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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00075
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: September 21, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00075
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


LtDRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GA"


Small Businesses
Create
Most Jobs

Editorial, Page 4


Annual
Farm Bureau
Meeting Planned

Story, Photo, Page 6


Howard Bees
Clobber
Baby Rattlers

Story, Page 10


Wednesday Morning J





Montic.


137TH YEAR NO.75. 50 CENTS


.II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2005


SHERRY HEYEN, center, executive director- money on behalf of the Jefferson Education
of school improvement, accepts a $10,000 Foundation. From left, Watson, Dick Bailar,
check from Lawrence Watson, left, commu- Heyen, David Ward, and Ulmer Miller.
nity relations manager from Progress En- (News Photo)
ergy. The electric company awarded the



Engineer Says County


Bridges in Poor Shape


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Fix Must Be
Pprm qnont* It


Consultant Environmental Engi- I ,I "UKUR.K ..,
neer Frank Darabi is warning comrn- on'tBe
missioners that the county's bridges B
are in dire need of repairs. Chea Per
What's more, because the Depart- C e
ment of Transportation (DOT) is Engineer
documenting the poor condition of
the bridges, it puts the. county in
greater jeopardy, Darabi said. project.
"The bridges are in poor shape," Darabi also informed commission-
Darabi told commissioners recently. ers of a contamination assessment
"You need to come up with the study the Department of Environ-
money to fix them. The DOT in- mental Protection (DEP) is requiring
aspects them, writes up a letter, and it at a county-owned site that previ-
goes in the file. If something hap- ously contained an underground fuel
pens, you are liable." tank.
"This needs to be a priority," Da- He said the total cost of a cleanup,
rabi added. "These bridges have if necessary, would be $400,000, of
.been needing help for a long time." which the county would be required
In other actions, Darabi informed to pay $100,000, and the DEP
commissioners that the drainage would pay the remainder.
problems at the industrial park have "I have put together a laundry list
now been corrected, notwithstand- --of all the things we need to do, and
ing the problems with the the associated costs," Darabi said.
contractor. He advised commission- He said phase one of the contami-
ers to release payment on the nation study, which is due to the


DEP in November, is $18,000. This
preliminary study, Darabi said, will
determine if a cleanup is necessary.
The commission approved the
$18,000 expenditure.
Finally, Darabi informed commis-
sioners of a situation on Blue Lake
Road involving the DEP. It appears
that in trying to correct a flooding
problem on the road, the county ag-
gravated the situation.
"The DEP is concerned that some-
thing needs to be done," Darabi
said. "There's a major flooding is-
sue associated there. My concern is,
where is the water going to go?
You have to study the hydraulics
and the solution will have to be per-
manent."
Darabi said that in its letter to the
county, the DEP indicated that the
effort to remedy the: problem will
have to start from scratch.
He said DEP recommended that
.the county study the drainage fea-
tures of the area and design a solu-
tion that was effective and long
lasting.
"It won't be cheap," Darabi said.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Frustration with the city's han-
dling of overgrown lots, abandoned
houses and other "quality of life" is-
sues is causing Councilman Tom
Vogelgesang to propose that more
drastic measures be adopted to ad-
dress the problem.
Under the current rules, the proce--
dure to get property owners to clean
up their overgrown lots or demolish
abandoned buildings involves a long
and tedious process.
The city first must notify property
owners of the violation by certified
mail. It must then wait an extended
period, among other things, before it
can take action.
Often, the process is hampered by
a shortage of manpower, as City Su-
perintendent Don Anderson will
readily attest.
Vogelgesang wants the city to act
more quickly and forcefully. Among
other things, he wants the city to im-


'I'm Frankly:
Miffed,'

Vogelgesang

pose fines on top of the cost of
cleaning up the property or demol-
ishing the building, if it becomes
necessary for the city to do so.
"I propose that we increase fines
so that people will know we're seri-
ous about overgrown properties and
abandoned houses," Vogelgesang
said.
"I know we don't have a code en-
forcement board, but some streets
are becoming one ways because of
overgrowth and people are hiding in
abandoned houses.
"We need to take some meaning-
ful and enforceable action. I'm talk-
ing about holding property owners
accountable. I'm frankly miffed that
we can't seem to take care of the
problem." I


Anderson's response was that Vo-
gelgesang's proposal was doable,
provided the city beefed up the
Street Department with an addi-
tional five or six employees.
Otherwise, the department could
not perform its other prescribed du-
ties and also handle aesthetic con-
siderations, he said.
But if the council insisted that he
do it, he would do it, Anderson said.
Vogelgesang reacted with evident
exasperation.
"It's not my job to go reporting
these things," he said. "You've got
garbage trucks that drive up and
down the streets. They don't see
things!"
City Attorney Brian Hayes inter-
ceded. He suggested that the way to
address Vogelgesang's concerns
was to amend the existing
ordinance. But the present meeting
was not the time to do so, he said,
referring to the late hour.
The council agreed to take up the
issue again at its October meeting.


$10,000 Donation



Aims To Raise 8th



Grade Math Scores


Goal is To improve

Math Teaching Skills


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

School Board Chair Beverly Sloan
was presented with a $10,000 check
by President Dr. Ulmer Miller of the
Jefferson Education Foundation, se-
cured from Progress Energy, at. the
Sept. 12 School Board meetingn.
Grants Coordinator Dick Bailar
explained that the project involves
K-8th grade teachers participating in
the Annenberg/CPB online course:
S"Mathematics: What's the Big
,Idea?"
Dates of the course have yet to be
'determined.
Participants learn how to teach
students to create their own repre-
sentations of mathematical situa-
tions and to do math in conjunction
with language arts and science.
The course will increase the
teacher's expertise in his/her field,
as well as improve teaching meth-
ods.
Much research has shown that the
students who approach math in this
way develop a deeper and more


*flexible understanding that supports
their ongoing mathematical
learning.
Students learn to describe their
strategiesto their peers and to prove
that their approach is sound.
The "Mathematics: What's the Big
Idea?" course shows, teachers how
to develop effective ways to use the
process standards of: Communica-
tion, Problem Solving, Reasoning
and Proof, Representation, and Con-
nections.,
These process standards comple-
ment the FCAT Sunshine State
Standards.
Teachers willlearn to help their
students better understand mathe-
matics.
In a larger sense, these standards
promote habits of mathematical
thinking that are useful to teachers
and students in any mathematical
context.
During the course, teachers will
also access resources that are avail-
-able free online, through the
Anneneberg/CPB website.
The course will be facilitated by a
consultant with Florida State Uni-


versity, or with the Panhandle Area
Educational Consortium, which
serves small, rural districts by pro-
viding consultants and staff devel-
opment activities.
Teachers who are responsible for
the teaching of mathematics in
grades 4-8 will be given priority to
participate in this course, particu-
larly teachers of students with dis-
abilities.
Second priority will be given to
teachers in K-3.
The success of this project will be
measured/monitored as follows:
*90 percent or more of the partici-
pants will successfully complete the
course as measured by the portfolio
which will include graded home-
work and reflection exercises. of
strategies/methods implemented in
the classroom.
*There will be an increase of 15
percent or more of K-8th grade stu-
dents who score Level 3, and above,
on the -mathematical portion of the
2005-2006 FCAT, as compared to
the 20004-2005 results.
Participants' will share the
strategies/methods taught in the
course with other teachers in weekly
study groups or grade group meet-
ings.


The county has a new Fire Rescue
chief.
He is 47-year-old Jeffrey Cappe,
who assumed his official duties on
Monday.
Cappe was one of eight persons
who applied for the position, which
became available upon the resigna-
tion of former Fire Rescue Chief
Larry Bates.
Commissioners interviewed six of
the eight candidates and rated them
accordingly, with Cappe earning the
-highest score. Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin alone voted against Cappe's
selection.
Sutphin's no vote apparently re-
sulted from a belief that if Cappe
was truly qualified, the latter would
not have gone unemployed for the
last couple of months. Cappe's last
job ended in July, when the grant
funds supporting his position ran
out.
According to his resume, Cappe
has 20. years of experience in the
emergency response industry, 15 of
those managing and supervising
personnel.
Cappe holds an associate degree in
Emergency Medical Service (EMS),
which he earned at Seminole Com-
munity College in Sanford, FL, in
2000. He is also a certified para-
medic and firefighter.
Cappe's most recent employer was
the Tallahassee Fire Department,
where he held an administrative po-
sition. He previously has worked for
(See Fire Chief Page 5)


FIRE RESCUE is now under the direction of a new chief. He
is Jeffrey Cappe, of Tallahassee, who has 20 years of expe-
rience in the emergency response industry. (News Photo)

County Receives $105,750 For

Old JC Public Library Building


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The county has found a buyer for
the former library building on North
Cherry Street.
She is Angela Dombro, of La-
mont. Dombro's offer of $105,750
was the highest of the three bids the
county received last week for the
historic two-story building. The
other two bids were for $78,000 and
$78,813.
Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
said Dombro gave no indication of
what she plans to do with the build-_


ing, which is on the eastern fringe of
the downtown district.
Commissioners' plan is to use the
motleyy from the sale -- in combina-
tion with the $500,000 the county
received from the Legislature -- to
renovate the former high school
buildings on Water Street.
Once renovated, the former high
school buildings will serve as
county offices for such operations as
building inspections, zoning and
planning, and grant writing.
The buildings will also house the
operations of the property appraiser,
tax collector, state attorney and pub-
lic defender, among others.


New Fire

Chief Hired

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Councilman Wants City To


Face Quality Of Life issues


Group To Provide
Humane Education
For Students

Story, Photo, Page 12







PAGE 2. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005


.. Greg Tidwell New

^ Monticello Postmaster


,- H. O' tion to Supervisor of Distribution
SFRAN HUNT Operations and subsequently to


POSTMASTER GREG TIDWELL, right, explains a postal
regulation to clerk Cleo Kelly. (News Photo)


wacissa Man Killed Saturday

in Single Car Crash/Fire


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Joe B. Vinson, 23, of Wacissa,
was killed in a car crash Saturday
morning on State Road 20, near the
intersection of Chittling Road.
Cpl. William E. Harrell of Florida
Highway Patrol, reports Vinson
was driving northbound on State
Road 20 at 3 p.m., Saturday, travel-
ing approximately 60-65 miles per
hour.
He entered a left curve, failing to


navigate the curve and exited the
road way on the east side within the
- intersection of Chittling Road.
The front tires of the vehicle
struck the curb and continued for-
ward and struck a concrete electric
pole with the front end of the vehi-
cle.
The vehicle then rotated clock-
wise striking a wooden fence, com-
ing to a final rest facing west, the
vehicle caught fire and burned.
Whether or not the crash was al-
cohol related and if seat belts were
used, is still under investigation.


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Customer Service Support. All of
his positions were in Tallahassee.
In the Customer Service Support
position, Tidwell was responsible
for all of the hiring and budgeting
for the entire Tallahassee area for
10 years.
He was promoted to Postmaster
land moved to Blountstown, where
he and his family have resided for
the past two years.
When asked how he came to end
up in Monticello, Tidwell re-
sponded, "I live in Killeam and I
have always loved Monticello.
Every time the position of Post
master came open in Monticello, I
put in for it. I began putting in for
the position a long time. ago when


Fire Prevention Expert

Will Speak To Groups


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

October is Fire Prevention Month-I
and the week of Oct. 9-15 is Fire
Prevention Week.
In conjunction with this, Jeffer-
son County Fire Rescue is open for
requests concerning Fire Preven-
tion Education.
Spokesman Don Burton said that
he is available Oct. 1-15 to come
out to schools, community groups,
Boy Scout troops and others in the
community, with the fire truck and
ambulances, and educate the public
on the vehicles, equipment and
other related fire prevention materi-
als.
Burton said that through the Fire
Prevention Program, Fire Rescue
reaches an average of more than
1,000 children per year, and almost
as many adults in community or-
ganizations requesting presenta-
tions.
He added that the program has -


new movies, children's fire hats,
reading materials and other new re-
lated items.
Anyone who wishes to set up a
time and date for a fire prevention
presentation can call Burton at 997-
0182 to schedule the event for their
school or organization.


Staff Writer

New Monticello Postmaster,
Greg Tidwell, brings with him
nearly 19 years experience with the
Postal Service.
Tidwell officially began his du-
ties here Sept. 3, and said he loves
being here and working with the
local people.
Tidwell began working with the
Postal Service in 1987 when he
started as a part-time flexible clerk
in Tallahassee, where he worked
I the night shift running the letter
sorting machine (LSM) for nine
years.
He worked his way through man-
agement beginning with a promo-


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING TO WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED

Date: September 26, 2005
Place: Desmond M. Bishop Administration Bldg.
Time: 6:00 p.m.

SUBJECT: Superintendent Annual Financial
Report and Other School Matters


Tim Braswell was in the position."
He added that every time the po--
sition was awarded, he was always
told that he was the next in line.
"They'll hire a Postmaster for the
position before they will hire a su-
pervisor," Tidwell explained.
When the position here opened
most recently, Tidwell had two
years of experience as Postmaster
in Blountstown, applied and re-
ceived the position.
He said that he fell in love with
Monticello for its historic charm
and architectural beauty of the
homes.
"I ran in cross country, so we
came over here a lot to run against
Jefferson," said Tidwell. "When I
graduated, I always came here to
play softball in festivities like the
Watermelon Festival," he added.
Basically, his duties here are tak-
ing the reigns and being in full
charge of everything in the Post
Office from the front desk to the-
back work area.
"It's different here," he
explained. "I can't work the win-
dow or sort the mail. I love people
and I love to interact with the cus-
tomers. So, I'll probably be spend-
ing a lot of time in the lobby


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meeting the people who come in-
and getting to know them and the
community a little better," he said.
In the past, he has been active in
Rotary, the Chamber of Commerce,
Cub Scouts, baseball coaching and
the like. "I believe in getting in-
volved in the community and I
want to start doing it here," said
Tidwell.
Tidwell has a 17 year old daugh-
ter, Kristina and a seven year old
son, Zack.
He concluded that he is looking
forward to a long an happy career
working as the Monticello Post-
master.


! vi k'1










'Witness For Prosecution'


Continues, A Must See Show


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Audiences are in for a treat, with-
murder, intrigue and courtroom
drama on stage, as the Opera House
Stage Company's "Witness for the
Prosecution," continues 8 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday.
Until the final curtain falls, audi-
ences will remain on the edge of
their seats to learn just who did mur-
der the rich old lady, the action upon
which this play is based.
A dinner is available before the
show at 7 p.m. Call the Opera
House at 997-4242 to make reserva-
tions.
Sophisticated theater goers have
been known to applaud a set, if it is
particularly well done, in theaters
everywhere, when the curtain opens
and before a player sets foot on
stage.
This having been said, the set of
"Witness" deserves a standing ova-
tion, as one of best sets seen here in
recent times.
Kudos to all who helped construct
and design the sleek and striking set.
"Witness" was originally written
by Agatha Christie as a novel, and
later as a play.
Thus this isa play that is demand-
ing for the players on several levels..
On one level, since little action
takes place on stage, the characters


must rely on dialog to tell the story.
This is a difficult task, as plays are
meant to be seen, and when we are
told the story, without seeing the
major action of the plot, the play-
wright relies on the time honored
devices of a messenger or letter to
advance the plot.
In addition, as this play is set in
England, it requires an English ac-
cent.
Directors will agree that plays re-
quiring consistent accents are al-
ways difficult for those not native to
the language of the accent.
Nevertheless, Jack Williams and
Jan Rickey are to be applauded for
casting the play as they did.
Leading lady of the title, Stepha-
nie Funderburke, as Romaine Vole,
is spectacular in every way. She
should receive an Academy Award
nomination.
As a German immigrant, and the
wife of Leonard Vole, she keeps her
German accent, and is clever, dia-
bolical, conniving, carrying all this
off with a toss of her head and con-
tinental aplomb.
Chris Peary, as Leonard Vole,
comes across rather like a ship with-
out a rudder. He seems to drift
through his life, not very concerned
about the direction, is naive, and at
the same time prone to volatile out-
bursts when he feels put upon.
Peary carries the part well.
Duncan Hoehn, as Sir Wilfrid
Roberts, always plays his parts well


and has the versatility to perform
comedy, drama and music, equally
well.
He is the lawyer for the defense,.
and is passionate about the process,
as he is about whatever he does on
stage.
Ron Cichon, as John Hayhew, a
solicitor, displays his skill at
oratory, gained over years as a cler-
gyman, and in other public speaking
situations.
He has several extended scenes of.
dialog with Hoehn, never an easy..
role.
Merry Ann Firsby as Detective In-
spector Roberta Hearne, is a natural.
for the part, having spent years in
law enforcement.
Her performance on the witness
stand certainly speaks of experience,
and her arrest of Vole is executed,
almost before the audience realizes
what happens. She's just that fast.
You do not mess with this lady,, if
you are on the wrong side of the
law!
The second Academy Award
nomination of the evening goes to
Judi Persons, as Janet MacKenzie,
housekeeper of the murder victim.
Persons is hilarious with her very
English outfit she' created herself,
her English accent, and her conduct
on the witness stand. She's right.
and don't tell her otherwise!
Persons is another of the players
in the company whose versatility is
mind boggling, a trait she has often
demonstrated in many productions
here.
Colin Rolfe as Myers, with his
natural English accent, is the lawyer
for the prosecution, and seems quite
at home as the English barrister.
He has a sharp mind and quick
turn of phrase, and has often shown
his versatility in the Stage
Company.
Pat Cichon, as Greta, a secretary,
is the stereotypical Gal Friday. She
knows what has to be done around
the office and what she has to say to
her employer and when to say it,
rather akin to Della Street of Perry
Mason fame.
George Hook, as Justice Wain-'
wright sits on the bench and judges
fairly. When an objection is logical,
he honors it. When he must over-
rule, he does that also.
Jonathan Counts as bailiff, does
what bailiffs do and calls witnesses,
hand over material, swears them in,
but most often remains stern in his
role with a "Don't mess with me at-
titude."
Ilene Steele, as Dr. Wyatt adds
comic relief in her medical descrip-
tion of a blow on, the head, that only
another medically trained person
could understand.
She is accurate, strives to be fair,
but brings a smile to the lips with
her comments now and then.


Marisa Bueschel, as Penny, can
best be described as an attractive
young lady with all the attributes
that contribute to that description.
This is a must see production, and
attendees are guaranteed an evening
that will keep them guessing until
the end.
In no way is "Witness" a Dinner
Mystery Theatre kind of play.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Friends and family came together
recently for a "cleaning party" to
help Joe and Judy Mosso of Pasca-
gula, MS. who were more fortunate
than many but still suffered great
losses from Hurricane Katrina.
The Mosso family evacuated to
the Monticello home of friends Bob-
bie and Fred Golden on Sunday,
Aug. 28 and watched with everyone
as Katrina destroyed their home and
work place on the Gulf Coast.
Joe is a Harbor Captain and moves
ships for the refineries. Most of the
refineries are closed for repairs for
many months to come. Conse-
quently, Joe and his partners have
lost their business, their vessels, and
their employees are out of jobs.
Their home was a half mile from
the coast and while it is still stand-
ing it was flooded. All upholstered
furniture, the 2 cars in the garage
and all their appliances are gone.
They have since been able to go
back to their home area, armed with
two generators but, it will be a long
time before they are able to live in
the house.,
They are living in a travel trailer
in the driveway of their home
brought down to them by a relative
from New York.
They are working daily on their
house and have already stripped the


inside including all the drywall.
They asked the Golden's if they
could store the furniture that could
be salvaged and the Golden's
agreed.
They sent via family members and
-rental truck, all the wood furniture
i.e.., dining room set, bed room and
some other pieces for storage. Much
of which was still covered with
putty colored mud. The furniture
was stored temporarily until it could
be cleaned..
The Golden's needed muscle to
help with the moving of the furni-
ture from the shed to an area where
it could be cleaned and then back
into the shed for storage until it can
be returned to Mississippi.
Bobbie Golden adds that Judy
tried desperately to save photos and
such.
Their grandfather clock had four
feet of mud in it but, it, was salvage-
able and will be kept in the Golden's
house to keep it from the Florida hu-
midity.
Family and friends from all over
the country came in town to help
with the cleaning at the Golden's.
All the stored furniture was taken
out of storage, cleaned, and returned
to storage. Items that were not sal-
vagable were discarded.
The Golden's comment that the
Mosso's are strong people and they
feel very fortunate and they realize
that at least they have! their lives and
things to clean, while many have
nothing left, nothing at all.


4

'. -
; --


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 PAGE 3








"-. 4.. r






.,',
Ott,


iL.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH members pack a
trailer with clothes for delivery to Hurri-
cane Katrina Victims. L-R: Jerry Home, vice-


First Baptist Church

Sends Trailer Of Cloth


For Hurricane

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The congregation of the First Bap--
tist Church is continuing their ef-
forts to assist the Hurricane Katrina
relief effort by sending a horse
trailer full of donated. clothing to
the Salvation Army ,Wednesday
morning, to go to the disaster area
for those in need.
"Anything we can do to help
them helps us feel good," said Pas-
tor Thurman Moore.
Volunteers gathered in the Fel-
lowship hall Monday and Tuesday
nights, removing clothing for the
church's clothing closet, sorting
them by size, gender, children's
sizes and adult sizes, folding the
clothing, boxing it and marking the
individual boxes with the informa-
tion of contents, for transport.
The church, which takes clothing
donations throughout the year and
distributes them free to the corimu-
nity in the spring and fall, will con-
tinue to take clothing donations for


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


Victims
the relief effort at the
Spearheading the c
were congregation
and Anieta Home ai


president of deacons, Anieta Horne, and
Pastor Thurman Moore. (News Photo)

Butch Galloway donated the use of .
his pickup truck and driving to
transport the clothing to the Salva-
tion Army.
es Congregation members donated J
funds for and prepared hot meals "
for 17 evacuee families for two
e church, nights while they were housed in
e chuh. the county. *
clothing project the county.
clothing project "We will continue to do whatever
memersd Jean Willis. we can to help," concluded Moore.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP TO WHICH
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED


Date: September 26, 2005
Place: Desmond M. Bishop Administration Bldg.
Time: Immediately following 6:00 special meeting

SUBJECT: Policies



In Case Of Emergency,


Dial 911


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


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IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

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Evacuees Housed,

Possessions Cleaned







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

9 MEMS, "RON CICHON
ID4 ~Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Small Businesses


Create Most Jobs


The biggest opportunities for job
seekers, these days, may actually lie
with smaller companies.
There are approximately 20 mil-
lion small businesses currently oper-
ating in the United States in
virtually every industry and field
from health care and technology to
accounting/finance, sales and hospi-
tality, according to the U.S. Small
Business Administration.
Small businesses employ half of
all private sector employees and
have generated. 60 to 80 percent of
new jobs annually over the last dec-
ade.
A recent CareerBuilder.com sur-
vey found 42 percent of hiring man-
agers operating in small businesses
still report difficulty in finding
qualified job seekers to fill their.
open positions.
"We talk to small companies all
the time regarding their need for tal-
ented people to move -their business'
forward and make the next big idea
happen," said Jason Lovelace, Vice
President of CareerBuilder.com's
Interactive Sales Group, which fo-
cuses on recruitment solutions for
businesses with 100 employees or
less.
"Smaller companies offer a unique
work environment that allows its


employees to have an active role in
the growth and success of the com-
pany."
According to the survey, small
business employees say there are
distinct advantages to working for
companies with:
Camaraderie/family-like envi-
ronment
Less red tape in corporate hier-
archy
A sense that you are making a
difference
Strong growth potential
More employee recognition
Even with all the advantages, there
still remains a shortage of qualified
job applicants for small business
jobs mainly because of misconcep-
tions regarding the compensation
packages and career advancement
opportunities of smaller companies.
In reality, many small businesses
offer compensation packages that
are competitive 'with their larger,
counterparts, produce considerable
revenue sums and provide employ-
ees with the means to rise through
the ranks quickly in a secure envi-
ronment.
In fact, job satisfaction levels for
employees of small business actu-
ally track above the national average
for all workers.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
September 13,1995,
Commissioners want to meet with
officials of the railroad and the De-
partment of Transportation to dis-
cuss the installation of traffic signals
at various railroad crossings in the
county.
There may be hope for the repair
of the Lake Miccosukee dam, which
collapsed in May.
Recent federal; government
budget cutbacks have hit close to
home for are seniors depending on
the Meals-On-Wheels program dis-
tributed through'the Jefferson Senior
Citizen Center.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
September 11, 1985
Come midnight, September 30,
residents who live outside the city
limits will be without fire protection
unless the County Commission
promises to pay half the projected
cost of operating the Monticello Fire
Department.
Resurfacing of US 90 from the
curb and gutter section on the East
side of Monticello 9.9 miles to the
Madison County, line, began early
Monday morning.
The new director of the Senior
Citizens Center hopes to have the
program moved to a facility closer'
to town.
Billboards placed along major
highways could attract business to
Jefferson County. This concept and
others were discussed during the
September 3 meeting of the Jeffer-
son Economic Development Corpo-
ration.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
September 11, 1975
Fred Naughton of Morrow Insur-


ance Agency has been notified that
he has been chosen to represent All
State Insurance..
The 1976 yearbook staff at Jeffer-
son High elected their coeditors on
September 2nd. They are Gwens
Saffo of Monticello and Jan Fields
of Lamont.
FORTY YEARS AGO
September 10, 1965
Dr: D.R. "Shorty" Davis, agricul-
tural meteorologist assigned to the
North Florida Experimental Station
in Quincy, was guest speaker at the
meeting of the Kiwanis Club last
Wednesday.'
Debbie and Annette Ritter cele-
brated their birthdays with a party
given by their mother, Mrs. Jim Rit-
ter at their home in Nobles Subdivi-
sion on Saturday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Foster Heseltine were
host Saturday evening at dessert
bridge at their home on Lloyd Road.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
September 9, 1955
The Monticello football team was
in the process of rebuilding its
strength. Of 25 who received letters
the previous year, only nine optimis-
tic over his squad were Kenneth
Watson, Jack Bulloch, Fred Wil-
liams, Talmadge Pace, Tom Tindell,
Bill Hughes, Tommy Fountain,
Wesley Boatwright, Sandy Sauls,
Sammy Ward, Douglas Maultsby,
Franklin Hightower, John Bembry;
Orin Hamilton, Malcolm Kinsey,
Dickie Taylor, Harrell Hamilton,
Andy Gillard, Bobby Smith, Bob
Bramblet, James Hagan, Martin
Clayton, Billy Sullivan, Charles Al-
ligood, Lyman Walker, Gene Cook-
sey, Jack Neely, Chuck Markley and
Anthony Spears.


Letters To The Editor Welcomed
Limit Letters to 500 Words Or Less
Sign Your Name and Include Your
Phone Number


Opinion & Comment



Must We Think In Extremes?


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

In 43 years of journalism I have
met my fair share of folks who take
the position, "My mind is made up,
don't confuse me with the facts."
There's probably some comfort
for those folks, 'cause they never
stretch their thinking. It's whenwe
attempt to broaden our horizons and
thinking that we struggle with
issues.
Often those struggles are difficult
and painful as we consider things
we hadn't much thought about be-
fore. and maybe change our minds.
What concerns me is we seem to
be b 6coi"ihg'a 'o'ciety of filks 'who
are no', interested in facts because
ouriiniids are made tip.
Everything is black or white and
there is no gray.
We're a deeply polarized society,
If there is a message in the last few
elections, it is that.
President Bush has been a polariz-
ing figure. Odd that would be the
case when in 2000 he campaigned
as a uniterr not a divider." Turns out
he's a first class divider and our po-
larization reflects that.
His supporters will tell you he's


done a terrific job. The Iraq war is dle ground?


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cic/ion


going extremely well, there was no
delay in federal response Hurricane
Katrina and the mounting federal
debt is quite okay. We just need
m ore a [i ; r: I' h e', c '[]|' V., Ill 'e
fine.
Detractors are just as hard on the
other side. They think his presi-
dency has been a disaster for the
country, the war in Iraq is rapidly
becoming a quagmire, federal re-
sponse to Hurricane Katrina was
wretchedly inept, and the mounting
federal debt is a result of Bush's tax
cutting frenzy and unnecessary war
in Iraq.
I think that pretty well summarizes
the positions.
My question is where is the mid-


* .1
.1.


A


Must we be in one camp or the
other?
And, are we so wedded to a party
or candidate that we can't admit
when a policy is failing or mistakes
Shave been'iimade?'
I appreciate people on the left and
right who are independent thinkers.
Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel, a Re-
publican, recently criticized the ad-
ministrations handling of the war
and said bluntly, "we're losing."
Connecticut's Senator Joe Liber-
man, a Democrat, has been very
supportive of Bush's war effort in
Iraq.
Too bad these independent think-
ers are rare.
So, we're out there hewing the
party line, Bush is good, Bush is


bad, blah, blah.
Much of the blame for this goes to
the Washington spin doctors whose
lines we pick up and use.
So, when criticism was leveled at
the federal government over the Ka-
trina response, the White House
called it the "blame game."
No, said critics, we're talking
about accountability.
Finally, the President said he took
responsibility for the failures of the
federal government's response to
the Gulf Coast disaster.
Good for him. I admire that much
more than I did the White House
spin about "not playing the blame
game."
We went through the same drill
when critics of. the Iraq war
surfaced.
The spin doctors immediately
went on the attack and said critics
were letting the troops down.-

The issues, of course, is not, the
troops, but the management of the
war.
How will we ever get out of this
mess of polarization where we seem
to be in one camp or another?
As long as we are not willing to let
facts speak for themselves, and en-
gage in honest debate we do a great
-disservice to our country.


Property Rights In Jeopardy


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

Put yourself in the homeowner's
shoes. You buy a home for your
family. Perhaps it's even handed
down from your father or grand fa-
ther.
It's a place you can afford in a
neighborhood you like. The children
have made friends. You intend to
stay for the rest of your life.
As you plant your garden, land-
scape the yard, put up a swing set_
for the kids, you mold your land
into a home, unknown to you, cer-
tain city officials are meeting around'
a table with developers.
In front of them are maps, plats
and photographs of your home.
They talk of dollars big dollars.
Tax revenues for the city, huge prof-
its for the developer. A shopping


center with all the trinnmmings begins
to take shape.
You're not asked for'input or per-
mission. You're not even notified
until the whole project is finalized
and the only minor detail is to get
rid of you.
Then the pressure begins. A notice
comes in the mail telling you that
the city intends to take your land.
An. offer of compensation is made,
usually below the market price you
could get if you sold it yourself.
The explanation given is that,
-since the government is going to"
take the land, it's not worth the old
market price. Some neighbors begin
to sell and move away.
With the loss of each one, the
pressure mounts on you to sell. Vis-
its from government agents become
routine. Newspaper articles depict
you as unreasonably holding up
community progress. They call you


greedy.
Finally, the bulldozers move in on
the properties already sold. The
neighborhood becomes unlivable. It
looks like a war zone.
Like being attacked by a conquer-
ing army, you are finally
surrounded, with no place to run;
but the courts. However, you're cer-
tain of victory.
The .United States was built on the
very premise of the protection of
private property rights. How can a
government possibly be allowed to
take anyone's home for private
gain? ,
Under any circumstances this
should be considered criminal be-
havior. It used to be. If city officials
were caught padding their own
pockets or those of their friends it
was considered graft. That's why
RICO laws were created.
Finally, five black robes named


Stevens, Souter, Ginsburg,
Kennedy, and Breyer shock the na-
tion by ruling that officials who
have behaved like Tony Soprano are
in the right and you have to vacate
your property.
These four men and one woman
have ruled that the United States
Constitution is truly meaningless.
Their ruling in the Kelo case de-
clared that, Americans own nothing.
After declaring that all property i's
subject to the whim of a government
official, it's just a short trip to de-
claring that government can now
confiscate anything we own; any-
thing we create; anything we
believe.
Astonishing. The members of the
Supreme Court have nothing to do
but defend the Constitution and
keep it the pure document the

(See Property Rights Page 5)




ts
enforcement or security' officers, a
salesperson with a name tag, an in-
formation booth clerk at a mall, or a
mother with children."
If children are lost outside, they
should never wander away from
where they first became lost.
If that place becomes too danger-
ous because of severe weather or an-
other threatening situation, children
should go to the nearest safe spot
and wait.
They should make noise by yell-
ing, blowing a whistle, or otherwise
attracting attention. This will help
bring someone to their rescue.


"Stranger danger" is a phrase we
hear often, but it is not an effective
safety message for children.
Child advocates point to incidents
where lost children hid from rescu-
ers because they were "strangers" or
willingly walked away with some-
one who didn't fit ..their idea of a
"stranger."
"Teaching your children to watch
out for bad-looking strangers is not
going to keep them safer," said
Nancy A McBride, national safety
director for the National Center for
Missing & Exploited Children
(NCMEC).


Most children find the stranger-
danger message confusing. When
asked, children will often describe a
"stranger" as someone who is ugly
or mean.

They don't think nice-looking or
friendly people are "strangers." If
someone talks to a child or is around
a child more than once, that person
loses his or her "stranger" status.

The child then thinks he or she
"knows" the person.
NCMEC recommends that you
teach your child to check first with a


trusted adult, take a friend along,
and learn how to avoid and get out
of dangerous situations.
Practice "what if' scenarios with
your children. Reinforce these skills
during a trip to the mall or park. Re-
assure your children that you are
there for them, and remind them that
there are other people who can help.
If your children are lost, they may
be surrounded by many "strangers"
who can help them if they ask. "We
need to give children safety nets of
people they can go to if they need
help," said McBride.
"That may include uniformed law


:rom Our Photo File


41 I


IN MARCH, 1990, Grade 3 and 4 students of Johnny Jening, Gretchen Erie and Laurie
Jefferson Elementary School visited resi- Yates. (News File Photo)
dents at Jefferson Nursing Center. L-R;


Give Children Safety Ne












Letters...


Citizen Urges Residents To


Voice Opposition To Rezoning


'Dear Editor:
Nearly 100 people attended the
.Planning Commission meeting on
Sept. 8, 2005.
^ The first major agenda item was a
proposal to amend the Jefferson
iCounty Comprehensive Land Use
1Plan to allow a zoning change to a
larger parcel; of land (acreage cur-
rently disputed) north of Capps.
, The land owners and developers
4had requested that the zoning be
changed from AG-5 to R-1.
' Citizens attending were given an
Opportunity to raise their hand if
they were in favor of this change.
No one raised his/her hand in sup-
port of this recommendation to
change, except one lady who, mo-
,ments later, said she misunderstood,
tand rescinded her vote.
Many citizens and adjoining prop-
terty owners came forward with pres-
entations as to why this change, and
its developmental density, should
not be allowed.
The Planning Commission Chair-
man stated that he believed that the
Comprehensive Plan should only be
changed if a need was clearly dem-


Writers Thank

All Donors To

Katrina Effort
Dear Editor:
We would like to thank all those
who donated food, money, and time
to the victims of Katrina in Missis-
sippi.
Every can of food you handed us
was given directly to someone in
Needd'
We couldn't have done it without
the help of our Pastor Fr. Ernie
.Sylvestre, Jim and Betty Bard,
Harry and Jeanne Brenner.
We are so proud to belong to this
wonderful community.
God Bless you all.
Jim and Nancy Kinniee
St. Margaret Catholic Church


Fire Chief
'Continued From Page 1)
the Gadsden County EMS and the
City of Deltona Fire Rescue, among
other organizations.
In his introductory letter to com-
.missioners, Cappe stated that he
worked his way up the ranks, from a
volunteer firefighter to EMS
"director/division chief.
He is a 1976 graduate of Northeast
High School in Oakland Park, FL,
and currently resides in Tallahassee
with his family.


Now you don't
need one of these
to get your
Federal payment.

Now, even if you don't
qualify for a checking or
savings account, you can
have your Federal payment
automatically deposited
to a low-cost, federally
insured ETAS.

Call 1-888-382-3311 to
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an ETA. Or visit our Web
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Bectronic Transfer Account


onstrated for such a change.
No Planning Commission member
spoke favorably of the proposed
change recommendation.
However, a motion was made and
seconded to recommend that the
change to our Comprehensive Land
Use Plan be approved. The motion
passed with no further discussion.
Planner Brad Mueller had excused
himself from voting, as he has ties
to the property owner.
Planners Wendy Moss, Angela
Gray, Pat Murphy, John Greene,
and John Walker voted in favor of
this motion.
Planners Bill Tellefsen, Bud
Wheeler, and Corbin Padgett voted
against the motion.
This recommendation will now go
before the Jefferson County Board
of County Commission for approval
or denial.
We can only hope that they will
consider the terrible precedent such
a change would represent. Such ur-
ban sprawl will be detrimental to
our county and lifestyle.
Jefferson County is attractive be-
cause of our rural heritage. Proper


growth management is vital to pre-
serve and what makes this county
attractive.
Ample R-1 property is currently
available for development. Unmer-
ited changes will make our. compre-
hensive plan worthless and
impossible to enforce.
Planning Commission members
serve at the pleasure of our elected
County Commission. Their job is
important, serious, and often thank-
less.
They should govern themselves
with integrity and ethics and not
friendship and kinship. Every
County citizen should contact their
County Commissioner and voice
their concern.
Every County Commissioner
should review the happenings of this
meeting and the actions of those
they have appointed to represent



v


- -them on the planning commission.
Five planners should be given an
opportunity to explain why they
voted against the will of the people
with no discussion.
The planners should be held ac-
countable and replaced when neces-
sary. The elected Commissioners
will be held accountable by those
who elected them.
The Jefferson County Comprehen-
sive Land Use Plan currently pro-
vides for an additional 37,500
building lots. This would give the
County approximately 150,000
more residents.
We do not need to approve (or
even recommend) changes in such a
thoughtless manner.
If such a recommendation is ap-
proved there will be little grounds to
deny other requests.
Robin Liford


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 PAGE 5


Property Rights


(Continued From Page 4)
Founding Fathers created to recog-
nize and protect the rights with
which we were born.
They sit in their lofty ivory tower,
never worrying about job security
with their lifetime appointments.
And yet, they have obviously
missed finding a copy of the Feder-
alist Papers, which were written by
many of the Founders to explain to
the American people how they envi-
sioned the new government would
work.

They have missed the collected
writings of James Madison, Thomas
Jefferson, John Adams and George
Washington, just to mention a very
few.
It's obvious because otherwise,
there is simply no way they could
have reached this decision unless


implementing another agenda was
their purpose.
I don't have the benefit of the Jus-
tices' grand staffs or unending sala-
ries. But just a little research has
turned up pretty much everything
Stevens, Souter, Ginsburg,
Kennedy, and Breyer would have
needed to reach a logical conclusion
that protection of private property
rights are the most important rights,
vital to the very foundation of a free
society.
Our Founding Fathers left no
doubt in their writings, their deeds,
or their governing documents as to
where they stood on the vital impor-
tance of private property. John
Locke, the man whom the Founders
-followed as they created this nation
said, "Government has no other end
than the preservation of property."


SEAFOOD
STEAKS

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S69 Riverside Drive St. Marks

i Try our other location at Shell point
SRiverside by the bay coupons good at both.
GOOD FOR 60 DA YS, NOT GOOD ONHOLIDA YS OR FEST ,
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------------------------------


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND USE

CHANGE



AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND
USE MAP; RE-DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 73 ACRES FROM AGRICULTURAL 5 TO
RESIDENTIAL I ON THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Jefferson County Board of County Commission will hold a public'hearing on the proposed comprehensive
.plan land use change ordinance. The land use map change proposed is from Agriculture 5 to Residential 1
for parcel numbers 35-1N-4E-0000-0060-0000 and 02-1S-4E-000(Y-0020-0000. The subject property is
shown on the map below.


The public hearing on the proposed ordinance will be held on October 20, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at the
courtroom of the county courthouse located at the-intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing
may be continued as necessary. Information concerning the proposal may be reviewed at the county
planning office, 277 N. Mulberry St., Monticello, FL 32344. From the Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or
hearing is required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if
a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any
matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for
such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which
recordincludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal' is to be based.
-%%....... .. .....o- -. -..o.o....o


Keeping You Informed In Our Growing Community

Monticello News


YOUR HOME CAN CAUSE TWICE AS MANY GRENHOUSE GASES AS A CAR.
Discover steps you can take to reduce air pollution from your home and car at energystar.gov.
ENERGY STAR`) is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.
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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005


Lifestyle


-JROTC Cadets, Boys,

Girls Club Participate in

Physical Fitness Program


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
rhe Boys and Girls Clubs Physical
Education Program (PEP) and the
Jefferson County High School
JROTC are working together to pro-
mote the importance of exercise and
healthy eating habits.
The JROTC are required to do
physical fitness testing weekly.
This physical component of the
program helps the cadets get pre-
pared for the physical challenge
known as the cadet challenge.
The Cadet Challenge consists of
'cardiovascular endurance and flexi-
bility challenges.
Sgt. Major Dwight Mack along
with Major Gene McKinney and
PEP Coordinator Tequila Hagan


agree that it would be a great idea to
educate the cadets on the impor-
tance of exercise and tracking their
process.
On a weekly basis different health
components are gathered, such as
height, weight, blood pressure, rest-
ing heart rate, and body mass index
analysis.
Therefore each cadet will have the
ability to review his/her progress
and meet the standard physical re-
quirements for the challenge.
"It has truly been.a pleasure work-
ing with this group. The cadets per-
form this challenge with a great deal
of dedication and view this as an
important component of their pro-
gram. I am thrilled to be partners
with such a dedicated group of in-
structors and students," Hagan said.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Boys and Girls Clubs of the
Big Bend began the ongoing promo-
tion of its Physical Education Pro-
gram, and encouraging physical,
activity and healthy eating habits
among the youth and the community
, during the summer.
One of the PEP objectives requires
that each student have a fitness port-
folio.
-In the Fall, the club began collect-
ing and tracking Club members'
cardiovascular endurance, fitness
levels, flexibility, body mass index
analysis, resting blood pressure and
heart rate.
The children are more aware of
the importance of exercise because
they are able to monitor their heart
rates with the Polar Heart Rate
Monitor System.


All three sites collected data on
each active Club members.
The timeline for this process be-
gan during the week of August 15
and ended Sept. 20.
Surveys to measure input on the
SPARK PE New Concept Curricu-
lum was also collected.
For the most part the students
seem to be ecstatic with the games
and the Polar physical challenges.
The post testing portion of this
program will begin the last week of
September and will be concluded by
Nov. 3.
The data collected during these
testing periods will be stored at the
Clubs, in the members file.
Parents are encouraged to stop by
at any site location and review their
children's progress.
For more information on this pro-
gram contact PEP Coordinator Te-
quila Hagan at 519-1200 or
997-3555 x731.


County Farm Bureau

SPlans Annual Meeting
I S


,.,,-= D ill||
S,-e =-- '*^F^lligf Hri
I._: ,.


II


(-. ia.e .._. .p """ m.. .-;aad i gB,5BirJ'' :..
DAN BUCHANAN, district fieldman, Jefferson County Farm
Bureau, serves chicken Pilau, at the Calico Arts and Crafts
Show in Moultrie, GA.

.



':. ..












MERVIN JACKSON, prepares a home cooked meal daily, at
Our Blessings Day Care. (News Photo)


Dinner Dance TO Benefit

Hurricane Relief Fund


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Ebenezer Baptist To

Celebrate 177 Years
Ebenezer Baptist Church will cele- attendees share old stories, memo-
brate its 177th Homecoming, 11 ries and current news.
a.m. Sunday, Oct. 2. Old friends are reunited and new
Sunday School begins at 10 a.m., friends are made. The church in-
and dinner will be served following vites all to celebrate its Homecom-
the service. ing.
Founded in 1828, Ebenezer is one
of the oldest churches in Florida. Main St. W ill
The adjacent cemetery holds gen-
erations of local families, as well as Host St. Party
Confederate soldiers, and veterans
o r Monticello's local and county
of more recent wars. merchants along with "Monticello
It is believed that slaves from the ,tic
Main Street" are hosting,a "Kickin'
antebellum also have a special place Street Party...Your Home Town Get
to any pastors have served .De- Down" beginning at 5 p.m. Friday,

nezer Baptist. Church, but the Sept. 30 at the location of Dogwood
church has called Rev. Andy Creel Street and Cherry Street.
to return as full time senior pastor Merchants will stay open until 9
along with his family. p.m. The purpose of this special
After completing his degree at event is to make local shopping
Southern Seminary in the 1980's, more accessible to citizens.
er wse re fi t sa. The event will feature activities
Ebenezer was Creel's first pastorate. for all ages including: live music by
Creel has served as interim pastor 19 South; Red Cross Donations for
d s a s a m 19 South; Red Cross Donations for
and special speaker at many
churches of various denominations. Hurricane Katrina;, food, beer, and
Nevertheless, he has accepted the wine; a Dress Your Pet Contest;
call to come back to Ebenezer. Carriage Rides and Face Painting;
Homecoming at Ebenezer draws Raffles, and Prizes.
large crowds from near and far, as For additional information call the
-Chamber of Commerce at 997-5552.



0d

GOSPEL SING :

featuring


4 Redeemed From Tifton, Ga. .
September 24, Saturday at 7:00



2 Lamont United 0

J Methodist Church 4
47 4
47 Lamont, Florida
47 Join us for refreshments after the sing 4
433 J3


Music will be provided by En-
core and '19 South, withPW'.Aiety
of selections to suit mos(tpastes.
Tickets can be purchased at Jack-
son's Drug Store, Christine's
beauty Salon, Kelly & Kelly Prop-
erties, or contact the Chamber of
Commerce at 997-5552.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Annual Meeting of the Jeffer-
son County Farm Bureau has been
scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
27, at First Methodist Fellowship
Hall.
The Bureau will provide a deli-
cious grilled pork steak dinner, pre-
pared by Dan Buchanan.
Homemade desserts will be con-
tributed by the members and door
prizes will be drawn.
A yet to be determined representa-
tive of Florida Farm Bureau will
provide an update on statewide Bu-
reau activities.
There will also be a short business
meeting and Election of Officers.
All 674 members of the bureau
have been invited but because of
limited space only the first 322 who
respond can be accepted.
An accurate count of the members
planning to attend is needed by
Sept. 20. RSVP to Zella at
997-2213.
Some of the following events are
fundraisers which will go a long
way in stretching the budget. Volun-
teering ones time with any of these
events is needed and would be
gratefully appreciated.
Members are being asked' to in-
vite friends and neighbors to attend
and join the Farm Bureau.
Among coming events are: the


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Clubs Test Fitness,


Members' Progress


Calico Arts and Crafts Show is Nov.
12 and 13, and in March 2006. This
is where member involvement will
make a big difference.
The county office has operated a
food booth at this event, which is
held twice annually at Spence Field
in Moultrie, GA. for the past several
years.
This event has raised much needed
funds for the county operating
budget. 10-15 county volunteers are
needed per day to operate the booth.
There will be experienced "core"
members to lead the effort and this
is possible if more members will
just pitch in and help.
The income from the past events
convinced the Board of Directors to
continue this effort.
Parking tickets-will be provided for
volunteers, which will save on the
parking fee.
Contact Zella if you are consider-
ing helping at this event.
Farm City Week will be cele-
brated Nov. 17 with a local Break-
fast Meeting. This event is held
annually to promote shared under-
standing between rural and urban
communities.
P idCare a
rFT6% KidCare










St. Margaret Church

Members Make 2 Trips With

Food For Storm Victims
desperately needed.
lDtffIlF SNAPP Bard related the.officials at Hori-
S(;i itetr zon Mission told them that in one
week meals were served to 68,000
St. \i.nI :. cts Catholie Church individuals, and 13,000 boxes of
joined with St. Vincent's in Madi- food were distributed.
s tn to haul a trailer full of dona- Responding to the SOS for dona-
tins of food and supplies to Hurri- tions for the hurricane victims were
eane Katimna victims in the Pasca- more than 50 individuals.
govu, INS .iic., Monday, Sept. 12.
Jim Kinnee and Harry Brenner In addition, Christ Episcopal_
drove the vehicle. Church, Elizabeth Baptist Church,
United Methodists of Madison, Ma-
When the men arrived at the Hori- sons of District 9, Progress Energy,
ron Mission in Pascagoula, they State Farm Insurance, and Tommy
were greeted enthusiastically, and Surles, and Three Sisters Restaurant
asked: "Did you bring food? Can and their supplier, rallied to the
you come back?" cause.
The word was spread around Also, Coldwell Bankers, Kelly-
town with announcements at and Kelly, the local Winn Dixie
churches, Chamber of Commerce, Store, Capital City Bank, John Den-
and elsewhere and this time two ham B&B, Big Dog Rescue, and
tr.nler loads of donations were gath- Sons of Confederate Veterans of
ered, and a return trip to Mississippi Madison and Monticello.
was made two days later, on Coordinating the dual efforts were
Wednesday. Nancy and Jim Kinnnee, Betty and
Jim Bard, and Jean and Harry Bren-
This time Jim Bard, joined Kinney ner.
and Brenner as drivers.
Spokesperson Betty Bard related During the collection period, vol-
that with cash donations, additional unteers manned the collection site at
food was purchased, particularly-St. Margaret's from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.,
ib', food and supplies, which were most days.


'Skillet Lickers' Band

To Play At Trade Fair


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The "Skillet Lickers" a bluegrass
group from Tallahassee will perform
at the 17th Annual Trade Fair to be
held at the Monticello Opera House
3-8 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 22.
The band will play from 5-7 p.m.
-in the garden area behind the Opera
House.
Band members include: Jason
Meadows and Ken Golson, guitar;
Scott Gleaves and local resident Pat
Powell, banjo; Willis Booth, mando-
lin; Dick Gastin, bass; and Kyle
Dunn. cello.
The band plays for community
and civic events and is also avail-
able for booking at private parties.
Contact for the band is Gleaves at
508-2609 in Tallahassee.
To date 29 booth spaces have been
reserved.
A barbecue dinner will be served
5-8 p.m.. Ticket prices are $7.50 for
adults, $4 for children under 12.
The purchase of a dinner ticket
guarantees entry into the drawing
for the door prize, and individual

SHARE Food
Distribution
Saturday
SHARE Pickup and Distribution
Day is scheduled for 9-10:30 a.m. ,
Saturday, at Central Baptist Church
655 Tindell Road, Aucilla.
Registration copy and Volunteer
Service Reports are due upon
pickup of the food packages.
Volunteer Service is anything one
does for someone other than family
that is done for no expected pay-
ment.
Food packages must be picked up
on Saturday as there is no way for
them to be stored or they will be for-
feited and sold to someone else.
Volunteers are always needed to
help with this program.
Cash donation are accepted to help
with the cost of the fuel expense.


vendors will have drawings at their
booths as well.


Diabetes
Classes Set At
Health Dept.

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Health de-
partment will host free diabetes
classes in the coming weeks.
Classes will be conducted 9 to 11
a.m. Saturdabs Oct. 22, 29 a nd
Nov. 5, at the Health Department,
located at 1255 West Washington
Street.
The Oct. 22 class will cover the
topic of "Nutritional Care of Your
Diabetes."
On Oct, 29 class will cover Medi-
cations, blood glucose monitoring,
foot care and complications of dia-
betes.
The Nov. 5 class will feature a
diabetes overview, and cover psy-
chology and exercise.
To register contact the Health
Department at 243-0170. ext. 301.

Coalition To
Hear About
WIC Program

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Members of the community are in-
vited to attend the next Jefferson
County Community Coalition meet-
ing 9:30 11:00 a.m., Friday at the
library on Water Street.
Speaker for this month's program
will be Holly Kirsch)Women Infants
and Children (WIC) Specialist.
This agency will dispel the myths
that WIC is an extension of welfare
benefits. Learn how this program
can help the working class people.
More information and directions
can be retrieved by calling Donna
Hagan at 948-2741.


ST. UGUSTINE

TALLAHASSEE'S PREMIER ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE
S i. 4guai ne4 P2atwa is the only family
owned and operated assisted living residence in
Tallahassee meeting the needs of families for
nearly 10 years.
W ia wde yoa to visit our "home," conveniently
located five minutes from Governor's Square Mall.
eall Iadaa lo a aided lIos.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 PAGE 7
St. Margaret Church To

Begin Inquiry Classes


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
St. Margaret Catholic Church will
offer inquiry classes, titled "Rite of
Christian Initiation for Adults,"
(RICA), 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, be-
ginning Sept. 28, in the parish hall
on US 90 East, behind the church.
The classes will continue until
Holy Week, and are intended for
persons wanting to become Catho-
lics, Catholics returning to the"
church, or for the unchurched who
want to learn about Catholicism.
RICA classes will discuss the ori-


PACKING the trailer at St. Margaret Church for delivery to
Horizon Mission in Mississippi, are Lucy Butler, left and
Nancy Kinnee.

*"i' F;. :' w ,
:- L N-- L. ...


gin of various Christian denomina-
tions and Catholicism, and how they
are connected to the early Church
described in the Acts of the
Apostles.
They church has changed over the
years including the former Latin
Mass, now said in the vernacular.
The meetings are discussions and
efforts to answer questions of the
participants.
There is no pressure for anyone to
become a Catholic.
For more information contact Pas-
tor Ernest Sylvestre, OMI, at the
parish office in Madison, 973-2428.


The drive is set for 1 to 3 p.m.,
Nov. 21 at JCHS.
All blood types are needed, espe-
cially the universal donors, 0+ and
0-, and members of the community
are encouraged to donate blood.

4-H Banquet

Set Saturday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Annual 4-H Awards Banquet
has been scheduled for 5 p.m. Satur-
day, at the Howard Middle School
Cafeteria.
County 4-H members and leaders
will be honored for their participa-
tion and accomplishments in the
2004-2005 year. At the same time,
the new 4-H year will be kicked off.
On the menu is oven fried
chicken, mashed potatoes with
gravy, green beans, garden salad,
buttered rolls, peach cobbler, and
iced tea.
"It should be an exciting evening,
and I am looking forward to seeing
everyone there," remarks John Lilly,
4-H Coordinator.
0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Students at Jefferson County
High School will begin collecting
for their "Christmas For A Child
Project" from Oct. 1 through Dec.
15.


The goal of the project is to raise
donations of children's clothing,
toys, books, jewelry and parental
items for hurricane victims for
Christmas, because due to the re-
cent loss of family homes and in-
comes, children will more than
likely go without this year.
All community members are en-
couraged to donate items for the
children at the school office during
school hours.
In related news, JCHS has coor-
dinated their Blood drive for the
*' victims of Hurricane Katrina with
the Red Cross.


JAMES KINNEE, LEFT and Jim Bard take along lunches do-
nated by Three Sisters Restaurant, on their way to Horizon
Missions. (News Photos)


Research saves lives.^^B^


American Heart
Association Y
Fighting Heart Disea
and Stroke

A Call to Arms:
Check Blood
Pressure.


I' refetson Couon f



* Hurricane Katrina *





Disaster Relief Benefit

Jefferson County Country Club

Friday, September 23, 2005

7:00 p.m. 1:00 a.m.


Ticket Price $20.00

Includes Dinner and Dancing

(21+ Event)


Tickets on Sale at:
Jackson's Drug Store, Christine's Beauty Salon, Kelly & Kelly Realty


or contact Monticello Chamber of Commerce (850) 997-5552




Entertainment Provided by:





Encore & 19 South



All Proceeds Benefit

The American Red Cross

Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund I


JCHS Seeks Donations
For Storm Victims' Gifts







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21 2005
















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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA Finishes 18th

in FSU Invitational


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
girl's Cross Country team partici-
pated in the FSU Invitational last
week, and of 32 competing schools
and 25 full teams of the best run-
ners in the state, the Lady Warriors
finished 18th overall.
For the past two years, the Lady
Warriors had competed as a JV
team in the Invitational. This is the
first year that they participated as a
varsity team.
Going into the invitational,
Coach Dan Nennstiel said he was
looking for the girls to finish in the
top 20-25 places, so coming in at
18 was a good job done, he said.
"I'm very happy with the way
they performed," said Nennstiel.
"This invitational, the girls faced
probably some of the stiffest com-
petition that they'll face all year.
All the state championship runners
were there."
Most of the Lady Warriors greatly -
improved over their times last year.


Olivia Sorensen had 22:03, im-
proving her time by 20 seconds;
Tristan Sorensen finished with
22:25, tying last year's time; and
Sarah Sorensen finished in at
23:34, improving last years time by
a four and a half minutes.
Nicole Mathis finished with
24:06, improving her time by one
minute; Alex Searcy had 24:30, im-
proving her time by nearly one
minute; Michaela Roccanti finished
with 27:10; and Courtney Connell
finished the race with 27:16.
The Lady Warriors competing in
the JV division, also faired well.
Tori Self finished with 29:20;
Nick'i Hammrick finished with
29:36; Elizabeth Riley finished
with 29:53, improving her time by
seven minutes; and Jessica Hagan
32:15.
Rikki Roccanti had a time of
,35:00; Taylor Baez-Pridgeon had
42:00; and Ashley Evans had a
time of 47:01.
The next slated invitational will
be hosted 4 p.m., Sept. 29, at


ACA Girls' Cross Country Team competed the FSU Invitational, last week. Here the
with 32 other schools and 25,full teams in girls begin the meet.


JCHS JV Ladies Win

Three Of Four Matches


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The JV Lady Tigers volleyball
team climbed to a 6-2 season, after
winning three of their last four
matches.
The JV's pulled out victories
over East Gadsden, 25-10, and 25-
15.
Carmen Skipworth and Brooks
both had three digs each.


The Lady Tigers defeated Hainil-
ton for 25-8, and 25-19 wins.
Coach Bill Brumfield said that
Hamilton was undefeated going
into the matches with a 5-0 season,
but the Lady Tigers put a halt to
their winning streak. '"
Maresha Barringtori had one
block and two kills; and Shanise
Brooks had one block and four
kills; and Carissa B'rinson served
up six aces straight.
The Lady Tigers ran out of steam
going in against Tallavana, losing


A drunk driver ruined something
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14-25 and 15-25.
Barrington and Kiarra Powell
each had two digs.
When the Lady Warriors went up
against Maclay, they came out for
the first in the history of the school,
with victories, 25-9 and 25-19.
Natorial Gilley served up 12 aces
in the two games, seven of which
were served straight up.
SBrinon and Bjrrington each had
three dis., and Latoya \\aldrop had
two kills.




ElMe tae


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer '
In their first official game of the,
season, the Monticello Christian
Academy (MCA) boy's flag foot-
ball team fell to Live Oak, 59-22.
Pastor Mike Burke said the
Chargers played a terrible first half,
probably because of a severe case,
of fist game jitters.
At the end of the first half, the
Chargers were outscored 39-0.
In the second half. the Charcer'
came back to outscore Lie .Oak
,22-20.
Burke said that what really hurt
the Chargers was, five turnovers
that resulted in four touchdowns
for Live Oak.
"It seemed like every time that
we got down to the 10 yard line,
we would suffer a turnover," he
added.
Quarterback Ian Morrow had 18
passing attempts with eight com-
pletions for 90 yards and four inter-
ceptions. He also threw one. two
point conversion to Jackson Parrott
and had one 12 yard rush for a
touchdown.
"I think he did extremely well for
never having been a quarterback
before," said Burke.
Running back Phillip Payne had
two rushing touchdown runs, one
for 40 yards and one for 18 yards.
He. also had 26 carries in the game
for a total of 183 yards gained.
Chip Gallon received one two
point conversion pass, Ben Mediate
had eight carries for 44 yards;
Payne received two passes for 27
yards; Mediate received one for 28
yards; Gallon had four catches for
39 yards; and .Parrott had one for
six yards.
Payne had two kickoff returns for
23 yards; Mediate had one kickoff
return for 22 yards; and Jared Bai-
ley, the youngest member of the
team, had two kickoff returns for
36 yards.
Burke said that he felt sure that
the second half of the game gave
the Chargers a lot of their encour-
agement for the upcoming game
against Tabernacle Baptist, In Jack-
sonville, Friday.

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"I expect that they'll play much
better in that. game, after getting
over those first game jitters," con-
cluded Burke.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The .etfferson Co'unty High,
School \arsitr volleyballl dropped
two of their last, four games, mak-
ing for a 5-3 season.
.The Lady Tigers were victorious
over East Gadsden, winning 25-16,
25-17 and 25-11.
Shaumese Massey had four
blocks, three digs and two kills;
Keandra Seabrooks had one block,
two kills and nine digs; Chandra
Tucker had two kills and four digs;
Loren Cox had 11 assists; and Je-
marra Cuyler had three digs.
The Lady Tigers lost the match to
Hamilton. ..---
Coach Bill Brumfield said the
-Lady Tigers led the first two
games, taking a 25-17 and 25-19
victory, then they fell apart, losing
the final three, 19-25, 18-25 and
14-16.
He added that JCHS only needed
two points to take the victory for
the win, but they couldn't pull it
off.
Massey had three blocks, four
aces, and two kills; Seabrooks had
eight digs, two kills and eight aces;
Tucker had five digs and one kill
and; Cox had ten assists. '
The Lady Tigers came out with
the victory over Tallavana, winning
the first two matches, 25-17 and
25-19, losing the third match, 19-


The ACA varsity Warriors lost
to Cottonadale 29-6, last week,
making their season 0-3.
Coach Dave Roberts attributed
the loss to lack of proper execution,
three fumbles and one interception
for the Warriors.
"The mistakes are still stinging us
a bit," he said.
Casey Gunnels was named the
offensive player of the week and
Jason Holton was named the defen-
sive player of the week.
Gunnels ran for 80 yards, and the
first touchdown pass for the Warri-
ors was a 40 yard pass from quar-
terback Stewart Williams to
Gunnels.
The two-point conversion failed.
The second Warriors touchdown
attempt was a flare pass for 60
yards from Williams to Gunnels.
The ball ran all the way down to
the one yard line, Uut the Warriors


25, and taking the fourth for the
win, 25-19.
JCHS lost against Maclay, one of
the top 10 teams in the state, 5-15,

Seabrooks had three blocks, 11
digs and one kill; Tucker had one
block and nine digs; Cuyler had
seven aces; and Jazmaun Hall had
six dies and one kill.

Stats For

JCHS Versus

Florida Game
The game statistics from the
JCHS vs. Florida High Game,
which the Tiger lost 48-8, have be-, ..
lately come in.
Offensively, Mario Rivers had
two five yard rushes, one six yard
.rush, one 16 yard rush, a two yard
rush, a 60 yard run and a one point
conversion.
Chris Branham had one rush for
six yards; and Lucious Wade had
one rush for six yards.
Jonathan Day had one 30 yard
kick off return, a 50 yard kickoff
return. and a 40 yard run.
Defensively, Breon Parker had
three tackles; and Tremaine Parker,
Anthony McDaniel, Timothy Cru-
mity, and William Wade each had
one tackle; and Demetrius Hicks
had one fumble recovery.
Statistics are being kept by Wil-
lie Cuyler.


were unable to score.
Colby Waddail kicked the 20
yard field goal; Holton had five
tackles; and Ben Grantham, four
tackles.
Daniel Greene ran for 38 yards;
Stewart completed four of nine
passing attempts for a total of 112
yards; and Kyle Peters had two
pass receptions for a total of 28
yards.
The Warriors will face Panama
City Christian, 7:30 p.m., Friday,
there.
Roberts said that he expected the
Warriors to do very well in the
game, coming out with the win.
"We're bigger and faster than
they are," said Roberts.
"This week we're going to be
working a little more on execution
and tackling, so we should do
pretty good," he concluded.


Live Oak Beats ,
MCA In Recent
Volleyball Play '

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In their first official game of the
season, the Monticello Christian.
Academy girl's volleyball team lost
all three matches to Live Oak,
25-7, 25-8 and 25-18.
Pastor Mike Burke said that %
though the girl's had a rough time,;
they had fun and defiantly im-
proved their match scores as they
played more.
Katlyn Burke had four kills, one ?
ace and one blocked shot; Loren,.
Lesperance had two aces and two*
assists; Sarah Parrott had four aces
and one assist; Rachel Ward had,
one ace; and Lindsey Matthews had
one kill, one ace and two assists.
"The girls learned a lot and they* -
definitely improved their playing,"
said Burke.
The Lady Chargers will travel to
Jacksonville to play against Taber-
nacle Baptist Academy, Sept. 23. .,
Burke said that he thought Taber-
nacle would be a tough team.
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Lady Tigers Drop TWO

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A ^Ih 114 0'









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005

HMS Bees Clobber

FAMU Baby Rattlers


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

HMS Bees clobbered FAMU
Baby Rattlers 48-8, Thursday.
Coach Willie Saffo referred to
the game as a middle school foot-
ball classic.
"If you are missing HMS foot-
ball, you are missing a treat," said
Saffo. "Offensively and defen-
sively, my guys played a very good
game."
"This is the kind of production
we must have during the remaining
part of the season to continue our
winning ways," added Saffo.
"This is team effort. We stressed
execution, no turnovers, good
blocking, and we were able to ac-
complish those goals in this game,"
said Saffo.
"High praise goes out to both the
offensive and defensive units," said
Saffo. "I commend my entire
squad once again.


He added that all of the Bees got
a chance to play which is a big part
of what HMS is trying to do.
Offensively, quarterback Mar-
quice Dobson, running back and
wide receiver DeVondrick Nealy,
wide receiver Shaquan Plunket and
fullback Keyron Bellamy, each
scored during the game.
"This was an awesome display of
scoring power," said Saffo. "With
continued execution, determination
and good blocking, we have the
power to score at will on
opponents."
He added that the Bees had well
over 400 yards total offensively.
Defensively, led by the intercep-
tion of Breshaun Parker, the de-
fense stepped up to the challenge of
shutting the opponent down. "I am
extremely proud of the offensive
and defensive units," Saffo reiter-
ated;
The Bees face Riverspings Middle
5 p.m., Thursday at Wakulla Sta-
dium.
N"-> .
.


~2
''a.


LT f


r- ....^


-TIGER ball carrier Clarence Fead is tackled in this practice
session by Demetrius Hicks. (News Photo)


Dixie County cages

Varsity Tigers 44-7


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

,' Dixie County caged the' varisy
*Tigers 44-7, Friday. :"
Head Coach Harry Jacobs named
lpemetrius Hicks as the' offensive
lilayer of the week and Dondre Ty-
* sort as the defensive player of the
yeek.
JCHS statistician Josh Moore
said that Dixie came out hard and
strong, scoring 16 points in the first
..quarter, 14 points in the second and
seven points in both the third and
fourth quarters.
The Tigers Were unable to score
-intil Telvin Norton rushed for a 21
yard touchdown in the third


quarter.
In passing, Norton passed for a
total of 105 yards and Lucious
Wade had 11 rushing yards.
DefensiTel), Dondre Tyson, had
10 tackles and one sack, Robert
Nealy six tackles and Desrick Jones
had five tackles.
In receiving, Jones had one re-
ception for five yards and one carry
for seven yards, and Mario Rivers
had one reception for 65 yards in
the final seconds of the game.
As a quarterback, Rivers passed
for a total of seven yards, and had
three completions of seven passing
attempts with two interceptions.
The Tigers now stand at an 0-3
season. They are slated to face-
Trenton, 7:30 p.m., Friday, there .


MOOD SWING tennis players Maxie Miller, left and Angie
DelVecchio pose for the camera.

Mood Swings 5th Of 16.

A-League Tennis Teams


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The "Monticello Mood Swings,"
ladies A-Legauge tennis team, took
three of six matches last week
against the "Swinging Volleys".
As of last week, the ladies stood
in fifth position of the 16 A-league
teams.
Team #1, Katie. Brock and Sub-.
stitute, player Robbyn Whitlock,
won the first match, 6-1, lost the
second, 6-7 and came back to take
the third, 10-6.
- Team #2, Patty Hardy and Cindy
Wainright, lost two hard fought


WE TAKE THE
D'NTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


matches, 7-6 and 7-6.
Team #3, Lorei Salie and Susan
Goodwin, lost their first set, 1-6,
won the second, 6-2 and took a
hard 1-10 loss in the tiebreaker.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff and
Angie Delvecchio, lost the first set,
406 and lost the second, 3-6.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor and
Trisha Wirick, lost the first set, 4-6,
won their second, 6-2 and won the
tie breaker, 10-7.
Team #6, Maxi Miller and Jenni-
fer Ellis won their first set, 7-6 and
took the second set, 7-5.
The ladies will square off against
the Capital City Deuces 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday at Tom Brown Park.


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LEGALS


Notice of. auction to the highest bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been seized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit
A-2 Reginald Dean household goods;
Auction Date: September 24, 2005 at 10:00
AM at Register's Mini Storage, 315 Wau-
keenah Hwy, Monticello, Florida.
9/16, 21, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:P5-232-CA IN RE: The Mar-
riage of REGINA A. BUTLER, Wife/Peti-
tioner, and JERRY W. BUTLER,
Husband/Respondent. AFFIDAVIT FOR
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE OF PROC-
ESS STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF
JEFFERSON BEFORE ME, the under-
signed authority, personally appeared
REGINA A. BUTLER, who after being
duly sworn and cautioned, deposes and
says: 1. That diligent search and inquiry
Shave been made to discover the residence
address of the Respondent and the same is
set forth herein. 2. That the residence
address of the Respondent is unknown.
FURTHER AFFIANT SAYETH NOT.
REGINA A. BUTLER. SWORN TO AND
SUBSCRIBED before me this 14th day of
September, 2005.
9/21, 9/28, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE Jefferson
County Board of County Commission will
have a public hearing on the following
proposed land development code change
on October 20, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County court-
house located at the intersection of U.S.
Highways 90 and 19. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ORDI-
NANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA,
REPEALING AND AMENDING THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY LAND DEVEL-
OPMENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; REPEALING ARTICLE- 1,
GENERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 3,
CONCURRENCY, ARTICLE 4
RESOURCE PROTECTION, ARTICLE
5, DEVELOPMENT DESIGN, ARTICLE
7, HARDSHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8,
BOARDS AND AGENCIES, AND ARTI-
CLE 9, ADMINISTRATION AND


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


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LEGALS
ENFORCEMENT, OF THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE; ADOPTING ARTICLE 1, GEN-
ERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 3, CON-
CURRENCY, ARTICLE 4,. RESOURCE
PROTECTION, ARTICLE 5, DEVELOP-
MENT DESIGN, ARTICLE 7, HARD-
SHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8, BOARDS
AND AGENCIES, AND ARTICLE 9,
ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCE-
MENT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIL-
ITY; PROVIDING A REPEALING
CLAUSE; PROVIDING FOR INCORPO-
RATION INTO THE LAND DEVELOP-
MENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE; AND PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such' meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings,'and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. Prior to the meeting
interested persons may contact the Jeffer-
son County Planning and Building Depart-
ment at 850-342-0223 or write the
Department at P.O. Box 1069, Monticello,
FL 32345 and provide comments. The pro-
posal may be reviewed during' business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
9/21, c
The City Council of the City of Monticello
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2005-10 AN ORDINANCE
OF THE CITY OF, MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA REQUIRING USERS OF
CITY WATER OR SEWER SERVICE
OUTSIDE THE CITY TO ANNEX INTO
THE CITY IN THE EVENT THE PROP-
ERTY BECOMES CONTIGUOUS; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE. The entire text of the ordinance
may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mul-
berry Street, Monticello, Florida between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday. Public hearing on the
ordinance will be held on Tuesday Octo-
ber 4, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City
Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Sieec. Interested
persons mai appear at (he meeting and be
heard with respect 1o the proposed ordi-
nance.
9/21, c
The City Council of the City of Monticello.
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2005-11 AN ORDINANCE
OF, THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, -AMENDING ARTICLE II,
SECTION 21-21 OF THE CODE 'OF
ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MON-
TICELLO, FLORIDA TO REFLECT
INCREASED MONTHLY SEWER SYS-
'TEM SERVICE RATES, AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The
entire text of the ordinance may be
inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Public hearing on the
ordinance will be held on Tuesday, Octo-
ber 4, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City
Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed ordi-
nance.
9/21, c
The City Council of the City of Monticello
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2005-08 AN ORDINANCE
REZONING PROPERTY LOCATED ON
GOLDBURG ROAD COMPRISING 26
ACRES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLOR-
IDA, FROM AGRICULTURE AND R-1A
TO R-l, RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE FAM-
ILY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. The entire text of the
ordinance may be inspected at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Flor-
ida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Public
hearing on the ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, October 4, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at
Monticello City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry
Street. Interested persons may appear at
the meeting and be heard with respect to
the proposed ordinance.
9/21, c


NOTICE The Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners and the Jefferson
County Planning Commission will hold a
Workshop at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, Sep-
tember 22, 2005, at 'the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, Monticello, Flor-
ida, to discuss procedures and advertise-
ments. Felix "Skeet" Joyner, Chairman.
9/2.,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that D.C.
Merritt the holder of the following certifi-
cates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
478 Year of Issuance 1998 Description or
Property: Exhibit A One (1) acre of land,
more or less, and being more particularly
described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at
the Northwest Corner of that certain prop-
erty deeded to John Hundley and .Lizzie
Hundley,. husband and wife, by Ben Ed-
wards, Jr., and Minnie Edwards, his wife,
by deed dated the 14th day of February,
1953 and of record in the office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida, in Deed Book "000" page
420 and to which references is hereby
made. From said point of beginning run-


LEGALS

ning thence East for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, thence running South for a
distance of 210 feet, more or less, thence
running South for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, thence running West for a
distance of 2.10 feet, more or less, thence
running North for a distance of 210 feet,
more or less, and to the point of beginning
of the land hereby conveyed. Said prop-
erty being in the Southeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of Section 21, Town-
ship I North, Range 5 East. This is the
same land conveyed to John Hundley, Jr.,
by Willie Lane joined by his wife, Mattie
B. Lane, and of record in O.R. Book 71,
page 460, Public Records of Jefferson
County, Florida, and to which references
is hereby expressly directed. Name in
which assessed Angelou Hundley. All of
said property being in the County of Jef-
ferson, Sate of Florida. Unless such certifi-
cate or certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in
such certificate or certificates will be sold
to the highest bidder at the court house
door on the 27th day of October, 2005, At
11:00 a.m. Dated. this 14th day of Septem-
ber 2005, Clerk of Circuit Court of Jeffer-
son County, Florida.
9/21, 28, 10/5, 12, c
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assessment process, direct. care for
geriatric patients, supervision in a
long term care setting. These, skills
will make you a better developed
professional and more desirable to
employers. Contact Pine Lake
Nursing Home, 13455 W US Highway
90 in Greenville, 948-4601. Or e-mail

adminpinelakenursinghome@earthlin
k.net
9/21, c
CNA's Pine Lake Nursing .Home is.
accepting applications for CNA's on
all shifts. Desired qualifications are
compassion, energy, loyalty and the
ability to work with all members of
our team. IF THIS IS YOU, apply at
13455 W US Highway 90 Greenville,
telephone 948-4601.
9/21, c
Jefferson County Youth Council has
two (2) positions available as Student
Advocates. Positions are part-time, 20
hrs weekly, with salary range of
$10.00--$12.50 per hour. Individuals
must have. experience in
counseling/behavioral skills, excellent
computer skills, the ability to work
with divers ethnic groups, ability to
work very flexible hours with
students, parents, school and
community partners. Individuals
must have excellent oral and written
communication skills. All applicants
must clear all background screening
requirements. Interested individuals
must submit a resume by September
28, 2005 to: Jefferson County Teen
Center, P.O. Box 346, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
9/21, 23, c
Carpenter Help Needed must be
experiences, dependable, and have
transportation and tools. If you have
these qualities please give us a call at
997-3271..
9/21, 23, 28,30, pd


A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: SECRETARY
#2173 high school diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/office clerical experience,
typing score of at least 35 CWPM.
Starting Salary: $6.43 Shift:
8am-5pm/ Monday through Friday.
For more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheechenter.org.
(850)523-3217 or 1(800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J Capital
Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL. Pre-hire
drug screen & FDLE background
check an equal
opportunity/affirmative action.
employer. Drug-Free workplace.
9/21, c
Horse farm help wanted. 15
hours/week in exchange for living
accommodations. References & farm
experience required. No smoking.
342-9909.
9/16, 21, 23, 28, pd
Waitress/cashier part-time. Apply in
person to Court Yard Cafe, 110 East
Dogwood Street.
9/14, tfn, c
Methodist Church Little, Angels
Preschool has opening for afternoon
and substitute, teachers. Applicants
must be Christian and have required
child care courses. Please call Connie
at 997-6400.
9/14, 16, 21, 23, c ,


HELP WANTED
Director of music ministries PT
position available. First United
Methodist of Monticello. Applicants
must have experience .in choral
direction. Responsibilities include
directing and rehearsing the Chancel
Choir for the 11 a.m. Sunday service.
Participation in other services as
appropriate. Fax to 850-997-6121 or
send to FUMC of Monticello 324 W.
Walnut' St. Monticello, Florida,
ATTN: Dean Jerger.
9/14, 16, 21, 23, c
Delta Land Surveyors, Inc. Is looking
for Instrument Man and Rodman for
full time positions. Experience a plus,
but not necessary, we are willing to
train. Apply in person at 440 South
Jefferson St., Monticello, FL.
(850)997-0301.
9/7, tfn
Wanted experienced roofers or
laborers pay by the hour 'or square
individuals or sub crews good roofers
earn $700.00 to $1,000.00. Laborers
start $9.00/hour. Call Gene at
562-8366 or 251-7459.
8/19, tfn, c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route, sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & 'tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
8/10, tfn, c

FOR RENT
Overlook the take from your private
deck. 1900 sq. ft. 3 bdrm, 2 bath
home. $750 per month. Call HB at
544-2240.
9/14, 16, 21, 23, pd
3bdrm, 1 V2 b w/office, garage, nice
house, 'in town. Fenced back yard'
w/nice size shed., $700 per "month-."
933-816".
7/13, tfn, c
FOR SALE


'93 Ford Aerostar, 6 cyl., good
condition, excellent gas mileage, $950.
OBO. Hunter green recliner, excellent
condition, like new never used, $300.
OBO. 997-1488.
9/21, 23, pd


Riding Mower, MTD 16hp
great condition $500.00
997-8224.
9/21, 23, pd


46in cut
Don at


FOUND
3 V2 yr. Old blue female shepherd/lab
mix at Chicken Delite. Very sweet,
housebroken, micro chipped to
Tammy Jackson of Grand Rapids,
S.D. wearing collar. Call 545-6533.
9/21. 23, nc


SERVICES
Kelly's cleaning service. Residential
and commercial. Large or small. "The
Personal Service Touch" to the
professional job you need in your
home or business. Call 694-8558.
9/16, 21, 23, 28, 30, 10/5, pd
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordoriii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn


Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn


W HHousing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~-3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

...... ......... 5 7 5 -6 5 71 l. j










108 Grand St. S.W., GreenvilleFL
Saturday -:- October 1 -:- 10:00 a.m.
Grand Old Brick Building Erected in 1899 Restored 1997 4,500t SF Two Story
50 Year Collection of Antiques and. Primitives
A Collectors and Traders Dream Many Unique Well Preserved Items


FURNITURE
Chifforobes
Pie Safes
Hoosier Cabinet
Washstand
Antique Dining Tables & Chairs
Drop-leaf Tables
Fireplace Mantels
Iron Beds
ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVE FARM IMPLEMENTS
Plows, Planters, Thrashers, Corn Grinders
100's Primitive Hand Tools
Numerous Cross Cut Saws
Grinding Wheels
Syrup Kettles & Cane Mills
Wash Pots
Horse Drawn Wagons
Wagon Wheels
ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVE KITCHEN & COOKWARE
Sausage & Coffee Grinders
Stoneware
Antique Wood Stove
ROWELL REALTY &
l 800-323-8388
7 l0/ RBu,,yr's Pmrmiuur


Hand Crock Churn
Griswold Ironware
Daisy Butter Churns
MISC. ANTIQUE & PRIMITIVES
Rocking Horse
Western Flyer Wagon & Tractor
Bells
Coca Cola Ice Chests & Signs
Railroad Jack & Lanterns
Buggy Light
Arrowhead Collection
Prints
Singer Foot Pedal Sewing Machines
Clocks & Violin
TRACTORS
801 Ford
Johi Deere 40
Farmall F-20
COIN COLLECTION
MISCELLANEOUS
Comic Books, Albums, Baseball Cards
ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO LIST!


AUCTION Co., INC.


AU 479 AB 296


www.row I a u, tion .com


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215N.Jeferion St.
Dow, itovtun t.lortkellom
(B5P)-997-S516 ww.cbkk.cum


-LadtinfiiffersonaCoiy-
* 6 Acres-hunting or a nice getaway, south
of Aucilla. $24,900
* Building Lots- rare find in the City,
just over a half acre. SS0,000
* 6.99 Acres of Open Field Some
Restrictions, site built homes.$83,880
* 9.25 Wooded Acres- Western Jefferson
Co. many excellent homesites S138,750
* Lake Miccosukee Waterfront Wooded
property with Creek 16.50 Ac. off of Hwy
90 in Tallahassee $288,750

.Many Other Troperties .9vailabie


A KfThntin A


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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Government Farms Road 5 or 10 acres
buyers choice hillside planted pines
$15,000/acre
Raise Your Family in the Country


Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on
five acres with guest cottage/playhouse,
big shop, pasture, pecans and a pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000
Brand New Listinq! 3 bedroom home in
town at East Anderson St..$155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy
Road in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding
acres with a beautiful view, lovely home site
in'a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-,
field meant for galloping $150,000
., Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bedrooms
2 baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile and hard-
wood floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace and


a screened porch, 1 acre Now only
$135,000
Horse-Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, cor-
ner of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted.pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50'acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Don't Miss this One-Under Contract
Big 1999 3 bedroom 2 bath double wide with
a bathroom that won't quit on a high hill with
a view in Aucilla Forest and Meadows only
$55,000
Check Out This One! 8 acres with big
doublewide and small house on a pretty old
hillside close to Leon County off Julia Road
$160,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000
Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside, county road $75,000
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
SOLD Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2
bath double wide with new galvanized alumi-
num roof and vinyl siding, 3 sheds, fish pond,
fenced on 2.4 acres only $86,500



Realtor Tim Peary


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850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for
acreage between Monticello and Lloyd
can you help?
SRealtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Simply the Best


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., SEPTEMBER 21, 2005

Group Provides Students


With Humane Education


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The co-founders of Citizens Sup-
porting Animal Welfare (C-SAW,)
Wendy G. Moss and Betsy J.
Pertierra, recently met with Sandra
Kay Collins, principal of Jefferson
County Elementary School to dis-
cuss a humane education program.
C-SAW currently sponsors the
KIND News Program for grades
three through five at the elementary
school.
This classroom newspaper with a
focus on character education is
published by the Humane Society of
the United States.
C-SAW hopes to expand the Hu-
mane Education Program in area
classrooms and organizations to in-
fluence children and adults towards
more responsible and compassionate
attitudes.
Future plans include presentations
to classrooms and local organiza-
tions to encourage proactive respon-
sibility towards animal welfare in
the community.
C-SAW is a non-profit 501-c-3 or-
ganization based in Jefferson-
County.


Executive Director Moss said the
goal of C-SAW is to improve the
quality of life in our community by
balancing the rights of citizens with
those of the animal population.
C-SAW Chairman Pertierra said,
"Humane education will teach our
youngest citizens the value of treat-
ing people and animals with kind-
ness and respect. Humane Education
is much more than teaching children
about animals. It is a process in
which children develop compassion,
a sense of justice, and a respect for
all living creatures.
Studies have shown that individu-
als who have abused animals as
youths were more than five times
more likely to commit violent
crimes, four times more likely to
commit property crimes, and three
times more likely to have drug or
disorderly conduct offenses than
non-abusers.
A child who admits to abusing
animals or who indicates that animal
abuse is taking place in the home
should be regarded as a possible vic-
tim of child abuse.
Humane Education can be used by
teachers as a tool to recognize chil-
dren who are at risk for abuse in the
home."


Home Decor, Gift Sl


Opens On Dogwooc


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

PaJenCo's LLC Unique Home
Decor & Gifts, opened Saturday,
on Dogwood Street, inside Jack-
son's Drugs building.
The name of the shop was derived
from the first names of the owner,
Patricia Whiteside, her daughter,
Manager Jennifer Blackburn, and
Patricia's granddaughter, Supporter
Courtney Whiteside.
Many homemade items are
available, including: jewelry, signs,
quilts, homemade hutches, and
fountains crafted of wood inter-
twined with vines and flowers, old
fashioned dolls, a bird house canis-
ter set, wind chimes, wall tiles, sea-
sonal items, po'D-urri. and
weathered iron table and chairs. -
"When we decided to start our re-
tail business, Monticello was the
ideal location," said Patricia. "The
friendliness and cooperatives of the
people of Monticello made it our
only choice.


'C


~* V ~
~11.

,~6 )


"We are looking forward to join-
ing the Monticello business family
and our mission is to present
unique, affordable, stylish, electric
home and yard items, and gifts with
a personal flare," said Pat. "
We are also interested in working
with others to promote Monticello's
business community.
She said the shop will- offer
weathered iron, nostalgic design,
antiques, urban and shabby chic,
Americana, classic and shabby cot-
tage, collectibles, seasonal items,
candles, shutters, mirrors, doors,
windows, lighting, quilts pillows,
candles and more," said Pat. "All
the accessories that will complete a
personal home setting and provide
a unique shopping experience for
our customers.
She added that they hope top sup-
port Monticello businesses through
a large bulletin board displaying in-
formation about the business com-
munity.
"We are inviting each ot you ,LU
post your business information on
this bulletin board," she added.
"We are looking forward to getting












4L 4


PaJENCO'S LLC Gift Shop owner, Patricia Whiteside, left,
Manager Jennifer Blackburn, and Supporter Courtney
Whiteside pose with Billy Bob, handcrafted copper rooster.
(News Photo)


KIND News teaches basic princi-
ples of right and wrong and focuses
on pet care and environmental con-
servation.
Humane Education applies to rela-
tionships with people as well as ani-
mals, and helps shape responsible
citizens, one of the most far, reach-
ing ways of solving animal related
problems in our community.
Moss and Pertierra formed C-
SAW to provide services needed in
our community.
"Providing KIND News for our
school children is just the first step,"
said Pertierra." Through the Adopt-
A-Classroom Program we hope to
find sponsors in the community to
continue to supply KIND News to
the students and increase the num-
ber of classrooms which will receive
subscriptions."
Moss explained, "Individuals,
-civic groups, and small businesses
can sponsor a classroom for $30 for
9-monthly issues and a resource
book for the class teacher. Certifi-
cates are sent to the class sponsors
and their classrooms."
Anyone who wants more informa-
tion about KIND News or wishes to
sponsor a classroom may contact C-
SAW at 342-3422 or. e-mail
betsyp@thomasmarketing.com


hop


, Street
acquainted with everyone and we-
see the establishment of our shop
as an opportunity to collaborate
with the established businesses in
Monticello."
The shop is open Monday
through Friday from 10 a.m. until 6
p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. un-
til 5 p.m. I
A Grand Opening is planned in
the near future.


Personal
Auto
Home
Mobile Homes
Flood
Watercraft


Darlene J. O'Brien
Agent


N o:'. .-st.,.: 3'.**-i /* 'l.. -- a '. ..".. ... ." n ,: -
MEETING TO discuss Humane Education Wendy Moss and Betsy Pertierra. From left,
Program at JES, are C-SAW Co-Founders Moss, Sandra Collins, principal, Pertierra.


Commercial
General Liability
Workers Comp.
Business Owners
Package Policies
Professional Liability


Kimberly Day Spivey
ACSR


LIMITED TIME
OFFER [


QFEF DEALER
FOR DrETA1L-Q


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
40 1 r m INCLUDES:
Normal Installation J
931U5.00 6 Months Free Tank Rental ]
50 Gallons of Gas
UL L

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba


_" 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
7., Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553 ,
Alfonza "Al" Hall ~ William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$Scount!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets



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WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN
10877-4550 1 Borde
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MAHAN



DREAMS COME TRUE
With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
"My kids" have
big dreams, too.
Help us cure
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Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
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Manager-Fast Food.

Seeking highly motivated and
enthusiastic manager to operate
Arby's in Monticello.

Competitive Salary, Bonus,
Paid Holidays & Vacation.

Call Gerry at

352/494-7552


Now Open In Monticello



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