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Clerk of Court,
whose address is Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, FL
32344 on or, before September 14, 2005,
and file the, original with the clerk of this
said court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
* demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on 10/14/05 Clerk of Court As Clerk
o :.;imc Court.
10/19. 10/26, pd
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:
05-27PR IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY
LORENA BEVIS Deceased. NOTICE TO
CREDITORS, Thl'eiSadninistration of the
estate of Dorothy Lorena' Bevis, also
known as Lorena S. Bevis, deceased whose
date of death was February 10, 2005; is
pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson


LEGALS


WLEGALS


County, Florida, Probate Division; File
Number 2005-27-PR; the address of which
is Probate Division, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, FL
32344. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons, who have claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors
of the decedent and other person who have
claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE:
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS: August 1, 2005(
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Curtis B. Hunter Florida Bar No. 0884243
Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa, P.A.
2075 Centre Pointe Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850)402-410 Q
Personal Representative: Kenneth Bevis
295 North Hickory Monticello, Florida
32344 (850) 997-2063
10/19, 10/26, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TIHE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Case No.: 02-266-CA IN RE: ESTATE OF
MACK POLK, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ACTION TO: Mack Polk, Deceased,
Chatfierine Polk, Minnie Mills, Amos
Polk, Marie Polk, Shelly Ammons,
William Ammons, Geraldine Ammons,
Ollie Polk WIlson, Donna Edwards, Oscar
Polk, and Lelia Polk, Katherine Ford,
Patsy Polk, Lelia Anderson, Randolphf
Ford, Josephine Miller, Yvonne A.
Johnson and Rachel Animmons, living and
deceased and any and all of their known
or unknown heirs, jointly and severally,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition to
Determine Heirs and Partition Property'
was filed October 16, 2002, File No:
02-266-CA, Second Judicial Circuit in and
for Jefferson County, Hli id.i,
encumbering the following real property
located in Jefferson County, Florida,
to-wit: Commence at the Southeast corner


ATTENTION: Jefferson County Road
Department will be accepting bids for a
2005 or newer tandem dump truck.
Maximum allowable miles on the
odometer can not exceed 20,000 miles. All
interested companies can obtain a
specifications sheet at our office or call
and we will fax it to you. We will accept
sealed bids for the remainder of this
month, October 2005. Bids will be opened


of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest November 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Quarter of Section 34, township 2 North,
Range 4 East, Jefferson County, Florid1'
and run South 89 degrees 40 mini 3' .
.se nids E.il. .llull2 tihe uluthll hb.uiid.ll) uL d .:
"^il >-3ii .n 34. ;68.91 feet for a POINT ,
Of IUjNNIN ING. thience 'from said Point '
of Beginning run South 88 degrees 5,o wa
minutes 29 seconds East, along the South W
boundary of said Section 34, 392.28 feet to


Homeowners with

money worries may qualify

for low-interest loans


Have you been turned
down for a loan? Do you
need more than $10,000 for
any reason? Are you paying
more than 10% interest on
any other loans or credit
cards? .
If you are a homeowner
and answered 'yes' to any of
these questions, they can tell
you over the phone and
without obligation if you,.
qualify.
High credit card debt?
Less-than-perfect credit?
Self-employed? Late house


payments? Medical bills?
IRS liens? It doesn't matter!
If you are a homeowner
with sufficient equity,
there's an excellent chance
you will qualify for a loan-
usually within 24 hours.
You can find out over the
phone-and free of
charge-if you qualify.
Honey; Mae Home Loans
is licensed by the Florida De-,
partment of Financial Ser-
vices. Open 7 days for your
convenience.
1-800-700-1242, ext. 211


LEGALS


a point on the Westerly boundary of the
Howell property as described in the Public
Records of Jefferson County, Florida in
Official Record Book 147, Page 260,
thence North 41 degrees 51 minutes 57
seconds West, along the Westerly
boundary of said Howell property, 615.49
feet to a point, thence North 23 degree 33
minutes 58 seconds West, along the
Westerly boundary of said Howell
property, 14.80 feet to the Southwesterly
corner of Lot 11 of Sprinfield Subdivision
(an unrecorded subdivision), thence North
26 degrees 33 minutes 58 seconds West,
along the Southwesterly boundary of said
Springfield Subdivision, 474.28 feet to a
point on the Southwesterly right of way
line of County Road 158-A, thence South
52 degrees 00 minutes 29 seconds West,
along said right of way line, 186.71 feet to
a point, thence South 26 degrees 33
minutes 58 seconds East 210.00 feet a
point, thence South 52 degree 00 minutes
29 seconds West 210.00 feet to a point,
thence North 26 degrees 33 minutes 58
seconds West 210.00 feet to a point on the
Southwesterly right of way line of said
County Road 158-A, said point being on a
curve concave to the South, thence run in
a Southwesterly direction along said right
of way line and curve having a radius of
4533.75 feet, through a central angle of 07
degrees 16 minutes 32 seconds, for an arc
length of 575.71 feet, chord of said arc
being South 48 degrees 22 minutes 13
seconds West 575.33 feet to a point, thence
South 78 degrees 01 minutes 53 seconds
East 676.00 feet to a point, thence South 89
degrees 40 minutes 58 seconds East 326.35
feet to a point, thence South 03 degrees 39
minutes 40 seconds West 120.42 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Containing 10.74 acres
more or less. has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to T.
BUCKINGHAM BIRD, Plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 247,
Monticello, Florida 32345, on or before
November 11, 2005, and file the original
with the Clerk of. this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded. in the Complaint or
Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 6th day of October,
2005. CARL D. BOATWRIGHT, CLERK
OF THlE CIRCUIT COURT.
10/12, 1i;/19, 10/26, 11/2, c


road department office. Our office phone
number is 997-2036. Our location address
is 1484 S. Jefferson St. Monticello,
Florida.
10/12, 10/14, 10/19, 10/21, 10/26, 10/28, c

HELPAWANTED

Come join our growing team.' If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Kennel help needed. 5 days a week, 6
hrs a day. MUST love animals, take
pride in your work & be dependable.
Must have own transportation. Call
the Jefferson County Humane Society
at 342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.
10/12, tfn, c
Office Assistant (Part-time 20 hours
per week 12:30 to 4:30 M-F). Duties
include: Assist with duplication .of
materials; answer telephone; type
documents; maintain inventory.
Complete job description on web site.
Qualifications: Must be High School


When you invest in our community
seniors and teens turning their lives
ElSAVER

( *1a







,?





When you invest in Or comYmunity
through United Way, the etuns are904) 440
enormous-healthier kids, more active q
seniors and teens turning their lives .,
around. It's a dividend that builds a ";
strong COmmn7llflIty. ,


* Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844 :,


B USINES S Cai,9973







^ "DIRECTORY __r_


BURNE'TE PLUMBING & ELEGANT WOODEN FURNITURE Northside Mower and CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.
WEL, SE RV E Gun Cabine+s, Hvfches, Tables,,
WELL SERVICE Choa+er Medi Ceners, Headboards Small Engine Repair "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"
P n RFamily Ownea Since 1902 (choose door styles, color, ies, etc.) For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs -- Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Fautets ~ Pumps Snapper Murray & More, Warranty,
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections- Tanks Replaced ~ also-AMiques and Giffs Snapper; Murray & More, W anty,
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs lIOam 4.30pm Tues -5 Repairs for all makes & models.

210Ww 4&S B 4<>4 (Ior by a Pickup & Delivery Service Available Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
SMoniclloFL 32344 850/997-3400 562-2962 (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717



i215 CSMoroE ST.,Suite 300t Regeister's BETTER BODI ES
.I AUTOMOBILE PAINT &. BODV REPAIr

TALLAHASSEE, LORIDA32301 NEED A DIVORCE OR A WILL? M ini-StoEESTIMATESe .ATPAKSV
850-599-8956 Mini-Storage
Y., l .If 800-937-0663 Affordable legal services provided by female attor- 315 Waukeeniah Hwy. FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION.
robertmazur@ml.com ney in Tallahassee with 9 years experience. Caring 1/4 Mi LOCATED JUST le off MILESSO 19 South MONTICELLOAT:
and personalized service guaranteed. 4 Mile off US 19 South 97460 I

Robert A. Mazur, Jr., CFP 850-566-4826 997-2535 ANDY & TINA AMES. OWNERS
Financial Advisor


HELP WANTED

Graduate. Proficient 'in Microsoft
software. Typing test will be given.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. A complete packet includes:
resume and application (available at
www.nfcc.edu). Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet
must be received by 10/21/2005. EOE.T
10/12, 14, 19, 21, c


Site Manager- Pt. 15 hrs/wk. Heritage
Manor, Monticello, FL. Resume to:.;
Flynn Mgmt. Corp., 516 Lakeviewo
Rd. Unit 8, Clearwater, FL 33756-
Fax: (727) 447-5516. -
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, c
A behavioral Health Care Center isc
currently seeking: Secretary #2173j
High school diploma + 1 year of.i
secretarial /office clerical experiences
Typing score of at least 35 cwpm.,
Starting salary $6.43 Shift 8am 5pm,.
Monday-Friday. .'
Adult Case Manager #2212 A!
minimum of a bachelor's degree with:z
a major in counseling, social work,A.
psychology, criminal justice, nursing,A
rehabilitation, special education,'#
.11







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community' Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions W ednesda) and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....S1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


health education, or a related human
services field; or a bachelor's degree
and two years full time or equivalent
.experience working with adults
experiencing serious mental illness.
Valid driver's license. Shift 8am -
5pm Monday Friday salary $10.75
per hour or $12.92 OPS Status. For
more information and complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or 1(800)226-2931 Human
Resources 2634-J Capital Circle NE,
Tallahassee, FL pre-hiring drug
screen & FDLE background check.
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
10/19, c
Registered Nurses / Licensed Practical
Nurses Be part of a team working side
by side with other health care
professionals. RN/LPN vacancies
currently exist at Jefferson C.I. in
Monticello. Exceptional Health Care
Insurance, Vested. Retirement after
six years, Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefit Package. If you prefer
per diem, rather than career service,
we also have OPS (non-benefited
positions). RNs $29-31, LPNs $19-22.
For additional information contact
Sharon McKinnie, R.N. at
850-922-6645, email:
mnckinnie.sharon@mail.dc.state.fl.us"
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 11/2, 4, 9, 11,
16, 18, 23, 25, c
The Jefferson Communities Water
System, Inc. is accepting applications
for engineering services related to an
anticipated $5 million expansion.
Applicants should be familiar with
USDA Rural Development policies
and procedures regarding grants and
loan applications. Interested parties
should submit a resume detailing
experience and qualifications to the
Jefferson Communities Water
Systemi, Inc., PO Box 82, Lloyd, FL
32337, 'by October 31, 2005.
10/7, 12, c :.
Pennyworth Homes is seeking highly
motivated draftsperson with excellent
communication, organizational and
computer skills to-- prepare
construction plans., Qualified
candidates need a college degree or
equivalent training in C.A.D.
architectu'raL drafting. Competitive
salary and benefits package available.
Fax or e-mail resumes to:
(229)227-6191 or
barmentor@pwhhomes.com.
10/7, 12, 14, 19, c
Looking for dependable, part-time
employee. Apply in person to Coffee
Bieak, 190 N. Jefferson Street,
997-9996. '
10/", 12, 14, 19, c
Clinical Support Specialist Jefferson,
County Knowledge of a variety of
software systems. Well developed
organization skills. Experience with
medical supplies, records and
terminology is necessary. Some
pharmacy related experience
preferred, but not' mandatory. Ideal
candidate must possess solid
communication skills and the ability
to demonstrate the highest standard
of work ethics and confidentiality.
RN / PRN Jefferson County Current
Florida license as RN required.
Minimum one (1) year-in-patient
nursing experience or previous
Hospice/Home Health experience.
Successful candidate will demonstrate
Qie ability to manage physical
demands and emotional stress of work
i)i a Hospice House position, caring
for terminally ill patients and their
OAmilies. Fax Resume to
(850)701-1395
i0/12 10/2L c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
btain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
ust. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
ax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
south JTfferson St. Monticello, FI.
/10. tfn, c
iadiscn County Memorial Hospital
ull Time Insurance Biller Mon. Fri.
:00 4:30 Experience Preferred. Call
'R 850-973-2271 or Fax Resume to.
0-973-8151
/19,c
orida Department of


ansportation has a vacancy in
ylor County for the following
sition: Position Number: 55004473
oad Band Title: Truck Drivers,
'avy and Tractor-Trailer, Working
tie: Senior Heavy Equipment
)eratorLast date to apply: October
S2005. For more information call
3/838-5800. To apply online go to:


HEEL~WANTEDN -.
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logo
n.htm or call 1-877-562-7287. The
department of Transportation is .an
Equal Employment Opportunity,
Affirmative Action and Drug Free
Workplace employer.
10/19, 21, 26, 28, c
The Jefferson County Building
Department is taking applications for
the position of Building. Permit
Technician / Secretary. Applications
can be found at the Building
Department, 277 North Mulberry St.,
Monticello, Fl 32345. Deadline for
submittal is October 28, 2005, 12:01
p.m.
10/19, 21, c
SEiRVICES
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
Combining Faith and Reason,
Tradition and Tolerance. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N. of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
10/19,
Health Ca're Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
mas see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40%.without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by, Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn


SERVICES
Kelly's cleaning service. Residential
and commercial. Large or small. "The
Personal Service Touch" to the.
professional job you need in your
home or business. Call 933-3563.
10/12, 14, 19, 21, pd
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
WANTED
We need 2' chain link fence sections
that can be donated. to the Jefferson
County Humane Society. Call the
Jefferson County Humane Society at
342-0244. Leave a message we will
call you back.

WANT TO BUY
Want to buy real cheap used good
condition large storage shed. We will
pick it up. Call the Jefferson County
Humane Society at 342-0244. Leave a
message we will call you back.
10/12, tfn, c

FOR SALE
7 new 32 in. alum. windows, 2 new 18
in. alum. windows, 3 interior doors
w/casings, 8ft 4 sectional garage door
w/opener, 4-5LVG alum. rims w/tires,
cable exercise machine w/weights, 36
in. all glass exterior door w/casing, 2
new tower speakers. 997-4785.
10/7, 12, pd
Blue Sofa and love seat Rank Baldwin
Organ, music household furniture.
Great shape. 997-1063
.10/5, 7, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd
Washer & Dryer $25 each 997-0901,
997-3568. Debbie

':I hl '111 b I


1 pm Sat., Oct. 22
Lake Placid, FL.,
100 Florida Homesites
in Highlands, Okeechobee & Polk Counties


. UTONER


FOR RENT
2bed/2bath, new paint, new carpet, no
pets, no children $550.00 997-6653.
10/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd
3 B/2 2B modular home in Parkway
Pines Subdivision near JCKC.
$650.00 North Florida Property
Management. 421-3911.
10/7, 12, 14, 19,21, pd
3bedroom/2bath, ctr. air, $750.00.
997-8011.
10/7,12, 14, 19, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
10/7, tfn, c
REAL ESTATE
New 3 and 4 bedrooms w/land Pick
your own plan owner financing
available call now to set appointment.
850/445-1838.
10/19, 21, 26, 28 pd
LOST
Dachshund red and black male. !Lust on
Hw.y 249A. 997-S99 ivalcolm.
10/19,21, pd.
Missing 2 Golden Retrievers in
Asht ille area. Reward. Call
997-6266.
li'l9, pd
B.C>k Lab/Rottweiller mix male. Lost
1-mile west of Elizabeth Baptist
Church on Bassett Dairy Road.
1-321-848-8704.
10/19, 21, c
Cat White w/orahge markings on
back, short haired w/light blue eyes.
Last seen in the Lacapra Dr., Spring-
hollow Rd., Waukeenah Hwy. area
REWARD 997-1084


b5pm Thurs., Oct. 27
Ocala, FL.
57 PRIME ACRES Tr
', erd in tract adjolnilngGoeth State Forest Located In nation,
SGreat for Equine Facillty or Weekend Get.Aways i Lny & Putnam Countil


M.E Higg,noircatam CAI
FL LicPAU3051AB1~B


800.257-4161
www.higgenbotham.com


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 .3/2 $715 -4/2,$895 ~$50 dep.
SPool & Youth Activities

.5756571


NOTICE OF HEARING ON
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE 2005-09

The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following entitled
ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY. OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
ANNEXING PROPERTY CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 85.01 ACRES
LOCATED ON WEST WASHINGTON STREET (U.S. 90 WEST) TO THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO; REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES, OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. This property is further identified on the map below. A complete
metes and bounds description, as well as the entire text of the.ordinance may be inspected
at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 ,p.m., Monday through Friday. A public hearing will be held on the
adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday, November 1, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall.


'-- *-'- ^ p'

Let us help you "fall"into your new home! "
B New Charm -2003 1800 sq. ft 3 Horse Lovers!- Adorable 2 Br/lBa
Br/ 2Ba modular home on 1/2 acre home on 5 fenced/crossed fenced
lot. Convenient to Monticello and acres ................$ 219,1
Thomasville................ S123J0
.:. ; ,
"1 Custom Builders Great Cnndition- .
Home- Stunning 1998 3 Br/2Ba mobile
., 4 Br/2Bachilltop home. Fireplace,
S estate on 9 1/2 acres. Kitchen with bar and "
oriledsnroom separate livingroom'
personal under- KELLY & KELLY All on 1 Acre
" ground Pool. PROPETITES S... 55$,700
215 NorthJefferson
$9 .000 (850)997-5516


Simply the Best!







. REALTOR


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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Hard to Find 5 choice hillside planted
pines on quiet graded county road Asking
$15,000/acre
Wow What a Deal! Comfortable 4 bed-
room 3 bath home on five fenced acres
w/ guest cottage/playhouse with bath, big
shop, 2 car garage pasture, 100 pecan
trees and a nice pool a real dream for a
growing family $400,000
Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
S.home intown at East Anderson St.
S55,000"
Magnificent Acreage-Under Contract
off Bassett Dairy Road in Bellamy Plantation
10 commanding acres with a beautiful view,
lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
A field meant for galloping $150,000
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
A remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon Countv-Under Contract


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10 mostly open ac, corner of Paul Thompson
and Julia Road only $150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Par-
tridge Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sun-
set Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Building Lots in Town-Under
Contract on Morris Road call for details
$10,0.00 to $40,000
Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
Check Out This One! Under Contract8
acres with big doublewide and small house
on a pretty old hillside close to Leon County
off Julia Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000
Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game $15,000 /acre.
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
HUNTING CAMP Lease Available, rent
by the season call for details


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340


See all our listings)
%Anall#%A-y i l AA~t A%


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www. iimi-eary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours

We have qualified buyers!
k Are you interested in selling?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


A3 A A A A' A A


7 - -- - - - - - - - - -- -


p


















-,.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.
MDW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., OCTOBER 19, 2005
C.


HELEN HALEY uses the new card catalog at
the newly relocated county, library on Water
Street. The spacious facility boasts two


Owen Hardy Promoted To

Army Lieutenant Colonel


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


tivities.
Hardy has completed key infantry


conference rooms for community use. (News
Photo)


assignments such as 2nd Infantry
Division Company Commander at
Camp Casey, Korea, as Medical
Logistics Battalion Executive Offi-
cer at Fort Bragg, NC, and as Task
Force 44 Medical Logistics Liaison
in Afghanistan.


Resident Owen Hardy, serving in
the Army since 1993, was pro-
moted from Major to Lieutenant
Colonel, Sept. 9.


Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
/ -' protect Florida's
manatees.
myfwc.org/psm


HARDY
He serves as the Winn Army
Hospital's Chief of Logistics in
Fort Stewart, GA.
When Hardy enlisted, he went
through the US Army's Delayed
Entry Program.
After graduating from Jefferson
County High School in 1981, he
entered Basic Combat Training in
Fort Leonard Wood, MO, and he
holds a BS in Broadcast Journalism
and an MA in Health Care
Services.
Hardy has been awarded the
Brown Star the Meritorious Service
Award and the Army Commenda-
tion.
He has been decorated for his ac-
tivities in Expert Field medical,
Airborne and Airborne Assault ac-


Normal childhood activities like running and
jumping are great ways to build healthy bones
and achieve "peak-bone mass" for adulthood.
But don't tell them that. For more on keeping
bones healthy, visit aaos.org, or call 1-800-
824-BONES. Or for physical education tips,
visit aahperd.org/naspe, or call 703-476-3410.
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF
ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
SPORT & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Get up. Get out. Get moving.


Okeechobee
County, FL

*Hnest Buyers M f aS4

*anrs/RanchersJL-J
Call for Inspection Dates I _ ___ _
& Full-Color Brochure
8O0451270m Thursday, Novemb 3
awimmc For .f. visit. t0
iWW. '~ www.schraderauction.com


That's what you'll get from your Liberty National
Life Insurance agent when you have questions and
need answers about life insurance for your family.
Help is one of the things we do best. No
obligation. No strings attached. Call us when you
need help with your insurance. We'll be there.

Reggie Coles
Serving Wakulla County
459-4247

Liberty National /h
Life Insurance Company |
home office 2001 Third Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35233
LN 83 ed. 6-02


C HO As seen
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, OnTV.g
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


AAS

UALLY GOOD.,


ni E RAM

15061 AD CAB