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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00077
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: September 28, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00077
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Lifestyle
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text





LIB
404


Distractions
Lead To Many
Accidents

Editorial, Page 4


IRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
LIBRARY WEST
IERSI'Y Ci' FLORIDA
FCV T. r T' *"'' '


ACA
Homecoming
Set October 3-7

Story, Page 7


ACA, JCHS
Blank Football
Opponents

Stories, Photos, Page 9


Juvenile Justice
Program To
Get Underway

Story, Page 12


Wednesday Morning


Montic


II


137TH YEAR NO.77,50 CENTS, Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28. 2005,


Public Notice Problems Discussed


Meeting Really More Of

A Brainstorming Session


PROPERTY APPRAISER DAVID WARD, left, developers the latest information on prop-
here talking with Planning Commission erty owners near proposed developments.
members Bud Wheeler and Bill Tellefsen, (News Photo)
will henceforth assure that his office hands


City, County Explore


Idea Of Sewer System


iLAZARO ALEMAN
jSenior Staff Writer

City and county officials and
other interested parties continue ex-
ploring the possibility of establish-
ing a central sewer system and treat-
ment plant, preferably in the Lloyd
area.
In pursuit of that goal, city and
county officials met recently and
agreed in principle to seek funding
for a study to determine the feasibil-
ity of such a project. Expected cost
of the study is about $65,0000.
Officials are hopeful that grant
funds will be available to pay for
portion of the study. They are hope-
4ful that low interest loans will also
be available to pay the balance.


Costly Study
Is First Step i
The question that remains is how
liability for the payback of the loan
will be distributed between the city
and county, in the event a loan is se-
cured.
County Attorney Buck Bird is
supposed to be drawing up the inter-
local government agreement that
spells out the exact responsibility of
each governmental entity for pay-
back of the loan.
Exploration of a central sewer sys-
tem in the Lloyd area started about
eight months ago with the formation -
of the Jefferson County Utility De-
velopment Committee.


Concerns about the environment
and economic development report-
edly triggered formation of the
group.
According to committee spokes-
man Dick Bailar, worries about the
proliferation of septic tanks (which
have the potential to harm the aqui-
fer), in combination with the desire
to spur economic development
(which a central sewer system
would do), prompted the group to
act.
1 Bailar described the committee as'
being comprised of city and county
officials, business community repre-
sentatives and area property owners
with land holdings that 'had the po-
tential for development.


Hall Calls For Night Meetings


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A commissioner's suggestion that
'the County Commission change its
(regular morning meeting to evening
Ito make it more convenient for
citizens to participate in the


-discussions went nowhere.
Commissioner Eugene Hall's
motion to change the 9 a.m.
first-Thursday-of-the-month
meeting to 6 p.m. died for the lack
of a second.
The main reason for the daytime
meetings, the other commissioners
explained, was to make it conven-

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ALTHOUGH admittedly a declining force in the county, the
agriculture sector retains a viable presence here. (News
Photo)


ient for department heads to report
to the board. Too, all public hear-
ings and one of the two monthly
meetings were held in the evening,
they pointed out.
"We have always had morning
meetings when the staff and the
state agencies give their reports,"
Commissioner Junior Tuten said.
"Evenings are for the public hear-
ings. No one has been penalized by
day meetings."
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin
added that until he had moved to
Jefferson County, he had never
heard of commissions holding eve-
ning meetings.
It was his further observation that
"the majority of people show up at
meeting when they are against
something, not when they're for
something."
Hall argued to no avail that the
convenience of department heads
should not take .precedent over the
convenience of citizens.
"This is a working class commu-
nity," Hall said. "Most counties
around us hold meetings at a time
when the working class people can
attend. Meeting are held for the
benefit of the public, not for the
benefit of the staff. Department
heads are the highest paid persons in
the departments."
(See Meeting Page 5)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A joint meeting of the Planning
and County commissions on Thurs-
day to discuss procedures and ad-
vertisements generated a lot of talk,
but no solutions per se.
Topics of discussions reportedly
ranged from how to assure proper
notification of property owners near
proposed developments, to the need
for adherence to the checklist that
developers must follow when mak-
ing an application, to what should
be the appropriate wording on
signage, to clustering.
One participant described the
hour-and-a-half long meeting as
really more of a brainstorming ses-
sion.
The one reported accomplishment


was agreement on how the county
will assure the accuracy of the certi-
fied list that is handed to developers
for the notification of property own-
ers living near a proposed develop-
ment.
Several times in the recent past,
public hearings have had to be re-
scheduled because of the failure of
the developer to notify all adjacent
property owners of a proposed de-
velopment.
The developer's excuse has been
that he depended on the certified list
provided by the Property Ap-
praiser's office for the mail-out.
It turns out.that the Property Ap-
praiser's certified list is produced
each January and doesn't include
persons who have purchased prop-
erty in the interim.
The new procedure entails the
Planning Department supplying de-


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'fit,> .. ....


FEEDER BANDS from Hurricane Dennis, which struck near
Pensacola in early July, dumped much rain here, causing
flooding and road damage in some areas. (News Photo)


7 Applicants Vie For

Job Of Grants Writer


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Seven individuals have applied for
the job of grants writer, a position
that will now report directly to the
commission and seek grants on be-
half of all county departments.
Commissioners have scheduled a 9
a.m. Wednesday workshop to begin
interviewing the seven candidates.
The workshop is scheduled to take
place in the library conference
room.
Commissioners hope to have the
new person aboard as soon as possi-
ble, so that the individual can begin
the task of researching and seeking
grants.
Previously, the grants writer
headed the Grants Office, which de-
partment the commission more or
less abolished in recent months.


Functions formerly performed by
the Grants Office were either con-
tracted to private entities or distrib-
uted to other departments.,
The thinking behind the restruc-
turing was that many of the func-
tions performed by the Grants
Office were rightfully housing is-
sues, which. distracted from the
grant writing and related activities.
Commissioners want the new per-
son to concentrate his or her efforts
on the search, attainment and ad-
ministration of grants.
At the same workshop, commis-
sioners plan to review the bids for
the architectural services that are
needed for the remodeling of the
former high school buildings into
county offices.
The Legislature awarded the
county $500,000 for the remodeling
effort in the last session.


velopers with a checklist that will
ensure a more clear communiication
with the Property Appraiser's office.
Thus, it is the expectation, the latter
will supply developers with the lat-
est information relative to the own-
ers of properties near proposed
developments.
Planners and commissioners also
agreed to hold a second workshop to
review the items on the checklist
that is handed to developers. The
idea is to determine if items need to
be added or deleted from the list.
It has been a complaint of plan-
ners in the past that the checklist is
often not strictly followed. Meaning
that applications not infrequently
come before them for a discussion
before all the required paperwork
and related documents have been
completed.
Finally, planners and commission-
ers briefly discussed what steps
might be taken to eliminate the er-
rors in the legal and other advertise-
ments that have forced rescheduling
of hearings.


Fed Money

Earmarked

For Roads


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Word is that the county could be
S' getting as much as $155,000 from
the federal government for the re-
-': pair of roads damaged by Hurricane
:i? Dennis in early July.


Road Department Superintendent
David Harvey reported the figure to
the County Commission at recent
meeting He said the funding would
be coming from the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency
(FEMA).
According to the funding formula,
the state and county are responsible
for 25 percent of the project's
amount. But Harvey said efforts are
being made to get the county's share
waived, based on its designation as
a region of economic necessity.
If the requirement is waived, the
county would receive the full
$155,000.
Harvey said the two roads hardest
hit by the storm were Goose Pasture
Road and O'Neal Tram, both in the
southernmost part of the county. He
explained that although the hurri-
cane struck near Pensacola, feeder
bands dumped much rain here, caus-
ing flooding and washouts.
Whether the FEMA money will
do the job is another question. Har-
vey underscored that FEMA puts its
own estimate on the cost of road re-
pairs. Too, the repairs are intended
to restore the roads to pre-storm
conditions, not improve them.
As it is, the Road Department will
not be doing the work. Rather, the
job will be bid out to a private con-
tractor. Consultant engineer Frank
Darabi and Associates supposedly
are working up the specifications for
the road repairs.
The expectation is that the FEMA
money will be coming soon.
The county received $140,000
from FEMA last year for the repair
of roads damaged by the four hurri-
canes that swept through the area.


"~ s"


..







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005


9
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"








t COUNTY COORDINATING BOARD received
*he 2005 Outstanding Board of the Year
Award form the Florida Commission for
Transportation Disadvantaged, last week.
Sitting, L-R: Donna Hagan, Annie Huggins,



:26 Animals Fi


At Recent Ad


TFRAN HUNT
'Staff Writer

i During the recent Adopt-A-Thon
'conducted by the Humane Society
-at Petsmart, 26 animals- were
!adopted by loving families.
At the recent monthly meeting,
;Humane Society President Caro-
'line Carswell said that the large
,number of adoptions over the three
.days was very encouraging news
Zfor members of the group.
: Spokesperson Tina Ames said
that more dogs than cats were
placed into homes.
"A good number of them were
Ihe older dogs we had," said Ames.
.'Dogs including Monkey, Big Mac
and two" 'of the, .three black lab'
>, 'i"' '


Building Permits Reflect

increased Development


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
The recent onslaught of develop-
ment in the county is reflected in the
increase of building permits.
In the 90 day period between
June 1 and Aug. 30, total building
permits ranged between 45-66.
In the same time period in 2004,
the range was 40-46.
New one family home permits
ranged between seven and 14, with
evaluations between $1,174,191 and
$1,944,646, as property values in-
crease here.


In 2004, for the same time frame,
new one family home permits
ranged between nine and four, with_
evaluations between $1,056,713 and
$479,314.
Mobile home permits for the 2005
time frame ranged between one and
four, whereas in 2004 the range was
between three and seven.
In the 90 day period for 2005 only
nine permits were issued for non
residential structures, valued at
$66,000.
The same time period in 2004
shows non residential permits rang-
ing between two and seven, valued
between $56,646 and $322,400.


HMS Posts First Six

Weeks Honor Roll


Robin Walker, Willie Ann Dickie, Patricia
Hall. Back, Carol Ellerbe, Lisa Spikes, Kent
Carroll, Robyn Davis, Commissioner Danny
Monroe, George Hinchliffe. (News Photo)




nd Homes


opt-A-Thon


mixes Missy, Sissy and Prissy that
have been in the shelter's care
since December, were also
adopted.
Ames said there were many vol-
unteers who worked along with
her, during the course of the three
days.
They included: Shelter Caretaker
Cheryl Bautista, who Ames said
"went above and beyond the call of
duty, working for the full three day
period and never leaving the booth
from the time it opened until the
time it closed, and setting up and
tearing down as well."
Also volunteering were Guerry
Watson, Connie and John Seweriy-
nak, two Tallahassee girls, Hannah
and d Rebecca '(last- names
unkno'... n),' Martha- Jean Martin,
0.-i


* .. s ':







JCHS was the scene of the second annual
!Health Career Fair last week. Here, students


TABITHA SMITH jots down information at
the FSU booth of the annual Health Career


Wendy Leeman, and Andrew
Ritter, who assisted with transpor-
tation and tear down.
"What Andrew does for us goes to
show that it doesn't take a lot of
time to really help out, and how
greatly every bit of help means so
much for the effort," said Ames.
Foster Chair Martha Jean Martin
advised the recent count of foster
homes and the animals being taken
care of in those homes.
She said that there is a total of 13
animals in foster homes, which in-
cludes three dogs, two puppies, one
cat and seven kittens.
She added that there are 13 active
foster homes, 10 inactive homes
aAd four who have~been removed'
from the fosterr home list.


Howard Middle School Guidance
Counselor Kathy Walker reports the
Academic Honor Roll for the first
six weeks grading period.
Students, and their grade levels
are:
In grade six, on the "A" toll:
Emily Howell and Simone
Williams.
On the A/B Roll: Keshontae
Akins, Dakota Allen, Raheem
Allen, Shataviah Anderson, Haylee
Bell, Alexus Chambers, Emanuel
Finn, Branden Hill, Brionna Jones,
and Taneaka Jones.
Also, Jeremy Lofton, Lanesyia
Massey, Anna Lee Montgomery,
Ka'Desjah Norton, Drucilla Shaw,
Williams Starling, Lawrence Tho-
mas, Denzel Whitfield, Tre'Von
Youman, and Shanice Young.
In grade seven, Brandon Whitfield
is on the "A" roll.
On the A/B roll are: Adia Alexan-
der, Gerrold Austin, Tevin Bellamy,
Arishia Campbell, Jimmie Crim, Ar-
anthza Fenimore, Issac Gilley, Jas-
mine Graham, Travis Gray, and
Shikari Hamm.
Also, Breana Harvey, Chasity
James, Sara MacDonald, Brandi
Massey, Raven Mosley, Devondrick
Neal3, Cardrecia Walker, Edward
Walker, Misty Watson, Brian Web-
ster and Leroy Montgomery.
In grade eight, Paris Littlejohn in
on the "A" roll.
On the A/B roll are: Efrain Bar-
ron, Jeanelle Bassa, Stanley Brooks,
Breyon Crumity, Eric Evans, John-
tue Gilley, Harold Ingram, Tamecka
Jackson, Tercina Jones and Tylisa
Jordan.
Also, Heather Kisamore, Susan
Marlowe, Darissa Nealy, Lena
Odom, Lakaydria Parris, Teylor
Richard, Carlos Scott, Kassandra
Simpkins, Ariel Thompson and Am-
ber Weinrich.


sign up for additional information about
their careers of choice from FSU.


Fair held at Jefferson County High School,
last week.


5. U


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~15' s5~*
..~


:AT THE JCHS Health Career Fair, Brenda
Jarmon, PhD. Speaks with Frances Johnson


about obtaining a Bachelor's Degree in So-
cial Work. (News Photos)


Steve Belmonte, Childreach sponsor.
CEO and President of Ramada hotels.
on a visit to hurricane-ravaged San Juan
in the Dominican Republic.


"Just look at

these kids.

How can you

not help?"

"In the poorest villages throughout
the world, families live in
conditions that are difficult to
imagine. And it's always the kids
who suffer most.
Childreach (formerly Foster Parents
Plan) is an amazing child sponsor-
ship organization that helps needy
children overseas to overcome the
most punishing poverty and not only
survive, but grow and thrive.
Childreach sponsors have helped
bring about miraculous changes.
Clean water, life-saving medicines,
hospitals, schools, and self-help
programs have improved the lives
of not only the children, but their
families and entire communities.
To find out more about
Childreach, call 1-800-556-7918.
Because if you really want to
help, Childreach really helps."


Total permits for alterations, roof-
ing and repairs 90 day period of
2005 ranged between 27-48, valued
between $79,677 and $342,268.
For the same time frame in 2004
permits for alterations ranged be-
tween 21 and 31, valued between
-$291,868 and $590,698.


I kL


H d I ;41


SEPT. 29 7 PM
Footworks Percussive
Dance Ensemble

OCT. 27 7 PM
Chamber Orchestra
of Northwest Florida

NOV. 14-7 PM
Pianist Teresa Walters


DEC. 1 7 PM
My Sinatra


JAN. 12"-7 PM.
Glenn Miller Orchestra

FEB. 17 -7 PM
Tribute to Ray Charles

MARCH 2 7 PM
A Closer Walk with
Patsy Cline

Tickets on Sale Nowl
$11 adults/S6 Child
WWW NFCC EDU


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


NOTICE OF CHANGE IN LIST

OF PERMITTED USES IN

B-1 ZONING DISTRICT

(DOWNTOWN BUSINESS)


The City Council of the City of

Monticello proposes to adopt the

following ordinance:


ORDINANCE 2005-07 AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS OF THE CITY OF MONTI-
CELLO, FLORIDA TO ADD TOWN
HOMES AS A SPECIAL EXCEPTION USE
IN THE B-1 ZONING DISTRICT; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE:


The entire text of the ordinance may be

inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry

Street, Monticello, Florida between the

hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,

Monday through Friday. Public

hearing on the ordinance will be held

on Tuesday, October 4, 2005 at 7:00

p.m. at Monticello City Hall. Interested

persons may appear at the meeting and

be heard with respect to the

proposed ordinance.









Annual Trade Fair


Well Attended


S :., .- -

" 1. M .-.

BEULAH BRINSON looks over display for Hurricane Relief
at Christy Clark ,left, and Nicole Honcel speak about Red
Cross projects.




-"" -


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 17th Annual Trade Fair, spon-
sored by the Chamber .of
Commerce, Thursday at the Opera
House drew a large crowd.
Booth space was a sellout, fea-
turing 31 vendors.
A barbecue chicken dinner was
served to some 250 persons.
Chamber members helped to pre-
pare and serve the meal and pro-
vided homemade desserts.
The "Skillet Lickers," a favorite
local bluegrass band, played popu-
lar and requested tunes for the din-
ers and dancers, in the garden area.
Band members included Jason
Meadows, Ken Golson, Scott
Gleaves, Pat Powell, Dick Gastin,
and Kyle Dunn.
The band is well known for it's
charitable gigs and is enjoyed by all
age groups because of its varied
musical fare.


Door prize drawing were held
throughout the evening as individ-
ual exhibitors periodically drew
winning names.
Attendees also received giveaway
items such as totes, pens, note pads,
candy, and the like, from various
exhibitors.
Chamber Director Mary Frances
Drawdy, with the help of Altrusa
and Chambers members, drew meal
ticket door prize winners.
Prizes were donated by local
businesses and individuals.
A complete list of donors will be
published as soon as it can be com-
piled.
"Thanks to all those in the com-
munity for attending and making
this a successful event again this
year," Drawdy said.
"Also, thanks to the Chamber
members that participated and to all
the local residents, businesses and
establishments for their donations
and door prize gift items," she con-
cluded.







Bank-issued, FDIC-
insured to $100,000



4.25%APY

2-eaMiimmDpo it ll


BETSY GRAY checks out Pampered Chef Exhibitor Margit
Miller at the Trade Fair Thursday.


> Primary Residence 0 No Income Verification
> Second Homes .No Asset Verification
> Investment Property First & Second Mortgages


SFirst Choice
AMERICANS DISCOUNT LENDERS


f:1NORTH CAROLINA. nOMDA LICENSED OWGAGE iLENDE


SERVING dessert and drinks at the Trade
Fair at the Opera House Thursday were, L-R:


Dianne Westbrook, Buck
era. (News Photos)


Bird, Gretchen Av-


..c..


'Annual Percentage Yield (APY)-Interest
cannot remain on deposit; periodic payout of
interest is required. Early withdrawal isi0ot
permitted. Effective 09/26/05 Subject to
availability and price change. The amount
received from a sale of a CD at current
market value may be less than the amount
initially invested.
Call or stop by today.
Robert J. Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.corn

EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


*I
*I
* I


, Okeechobee
County, FL
Home Site Buyers ew Bc.dy. & Ra. S."
nvestors/Developers 1 ;4
Farmers/Ranchers


Call for Inspection Dates
& Full-Color Brochure
800-451-2709
67 WAUTERS-SCHRADER
AUCTION COMPANY INC.


Thursday, Novembde 3
For info. visit: 0
www.schraderauction.com


Frances Yeager and Amanda Ouzts. There
were 31 booths at the event.


1-800-USA-NAVY.


World Wide Web:
http://www.navyjobs.com





When was SAVER
SAVER
the last

time you

made an


Investment


that saved When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
lives? enormou5-healthier kids, more active.
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It'". a dividend that builds 3
strong community.,

307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee; FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
TEXT AMENDMENTS
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ORDINANCE NO.
AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL
AREAS OF THE FUTURE LAND USEtELEMENT; AMENDING THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO REPEAL POLICY 1-2, BY ADOPTING A
NEW POLICY 1-2, CREATING NEW STANDARDS FOR FAMILY MEMBER
SUBDIVISIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
The Jefferson County Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed text changes that will amend
the county wide Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan.




C-,









;'-- C ---



JEFFERSON COUNTY
The public hearing on the proposed comprehensive plan amendment ordinance will be held on October 20,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the county courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90
and 19. The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary. Information concerning the
amendment is available at the Jefferson County Planning Department, 277 N. Mulberry St., Monticello, FL
32344, telephone.850-342-0223. From the Florida 'Government in the Sunshine Manual' Each board,
commission, or agency of this state or of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any
meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.


CHECKING out an exhibit at the Trade Fair
.Thursday,were from left, Judson Freeman,


NORTH CAROLINA. nOWDA LICENSED MORT GAGE LENDER'g


Research. saves lives.








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.. SEPTEMBER 28. 2005



'Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


SC.,e MEMe RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
SManaging Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
S.............


Distractions Lead


To Many Accidents


Anyone who is surprised at the
number of accidents caused by dis-
tracted drivers has not been paying
attention.
I' n a recent survey by Farmers In-.
surance Group of Companies, more'
than 80 percent of drivers said they
don't drive as well when they are
subject to distractions.
; Eighty-three percent acknowl-
edged that it's harder to concentrate
on driving while engaging in activi-
ties such as eating or drinking, talk-
ing on their cell phones adjusting
radios or CD players.
A.... ; to the National High-

_"H"-. ,. distracted .i' e7 s C re a
.iio,.. ie. 25 to 5 percent ofall vehi-
ele cuashes or between 4,000 and
1 :" crashes each day -:: .- in
an estimated $40 to S80 billion in
i -..- x : -.:-.> ..
Distracted driving can, take many
forms: using a cell phone, adjusting'
Mhe radio, i.il. iii.. to passengers,
il.l',.,inI i ." reading a map,
cleaning the windshield, .miii.diiig to
.* I.-1 c. or i', eating or d ::.i'
.. p off' the floor and
.'i.i .. ,.,,;r are a few exam-
ales. .
T T o nramber of motorists using
S .: '' cell has c. '. in-
Creased driver ," :.1, : ,
SA study by the New England Jour-
&al of Medicine found :h.it talking


on a mobile phone while driving
quadruples the risk of an accident -
a rate similar to that of drunk driv-
ing.
More than seven in 10 said motor-
ists who use handheld .cell phones
should be subject to -a penalty or
fine.
In addition, nearly two thirds (63
percent) of those polled favored
stricter driving rules for teens, limit-
ing the number of passengers young
drivers may carry. The NHTSA
found 16-year-old drivers were 50
percent more likely to be ,killed
when there is another passenger in
the vehicle.
The following tips help prevent
drivers from becoming distracted:
Make adjustments to radios,
seats, air conditioning and mirrors
before prain'i the vehicle in gear.
Review map directions before
getting on the road.
Refiein fioin reading in the car.
Even a glance could cause you to
miscalculate the response to the ve-
hicle in front of you,
Do not reach for items in the
back seat or in the glove compart-
ment '.' hi,- driving.,
Avoid talking on a cell phone
while driving.
Personal grooming should be
done t'fei- :get6iinu into the vehicle,
Do not engage in uir-ic.I ul, over-
emotional conversations while driv-
ing. Pull off the road.


From Our Photo File


-'-
S0



















FR. BILL YATES, former rector of Christ
Episcopal Church, directs the Community
Chorus in this April, 1990 rehearsal.


Women in the front row from left: Joanie
Yates, Becky Pickle, Eleanor Hawkins.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Commen


Conversations Worth Recalling


Things people have said to me that
I filed in my memory bank. Read on
and see why.
Employee: "You didn't use the
correct name on my paycheck."
Me: "We used the name you gave
us."
Employee: "That's my married
name, but I don't think we ever
completed the marriage ceremony
so I don't know if I'm married or
not."

Reader: "I didn't like the story."
Me: "Did you read it?"
Reader: "No."

Public Official: "You may have
quoted me correctly but I didn't
mean what I said."
Me: "I see." "'

Brother of man charged with
crime: "If you run the story about
my brother's arrest it will kill my
i.iidfiilhi He's old and has a
heart condition."
Me: "Did you discuss your grand-
father's condition with your brother
before he committed the crime?"


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cic-fon


Employee: "I just can't think to-
day."
Me: "Why not?"
Employee: "I get spacey 'every
third day." .

Reader: "It's clear you're against
my candidate 'cause you put his pic-
ture last,"
Me: "We place photos of candi-
dates alphabetically."

Job applicant- "I need a job,"
: Me: "What dan you do'?"


Job applicant: "Nothing."
Reader: "How come you didn't in-
clude information about the Repub-
lican candidates in your coverage, of
the Democratic primary?"., -. :
Me: "Because it was the Demo-
cratic primary."
Reader: "I didn't get my paper."
Me: "Did you send in your sub-
scription renewal when you got the
notice?"
Reader: "Ooops. I threw that
away."


Mother of serviceman: "My son
said the Army sent you a news re-
lease about his promotion."
Me: "We haven't received it yet."
Mother: "What's wrong with that
Army, anyway."
Me: "I dunno."

Late night caller: "I can give you
this story or I can take it to the Tal-
lahassee Democrat."
Me: "We ran that story.two weeks
ago."
Late night caller: "I've been out of
town and missed it."

Reader: "Why do you let that
dumb so and so write letters to the
editor?"
Me: ."We invite letters from read-
ers.,. ,
Reader: "Maybe I'll write you a
letter too."
Me: "That'll be fine."
Reader: "No it won't 'cause I'll
tell things like they are."
Me: "OK."

By the way, we never did receive
a letter from the reader.


Food Police Got Smoking Gun


From Our Files


TEN YY \RsRAGO
qptmL-btu r 20I. 1995
A long ;iO'lnu inii: feud between,
ity n pi..'. ee- erupted into the
ipen 71. ..!..r 'uihlt at the C"'-.
,r j '. first public hearing on the
"r,,-,. .1 hidj. the result of salary
i'- W .. .. that r-.\-', certain employ-

Education Now and Babies Later
is the name of a competitive grant
program m .::.r, approved by the
:.,.. E.-,:, The program is
"i,, -. at grade six students.
can all go i&l.--i. .-:I now. Not
the '.l-..- .. J.Iagger fm.rTi.
and tle i".iy) Ct ...' ll. i-', but
i. ,o...,, County allsAo) can close the
i;.i r and monive to he next chapter
6f our life .

T,\: ENI. .VYE R1-S AGO
September IS, I i)
George Griffin% wants to remain
0.rlhiC Chief of V:'.. He has
Hield the position since 1972-
William (Bill) Tellec. has an-
nounced that he is seeking the
iroup 5 City Council seat currently
occupied by Elbert Hartsfield.
Sii Ckoutml member Lou Bi:inl%
jays he will be' able to devote full
time to the Council if he is elected.
He is running for the Group 7 seat
recently vacated by George Snel-
arove,
In the near future, two-way radio
communications equipment will be
installed at the county landfill and in
landfill refi.'e trucks.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
September 18, 1975
;.'ai Max Bilinski was the guest
speaker at the regular meeting of the-
Civilian Club last H\ eJne-da. Sept.
10..


M',.ndj.,. Sqt 15 was the day the
site of the Franciscan Mission San
Miuei de Asile 1617 1704 was
dedicated.
In ceremonies held at the Lloyd'
railroad depot on Monday, Sept. 15,
the Depot was officially placed in
the Reier -r of Historical Sites.

FORT, YEARS AGO
September 17, 1965
Nason Rc.cil. Vice Chairman of.
Big Bend Navigation District and
Mrs. Revell were in Tampa to attend
a meeting hosted by the Tampa Port
.iiLormi.. honoring the Big Bend
and Suwanee Anclote Island Navi-
gation Districts.
Mr. W.M. Scruggs Sr. was hon-
ored with a dinner Saturday night to
celebrate his birthday.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Norris and
Ilnt'u were in tii,'p.a over the
weekend to attend a Kiwanis con-
vention.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
September 16, 1955
Mrs. W_ L. Hunter entertained at a
tea to introduce Mrs. John A. Ward.
About one hundred guests called.
Mrs. Van H. Preist spoke to the
Woman's Club on "Responsibility of
Club Women as a Democratic Citi-
zen." Girl Staters Polly Clarke and
Barbara Ann Morris gave reports.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
September 14, 1945
A colramn "Just Call Me Mister",
was on the front page listing the
boys who had iccciih received
their discharge from the services: T-
Sgt. Thomas J. Reeves of Lloyd:
Pfc. John T. Granger, Ist Lt. Francis
V. Home, Aucilla; Seaman 2c Jesse
Lovett, Lloyd; Sgt. David J, Ham-
rick and S'Sgt Marion E. McLeod,


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

We have been warning for years
that they were using the exact same
play book used to destroy the smok-
ing industry. .Now the food police
have what they've been looking for.
A special report that says french
fries cause cancer. There's no proof
to the claim, of course. Just a Swiss
study done three years ago that said
Acrylamide, a by product of chemi-
cals and high heat found in deep
fried foods might have a link to can-
cer.
In fact, since that study first came
out, there have been several more is-
sued to dispute it. There is no peer-
reviewed, sound science to prove
the statement. But one disputed arti-
cle is all it took.
Suddenly, after three years, the


food police decided it was in their
interest to resurrect the study and
make an issue of it.
Now, true to the play book, the at-
torney general of the' State of Cali-
-fornia. Bill Lockyer, is calling for
warning labels on potato chips and
fries.
The attorney General lost no time
in filing law suits against nine food
chains and snack-food makers, in-
cluding McDonalds. Wendy's, and
Frito Lay.
However, as Frank Muir of the
Idaho Potato Industry pointed out,
'"We've been eating Acrylamide
ince man invented fire. Ever since
.c started cooking F:.ds. there's
been Acrylamide that we've been
consuming."
SV'h,. is the California Attorney
General in such a haste to force the
heavy hand of the law into the mar-
ket place ,i again? Do you know


how much money states have made
through class action .suits against
cigarette manufacturers?
This is a new a way to raise state
revenue without having to raise
taxes.
It's kind of a new Eminent Do-
main scheme where government just
grabs a company's profits when it
wants to.
First the warning labels, then the
suits in the name of the poor victims
of the potato chip profit mongers.
This is how we do things in Amer-
ica now. An unsubstantiated report
(perhaps even just a news release)
i.o"i a group or individual that has a
pol'i.',: agenda. The perpetrators
know it's coming. They prepare be-
hind the scenes and, suddenly, we
have an instant nationwide outcry
for '.,' eth.:' to be done."
..,.,'i::':.eVt officials puff up to
the microphone to tell us how they


are- protecting us all.
The lawyers just want to get "jus-
tice" for the preselected, ready-made
clients. And another American right
disappears for the common good,
of course.
As Attorney General Lockyer
says, "I'm not telling them to stop
eating potato chips and french
fries..." The arrogance of that
thought should speak volumes about
how this guy thinks.
He certainly does think he has the
power to tell us to stop doing things
in our everyday lives if he can find
.the right excuse to scare people and
stampede them in the right direction.

By the way, just for the record,
there never Was a peer-reviewed sci-
entific report that proved second
hand smoke ever existed, either.
It was just an internal report at the
EPA, put out in a press release.


Who Handles Hard Times Best?


BY TRAVIS HUSSEY
Columnist

Throughout the years, I have no-
ticed the best way to get the atten-
tion of some Americans, in regards
to an issue that is having an ill effect
on the citizens of this country, is for
something to come between an indi-
vidual and his wallet and / or be-
tween an individual and his televi-
sion remote..
In other words, many people do
not care to get involved in a matter
that is against the good of mankind-
(even. when it negatively affects
their family) unless it comes be-
tween them and their television en-
tertainment and / or their money.
Put another way, numbers of peo-
ple in this country do not seem to


give a hang about what is hli..:.,ci'.'
to their government, their schools,,
their economy, and in some cases
their families.
In short, when it comes to numer-
ous issues, .iuio.' citizens seem to be
of the mindset: As long as it does
not affect me. I am not going to
worry about it,
. What so many people do not seem
to realize is that there are many is-
sues and concerns taking place
every day that can have a direct or
indirect effect on their :'m-.--. menit-
bers.
Some ,,t ,i:,' may have an minme-
diate effect and some may not have
an effect until nimoths or even years
dow8 the road. EiSier way, the po-
tential effect is there and can have
negative ,- -. v-- ,'..
The one exception I have found to


the above is when this country, has
some type of i.':. then the peo-
ple of this nation raily together like
.'',d'J'. 's business. However, in this
piece, I am not referring to disasters.
I wonder how many people in this
country kep 'n contact with his /
her local state and federal represen-
tatives concerning their government
and the issues of their community,
stale, and this nation.- -
It seems that most of us live a fast-
paced routine. As a rule. this has us
so wrapped up that we are unable to
see any rti.'r tihan the end of our
individual and collective nose(.sI-
Of course, mosi of us are busy
making a 1- i:j.: However, it seems
dtal n:.'.r', of us have long passed
the point of making a living and are
berm on chasing after more money
because ,our standard of livmig is so


high. Then some enjoy going after
dollars just for the desire for more
money.
It is a shame that we have raised
the standard of living in this country
to a level that tiljii., once consid-
ered to be a convenience, (actually
these things still are a convenience)
are now considered, by many, to be
a necessity.
We live in a society in which any-
one, with good or bad credit and
even bankruptcy can buy anything,
on credit, whether it is a necessity, a
convenience, or a luxury. There is
no doubt in my mind this helped
raise the standard of living in this
country to such a level dithat one day;
we will all pay in one way or an-
other. For this, we can pal only our-
(See Hard Times Page 7)











Lifestyle


MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 5


Program Volunteers


To Mentor Students


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The School Mentoring Program,
as it has been known in public
schools here, winds to a stop, as
grant funds providing monies for the
program end, as of Sept. 30.
To replace this grant funded pro-
gram, the Governor's Office has de-
vised the Florida Mentoring
Partnership Program, titled "Focus
on Achievement."
Because of its F rating based on
the 2005 FCAT, Jefferson Elemen-
tary School is part of this pilot vol-
unteer mentoring program, designed
especially for elementary schools.
Mayor Julie Conley, as well as
other Florida City Mayors, with ele-
mentary schools earning an F rating,
have been asked to be honorary
chairmen and take the initiative to
recruit community leaders from
businesses, corporations, faith based
organizations, government offices,
Department of Education members;
and local dignitaries, and the like, to
work with them on this mentoring


mission.
As there is no state funding tied in
with this program, it becomes vol-
unteer effort on the part of the com-
munity.
Community volunteers are asked
to commit one hour a week before
or after school hours, and to spend
this quality time with FCAT Level I
and 2 students, helping the students
their, areas of deficiencies.
Conley adds that the Volunteer
Florida Foundation that administers
the mentoring partnership is helping
to form a plan of action in the im-
plementing of this mentoring pro-
gram for JES.

As she digests the general infor-
mation the state provided, Conley is
in the process of scheduling ap-
pointments with Sandra Collins,
principal of JES and with Superin-
tendent Phil Barker, to determine
how best to implement the oroeram.
When this is determined, infor-
mation will be published in the
Monticello News, as plans are de-
veloped.


V -,.I I .. --


MATTHEW HAYES AND LINDSEY TRIGGERS


Lindsey Driggers Will

Marry Matthew Hayes


Annette and Johnnie Driggers, of
Eridu, FL. announce the engage-
ment and approaching marriage of
their daughter Lindsey Nicole Drig-
gers to Matthew K. Hayes, of Day,
FL.
She is the granddaughter of Ra-
chel and Charles Sheffield, of Eridu,
and Inez Driggers, of Mayo, FL.
He is the son of Cindy and Ted
Hayes, of Perry, FL. and Margaret
and Jimmy Riggins, of Day.
The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate
of Aucilla Christian Academy and is
currently pursuing a Doctor of Phar-
macy degree at Florida A&M Uni-
versity.


She also works at Doctor's Memo-
rial Hospital and with the Florida
Division of Forestry.
The prospective groom is a 1995
graduate of Mayo High School and
is currently employed with the Flor-
ida Department of Corrections.
The couple will be married at 5:30
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2005 at
the Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
in Eridu.

A reception will follow.
All friends and family are invited
to attend. No local invitations will
be sent.

own discretion for cutest and most
innovative costumes.
Ribbons will be awarded to first,
second and third place winners.
The grand prize winner will receive
a $30 gift certificate to delightful
Pets on West Washington Street.
There is no entry fee and every-
one, is encouraged to dress their
pets, come on out and -have a good
time.
The time of the judging has not
been determined. It will take place
when the band takes their first
break from the stage so contest par-
kicipants may take the stage in their
ahbelnce..
In related news, President Caro-
line Ca.rswell advised that the next
MNiembership meeting is 7 p.m.,
Oct I -, with the Board meeting to

The meetings will be held in the
ne.'. office, located across from
F-,.t Baptist Church on West


\\j-,hmton Street.
Meeting
continued d From Page 1)
The commission in fact used to
hold both its regular monthly meet-
ing-. Thursday morning. It was pres-
siue from citizens that caused the
comnusiision to change one of its
meeting to evenings about 12 years
0 0


The Jefferson County Historical
Association will meet at the Wirick-
Simmons House, Monday, Oct. 3,
featuring a dinner and program
about the history of Waukeenah.
A Southern Dinner of ham and all
the fixings will be served at 6:30
p.m., with carryouts available.
Cost is $10, with proceeds to go
towards helping to replace the anti-
quated central heating unit in the
Wirick-Simmons House.
Advance tickets are available by
calling Beulah Brinson at 997-2465,
or EleandorHawkins at 997-2863.
The program will include a discus-
sion of the rich history of Wau-
keenah, the oldest community in
Jefferson County.
Discussion will include the Wau-
keenah School, and Waukeenah
United Methodist Church.
There is no charge for the
program, and all interested in the
history of Jefferson County are en-
couraged to attend.
Speaker include: Mary Connell,
Mary Helen Andrews, and Melva
Walker, all of whom are Waukeenah
natives.


meeting.
Copies of the award winning "His-
tory of Jefferson County," by Jerrell
Shofner, will be available for pur-
chase.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


During the regular meeting of the
Humane Society, Spokesperson
Martha Jean Martin. reported that
an adoption booth beginning at 5
p.m., during the Home Town Get
Down, Friday.


She added that the Humane Soci-
ety has been asked to provide a few
judges for the Dress Your Pet con-'
test.
Members said they would ask
around in an attempt to obtain vol-
unteers to judge the contest.
There is no specific criteria or
theme for dressing the pets.
They will be judged by the judges


U 'A ass.


Association President Brinson .
states: "This will be an excellent op-
portunity for longtime residents to
refresh their, memories of Wau-
keenah. 3uck
I "Our new county residents can
gain a wealth of history in one eve- I
ning." U I
Brinson reports that the associa-
tion is eager to welcome new mem-
bers and dues can be 'paid at the.


Dr. Wes Scoles Leads

Medical Mission Team

To Travel To Guatemala


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Rotarian Wes Scoles, MD will be
traveling to the villages of Palacal,
Chuisamymac, Tzampoo, Pana
Jachel, and San Juan Laguna in
Guatemala on Oct. 8 through Oct.
16, to lead a medical mission team.
The team will be primarily work-
ing with Mayan Indians in the mid-
dle of the large plantations
bordering the jungles on the Pacific
side of the country.
There will be 20 other people on
the trip, including two other Medical
Doctors, local CVS pharmacist ,To-
nya Drawdy, and one optometrist.
The team was able to purchase
about $350,000 retail value medi-
cines and $10,000 worth of eye
glasses for distribution while they
are there.
They will also be helping to build
a medical clinic in one of the small-


towns and remodeling an abandoned
church so other missionaries may
use it as a gathering place and clinic
setting.
With donations of clothes, they
will take about 500 pounds of cloth-
ing for distribution and about 150
pounds of shoes.
They will be taking sterile gloves,
gowns, syringes, needles, surgical
equipment, and lancelets for the lo-
cal hospital.
All told, they will be taking with
them about 2,100 pounds of luggage
for distribution.
Scoles adds, "We have been lucky.
enough to have partnered with Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital to sup-
ply equipment and sterile supplies.
,Other private donations have al-
lowed us to purchase the much-
needed medicines and eye glasses.
We are still short oi. our budget
goals, and monetary support for the
purchasing of more medicines and'
eye glasses would be appreciated'


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+ Coic+ Ss a rpel Tune

+ NekPi n + Hea [ K"IIIRdaches + Siaical~


Historical Association

Plans Dinner, Meeting


Pet Adoption Booth At

Home Town Get Down


I ". 11


r[


II






'AGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005
----------- ---- -- --- ---------------------------------------------------n -


Senior





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The average increase in the price
manufacturers charge for bran,
name prescription drugs widely:
used b\ older Americans contain
ued to substantially exceed the rat,
of general inflation through March. 2005
according to the A.-\ARP "R\ Watchdo
Report" AARP's CEO \\ilham Notelli said. "\Ve ar
\er\ disappointed that brand name manufacturer
ha'.e tailed to keep their price increase min line \itll
inflation and we \\ ill continue to edticate our memr
ber, and the public about ho\\ best to find the mos
affordable prescnption digs to suit their needs."
More than one-halt of the drugs in the sample
110 of 195. had incieaes in manufacturer price
durinn the period Irom December 31. 2004 through
March 31. 2005. .As a result of this and
increases in recent \ears,. a typical older
American is likely\ to ha\e experienced an
increase, on average. in the cost of therapy\
trom the year 2000 through March 31. 2005
of $866.16 if the drugs are brand name prod-
ucts used to treat chronic conditions and the
full price increases were passed along to the
., consumer.
A second report. "Trends in
. Manufacturer List Prices of Generic
SPrescription Drugs Used By Older
Americans First Quarter 2005 Update",
states that manufacturer list prces for the
sample of 75 generic drugs rose only by 0.7
percent in the 12-months ending on March
31. 2005. While this is a slight increase
compared to the 12-month period ending on
December 31, 2004. it represents a substan-


tial slo ing compared to the dramat-
ic rates of increase for 2001 17.8 per-
cent), 2002 115.8 percent and 2003
113.3 percent). Furthermore, the report
states that in the first quarter of 2005. only three out
of the 75 generic drugs in the sample had an
increase in manufacturer list price.
AARP is helping states find \\ays to looer the
cost ot prescription drugs for their Medicaid and
state drug assistance programs and continues to
support legislation that \\ill legalize the safe renm-
portation of prescription druIgs from Canada and
other countries. AARP also supports gi\ ing author -
it\ to the Secretar. of the U S. Department of
Health and Human Ser\ices ,HHSi to negotiate
drug pnces.
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Aucilla Christian Academy


Homecoming Set October 3-7


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Academy will
celebrate its annual Homecoming
Week Oct. 3-7.
Monday, Oct. 3 is "Pajama Day"
when students can come to school
dressed in their bedtime best.
Tuesday, is "Theme Day", where
each class will pick their individual
themes and dress to match that
scheme.
Wednesday, is "Camo Day",
when students come to school
dressed in camouflage and gear to
match. ...-...
Thursday is "Rat Day", with sen-
iors choosing lower classmen and


Society Cho

Animal Art l

FRAN HUNT o;
Staff Writer

Humane Society Fundraising Co-
chair Mary Helen Ringe~ reports
that the artwork by Jefferson Ele-
mentary students originaIy planned
for a calendar, will be .used for
greeting cards instead. .,
She said it was too late, to carry
out the printing of a calendar, but
as originally planned, 12 w winners
will be selected for use on the
cards.
First place winners will receive a
Humane Society Pet Math'T-shirt,
a box of the cards and all winners
will receive a ribbon and have their
artworks framed and marted by
TomKline.
Awards will be: given during the
first student recognitiof'hdassembly
at the school, conducted eVery nine


Hard Times
(Continued From Page 4)
selves on the back. .
Repeatedly. throughout history,
the old rule of suppl:, arid demand
has been p &ovri.Jritoda)"s soclegr.
this is certainly the case
In general, our standard of living
is sky high. Products (convenience
and luxury items) are very expen-
sive yet, members of society as a
whole, continue to buy -hese items,
many'-on credit, like there % ill be no
tomorrow.
Again, we are our own worst en-
emy in this respect. This- I'pe of:,
consumer spending will certainly
not help the prices go down,. To the
contrary, the prices rise because of
the public's, demand.
A few decades ago, more and
more women began to join the work
force. Therefore, another reason
why consumer prices began to rise
because this movement brought on
more of the supply and demand.
History shows us examples, in
most any avenue of life, where one
extreme followed another. The
economy of this country is no ex-
ception. ,.
The standard of liviig,,'in this
country, is so much higher than it
was, say, thirty years ago, that many
people in our society, especially the
younger generations, do 'not know
the difference between necessity ,
convenience, or luxury. 'We, the
older ones, can take much' of the
credit for this. '"
It is not a matter of-if- extreme fi-
nancial hard times are coming. Ac-
tually, hard times are on; the way
now. So, it is only a matter of time
before they arrive in full force. Fur-
thermore, these times may be just as
tough and hard as those of the great
depression were. They may be more
difficult! -,
I believe when these extreme hard
'financial times arrive, people who
are use to having the least will with-
stand the elements of this financial
crunch, the best.
When you get down to it many, if
not most of us, in the United States
of America, have a whole heap
more than we need.


dressing them in a variety of ways,
to either look colorful, goofy, or
the all-time favorite, dressing the
boys. as girls.
Once the lower classmen are
dressed, they stay in costume until
noon.
Friday is "Spirit Day" when all of
the students will come to school
dressed in the school colors of blue
and gold, with a series of events
planned.
The Fellowship of Christian Ath-
letes (FCA) sponsored field day
takes place in the gym from 10:30
a.m. until noon for grades 7-12.
At 12:45, p.m. high school stu-
dents line their floats up on the side
street and elementary students will
line up in front of the school.


losing JES

Winners
weeks.
The art became available for the
judges to begin their task Sept. 23
and judging will continue until
Sept. 30. ,
Students submitted 8 '/ x 11 inch
color drawings designed with cray-
ons, of either dogs, cats, puppies or
kittens.
Printing of the cards is estimated
to. be completed, by Oct. 14., Art
works will be given to Kline Oct.
17 for framing, and matting and the
finished pieces of art. would be
ready .for public display by Nov. 1.
After. the winners receive their
prizes, local merchants will be
asked to display the winning pieces
in their store windows.
The winners are to be announced
to the public by the time the Hu-
mane Society holds their fund rais-
ing trail ride on Nov. 19.

: Tell' it all -
Tell it well,
through an ad in
the classifieds!I
.You'll hear the
results "
immediately!



Call Today!
997-3568

Monticello News


Row


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 7

Local Volunteer Awaits

Deployment To Storm Area


At 1 p.m., the homecoming pa-
rade begins in front of the school
with one float for each of the four
high school classes.
Following the parade, each class
will park its floats on the side of
the road at the south end of the
football field so they can be, dis-
played during the football game
against the Oak Hall "Eagles" that
evening.
From 1:15 until 2 p.m., there will
be a scavenger hunt in the gym for
students in grades 7-12.
From 2:10 until 2:55 there will be
a pep rally.
Spirits should be high for the.
homecoming game, at 7:30 p.m.
against Oak Hall.
As is tradition, the homecoming
queen will be crowned at half-time.
Class representatives for the
queen's court and their escorts in-
clude: ninth grade, Mallory Plaines,
and Matt Bishop; tenth grade Ram-
sey Revell, and Kyle Bamwell;
eleventh, grade, Angela Steinberg
and Justin Payne.
Candidates, for Homecoming'
Queen and their escorts include:
Keri Brasington and Chris Tuten;
Casey Handley, and Matt Poston;
and Suzanne Walker, and Colby
Roberts.


Homes Of

Mourning

Tamara Ann De Palma
Tamara Ann (Tami) DePalma, age
46, died Friday, September 16,
2005, in Tallahassee, Florida.
The service will be at 4:00 p.m.,
Saturday, October 15, 2005, at Cul-
ley's Meadow Wood Funeral Home,
Riggins' Road Chapel, in
Tallahassee, Florida.
She was born August 29, 1959 in,
Englewood, NJ, and was a longtime
resident of the Daytona Beach Area,
graduating from Fr. Lopez High
School. She was also the FoundeL
and Operating Manager of F..piess
SUIe', of T.alla h -_ee ,Flo ida
She is stir iyved b. her pjients
Bernice NI \d .lames J (Jiin) De-
Palma of Ormond Beach, Florida;
her son Travis Michael King, of Tal-
lahassee, Florida; one brother Tim
De Palma, Orlando; two sisters Teri
Teasley of Vero Beach, ,Florida and
Toni Busch of Sautee-Nacoochee,
Georgia; two nieces, Heather Hen-
neman and Rebecca Bankey and one
nephew,.John Teasley.


Ar
trw
a


Anyone willing to open their
homes to a family in desperate need
can contact her at 997-5980 or 997-
3678.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local resident and Red Cross vol-
unteer, Jennifer Allen, is awaiting
deployment to the New Orleans
area.
She is expected to spend up to two
weeks on assignments to various lo-
cations where needed.
She will be providing assistance in
relocating displaced victims.
Long and short term housing is
needed in other areas for these vic-
tims as well as clothing and
supplies.
Allen has offered her home to one
of the families in dire straits from
the devasted area.


Big Chief Pawnbrokers

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Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
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Nestld Waters to Hold Job Fair October 1
Nestle has immediate openings at its Madison County bottling facility.
Opportunities are available for flexible and self-motivated
individuals seeking careers in logistics, quality assurance, production
and maintenance.
Come to the Nestle Waters job fair being held this Saturday, October 1st,
from 8 a.m. until 12 p.m. at the Madison bottling facility to find out if
you are qualified for one of these positions.
Nestle Waters offers great pay and an outstanding benefits package
that includes health and dental insurance along with a 401K and
profit-sharing plans.
Join us on October 1 and take the first step toward a challenging and
rewarding future with Nestle Waters. Applications will be available at the
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WALKER

First Birthday
Justice Walker will celebrate his
First Birthday Thursday, Sept. 29,
2005.
He is the son of Reanna and Bud
Walker, and the brother of Christo-
pher Savage.
His big day will be spent with
family and friends at the home of
his paternal grandparents Paula and
.Carl Sykes in Wacissa, 3 p.m., Sun-
day.
He is the maternal grandson of
Brenda Lynch of Monticello and,
Randy Savage of Miccosukee.
His maternal great grandparents
are Sylvia Thompson of
Luthersville, GA., and the late May
Stetens ofTN.
Paternal great grandparents are
Bill :and Paulette Clark, of Wacissa,
and the late Junior Sims.


Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds'
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
.y, protect Florida's
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or\





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005
1t^i 1 n ll I I i ll il il* Ur '^ l *1 k II I E 11 1 11 "_II .- I. i .... _iuI I





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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005 PAGE 9


Jefferson Tigers Trounce


Trenton Tigers 38-(
pletions for 70 yards.
FRAN HUNT In rushing, Rivers had eight
Staff Writer rushes for 100 yards, two touch-
downs and one two-point conver-


The Jefferson County High
School varsity Tigers blanked the
Trenton Tigers Friday for a 38-0
win, for a 1-3 season.
Coach Harry Jacobs named
Mario Rivers as the offensive
player of the week and Desrick
Jones as the defensive player of the
week.
In the first quarter the two Tigers
teams were unable to score, but
JCHS came alive in the second
quarter, scoring 12 poirits.
JCHS scored 20 in the third and
six in the fourth quarters..
Quarterback Mario Rivers had
seven pass attempts with five com-


sion.
Lucious Wade had seven rushes
for 70 yards and one touchdown;
and Desrick Jones had four rushes
for 85 yards.
In receptions, Telvin Norton had
one for 21 yards, and Jonathan
Dady had two receptions for 57
yards, and a one handed 45 yard
pass interception.
On the defensive side of the field,
Fred Mitchell had three tackles, one
assist and one interception; Jitavian
Bennett had.two tackles for a loss,
one interception and one sack; and
Jones had five tackles, one tackle
for a loss and four assists.


Daryl Jones had four tackles, one
assist and one fumble recovery for
a touchdown; Dady had three tack-
les, three assists and one intercep-
tion; and LaMarcus Bennett had
four tackles, four assists and one'
fumble recovery.
Wade had one tackle, one tackle
for a loss, one assist and one sack;
Marcus Brown had three tackles,
one tackles for a loss and one
forced fumble; and Robert Nealy
had two tackles, two tackles for a
loss, one assist and one forced fum-
ble; William wade had three tackles
and four'assists; and Breon Parker
had one interception and one fum-
ble recovery for a touchdown.
In Tiger punt returns, Dady had.
one for 40 yards.


OVER THE WEEKEND, Jefferson
blanked the Trenton Tigers, 38-0.


Tigers shows the local Tigers in white, all over the
Photo Trenton players.


Lady Tiger Varisty

Falls TO 6-6 Season


The Jefferson County High
' School varsity volleyball team fell
to a 6-6 record after dropping four
of their last five games.
When the Lady Tigers faced off
against Rickards, they were victori-
ous with wins of 25-18, 25-12 and
S 25-8.'
Shaumese Massey had two kills
and three digs; Keandra Seabrooks


had four digs and one kill; Chandra
Tucker and three digs and Jazmaun
Hall had 11 service points.
The Lady Tigers lost in their
quest against John Paul, 20-25, 21-
25 and 23-25.
Hall had nine service points; Se-
abrooks had eight digs, two kills
and one blocked shot; and Massey
had two blocked shots, two kills


Seminole Club Meeting

Speaker Chad Matthews


ACA VARSITY Cheerleaders in formation. Bottom, L-R:
Amanda Hunt, Caitlin Murhpy, Suzanne Walker, Tayloir
Rykard, Angie Stienberg. Top, L-R: Joanna Cobb, Ramsey,
Revell, and Shaye Eason. (News Photo)


Panama City Christian

Blanked By ACA 27-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity football tam blanked Panama
City Christian 27-0, Friday, and
stands 1-3 on the season.
Coach Dave Roberts named Ca-
sey Gunnels as the offensive player
of the week and Ben Grantham as
the defensive player of the week.
Gunnels rushed for a total of 218
yards and two touchdowns; Daniel
Greene, 78 yards and one touch-
down; and Grantham five yards,
and one touchdown.
Quarterback Stewart Williams
had three successful pass recep-
tions out of five attempts for 29
yards; Kyle Peters had one pass re-

MCA Games

Last Week
Postponed

Both Monticello Christian Acad-
emy's girl's volleyball team and
boy's flag football team, remain at
an 0-1 season after receiving an
emergency call Friday morning
postponing the games.
-Pastor Mike Burke said both
games have been rescheduled for
Nov. 5.
"The coach called and said they
had an emergency at the school and
had to postpone the games," said
Burke. "He called back later in the
day to explain that a sewer pipe had
broken and was backing up in the
gym, so instead of taking just the
flag football team, we agreed to go
ahead and reschedule both games."
The boys and the girls will face
off against Grace Church of God in
Baldwin Friday.
"I think the girls will do good,
but it's hard to say about the boys,"
said Burke. "We didn't get a good
look at their team during the Jam-
boree, so we really don't know
what to expect, hopefully, they'll
do fine."


ception for 12 yards; Colby Wad-
dail had three of four attempts on
extra points; and Colby Roberts
had two quarterback sacks.
Warriors play their first District
game of the season 7:30 p.m. Fri-
day, against Monroe, there.
Roberts said the Warriors are go-
ing into the game with a specific
mission, "To beat Monroe for the
first time in eight years, but I think
we will do well."
He concluded that injured player,
defensive back Glen Bishop, did
see a little playing time during the
Panama City game, and he will be
back in full swing Friday for the
Monroe game.


FRAN HUNT '
Staff Writer

Chad Matthews of FSU's Flying
High Circus will be the guest
speaker for the Jefferson County
Seminole Club, Friday at the Christ
Epiicopal Church Fellowship Hall.
Social time is 6:30 p.m. and din-
ner will be served at 7 p.m.
Matthews became involved with
the Flying High Circus in 1993 as a
student.
He has performed Teeter board,
Flying Trapeze, Comedy Trapeze
and Hand-to-hand Balancing.
He has performed in more than
500 shows throughout the South-
eastern United States and in the
Caribbean. :
Matthews earned his degree in
Philosophy in 1998 and shortly
thereafter, took over as assistant-di-
rector of the FSU Circus.

Some of his main responsibilities
include production, rigging and set-
ting up the "Big Top" tent.
He also coaches all of the acts for
each show and is heavily involved,
in the recruitment and retention of'
new students.
Tickets are $8 and those attending


are asked to RSVP to Jim Messer at
997-2230.
In related news, John Dickey will
stand in for regular chef Rusty
Hammrick.


and three digs.
The Lady Tigers were defeated
when they went up against North
Florida Christian, the number two
ranked team in the state, losing 6-
25, 6-25 and 6-25.
Massey had two blocked shots;
Seabrooks had one blocked shot
and three digs; and Tucker had
three digs.
When the Lady Tigers went up
against Hamilton, they won the
first game, 25-18; lost the second,
23-25; lost the -third, 26-28; and
lost the fourth, 25-27.
"We did the best we could," said
Coach Bill Brumfield. "We went
in with only seven players and one
of those got hurt in the first game:"
Hall had 12 service points; Mas-
sey had four blocked shots and
three kills; .Tucker had four digs
and one blocked shot: and Seab-
rooks had eight digs, two service
points and two blocked shots.


Lady Tigers

Split Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School junior varsity volleyball
team split its final two games and^
ended the season 7-3.
The Lady Tigers were victorious ,
over Rickards winning 25-18 and
25-6.

Keneshu Coates had two digs
and one. kill and Maresha Barring-
ton had one kill

The Lady Tigers fell to Hamilton,
losing 8-25 and 6-25.
Carissa Brinson had three digs
and two service points.


bp

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bp


HIGH SCHOOL PLAYERS OF THE WEEK



Aucilla Christian Jefferson County H.S


Bien Grantham'
Defense


( ase Gunnels
Offensive


Defensive


Mario Rivers
Offensive
Offensive


Ford recommends BR..


1 .


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005


Become an American Red
. Cross Disaster Services
Volunteer

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
850/878-6080 or visit our website
at www.tallytown.com/redcross.

+ American
Red Cross


LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:P5-232-CA IN RE: The Mar-
riage of REGINA A. BUTLER, Wife/Peti-
tioner, and JERRY W. BUTLER,
Husband/Respondent. AFFIDAVIT FOR.
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE OF PROC-
ESS STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF
JEFFERSON BEFORE ME, the under-
signed authority, personally appeared
REGINA A. BUTLER, who after being
duly sworn and cautioned, deposes and
says: 1. That diligent search and inquiry
have been made to discover the residence


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LEGAL NOTICE-
address of the Respondent and the same is
set forth herein. 2. That the residence
address of the Respondent is unknown.
FURTHER AFFIANT SAYETH NOT.
REGINA A. BUTLER. SWORN TO AND
SUBSCRIBED before me this 14th day ol
September. 2005.
9/21, 9/28, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE The Jeffer-
son County Commission will have a public
hearing on the following proposed land
development code change on October 20,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19.
The meeting may be continued as neces-
sary. JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS ORDINANCE NO. __ AN ORDI-
NANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY
FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS
OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE;
AMENDING LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE SECTION 2.04.02.H, RESIDEN-
TIAL DENSITIES IN THE MIXED USE -
SUBURBAN / RESIDENTIAL LAND
USE CATEGORY; AMENDING LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION
2.04.07, TABLE OF DEVELOPMENT
STANDARDS; PROVIDING FOR SEV-
ERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CON-
FLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COM-
PREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Information con-
cerning the proposed change may be
reviewed at the Jefferson County Planning
Department, 277 N. Jefferson St., Monti-
cello, FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223.
From. the Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,. paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency of this
state or of any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any meeting
or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing
is required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which tie apeal is to be based.
9/28, c
The Jefferson County Board of Commis-
sioners is seeking bids from any Florida
Licensed General or Building Contractor
for the construction of a
concession/restroom Facility. Blueprints
can be viewed at the Building Department.
Bids must be turned in to room 10 County
Courthouse by October 7, 2005 at 12:01
p.m. Contact 850-342-0223 (ext. 104) or
35a-3240.
9/28, 9'30, c
.L..AL NOTICE The Jefferson County
Planning Commission will hold a meeting
on October 13, 2005 at 7:00 P.M. The
*.-meting will be held in the Courtroom of
the Jefferson County Courthouse located
at the intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 in Monticello, Florida.
The meeting may be continued as neces-
sary. Information concerning the meeting
is available at the Jefferson County Plan-
ning Department, 277 N. Mulberry St.,
Monticello, FL 32344, Telephone 850-342-
0223. From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36, para-
graph, c: Each board, commission, 'or
agency of this state or of any political sub-
division thereof shall include in the notice
of any meeting. or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency, conspicu-
ously on such notice, the advice that, if a
person decides to appeal, nay decision
made by the board, agency, or commission


LEGALS ...
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
9/28, c
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Jeffer-
son County Planning Commission will
hold a public hearing on October 13,,2005
at 7:00 P.M. The purpose of the public
hearing will be to accept public comment
concerning the proposed new computer
format for the Jefferson County Future
Land Use Map. The change proposed is
from the Auto Cad 14 program to the Arc
View program. The maps are available for


LEGALS "'
review at the Jefferson County Plannifng
Office, 277 N. Mulberry St., Monticello,
FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223. The
maps are also available for review at the
Jefferson County Public Library, 375
South Water Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
telephone 850-342-0205. The public hear-
ing will be held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of US Highway 19 and US
Highway 90 in Monticello, FL. The meet-
ing may be continued as necessary. From
the Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or


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Gun Cabinets, Hutches, Tables, 215 S. MONROE ST., ,Suite 300 MIr. VAerc h ant
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NOTICE OF PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE
LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, BY
REDESIGNATING A PARCEL OF LAND BORDERED BY NORTH
JEFFERSON STREET ON THE WEST AND NORTH CHERRY STREET ON
THE EAST, COMPRISING 2.23 ACRES, FROM RLD-RESIDENTIAL LOW
DENSITY AND RHD-RESIDENTIAL HIGH DENSITY TO COMMERCIAL;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION OF THE
SPECIFIED AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF MONTICELLO
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR LEGAL EFFECT; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY, CODIFICATION, SCRIVENER'S ERRORS, AND AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2005-12. The ordinance will change the Future .Land Use Map for
Parcel Nos. 00-00-00-0350-0000-0010 and 00-00-00-0360-0000-1670 from RLD -
Residential Low Density and RHD-Residential High Density to C-Commercial. A public
hearing on the ordinance will be conducted by the Local Planning Agency on October 11,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, FL 32344.
Interested persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance. The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S.
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
Monday though Friday.


LEGALS
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
9/28, c
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that D.C.
Merritt the holder of the following certifi-
cates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it


I ,








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005 I


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


'AGE 11




CLASSIFIED


Your Community ShoppingCenter


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...S7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for WednesdaN
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS

was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
478 Year of Issuance 1998 Description or
Property: Exhibit A One (1) acre of land,
more or less. and being more particularly
described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at
the Northwest Corner of that certain prop-
erty deeded to John Hundley and Lizzie
Hundley, husband and wife, by Ben Ed-
wards, Jr., and Minnie Edwards, his wife,
by deed dated the 14th day of February,
1953 and of record in the office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida, in Deed Book "000" page
420 and to which references is hereby
made. From said point of beginning run-
ninig thence East for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, thence running South for a
distance of 210 feet, more or less, thence
running South for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, thence runnifig West for a
distance of 210 feet, more or less, thence
running North for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, and to the point of beginning
of the land hereby conveyed. Said prop-
erty being in the Southeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of Section 21, Town-
ship 1 North, Range 5 East. This is the
same land conveyed to John Hundley, Jr.,
by Willie Lane joined by his wife, Mattie
B. Lane, and of record in O.R. Book 71,
page 460, Public Records of Jefferson
County, Florida, and to which references
is hereby expressly directed. Name in
which assessed Angelou Hundley. All of
said property being in the County of Jef-
ferson, State of Florida.Unless such certifi-
cate or certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in
such certificate or certificates will be sold
to the highest bidder at the court house
door on the 27th day of October, 2005, At
11:00 a.m. Dated this 14th day of Septem-
ber 2005, Clerk of Circuit Court of Jeffer-
son County, Florida.
9/21, 28, 10/5, 12, c

HELP WANTED


HEALTHCARE Explore a New Place
For Your Skills! When you join the
Prison Health Services team you will
experience a unique career
environment that offers you the
opportunity to leave the ordinary
behind. Join us in one of these
immediate openings at the Taylor
Correctional Institution: ARN/PA -
FT / MD FT We offer a safe and
supportive environment with
competitive compensation, and
benefits. Contact Dave Hall at:
850-838-4000, ext. 069 or forward
resume via fax: 850-838-4081.
EEO/AA www.prisonhealth.com.
9/28, c
A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: SECRETARY
#2173 High school diploma + 1 year
of secretarial/office clerical
experience. Typing score of at least
CWPM. Starting salary $6.43 Shift:
8AM 5PMSMonday through Friday.
Adult Case Manager #2212 A
minimum of a bachelor's degree with
a major in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related human
services field; or a bachelor's degree
and two years full time or equivalent
experience working with adults
experiencing serious mental illness.
Valid driver's license. Shift 8AM -
5PM/ Monday Friday. Salary:
$10.75 per hour or $12.92 OPS Status
For more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
(850)523-3217 or 1(800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J Capital
Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL Pre-Hire
Drug Screen & FDLE background
check An Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer Drug-Free Workplace.
9/28, c
Wildlife Technician FL Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Com. Aucilla
Wildlife Mgt. Area, Jefferson County
$26,428 Annual. Use tractors and
farm implements, road and facility
maintenance, prescribed burning.
Class A CDL required within 900
days. Experience and/or, education
requirements: Req No. 7701170.
Applications must be completed on
line at:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
(must be received by 10/9/05) For
additional information contact: David
Johnson 5300 High Bridge Road
Quincy, FL 32351, 850-627-1773 ext.
107 EEO/AA Employers
9/28, 30, c
RN's We are offering you an
opportunity to increase your skills on
the job. You can learn he MDS
assessment process, direct care for
geriatric patients, supervision in a
long term care setting. These skills
will make you a better. developed
professional and more desirable to
employers Contact Pine Lake Nursing
Home 13455 W US Highway 90 in
Greenville, 948-4601, Or email
aaminpinelakenursinghome@earthlin
k.net CNA's Pine Lake Nursing Home
is accepting applications for CNA's on
all shifts. Desired qualifications are
compassion, energy, loyalty and the
ability to work with all members of
our team. IF THIS IS YOU, apply at
4


HELP WANTED

13455 W US Highway 90 Greenville,
tel 948-4601.
9/21, 28, c
Party Chief/Instrument Person.
Growing Land Survey/Engineering
Firm needs experienced Party
Chief/Instrument Person. Salary
range: Party Chief $16 $20/hr.
Instrument Person $13 $15/Hr.
Starting Pay Based on Experience
Full Benefits Plus Overtime Pay: Fax
Resume to: (850) 942-2717 or send to:
P.O. Box 7526, Tallahassee, Florida
32314 EOE/DFWP
9/28, 30, c
Stylist ,Needed. Busy Salon in
Tallahassee. Flexible hours,
guaranteed base pay. Plenty of
walk-ins. 850-545-0991, leave name
and number.
9/23, 28, pd
Cashier needed. Experienced, reliable
with own transportation. Must be
flexible with hours. Progression to
management for right candidate. Call
997-3538 ex. 5.,
9/21, 23, 28, 30, c'
Taking applications. Our business is
Striping, Seal Coating, Asphalt
Repair, Etc. Ideal candidate can take
on anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies Need Not
Apniv. 545-1776.
9,/3, tfc, c
Carpenter Help Needed must be
experiences, dependable, and ,have
transportation and tools. If you have
these qualities please give us a call at
997-3271.
9/21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Horse farm help wanted. 15
hours/week in exchange for living
accommodations. References & farm
experience required. No smoking.
342-9909.
9/16, 21, 23, 28, r.d
Waitress/cashier part-time. Apply in
person to Court Yard Cafe, 110 East
Dogwood Street.
9/14, tfn, c


Delta Land Surveyors, Inc. Is looking
for Instrument Man and Rodman for
full time positions. Experience a plus,
- .but not necessary we -are willing to
train. Apply in person at 440 South
Jefferson St., Monticello, FL.
(850)997-0301.
9/7, tfn
Wanted experienced roofers or
laborers pay by the hour or square
individuals or sub crews good roofers
earn $700.00 to $1,000.00. Laborers
start $9.00/hour. Call Gene at
562-8366 or 251-7459.
8/19, tfn, c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
8/10. tfn. c
FOR RENT
3bdrm, I ': b %% office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
7/13, tfn, c
Overlook the lake from your private
deck. 1900 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom home. $725.00 per month.
Call HB at 544-2240.
9/23, 28, 30, 10/5, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
9/28, tfn, c


mechanically inclined Electrical, cabling,
out this great opportunity. We provide:


DIGITAL
RECEPTION'
SERVICES, INC.


LOST
Small, female white and buff colored dog
weighs 7 Ibs, right front leg is bent. Last
seen area of Cool & Freeman Rd. Answers
to April if found please call 997-2542.
REWARD
9/28. 30, 10/5, 7, pd

GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale. 2 Family. 9-4 Saturday,
October 1. Come rain or shine 1701A
Noel, Christmas Acres.
9/28, 30, pd
Garage Sale. Multi Family.
Monticello Family Medicine Parking
Lot. Hwy. 19, Sat., October 1st 8-12
noon.
9/28, 30, pd
1511 Spring Hollow Drive on
Saturday 8-12 noon. Household items,
treasures, plants and clothes, etc.
9/28, 30, pd

SERVICES
Kelly's cleaning service. Residential
and commercial. Large or small. "The
Personal Service Touch" to the
professional job you need in your
home or business. Call 694-8558.
9/16, 21, 23, 28, 30, 10/5, pd
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Lightning will NOT strike if you enter
(our door. We've tested it with the
sinners we already have here. Christ


2/2 $615


2/2 $615


108 Grand St. S.W., Greenville, FL
Saturday -:- October 1 -:- 10:00 a.nm.
* Grand Old Brick Building Erected in 1899 Restored 1997 4,500 SF Two Story
50 Year Collection of Antiques and Primitives
A Collectors and Traders Dream Many Unique Well Preserved Items


FURNITURE
Chifforobes
Pie Safes
Hoosier Cabinet
Washstand
Antique Dining Tables & Chairs
Drop-leaf Tables
Fireplace Mantels
Iron Beds
ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVE FARM IMPLEMENTS
Plows, Planters, Thrashers, Corn Grinders
100's Primitive Hand Tools
Numerous Cross Cut Saws
Grinding Wheels
Syrup Kettles & Cane Mills
Wash Pots
Horse Drawn Wagons
Wagon Wheels
ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVE KITCHEN & COOKWARE
Sausage & Coffee Grinders
Stoneware
Antique Wood Stove


ROWELL REALTY &
j 800-323-8388
10% Buyer's Premium


Hand Crock Churn
Griswold Ironware
Daisy Butter Churns
MISC. ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVES
Rocking Horse
Western Flyer Wagon & Tractor
Bells ,
Coca Cola Ice Chests & Signs
Railroad Jack & Lanterns
Buggy Light
Arrowhead Collection
Prints
Singer Foot Pedal Sewing Machines
Clocks & Violin
TRACTORS
801 Ford
John Deere 40
Farmall F-20
COIN COLLECTION
MISCELLANEOUS
Comic Books, Albums, Baseball Cards
ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO LIST!


AUCTION Co., INC.


AU 479 AB 296


Fo dtoa l a ora tio
- 'II ______31_1


TI A


I
al I


.. ..'au- u I *fU.*f-lCOu o or IAL L,.1 g I*UG1* I *ll IVIUSM u b
phone and alarm experience a plus but will train the right individual Check

SCompanyTruck andTools
Paid Training
SSteady Schedules


Strong Advancement Opportunities
* Exc. Pay & Benefits Incl. Health, 401K, Vacations


Join our team and learn how to put your talent to work for you.
Apply online at: www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers
or call: 1-877-351-4473. DRS is a drug/smoke-free EOE.


OuS rinng yurtol ortheftue


SERVICES
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM 997-4116.
9/28, c
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger. jk
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
,Leave Message.
2/11, tfn .,
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509 ,8530. Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn A
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466 A


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 ww.cbkk.coxin


* GR E E NVI LLE- affordable starter
home in town, 1.75 acre lot. $42,500
* Room Mobile Home- Affordable,
Greenville area on 1 acre lot $55,700

* Location Location!- Great comer
location, 2BR/1IBA, on 5 acres, guest
house. $215,000
* Horse Lovers- a special place in the
country, 5 acres, fenced and cross
fenced, comfortable 2 bedroom home.
$219,000

Many Others Available


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Government Farms Road 5 or 10 acres
buyers choice hillside planted pines
$15,000/acre
Raise Your Family in the Country
Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on
five acres w/ guest cottage/playhouse,
big shop, pasture, pecans and a pool .a
real dream for a growing family $400,000
Brand New Listinq! 3 bedroom home in
town at East Anderson St. $155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy
Road in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding
acres With a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000
On Pinney Woods built 2002, 3/2 1864 sq.
ft., ceramic tile, cathedral ceiling, fireplace,
screened porch, 1 ac yes only $135,000


Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, cor-
ner of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset
Street 100'x220 in the City $15,500 each
On the Top of the High Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town-Under
Contract on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000


Just Listed-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500
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Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
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Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
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Home Site close to town on West Groo-
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fenced on 2.4 acres only $86,500


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 28, 2005

-.- ,V .


SJuvenile Justice Program


7 To Get Underway Soon


.JEFFREY CAPPE was recently named Fire Position. The 47 year old Tallahassee man
'Rescue Chief by the County Commission, re. was one of two finalists, of the six inter-
placing Larry Bates, Sr., "who resigned the viewed for the position. (News Photo)


Microchip Helps To

Return Missing Pet


Microchipping, used for the iden-
i:fication lost pets, helped return a
local missing pet this week.
- The story all began last Thursday
when county resident and Humane
-Society and Big Dog Rescue volun-
-feer Cay Curtis was in the parking
-lot of Chicken Delight.
: "I saw this female dog, running
through traffic on South 19.
- "I called the animal and opened
'my car door and the dog jumped
Inside.
"I took her to Animal Medical
Clinic, and they checked her and
,found a microchip," said Curtis.
-'She was microchipped to the
-Black Hills Humane Society in
South Dakota, so I called them to

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get the name of the.owner.
"The information was outdated,
but the dog had been adopted by
Tammy Jackson, so when I couldn't
contact her, I made posters figuring
that someone. in the area had to
know of Tia and how she got here."
Curis hung the posters up and
down US 19 and placed an ad in
the "Monticello News."
The poster included the name of
the owner and a description of the
dog.
Tammy Richards, an employee at
the Rare Door, knew that her co-
worker, Tammy Jackson was
searching for her missing dog.
She alerted Jackson to the posters.
"We just moved here a week

son Is Coming!!


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in the d.irk Call Robinmnn's
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162


ago," Jackson said Tuesday mom-
ing. "We were devastated, search-
ing all night and day for Tia."
After being advised of the post-
ers by Richards on Sunday, Jack-
son quickly called Curtis, and the
family went to the Curtis home to
reclaim their pet.
"When they approached, you
wouldn't believe it, but that dog
scaled an eight foot fence to greet
them, she was so excited," Curtis
said.
After the ordeal, both Jackson and
Curtis laughed about the situation.
"Cay thought she was lost, we just
knew that she was missing," said
Jackson.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Two recently received Department
of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) Grants are
about to be implemented in the
county.
The Jefferson County Youth
Council is accepting resumes for
two student advocate positions.
A detailed help wanted ad with all
the specifics is printed in the
Wednesday, Sept. 21 edition of the
Monticello News.
Officials plan to fill the positions
,,,by Oct. 1.
In January of this year the DJJ
awarded Jefferson County a $65,
000 grant for the implementation of
an intervention plan that aims to
keep at-risk youths out of the juve-
nile justice system.
This is offered to youths with no
criminal record, and first offense
misdemeanors.
This program gives law enforce-
ment officers another tool to combat
. juvenile delinquency.
It gives officers the discretion to
!cite youthful offenders, instead of
arresting them, depending on the na-
ture and the severity of the offense.
A teen court will be established

and put into place to hand down
punishment in specific cases.
Upon completion of a court or-
dered assignment the individual will
have no criminal record.
The DJJ will fund the program
for the first year.


The plan calls for the involvement
of Judge Bobby Plains, Sheriff
David Hobbs, Police Chief David
Frisby and School Nurse Gladys
Roann.
In June, DJJ awarded another
$33,000 to the council for the pro-
gram.
The grant monies will allow for
the hiring of a full time individual to
coordinate the program activities
and collect the appropriate data for
establishing and monitoring com-
munity work sites and to coordinate
alternative referrals to intervention
programs.
The staff person will also coordi-
nate the County Teen Court, assur-
ing effective communications
between the programs, the judiciary,
and the local law enforcement agen-
cies.
Special emphasis in that commu-
nication will be placed in keeping
the law enforcement officer, making
the referral to the program, informed


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as to the juvenile's status and pro-
gress.
The full time position will also in-
clude the keeping and maintaining
of records and collecting data re-
quired by the 4Florida Department
of Juvenile Justice.
Judge Plaines has been innovative
in establishing the Teen Court and
has committed to lend his efforts to
assist in a successful implementa-
tion of the Civil Citation program.
The program is expected to get
underway soon, and will be oper-
ated out of the Teen Center near the
old high school on Water Street.


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Association-^p
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andfStroke

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