<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00067
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: August 24, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00067
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


,-', r072 OF',CRIDA HISTORY
'~ ALIJARYWEST
r7 7T.'IUCF Fl ORIDA


Wednesday Morning





Montic

137TH YEAR NO.67, 50 CENTS M Ptt


ello N
ed Wednesday & Fridays


ews
,WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


Revised Code




Finally Passes


Work Has Been Nearly

5 Years In The Making


COMMISSIONER JERRY SUTPHIN, left, Bob Arredondo following Tuesday's
talks with, from left, Planning Commission meeting. Land-use issues took up a great
Attorney Scott Shirley and Planning Official part of the meeting. (News Photo)


Land-Use Issues Roil


Com mission Meet Ing


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The issue of the two Comprehen-
sive Plan amendments that planners
recently had to reschedule because
of a procedural error took up com-
missioners' time on Thursday eve-
ning.
The error involved the failure of
the representative of two proposed
rezoning changes to notif\ adjoining
property owners of the public hear-
ing. The error supposedly occurred
because the property appraiser's of-
fice failed to provide a correct mail-,
ing list.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin on
Thursday wanted it made perfectly
clear that the developers shouldn't
have been made to wait because of
the alleged error of an incorrect
mail-out list.
In researching the matter, Sutphin.
said, the Attorney General's office
had informed him that once the,
p roperty appraiser certified a list,
the applicant had met the statutory
requirement.
"If an individual has been left off'
the list, that individual's problem is
with the property appraiser," Sut-
phin said.
Count Attomen Buck Bird ex-,
plained that the problem arose be-
cause the property appraiser
certified the listeach Jan. 1. Conse-.
quently,. indi\ iduals who purchased
properties after Jan. 1 weren't put on
the list until the following year, Bird -
said.


Watchdogs,
Sugarcoated |
Responses, &
Allegations Of
Deviousness

He said that in discussing the
problem with Property Appraiser
David Ward, the latter had. sug-
gested a solution.
"Ward says that if the Planning
Department asks for an updated list,
be can provide t." Bird said.
As for' Siutphii's suggestion that
the county legally had no responsi-
bility to .notify property owners
whose names were left off the prop-
erty appraiser 's certified list. Bird
said it -% as a matter of courtesy.
In that respect, he said, the new
policy requiring that all proposed
changes be posted on large signs on
the applicant's property should help.
The issue didn't end there, how-
ever. Self-avowed "watchdogs"
Cindy and Don Lee raised questions
about the proposed rezoning of the
73-acre parcel off US 19 from
agriculture-5 (one house per five
acres) to residential-' (one house
per acre).
This proposal came before the
Planning Commission several times
and had to be re-advertised because
-of procedural or advertisement er-
rors.


When finally recommended for
approval by the Planning Commis-
sion, the proposal 'ran into trouble,
again when it came before the
County Commission in mid MaN
This time it was because the Plan-,
ning Department had failed to, fol-
low' through on its promise to post
signs on the applicant's property no-
tifying surrounding'property owners
of the proposed change.
On June 16, when the proposal
was again scheduled to come before
commissioner, it was "withdrawn"
from the commission's agenda at the
last minute. Then last month, it ap-
peared before the Planning Commis-
sion again, to some planners' sur-
prise.
Cindy Lee wanted to know how
long an application was good, for,
given that this particular one went
back to June 2004?
Shouldn't the applicants have had
to file a new application and paid
the appropriate fee when they with-
drew their application? she asked.
And since when did-an applicant
have the right to withdraw an appli-
-cation and return 'it to the Planning
Commission?
Planning Commission Attorney
Scott Shirley responded that the
Planning Department, not the appli-
cant, had withdrawn the application,
based on the Lees pointing out er-
rors in the posting of the signs. If
the commission minutes gave the
impression that the applicant had
withdrawn,the application, it was an
error, he said.
(See Land Page 6)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners last week
finally approved the revised Devel-
opment Code, a work that has been
in the making for almost five years.
The 200-plus page document --
which addresses every land-use is-
sue, from signs to density levels to
clustering to concurrency -- has the
potential to, affect every county resi-
-dent sooner or later. Even so, it
drew scant public attention Thurs-
day night.
Santa Hokanson, who has fol-
lowed the revision process since its
start in 2000, alone expressed any
concerns. Hokanson questioned the
definition of certain terms, the per-
mitted number of septic tanks in
one-acre subdivisions, and the con-
sistency of certain sections of the
document.
She was reminded that the code, in
essence, is a living document, sub-
ject to continual revisions as the
county continues to grow and new
'land-use issues arise. As it is, plan-
.el. are still.working on article .six
of the nine-article document.
Article six deals with all aspects
of signage, including height, size,
placement and types of signs al-
lowed anywhere.


Commissioner Junior Tuten of-
fered the motion to approve the
measure, after a couple of minutes
of discussion.
Tuten noted that many people in
the community disapproved of the
document because they felt it in-
fringed on their rights, while others
objected because they didn't think it
went far enough. But under the cir-
cumstances,. it was the best the
county could do, he said.
Following is a brief overview of
the eight adopted articles and the
more important elements that each
addresses.
Article one establishes the general
provisions and objectives of the
code.
Among the objectives of article
one is to carry out the goals of the
Comprehensive Plan; to secure the
safety of residents from flooding
and other natural disasters; to pro-
tect the public health; to protect the
county's varied and complex envi-
ronment; to minimize dependence
on fossil fuels; and to control and.
abate the use of land and buildings.
Article two, which commissioners
adopted 3 1/2 years ago, is about 80
pages long. Titled Land Use and
Vegetation, it addresses the types of
uses allowed in the various zoning
districts, as well as the regulations
governing each type of use.


This section is broken into three
major areas: overlay districts, den-
sity and intensity, and vegetation.
The section on overlay districts
sets the rules for the traditional and
historical communities, as well as
for the placement of transportation
and utility systems and antennas and
towers.
The section on density and inten-
sity addresses clustering, lot sizes,
building placement, industrial stan-
dards, mining operations and pond
excavations, among other things.
The section on vegetation, mean-
while, addresses buffers, landscap-
ing of car junkyards, tree protection
and protection of canopy roads.
Article three deals with concur-
rency, which requires that the neces-
sary public facilities be in place be-
fore a development is approved. A
developer, in other words, must
show proof of the availability of po-
table water, a sewage facility, roads
and other infrastructure before a de-
velopment will be permitted.
Article four establishes the natu-
ral resources -- specifically environ-
mentally sensitive areas -- that must
be protected from the harmful ef-
fects of development. These include
flood-prone areas, sinkholes, caves,
lakes, streams, wetlands and critical
wildlife habitats.
This section also addresses histori-
cal and archaeological sites and re-
sources, as well as hazardous waste
and mining operations, especially as
the latter relate to environmentally
(See Code Page 7)


Ii


RPMNO,


LUCILLE HUNTER, administrative aide for
~Fire Rescue, talks with Clerk of Court Dale
:Boatwright on Thursday. The commission


authorized Hunter to sign billing documents
to insurance company until a new director is
hired for Fire Rescue. (News Photo)


Commission Okays Increase

For Building Inspection Fees


WALLACE BULLOCK, right, building inspec-
tor, talks with resident Dick Bailar during a
recent County Commission meeting. Bullock


says the new fee increases are fair and eq-
uitable and will make his department more
self sufficient. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

* County residents building new
homes, making alterations or addi-
tions to their homes, or moving into
a new mobile home will find that all
these activities have just gotten
more expensive.
That's because the County Com-
mission last week approved a fee
rate increase that raises the permit
fees for all services associated with
the Building Inspections Depart-
ment.
Take the basic charge, which used
to be $18 previously. That fee has
now gone up to $35, nearly doubled
the original.


Fees TO cover
Services Cost

At that, the new fees barely cover
the department's costs for providing
the services, according to Building
Inspector Wallace Bullock. He said
it costs the department $42 per trip
to provide the service.
"The old fee was a losing proposi-
tion," Bullock said. "The $35 will at
least recoup some of our expense."
Likewise for the per-square-
footage fee for residential new con-
struction. It used to be $55 per
square foot. The new fee is $70 a
square foot, which Bullock called
-minimal.


"We feel it's fair and equitable,"
he said of the new fee schedule.
"We're just trying to recoup our
minimal expenses."
He said the average number of in-
spections for residential new con-
struction was between seven and
nine.
Commissioners' goal is to make
the Building Inspections Depart-
ment more self sufficient, especially
as it parts way with the Planning
Department, which also raised its
fees recently.
The two departments are pres-
ently housed in the same building on
Mulberry Street. But that situation is
expected to change when the two
operations move to the new location
at the former high school.


-C







'..:rPAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005





4Q4-
S

-











. .. .



DALE ELLERBE replaces florescent lights at the new I
brary location.


Library Grand Opening


Planned Monday
i Tuesday.
2 FRAN HUNT T usa
A ribbon c
Staff Writer A ribbon
StaffWriter planned 5:30 p
i The opening of the Jefferson- an open house
% County, Library, originally planned Director Lit
_ this week, has been postponed until Friday momin







. .. '.. . .....




--7 .
,-E.. .
.. .,1 .:.


..... ........ .
STEPHANIE MONTGOMERY shelves books at the new li-
; braryin preparation for the opening next week. (News Pho-
Stos)


I pecan Growers To

tMeetAt Country Club


The Florida Pecan Field Da. An-.
-:nual Meeting of the Florida Pecan
Growers' Association begins 8:30
-a.m.. Thursday, :Sept. 1, at 'the
S.Counm Club. -
The schedule of the day's activi-
-ties follows:
c & 8:30 a.m., Registration with
Coffee, juice, and doughnuts.
9:00 a.m., Introduction and wel-
,:come; introduction of speakers
UF/IFAS welcome by Associate
.Dean for Extension Joan Dusky.
9 9:10 a.m., Storm Recovery, Hor-
ticultural Practices. including pest
management during recovery.
9:35 a.m.. Tree appraisal and eco-
nomic evaluation.
9:55 a.m., USDA Farm Service
Agency: Documentation and Quali-
flying for Disaster Assistance, TAP
Programs.
10:10 a.m., Surveying and sam-.
;pling, IPM for Pecan Insect and
other pests.
10:35 a.m., Break, refreshments
; provided by Farm Credit of North
:' West Florida.
10:50 a.m., Weed Control Update.
&. 11:15 a.m., Pecan variety update,
.- with emphasis on scab resistance.
r 11:40 a.m., Pecan disease manage-
d ment, including fungicide
resistance.





Help us fight amyotrophic
| lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717* www.mdausa.org


12:05 p.m., Business Meeting,
'Florida Pecan Grower Association.
12:30 p.m. Lunch sponsored by-
DuPont, NIPAN, Simpson Nursery
and Boston Tractor Co.
Farm Tour of Rossi New Leaf Pe-
cans and Nursery on south US 19.
'1:45 p.m., Nickel application; con-
trol of mouse ear; discussion,in the
field; restoration of storm damaged
trees; pesticide licensure and com-
pliance.


ANGELA SCOTT prepares to unpack this box of supplies at


Morgan's Bows -n- Toes
All Breed Dog Grooming
Kerri Kercher
Groomer 1065 N Jefferson St
Monticello, FL 32344
Phone: 850-997-8599
Alt Ph: 850-294-9104
h E-mail:kerrikercher@yahoo.com


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba


k V 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall ~ William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


the library


much work remained to be done,
County Commission Chairman
Skeet Joyner, advised her to post.
pone the opening another week, to
finish unpacking, and shelving
books and the like..
Friday, library employees contin-
ued .,npacking and shelving books,_',:
moving, and. settingup equipment;,
handling books since .dropped off'
in the book drop, replacing flores-,
cent light bulbs, and the like. .
Volunteers from the community,:
arrived later in the day to assistL
with the work.

The library's Cherry Street loca-
tion closed June 17, when the date
was advanced because of the mal-
functioning of the air conditioning.
The original grand opening was
set for Aug. 1, but had to be post-
poned when Hurricane Dennis re-
sulted in the loss of some of the
volunteers helping with the project.


When was

the last


time you

made an

investment

that saved

lives?


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous--healtlier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It'5 a dividend that builds a
strong comurflnity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 4 14-0844


w, -4 1. ,..... Y iSaoerYour Lijfre .


r.nt Fr'-g' Ybur A nnual Prostate Screening.
ery yearmniore than 200,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in the U.S. and nearly 40,000 will die from it. That makes prostate
... -cancer the most common cancer among American men, except for skin cancer. The good news is that the outlook'for men
diagnosed with prostate cancer is better than ever if it's found early.
Tallahassee Memorial is teaming up with Southeastern Urological Center to provide free prostate cancer screenings.
Make your appointment today. It could sa'e %our life.
September 13 and 14, 2005
S Southeastern Urological Center
I- s been about 10 years since .I bound out I had
prostate cancer as a result of annual prostate Pre-registration is required.
screening with my urologist. I 'm glad we To register online, visit www.tmh.org,
caught it ear/or g vou 're a man over age 50 or or to register by phone,
you have a family/ his to.ry o/fprostate cancer; I call 850-431-2273 or
encourage iou haie an annual pirostate toll-free at 866-220-1043.
screening. If vou 're. African.-imerican. start at
age 40, because you re at greater risk.
Timothy Lane.
Quinc, PloIaTallahassee Memorial
.. ... ... Cancer Center -
.. -.. ,, ,._Talahd.seAfenwrial HealhCare-
4'.,j -" _.. 'ate.'. the .Lee Mofitt
.... ,*.~Caneer Center & Research institute
.Aw'A r.


i-


I


~ I,
V


4~


cutting ceremony is
p.m., Aug. 29, with
set for 7 p.m.
nda Hamedani said
g that because so


FE


SAVER


The Wait for Affordable


HIGH SPEED INTERNET IS OVER!



Announcing WILDBLUE.
Satellite Speed Internet

Available Anywhere Prices start at $49/mo
Always On Speeds up to 1.5 mps down/256kps up

PC or Mac Compatible .S
PERRY CONNECTIONS .COM

Call us today to discover the
WildBlue difference 888-499-1700


TIMM=


1 5







Downtown
Spaces
Striped Wed
DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


'1 ~~A~'-~.-:
C ~ ~ ~
.44.
A A~


D.H. STRIPING COMPANY CREW members
work on angled parking Wednesday. From
left, Matt Zietlow and David Soto. VMS In-


spector Warren Musselwhite
the sidewalk. (News Photo)


160 Animals Adopted
First Half Of 2005


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Board and membership members
of the Humane Society were ad--
vised during their recent meeting,
that from Jan. 1, 2005 through July
31, 2005, homes were found for
160 animals.
Shelter Operations Director Tina
Ames gave this.breakdown:
In all, 134 canines, and 11.4 fe-
lines, came through the shelter.
Of these, 87 canines and 73 fe-
lines were adopted.
However, 35 canines, and 13 fe-
lines were euthanized because of
lack of space, or severe illness, for
a total of 48 animals.
Five canines and one teline were
returned to their owners, and 45 ca-
nines and 59 felines, remain in the
Society's care, either at the shelter
or in foster homes, for a total of
104 animals.
-"now"amp .1smp- .MEO


5


Some 248 animals came into the
shelter, and 208 went out, either by
adoption or euthanasia.


looks on from


The Humane Society urges resi-
dents to have their pets neutered,
especially during the spring and
summer months of the "Critter
Baby Boom."
As an example, the Shelter topk
in 82 animals, in the non boom
months, versus 176 animals in the
boom months.


BU FDDYS IHOME
FURNISHINGS


D. H. Striping began the striping-
of the 40 to 30 degree angled park-
ing around the courthouse and sur-
rounding streets, Wednesday, and
expected to complete the work Fri-
day.
Two crews and VMS inspectors
were at work on the project.
The crews, armed with a grinder, a
blower, and three paint machines,
were at work.
The three paint machines each
held a different color. One held
white paint to mark the regular park-
ing areas. The second held blue
paint for the handicapped areas. And
the third was filled with red paint
for the brick walking areas.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS



li The MEGA Life and Health
MEGA Insurance Company
CALL TODAY
800-290-3927
Home Office: Oklahoma City. OK.
Association membership required. M/000208


S, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005 PAGE 3
'.---


fIfiKuP POWER
No Fuel No Noise Safe Indoors
Under $500
678-494-2035
www.powerpal.us


CASH NOW As seen
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS
(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


*s M VUSMW


*PIPVM FORA ANDGOGA FP VR4YA


FREE SERVICE
NO CREDIT NEEDED


NO LONG TERM OBLIGATION


... .^_.__,_ ,a ,


STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Rich Tradition






L.. Jefferson County


"Tiger Football"


Booster Membership Drive

Please Call 997-8 111


For Information About Becoming A

Booster And Supporting Our Youth!!!


We Meet Every Tuesday During Football Season
7p.m. at the Old Jefferson High
School A auditorium


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


I


11417 27 ,ZQ


I


z








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
,Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

E ME RON CICHON
'DPublisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

:Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
IMonticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
:Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Endangered Species


Act Needs Updating

hands of wildlife managers and
BY JAMES L. CUMMINS places it in those of lawyers.
; We should update the ESA by
Since the Endangered Species Act-providing incentives to forge solu-
wis signed by Richard Nixon in tions that both recover species and
1973, over 1,300 species have been protect the private landowner.
listed as threatened or endangered, This is not a new concept. The Act
yet only 10 have recovered and been could also be improved to do more
delisted. to keep species from becoming en-
During that same period, 35 listed dangered or threatened, like control-
species have been found to be ex- ling invasive species.
tinct. If our health system had those Damage to habitat by invasive
kinds of success rates, we would species has contributed to the de-
rnake some changes. cline of 42 percent of listed species.
The well-intentioned ESA some- We also need greater cooperation
tiiies results in hostility on the part between state and federal agencies
of landowners by giving govern- to protect species.
ment the ability to control how Fish hatcheries and other captive
property is used. breeding programs should be util-
. 1 This can make even the most ized.
harmless of birds, plants or other, Small tweaks in the Army Corps
listed species and landowner's foe, of Engineers' maintenance pro-
while actually damaging the species grams have allowed it to greatly
needing protection. benefit species along the Mississippi
.The Act does not now place em- River. Similar, opportunities exist
phasis on recovering populations to with other agencies in other ecosys-
get them off the list. terns.
-The Act should require scientific Our-current 1 percent success rate
consideration of what habitat must in recovering species is riot good
be protected, restored and enhanced,; enough. We can do better. Congress
now much is necessary, or if habitat should update and modernize the
even is a limiting factor in recovery. Endangered Species Act.
Lacking that, litigation has re- (James L. Cummins is Executive
placed careful, peer reviewed sci- Director of the Mississippi Fish and
eflce in decision making. This takes Wildlife Foundation, P.O. Box 10,
protection and recovery out of the Stoneville, MS.)




From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
August 16, 1995
-Ike Anderson announced Monda)
he will seek re-election -to the City.
Council
Enrollment is up by 40 to 50 chil-
d4en at the elementary school for the
coming year, necessitating the addi-
non of several new classes. But the
shighi increase does not necessarily.
signify growth occurring in the.
county.
4Hal Stone has been named chair-
mtn of the 7th Annual Trade Fair,
set for 4-9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28,
at the Opera House.'
TWENTY YEARS
August 14, 1985
A routine burning of confiscated
marijuana turned briefly into a scary
scenario Thursday when sounds of
gunshots, or explosions, emitted
from the burning pile.
Environmental Health Director
Dan MacDonald has asked the City
Council to pass a leash and dog con-
trol law.
School Superintendent Stephen
Walker has asked that a second as-
sistant principal position be created
at tie high school.
Chester Cox was a named an Hon-
orary Life Member of American Le-
gidh Post 49 at the Tuesday night
meeting of the organization.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
August 14, 1975
The 1975 tax roll was approved by
the, State of Florida on July 23,
1975. Jefferson County, Board of
Tax Adjustment held a meeting on
August 6 in the County Commis-
sioners' room and at that time no
complaints were filed with the
bojrd.
The citizens of Monticello have a
ne%\ club in the area. The Horse
Cl~b, has been organized and had


their first meeting last Sunday after-
noon. The club meeting every two
weeks at the Sports World Store
here in Monticello at 8 p.m. on
Monday nights.
FORTY YEARS AGO
August 13, 1965
Band majorettes, Donna Blow,
Lynn Boland, Mary Bassett, Cassey
Kelly, Rena Carney, and Jo Stokley
were at Howey-in-the-Hills attend-
ing Twirling Camp this week.
Mr. and Mrs. John Couch and
family, of Oklahoma City visited
briefly with her uncle, Mr. and Mrs.
Carr Settle Friday enroute to attend
the National Barr Association con-
vention.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
August 12, 1955
New teaching personnel of the
county school was announced. Su-
pervising Principal, Tom A. Backus;
Girls' PE, Miss Patricia Orr; Asst.
Agricultural teacher, Garth G. Alex-
ander, Spanish and English, Miss
Alma Altman; B.D. Caton was prin-
cipal at Wacissa Junior High and
Mrs. Canton was also to be a teacher
at Wacissa.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
August 10, 1945
4-H Club boys Hugh Collins, Jerry
Bulloch, Allen Dyer, Andy Lacy,
Cap Shuman, Steve Walker, Sonny
Sorenson, Bryan, Coksey, J.I. Fol-
som Jr., Clyde Sauls Jr. and Luther
Fountain were at Cherry Lake
Camp.

Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed
and include phone
number of writer


Opinion & Comment


Grown Up Gals, This Is For You


I'm not sure what's going on, but
my friends are looking older and
older.
Some are balding, some are al-
ready there, and the rest have gray
'hair if they have any.
Waistlines have expanded and
there's no indication that will stop
anytime soon.
As for me? All I know is I look in
the mirror each morning and my fa-
ther is looking back at me. Boy, he's
getting old, I think.
But, there'are some compensations
for this aging journey, to be sure.
We don't care about as much stuff
as we used to.
I think singer Eddie Arnold said it
best some years ago when a reporter
asked him about the Grammy award
winners. He said, "I'm old and
cranky and I'm rich and IYdon't give
a damn."
My friends are not all rich, but
they are getting old and cranky and
they don't want to be bothered with
trivial stuff either.
One thing we've learned to do is'
appreciate women over 40. There


Publisher's

Notebook


,-.
4'


rRon Cichon


are several reasons for this.
A woman over 40 doesn't want to
watch a football game, but she does-
n't sit around whining about it. She
does something she wants to do and
it's usually something more interest-
ing.
Women' over 4JO are dignified
They seldom have a screaming
match with you in the middle of a
restaurant.
Older women are generous with
their praise, often undeserved. They
know what it's like to be unappreci-
ated.


A woman, over 40 has the self-
confidence to introduce you to her
friends.
That's not true with younger
women who are reluctant to intro-
duce their men to other women.
\Vomen over 40 couldn't care less
if you're attracted to her friends be-
cause she knows her friends won't
betray her (most of the time).
By the time a women hits 40, she
has developed a remarkable sixth
sense. She knows what you are do-
ing even if you haven't told her and
she knows what you're thinking be-


fore you think it. Amazing!
You also have to admire the di-
rectness of older women. They will
tell you right quick if you are acting
like a jerk. You don't have to won-
der where you stand with her.
A woman 40 or older, knows the
right questions to ask. It's as if there
has been a detective lurking inside
her all these years just waiting to
come out.
Women over 40 can be fearless.
What's going to happen to them that
hasn't already happened?
They don't worry about prom
dates, pimples, what the boys think
of them or anything like that.
They've been there and done that
and don't want to do it anymore.
So, a lot of single women over 40
prefer a quiet evening with a good
book or diiner with the girls instead
of working the singles scene.
They have a sense of humor too.
A well-coiffed hot woman of 40
smiles as a bald, paunchy relic in
yellow pants makes a fool of him-
self with some 18-year old waitress.
Gals over 40 you gotta love 'em!


Growth Counties Want Help


BY ROBERT F. SANCHEZ
James Madison Institute

Florida's growth management de-
bate heated up this year, but it still
boils down to two basic issues; how
to regulate growth and how to pay
for it.
I'll skip the regulatory issue ex-
cept to note that 20 years after advo-
cates of centralized planning passed
the Growth Management Act of
1985, the law's failure has become,
ahem, growingly evident.
Even the law's .advocates now
concede that it hasn't curtailed
growth or even steered it to the "ur-
ban in-fill" areas favored by the
planning elites.
Instead, the government's ham-
handed interference has made
homes more costly so much so that
planners are now fretting about "the
lack of affordable housing."
While the complex debate over
how to "manage" growth rages on,
the debate over how to pay boils
down to a simple tug-of-war be-


tween state and local officials. Each
side wants the other to pay more. In'
sorting through this, it's helpful to
look toward an improbable spot:
Jefferson County, which has at least
two unique distinctions.
One distinction is geographic: It's
beautiful, and a rarity in coastal
Florida, but it adds relatively little to
Jefferson County's economy and
nothing to its tax base.
Yet Jefferson's more remarkable
distinction isn't geographic; it's
demographic: It is the only Florida
county whose population is lower
now than 125 years ago, when the
1880 census counted 16,065 resi-
dents there. Jefferson's 2005 tally
was 13,998.
The 1880 census found only 257
residents in Dade County, whose
boundaries then encompassed an
area that now includes four counties
- Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm
Beach, and Martin with a com-
bined 2005 population of 5,644,583.
As Southeast Florida grew, it also
prospered while Jefferson County
languished. At present, for instance,_


Florida Trend magazine reports that
Palm Beach County's per capital in-
come of $48,081 is nearly twice Jef-
ferson's $24,317.
Jefferson's poverty may account
for the comparatively poor perform-
ance of its schools, which lag state
and national norms. Result: Families
are reluctant to move there, and the
boom that has buoyed real estate
values and the tax base in many
other counties has been tame in Jef-
ferson, where local officials, often
face a tough challenge to fund basic
services.
Meanwhile, the same counties that
courted or countenanced rapid
growth and prospered as a result -
are now complaining that "the state"
should pay more for the roads and
schools they need to cope with traf-
fic congestion and rising school en-
rollment.
When they say "the state," of
course, they mean revenue derived
from taxing every Florida resident
and visitor. But why burden resi-
dents of poor, slow-growth counties
to fund roads and schools for afflu-


ent, fast-growth counties?
After all, the fast-growth counties
have the potential resources neces-
sary to pay for their own infrastruc-
ture needs something they man-
aged to do in the past, when their
growth was even faster.
The current real-estate boom has
enriched the property-tax base.
Many counties are also receiving re-
cord numbers of visitors and, as a
result, more revenue from local-
option taxes on sales and gasoline.
And some counties are also extort-
ing outrageous impact fees from de-
velopers, enriching their coffers
while inflating the price of housing.
By borrowing against these reve-
nue sources, Florida's fast-growing
counties could build roads and
schools now and pay for them later,
when the dollar will be cheaper and
their taxpayers presumably more nu-
merous.
Unfortunately, instead of investing
their revenue windfalls in tangible
projects such as roads and schools,
local officials in many of Florida's
(See Growth Page 5)


Women Were Force In Search


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I have been a Red Cross volunteer
in Jefferson County since 1993.
Once when the US military called
on the Red Cross to deliver an emer-
gency message to a woman in Mon-
ticello, I got the assignment. There
was some family trouble and a Mon-
ticello woman here, needed to call a
telephone number right away.
As I slipped on my sandals, I ex-,
perienced a slight twinge of guilt.
My father thought that a real lady
should not wear open-toed shoes. To
him, something was not quite right


about your toes sticking out in pub-
lic. However it is so beastly hot in
summer that I wore them anyhow.
I drove to the woman's Monticello
address and knocked on the door.
No response. The message was too
important to be resolved by leaving
a note on the door, so I went to her
next door neighbor and tapped on
that door.
An elderly woman met me at her
door and I explained my task. She
said "Wait a minute." I sat on the
porch in a rocker for quite a long
time. Finally she emerged from her
home.
She had put on her stockings


which hung on her small legs. They
were crooked and twisted, and
looked like the red stripe in a candy
cane, as they twirled around her thin
legs.
When she had retrieved her purse
from a chair in the parlor, she was
ready to go. It was a sturdy dark
leather purse with a heavy gold
clasp in the middle. Almost all of
the elderly ladies I know have such
a purse. The clasp made a heavy
'thunk' and she closed it. Off we
went.
She said that the woman I was
seeking was probably visiting the
sick in the church. Her specialty was


macaroni and cheese casseroles, and
she was likely delivering one to a
shut-in. She directed me to a second
house.
At the second house a second
woman was recruited. After putting
on her stockings and finding her
leather purse, we were ready to go
again. Dressed in almost identical
outfits, I now had two crooked
stocking women in my car.
We went to the home of a third
neighbor woman. She also joined
our mission. The third neighbor was
heavyset.
Her crooked stockings were held
(See Women Page 5)


From Our Photo File

























WINNERS of the FHA/HERO Red and White 8; Latoya Robinson, grade 7; and Ginger
Contest at Howard Middle School in March, Carter, grade 8. (News File Photo)
1990 were, from left: Tequila Hagan, grade











Letters...

Former Local Firefighter/EMS

Lauds Chief Larry Bates, Sr.


Dear Editor:
I just read the article in the Monti-
cello News Aug. 5th issue, in refer-
ence to Chief Larry Bates'
resignation, and would like to take a
moment to tell you about the Chief
Bates I have come to know.
I have personally known Chief
Bates for many years, and also
worked with him for about two
years with Jefferson County Fire
Rescue.
I became a volunteer firefighterjin
1987, a professional firefighter in
1990, and began working with the
Chief in 1996.
I can assure citizens that the entire
scope of his position has not been-


fully understood.
Chief Bates ran a tight and disci-
plined department. Although small,
it was staffed with highly dedicated,
professional, and trained personnel.
Often the Chief would train a new
firefighter, fresh out of school, to
the department's standards, only to
have them leave for higher pay and
better working conditions.
He personally fought for every
pay raise and to improve conditions,
as well as for additional personnel,
and equipment.
The call volume at times would be
so great that the Chief would come
in at all hours to help take those
-calls and remain calm in every situa-_


tion.
Chief Bates took Fire Rescue from
its beginnings with little manpower
and equipment, to adding Emer-
gency Medical Services, and pro-
gressing to Advanced Life Support,
which was not an easy task.
He went through the Paramedic
Program himself, which I can say is'
not an easy program to accomplish.
Jefferson County Fire Rescue has
a reputation as a small, yet profes-
sional and highly trained
department.
EMS is known for its excellence
in care, treatment and transportation,
covering the county.
Chief Bates made that possible
.with his Lieutenants, with constant


Women Were Force


(Continued From Page 4)
up by a strong rubber band-like
thing that rolled the stockings up
around her knees. All three of these
proper women. had their required
handbags. We all continued our
search of their friend.
As we rounded a comer, we
passed, several elderly men who
were sitting in chairs under the trees.
They sat all in a row. They sort of
reminded me of turtles resting on a
log.
Deep and comfortable in the
shade, they emerged into the blaring
sun to help assume the burden of
finding their mutual friend. The
crooked stocking ladies sent them
scurrying to phone this or that per-
son.
On the next street we came to a
group of kids on bikes. .They were
all Noung teen-age boys hanging out
in a small huddle. They were way to
cool to be bothered by a bunch of
women and so they ignored us.
TheN reminded me of Marion
Brando in the 1953 motorcycle
mo.ie "-The Wild. Oiie." 'The
crooked stocking ladies .exited my
car, and approached the group. They
were still ignoring us so, WHAP!
Rubber-band crooked stocking lady
popped Marlon Brando on the bot-
tom with her purse, as she said "I'm
talking to you." Marion wheeled
around and said '"Ma'am?"
The bike brigade roared off to do,
their part of the important mission. I
had been reduced to merely the
driver in the Generals brigade. The
crooked stocking ladies %%ere fully
in charge.
These women were a force! If I
had an armored tank and rolled
down Clark St.. we would not have
had more of a presence. The entire'
neighborhood was'buzzing.
Soon, the woman I, was seeking-
came walkingg up the road with Mar-
lon riding' behind here on his bike.
She got in my now very crowded



(Continued From Page 4)
fastest growing areas 'too often yield
to public employee unions' strident
demands for higher wages, costly
benefits, excessi\e pensions,, and
other perquisites.
This type of political pandering is
consuming revenue that could be
used: to build local' roads, arid
schools.
Granted, there are some highways
that provide a statewide or regional
benefit and thus require state reve-
nue or a state-local partnership.
Like ise, there are some educa-
tional facilities public universities
and community colleges, for in-
stance. that are' also principally a
state' responsibility.
However, in pondering how to pay
for local growth. Florida should rule
out imposing higher statewide taxes
that would force residents of poor,
slow-growing counties pay more. to
save* rich, fast-growing counties
from 'the consequences of the bad
choices they have made.


car. We rode in complete silence. Casseroles are the calling cards of
The crooked stocking ladies quietly all southern women, and I know
respecting their friends trouble. they wanted to comfort their friend.
I dropped each of them all off and These proper, generous Monticello.
delivered the message. As I drove ladies did not know me at all, yet-
away, I figured the crooked stocking they were willing to help their
ladies were at their homes making neighbor by riding with me, even
casseroles. though my toes were sticking out.


training, and the vigilance he de-
manded from his staff.
Many times I have dropped into
say hello to him and the rest of the
crew, to find him hard at work with
the many concerns the department
was facing. He always remained
calm andreassuring.
During my employment with Fire
Rescue, I noticed that a majority of
the citizens had the idea that all his
department did was sit around and.
play cards.
I can testify that this was not the
case. Chief Bates directed us to train
daily, conduct public service educa-
tional events, along with departmen-
tal duties.
Chief would often go "head to
head" with commissioners on behalf
of his department, even sacrificing
other issues to improve the depart-
ment.
The citizens and politicians of the
county should give credit where
credit is due. Thank you, Chief
Bates, for making Fire Rescue what
it is today.
It will be hard to replace such an
outstanding person, considering all
he has done for Fire Rescue.
I personally wish him the best
with his new position, knowing he
will do an outstanding job, as he al-
ways has.
Awesome job, and best always,
Chief Bates!
Charlie Hatchett
Former Fire Rescue
Firefigher/EMT
Central Florida
Firefighter/paramedic


I, ACPWPlPS,kPB, Alloys, CD, qM i I
%,,;i,.'IiTIt,'Crulse, Stk: P126941 OiN) IIHIVVIV

20 Mercury Moutaineer I



.-- -. AA



AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB, Alloys,
CD, TV/DVD, Tow Pkg, Stk: RJ10199

2003 Nissan Xterra XE



..G. COOD CREDIT


V6, AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB,
Alloys, CD, Roof Rack. Stk: 6694538

2003 Chevy Silverado LS Z.71


V8, 4x4, AT, AC, PW, PL! PS, PB, Alloys,
AM/FM Cass, CD, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: P334522
DON BITNER.- Sales Mana er T


BAD CREDIT



NO CREDIT


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005 PAGE 5

VTW Band To Perform

At Opera House Friday


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Opera House will present
VTW, a band with an eclectic mix
of Bluegrass, "Newgrass," Folk and
Old Time Music, 7:30 p.m., Friday.
Band members include: Gabe
Villa, who won the Merle Watson
Festival Flat Picking Championship;
Jason Thomas, who won the Cana-


dian Open Mandolin Championship,
as well as the Florida State Champi-
onship on both fiddle and mandolin;
Lis Williamson, vocalist, and guitar;
and Lon Williamson, vocalist and
bass guitar.
VTW has performed traditional
Canadian music for the past two
years at Disney's Epcot Center.
Tickets are $12 and may be pur-
chased at the door.
For additional information, call
the Opera House at 997-4242.


EIS THE ORIGINAL






2002 Chevy Avalanche Z66






V8, AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB, Sunroof,
Alloys, CD, Stk: U100349

2003 Toyota Camnry LE


V6, AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB, Alloys,
AM/FM, CD, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: U554346

1999 Pontiac Grand Prix

1.~ ....i


6 cyl, AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB,
Alloys, CD,,AM/FM, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: U276183

2003 GMC Sonoma SLS

^I---


rNnfl PRlORFMI


1EV I IIV~wUUIUIE


AT, AC, PS, PB, Alloys, CD, AM/FM Cass,
Bedliner & Cover, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: P148488













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005


Lifestyle


Allison Lee Belt Marries


Randall V. Simmons


Allison Lee Belt, and Randall V.
Simmons, both of Dover, FL., were
married 7 p.m., July 1, 2005, at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Sim-
rons, Fish Hawk Ranch, Lithia, FL.
Pastor Galen E. Scott, of Sunset
B3ay Chapel, officiated the
ceremony.
Operatic vocalist was Kaci Al-
phonso, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John Peurrung, friends of. the bride
and groom, of Valrico, FL.
The bride is the daughter of Fern
:E. Bretz, formerly of Monticello,
and Bob. H. Williamson, of
Brevard, FL.
She is employed as an Administra-
tive Specialist for the Tampa Elec-
tric Company, Tampa.
The groom is the son of Christine
H. Simmons, and the late Robert
Daniel Simmons, of Brando, FL.
He is Superintendent of Plant Op-
erations for the Tampa Electric
Company.
The bride was given in marriage
by her beloved uncle, and
namesake, M. Lee Young of Tampa,
and Brevard.
The bride wore a tea length cham-
pagne chiffon T-strap gown, with
:'delica seed bead embellishments.


The shoe clasps worn by the bride
were worn by her late grandmother,
Evelyn S. Sidwell, at the bride's
mother's wedding in 1965.
The bride's mother gave her a
gold diamond and pearl pendant,
which came from the country of
Bahrain, located in the Persian Gulf.
The bride's pearl and Swarovski
crystal earrings, and bracelet were
hand crafted by her mother. She
wore a two tiered Swarvoski crystal
tiara, originally worn by her mother
(1965) and her sister Trisha M.
Wirick, in 1991-.
She carried white and fuchsia
roses. The bride also carried one of
her mother's antique handkerchiefs,
which had been embroidered with
the bride and groom's names and
wedding date.
The Matron of Honor was Trisha
Michelle Wirick, of Monticello, sis-
ter of the bride.
The bridesmaids were Carley
Amanda Simmons and Alison Leigh
Simmons of Brandon, and Yadi Lee
Belt, of Dover.
Bailey Ry Watson, of Dover, was
the little flower girl.
The, best man was Robert Daniel
Simmons, of Fish Hawk Ranch, of
Lithia.
A reception was held at the home


of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Simmons,
Fish Hawk Ranch, Lithia.
In addition, there were several
homemade family favorites pre-
pared by the groom's family.
The wedding cake was presented
on the cake plate of the bride's late
maternal grandmother, Evelyn S.
Sidwell.
The Sterling silver cake server.
was- used by the bride's, mother in
1965 and her sister in 1991.
Bonnie R. Smith, friend and co-
worker of the bride, presented the
bride and groom antique crystal
used for the champagne toast.
The crystal stems were used at
Bonnie's late grandparents wedding
in 1926, as well as on their 25th and
50th wedding anniversaries.
Punch was served in the bride's
late grandmother's antique punch
bowl.
A wedding shower for the bride
and groom was held July 28, at
Teco Hall, Tampa.
Hostesses were Beth Purtell,
Nancy Foley, Bonnie Smith, and
Coleen A. Englehardt.
The couple honeymooned at Anna
Maria Island, FL., and a belated
wedding trip is planned in April,
2006 to the West Coast of the US.
The couple will reside in Dover.


Nancy Banks Helps Online

Friend Find Birth Mother


.


CK-







MR. AND MRS. RANDALL V. SIMMONS


Nazarene Church Sets

Skate Night Friday


. -<^


-DEBBIE SNAPP
-Staff Writer

- When Nancy Banks decided to
-find out. a little bit about her fam-
ily's heritage and especially infor-
mation on her deceased grandfather,
;he decided to go on-line to do the
'research.
While doing research online one'
"day, Banks hooked-up with a nice
-young lady, whom she now calls her
'friend. Through their chats online,,
l3er friend mentioned that she had
been adopted some years ago and
was trying to locate her birth
-mother.
^ Banks offered to help her with her
search, and after exchanging some
basic information, and lots of re-
search, they located the birth
mother, in California.
First the women researched the
adopted mother, and adopted sister,
which lead to the recent death of the
birth mother's husband, and eventu-
.ally to the birth mother.
SThe women took many wrong



Homes Of

Mourning

Sarah Elsie Desear
Sarah Elsie (Sally) Desear, 79,
passed away August 5, 2005 after a
long illness. Sally was born in Salts-
burg, PA and moved to Florida as a
young child.
: Sally was a devoted wife, mother,
grandmother and
great-grandmother. She was deeply
loved .by her family and all who
knew her. Sally was retired from the
retail grocery trade where she was a
coworker with her late husband,
'Milton for over 30 years. She al-
,ways loved interacting with the pub-
.lic and seeing children grow up and
.having children of their own. Sally
iwas a long time Baptist who was de-
i*oted to and active for many years
*at Riverside Baptist Church, Cross-
roads Baptist Church, and Baptist
-Church, Ft. Meyers.
: Sally was predeceased by her hus-
'band, Milton Desear (November 24,
-2004). Sally is survived by her son
mid daughter-in-law Ray and Linda
Desear of Monticello, FL and her
on Buddy Desear of Naples, FL;
her grandchildren include Angela,
Tiraig, Paul, Matt, Nathan, Chad and
.Shawn; her great-grandchildren in-
clude Nathan, .Hanna, Mikayla,
Trenton, Peter, Noah and Andrew.
^ Services were held on Wednesday,
August 10, 2005. at Lee Memorial
Park Funeral Home at -11:00 AM.
.Visitation was held Tuesday, August
9, 2005 from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM.
Lee Memorial Park, 12777 SR 82.


turns and the search took about one
and a half years.
Banks relates that before starting
her searches she tries to get as much
information as she possibly can,
such as family names; dates; city,
county, and state of birth; branch of
military service, and the like.
She adds that there are several ge-
nealogy programs that can be pur-.
chased," and ornline programs
available at no charge.
-"To be successful in your search,
you have to be patient, and keep try-
ing," Banks states.


,BANKS


.'- -.


BANKS


Extension Agent Notes

Salads Make Good Meals


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sciences
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
extols the benefits of healthy sum-
mertime salads.
"Most anything can be useal to
make a' salad," said Copeland.
"Use what your family enjoys and
you will have a cost-effective, nu-.
tritious, almost effortless meal."
Make half of your grains, whole
and consider trying brown rice,
wild rice, cracked wheat (bulgur),
whole wheat pasta, and couscous in
your salad.
Vary your vegetables, and eat
more vibrantly colored ones. Try
corn cut off of the cob, blanched,
fresh beans, boiled potatoes, grape
tomatoes, broccoli, and spinach.
When using lettuce,, it should be
well washed and the darker the
color, the better.
When focussing on fruits, choose
fresh, frozen, canned (not in syrup)
or dried.
To avoid excess fats and oil, use
only what you need. Try a bit of
oil mixed with flavored vinegar,
herbs and spices.
When. getting your calcium-rich


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Church of the Naza-
rene will host a Community Skate
Night 7 p.m. Friday, August 26 in
the Family Life Center on US Hwy.
19.
This event is free and is held the
. last Friday of every iorah.
Those attending:are encouraged to
bring'skates or roller blades, though
there are skates available on site.
This is a family fun time. Non-
skaters are urged to come on out and
enjoy the excitement of the skaters
and visit with other non-skaters.


II | el .6


foods, go low-fat or fat free when
you chose milk products for your
salad.
Go lean with protein,, and vary
your protein routine by choosing
fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds to
enhance your salad.


THANK A VET!!
We would like to recognize and honor all persons
currently serving on active duty in our nations military.
We need the names of our county's service members,
their branch of service, and their mailing address.

If you are a relative or loved one of a current military
member please call Michael Bishop at the Jefferson
County Veterans Affairs Office at #342-0211, and provide
what information you have. The American Legion wishes
to reassure all of our military personnel, regardless of
where they are assigned, that we in Jefferso9 County
appreciate their sacrifices, ,and patriotism. We will be
sending care packages to military personnel in the near
future.
Please help us to collect the requested information in
order to honor our Service Members.
Jefferson County Veterans Affairs Office & Monticello American Legion Post #49


"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care Free Blood Pressure
Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello *997-3553





By Encore Senior Living
Tallahassee's Original Assisted Living Community
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Service


License #


850-562-4123 x3207 North Monroe St. -
Lmn u4wwflre c -.nres.l com


voaa C(asses


ARCHBOLD INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE CENTER
2705 E. Pinetree Blvd., Thomasville, Ga.
Affiliated with Archbold Medical Center


Gentle. Soothing. Relaxing.
Classes for all ability, levels.
Improve flexibility, range of motion,
/ 'y strength, and body tone. Ease pain
I/ from arthritis, headaches, and more.
Monday evenings. Tuesday afternoons. Tuesday evenings.
Wednesday mornings. Wednesday evenings. Thursday afternoons.
Call the ARCHBOLD INTEGRATIVE. MEDICINE CENTER. (229) 228-7008



193NW US HWY. 221, GREENVILLE, FL, (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
i qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
-E-i- ... We accept Medicare, Medicaid aB ARNP
HeOgsebeckD. & most insurance plans

Open Mon-Fri 8-5, Tue, 8-7 walkins welcome,24hr telephone coverage


Located at 1702 South Jefferson St. in Perry, Florida
850-223-1744

1885 Professional Park Circle Suite 60 in Tallahassee, FL
850-421-7600
Call Us If You're In Need Of Care In Your Pregnancy or
For Any Women's Health Care Issues


.. f


www no VV Y ;JJ\i.L.Ul.


y99y


Land Uses
(Continued From Page 1)
"The staff places items on the
agenda," Shirley said. "When the
staff sees advertisement problems,
it's up to the staff to send it back for
the proper advertisement."
Cindy Lee took issue with what
she called Shirley's "sugarcoated an-
swers." She urged commissioners
to step up to the plate and insist that
the Planning Department do its job
right.
"The public shouldn't be the
watchdog for the Planning Depart-
ment," Cindy Lee said. "You need
to make sure it's doing things and
not only give it a little slap on the
hand."
Don Lee was more forcible. He
contended that the withdrawal of the
application at the last minute was no
coincidence.
"If I had an application and I
thought it was going to go astray
and people from people from south
Florida (who own adjacent property
here) were coming up to oppose it, I
would withdraw it until these people
went away," Don Lee said.
The reason being that if the appli-
cant's proposal was rejected, it
would be two years before that per-
son could reapply for a Comp Plan
amendment, he said. But if the indi-
vidual waited until the opportune
time when the opposition was un-
awares, the application would sail
through, he said.
"My wife and I are watchdogs,"
Don Lee said. "We are trying to stop
the things that are trying to take
away the good life here."







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005 PAGE 7

"i


Fr.Mal Jopling New Pastor

At Christ Episcopal Church


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Christ Episcopal Church members
recently welcomed Father Mal
Jopling as their pastor. This is his
first Church appointment.
Jopling grew up in the Lake City
and north Florida area. He descends
from a family of Methodist minis-
ters, though his father is a retired
Circuit Judge.
He attended Wofford College in
South Carolina after high school and
before beginning a career in
banking, and was a branch adminis-
trator for three years.
He enjoyed this line of work but


says a desire for the ministry has al-
ways shadowed him.
After 20 years in the banking busi-
ness, Jopling decided to attend the
Seminary at Sewanee University of
the South in Tennessee, and earned
his Masters of Divinity.
His first goal at the Christ Episco-
pal Church is to get to know the
people of the congregation, and
community. He loves people and
considers himself a people person.
He also loves history and was aw-
estruck by this old and well kept
church, and has been reading the
history of the county.
Another goal of his is to continue
to see the church membership grow
in outreach, and in children and


youth programs.
He also looks forward to working
together with other churches in the
community.
"I am thrilled, humbled, and
blessed to be accepted by the mem-
bers of this church and this commu-
nity. Marsha and I look forward to
seeing where this wonderful change
leads us," he adds.
He is married to the former Mar-
sha Swem, a teacher in Leon
County. They are the parents of a
daughter Amanda, also a school
teacher and living in Maryland with
her husband and the special love of
their lives, granddaughter Hannah.
They also have a son, Guy, re-
cently married and living in Califor-
nia.


V
pk~


FR. MAL JOPLING is the new Pastor of
Christ Episcopal Church. He attended semi-
nary after more than 20 years in the banking


field, and this is his first appointment.
(News Photo)


Agent Says Inspect Trees,


Yards Prior To.


With hurricane season this year
predicted to have more storms than
last year, Consumer Sciences Ex-
tension Agent Heidi Copeland
stresses the importance of prepare-
ing for possible storms.
She states that one of the best
preparations for any storm is to in-
spect any trees in the yard.
What is their condition? Are
there limbs that should be removed
because they, are weak or hang too
low over a roof?
"These are questions to answer
and now is the time to prepare for a
storm," Copeland said.'
"Call a reliable, licensed tree serv-
ice' for an inspection and to trim
trees," she adds..


Copeland report
summer's hurrica
on roof tops, car
caused millions 0
ages.
"Giving attenti
they become a pr
family hundreds,
of dollars, and wl
become months o
and recovery," sh
Some tips foi
storm include sti
the kitchen, when
a flood, to avoid i
*Wear rubber
protective clothing
*Clean and sa
_surfaces, especial


Storms
ts that during last have been contaminated by flood
anes, trees falling waters.
s and utility lines *Wash and sanitize your dishes,
)f dollars in dam- utensils, and kitchen appliances bb'-
fore using them.
on to trees before *Discard all soft plastic and po-
oblem, can save a rous items such as wooden spoons,
maybe thousands cutting boards and plastic utensils
hat can potentially which may have absorbed contami-
f stressful cleanup nants.
e said. *Discard all meats, poultry, fish,
r cleanup 'after a eggs, fresh produce, jams and jel-
eps to be taken in lies sealed with paraffin, home
cleaning up after canned foods, any commercial
food borne illness: glass jars, foods in covered boxes,
gloves and other or bags, spices, seasonings, and ex-
g. tracts, any food in canisters and
anitize all kitchen damaged cans.
lv those that may *Undamaged commercially


Cox Soul Food
Reopens Eatery

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Cox's Soul Food a restaurant lo-
cated at 490 South Railroad Street,
reopens, after supporting the Learn-
ing Center' during the summer
school break.
The' eatery serves daily lunch spe-
cials 11:30 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and
extends hours Friday and Saturday
until 7 p.m., and offers free clothing
Friday and Saturdays.
"Serving our seniors and disabled
citizens is a priority with special at-
tention always given, although we
are not able to deliver meals at this
time," remarks Gloria Cox-Jones.
For additional information, call
997-2359.


canned goods are safe if paper la-
bels are removed and the cans are
sanitized. Mark the can in indelible
ink.
The sanitizing solution recom-
mended for cleanup is one teaspoon
of liquid bleach per quart of water.


Code
(Continued From Page 1)
sensitive areas.
Article five deals with develop-
ment, design and improvement. Its
intent, according to the preamble, is
to ensure that functional and attrac-
tive development takes place in the
county.
The section addresses such things
as transportation systems in residen-
tial and commercial developments,
curbing requirements, off-street
loading, and placement of wastewa-
-ter systems and septic tanks.
Article seven is titled Hardship
Relief. It establishes the procedures
for obtaining relief from the require-
ments of the code, in situations
where compliance would present a
hardship.
Article eight establishes and de-
fines the boards and agencies that
administer the code.
Article nine sets forth the applica-
tions, .reviews and procedures that
are required for obtaining develop-
ment orders and certain types of per-
mits.
It also specifies the procedures for
appealing decisions and for seeking
legislative action.
A copy of the revised Develop-
ment Code is available for review in
the Planning Department office on
Mulberry Street.


LIMITED TIAME
OFFER


-Q--DEALER
FOR IDETAILQ


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
INCLUDES:
CI OlM L Normal Installation )
S5-.00 6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas
Ui LJ

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331




mSayve
up to 800/0
on your
Prescriptions
Still helping thousands of Americans!
Medication- Strength Quantity Our Price'*Savings"
Flomax '(Brand) 0.4mg 100 tabs $11,1.72 $72.10
Fosamax (Generic) 70mg 12 tabs $86.80 $108.17
Lipitor (Brand) 10mg 90 tabs $176.28 $31.79
Zocor (Generic) 20mg 100ltabs $170.79 $247.21
*All prices are in US dollars and are subject to change. Code 120105
Order now and save an extra $12.00

1-877-966-0567
www.canpd.com
30 Franklin St. Belleville,
Ontario Canada K8N 1A1


Dicoe.sesyu an aket eueair polutinafrm yor hoe an carat n *gsar E l
EN RG ST R- issp nsre byte S.1 Env.iro m na rtci o Ag nyadteUS D p rm ntf e y


COX SOUL FOOD. opened recently after closing for the
summer to volunteer at the Learning Center. The eatery
collects donated clothing, which is then available to those
in need, every Saturday. (News Photo)



TELEPHONE: 878-0471 OR 878-0472


JOSEPH L. WEBSTER, SR., MD., RP.A.
Internal Medicine ~ Gastroenterology

2048 Centre Pointe Lane Tallahassee, FL 32308


'F


IFRHOME

ok FURNISHINGS


1 I "h A P- I O --I l m-


GRILL

NO CRErDIT mD.E s99 A ft



FREE DELIVERY O LIATION


NO LONC TERM OBLIGATION


TANr' NOT INCLUDED


R,-,-1-r- jNT T0 j01iij -N


11025 EAST MAHAN
8 7 .9 iMonticello "Border /
87 0 4 2 /Border 1-10
MAHAN .


LAWN

MOWER


OJILS V En


v t2. = Dock
t5 pofdtlon 6lio.it Acdl1d.


ASK Us -ABOUT


VISIT US AT
WWW.BUDDYRENTS.COM


INROUCOR PMAL


-- .L


--., -2 ............. a


C-







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005




x`O zirbnm enmtal

ea S problems?

John 'ii ieler
L Certified Indoor
41 Environmentalist &


SInspections and Consulting
( 7 J ( J 6p (0 V; Residential & Commercial Building .
l|l-. -Diagnostics
V Water Intrusion Control Measures
V Mold Remediacion
V R ld.* A _.l^ j d


Thermogr,
Ir' hotwires)
S383-6







Lindal Cedar Homes is thelp
largest manufacturer of quality

timber homes. We offer ap

Iyou each step of the way, from
..... planning to turn key. Your Hometown Electrical Services.
'Walden Classic Homes LLC Be prepared for hurricane season.
An Independent ULindal Homes Dealer
Ar % Jerry Walden Sales and Instalation of
-' 850-907-9596 Automatic & Manual Generator Systems
jr::, .850-509-7914

i 850-933-8167
-Lic. & Insured EC13001894


Now Open In Monticello

iI Free Comparlson
G -Yu Id
THE--A AGENCY So". 850.322.5826
IHE U"ENC,#130 31 iMaUhsnDve
"Your Independent Insurance Agent" Suite 20
ur onl C oi Tallahassee, FL 32308
Personal Commercial
_ Auto General Liability CALL FOR ESTIMATEl I W
Home Workers Comp.
Mobile Homes Business Owners Our Price Home Depol Lowe's
i" iFlood Package Policies .i60'x 60"


Watercraft
1287
S* Conveniently loc

l Darlene J. O'
Agent
REPRESENTING
:_ PROVIDE YOU W1


Professional Liability
S. Jefferson Street
ated in the Jefferson Square Shopping Center,.

Brien Kimberly Day Spivey
ACSR
G MANY A+ CARRIERS ALLOWS US TO
ITH THE MOST COMPETITIVE PRICING.


2' Faux Woo ,ds V102 SISO S134
HD) Silhouette. Orriginals S391SS~35 $539
HD) 3/8 Apel .ause Cebular S 2S25T s1Vl
Mi.Isurlng FREE 5S3S 3
Estimate FREE Itti.d ilid
Installation i FREE S1 Wwimw iii S'lO 109/hiw &jvmuS57
PusMm m 41 i g p W xiji m knI. lia".


malysis \v Infrared
aphv (e.g., roo leaks, *


EI~


'El

it"







~'UU

1~nE

I',"

'El

it"

*


QUALITY STEEL
14624 VADA RD. CLIMAX, GA 31734
1 i CERTIFIED METAL BUILDING FABRICATORS

ANY SIZE STEEL BUILDING
MINI-WAREHOUSES *. BOAT SHEDS
S*OFFICE BUILDINGS *METAL ROOFS
UTILITY BUILDINGS FARM SHEDS


I A





236334

ALL TYPES OF CONCRETE WORK
PHONE:229-243-0286 FX: 229-243-0669
MANAGER: SHAD GLOVER
... EMAIL ADDRESS:STEELMETALFAB@YAHOO.COM

^EIMaw ', '*, n r__ r rA_ ^ t, woJ l ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^T. ^W W


7 ,'U,1



; A

A6.\










Iitll
A"U
Vill


9'AY! N' VVI 'NTA 1,






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., AUGUST 19, 2005 MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005 PAGE 9
Alm"


Real Estate


II~

II;
-V -
II,

II

II
II.
_ II

_ Iii

El:
'4,.
fiji
jfr
~I.uI

II
III
4:.-
I~1II
.4.. *
I~ **~

iF"

-~ Iii

~ mu:
- U


Wanted! Wanted! Wanted!
Large Acreage, Commercial & Industrial Properties

I have BUYERS
Call me TODAY with your information
Mary Youngblood-Shaw, Realtor
(850) 556-1142


FRITH ABSTRACT

& TITLE CO.
Owners & Mortgage Title
Insurance Policies
Title Searches Real Estate Closings


501 N. Byron Butler Pkwy.
850-584-2672


I Metal Roofing -
$ SAVE $
!!Buy Direct From Manufacturer!!
New Profiles & Colors to Choose from
All Expose Instock


CALL TOLL FREE FOR QUOTE! 1-888-393-0335

35-48-77s FX(32)49-75


Perry, Fl.


Florida Realty
Look for the Red Roof
We pay all title charges at closing.

* 11.8 Acres on 95th Street, Lake City,$79,000
.. Mobile Home on 2.69 Acres on Gum Swamp Road, Lake
City, $141,900
* Mobile Home on 5 Acres on 47th Drive, $110,000
* Mobile Home on 3.7 Acres, :Lake City, $59,500
* .85 Acres on 79th Drive, Lake City, $29,900
. 11.37 Acres on CR 136 & 1-75, Lake City, $1,137,000

Check us out at
www.lakecityfloridarealty.com
www.buyerbrokerusa.com
(386) 754-0800 or (877) 231-0080


* uE*A

A im~
"lo


-~ UU~.
%. ~ ~
~U J~u ~ Ill ~ I *~ 3 *~ ii *i


"Helping You is What We Do Best."
Health 4 Farm 4 Home
Business 4 Auto 4 Life
Report All Claims (800) 330-33,27
Call Us For A Free Quote!
Madison Monticello Perry
973-4071 997-2213 584-2371
503 W. Base 105 W. Anderson 813 S. Washington
www.floridafarmbureau.com


i~I.

~mhi'~


SWACHOVIA.
Timbre Denmark
4 Mortgage Consultant
Wachovia Mortgage Corporation
FL1925
1997 Capital Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: 850-320-1094
Fax: 850-920-1089
3 timbre.denmark@wachovia.com


U
iFtmm'


MU


VONi




I M l ,

Zl",

aU


Specializing In
Ornamental Aluminum Fencing

.*Chain Link Custom Wood Custom Deck
*Custom Gates & Operators *PVC Fence


942-1003

btfencing@comcast.net


Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured

Member of Tallahassee
Chamber of Commerce


'I ^ ;\., -


Mor


I U





AI-,
















V-l
Allo
J.,':
oiow











PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005


Sports


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy re-
cently recognized their players of
the year for the 2004-05 baseball
season.
They were not able to receive
their awards last year during the
Athletic Banquet because they were
still in the midst of playoff action.
Coach Ray Hughes said the War-
riors ended the season with a 26-4
record. They were Regional final-
ists for three years in a row and
also the District Champions three
years in a row.
Glen Bishop was named the De-
fensive Player of the Year. He
only had one error all season and
he had a .984 fielding percentage.
Casey Gunnels and Chris Tuten
were named the Offensive Players
* of the Year.
Gunnels finished the season with


a batting average of .422, he scored
a total of 47 runs, and stole 21
bases. He had an on base average
of .628.
Tuten had a batting average of
.430. He scored 46 runs and stole'
13 bases. His on base percentage
was .670.
Ridgely Plaines received the
pitching award. He pitched nine
wins and two losses for the season
and he is accredited with two saves.
He also struck out a total of 61 bat-
ters.
Over the past four years, Plaines
has pitched 23 winning games and
only pitched five losing games for
the Warriors.
Drew Sherrod was named the
MVP for the third year in a row.
He had a batting average of .500,
he had 19 extra base hits, including
five home runs, 46 RBI's which
tied the school record and an on
base percentage of .659.


. JCHS Falls To Chipley

26-19 In Kickoff Classic
couldn't get the quarterback ar
FRAN HUNT ceivers on the same wave lena


Staff Writer


JCHS Brian, Brock prepares to snap the ball to
for the kickoff, at a recent Tiger practice session


The Jefferson County High school
.-" varsity football team lost to Chip-
ley, 26-19 in the pre-seAson Kick-
off Classic, Friday.
Head Football Coach Harry Ja-
cobs said the loss did not reflect
who the Tigers are or their ability
to play.
"It was really hot and nine or 10
of the players were suffering from
heat cramps," said Jacobs. "We
rolled down on them, but it was
S. .. just too hot. I think they may have
gotten dehydrated.
"We did the best we could under
the circumstances," he added. "If
the situation was better, they
wouldn't have been able to keep up
with us on the field."
He added that they hope they
have no more extremely hot game
o the punter days.


n.


Aucilla Warrior JV

Football Roster Told
taking one season off, is Dillon
FRAN HUNT Flores.
Staff Writer The first game of the gridiron
season is slated 3:30 p.m., Thurs-
'In-..Ri -O+ 1 osimt MAunrnp here.


Aucilla Christian Academy re-
ports its Junior varsity football ros-
ter.
There are 25 boys on the team,
this year, which Coach Ray Hughes
said in the past numbered 18.
"We have more players and that
gives us more depth," said Hughes.
Of the returning nine players,
there are three ninth graders, where
there is normally a substantially
higher number.
There are 15 new members to the
team, and one member who took a
year off, is returning.
Returning to the Warriors are
Daniel Ward, Casey Anderson, De-
vin Reams, Ceth Whitty, Luke
Whiter, Matt Bishop,- Brian
Scholte, Jacob Newberry and Jake
Walker.
New to the Warriors this year are
Tyler Jackson, Matt Dobson, Bran-
don Dunbar, Wilson Lewis, Mat-
thew Harrington, Ryan Barkley and
Buddy Vollertsen.
Also, Christopher Westberry,
Clark Christy, Levi Cobb, Alex
Gulledge, Jacob Pitts, Matt Tuten,
Trent Roberts and Mason Shiver.
Returning to the Warriors after


Warriors Face

Munroe Sept. 1

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy JV
football team scheduled game
against Steinhatchee, had to be
canceled.
"Steinhatchee didn't have enough
play ers." said Coach Ray Hughes.
Warriors open thier season
against Munroe, 3:30 p.m., Sept. 1.
Hughes really had no foresight
into the coming game,. "I haven't
seen them in action, so you never
know the outcome," said Hughes.
"We are making progress, but still
have a long way to go," he added.
"We do have more players and
more depth this year," said Hughes.
"But we also ha\e onl\ three ninth
graders and that's less than we usu-
ally have."
As 'the Warriors continue to prac-
tice for the opening game of the
season.


.. .


.


ACA Colby Roberts tackles Colby Waddail, who
cessful at getting over the goal, as he went dowi
Photos)


"Overall, we looked good as a
team, there were a few problems,
but we looked good," said Jacobs.
He added that the blockers did an
excellent job on passing, but the Ti-
ger quarterback and receivers have
to work more on their timing.
"The blockers did their jobs,"
said Jacobs. "We had plenty of
time to throw the football but just


Flag Football

Signup Set


The Jefferson County Recreation
Department will be taking registra-
tions for Pee Wee Flag Football
from 9-11 a.m, Saturday, Sept. 10,.
at the park.
Preregistrations may be made
Sept. 1-9. The registration fee is
was suc- $15 and the sport is for children
n. (News ages 7-11, as of Dec. 1, 2005.
For further information contact
Director Kevin.Aman at 342-0240.


Aucilla Christian Academy JV

Cheerleaders Ready For Season,


Aucilla Christian Academy JV
Cheerleading Coach Stasey
Whichel reports that there are nine
girls on the squad this year.
Five are returning, three are new
to the squad, and one is returning
after taking one year off.
"They've been practicing new
cheers and stunts," said Whichel,
"and the new girls are picking eve-


rything up very well."
Returning to the Lady Warriors
are ninth graders Captain Savannah
Williams, Co-Captain Erin Kelly,
Kasey Joiner and Kaitlin Levine.
The returning eighth grader is
Co-Captain Dana Watt.
Returning to the squad after tak-
ing one year off is ninth grader Sa-
vannah Reams, and new to the


Lady Warriors this year are eighth
grader Kalyn Brown, and seventh
graders Cheyenne Adams and Kait-
lin Jackson..
Subscribe Today!
Monticello News
In State: $45.00 (yr.)
Out of State: $52.00 (yr.)


nd re-
th ,:


The Jefferson County Road Dept. is seek-
ing bids for a 30 days rental of a Track
Excavator. All interested companies please
submit their bids to the attention of the
Road Dept. Should be comparable to a
Hitachi 450 with a 2.8 yd rock bucket.
Bids may be informally submitted by
phone fax or written. Office 997-2036, fax
997-6760
8/19, 8/24, c
The Jefferson County Planning Commis-
sion will hold a meeting on August 25,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held
in the Courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


_________________________-----------*-------1
U *


BURNETTE PLUMBING &

WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


LUMART AVIATION
Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
Come fly with us!


LUTHER S. TURNER
2150 ElftIon Rd
Perry, FL 32347
Phone:(850)584-8867
Lumart's Stolport
N 30-07-51,W 083-32-58
E-mail: LST@gtcom.net


Classic Cessna, 170-B


I


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT



M 850-997-5808


850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JOlN COLLINS RD.


I


STAR TEAM
(MONTICELLO / TALLAHASSEE)
SHAUNDRA M. BUGGS



HO
LADY BUOG LIFESTYLES (
Website: www.ladybuggllfestyles.blz Ema


OME: 850-997-2404
CELL: 850-264-5112
"*h ""ascennl nn 'b_6r


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road,
Maintenance ,
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757"?


ELEGANT WOODEN FURNITURE
Gun Cabinels, Hutchas, Tables,
Chairs, Madi Canters, Hladbods
(daoo door =tyl, color, s'=as, ..)
Also-Aniqu.s und Gif-s
10 m 430pm Tvas-
Hucdabay'.... Cr. L 3m Tes-
210 W W4&FLngn24 (or by 8 on-3)0
Moradlo FL 32344 850/997-3400


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South
997-2535


Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


1538 Jefeso


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


BETTER BODIES


I AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY REPAIR I


REE EST1MA TESi 1


I FREE PARTS /
.OCATION SERVICEl


ROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION!.
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
966N. BARBER Hr.L RD. LAMONT, Fl.
I 997-4160 1
ANDY & TLNA AMES. OWNERS


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE


qorman L. Barf
exclusive Agent
arfoot Insurance Gr


Allstate Insurance Compan'
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 13(
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.

oot 878-8077 :
OPEN Monday-Fnrday 8:30-5 30
oup Email:NORMANBARRFOO1l'allstate.com I


ACA Recongizes


Baseball Players


P


-A


-I


curtis morgan's Garage, inc.


I


I


49w-Romm


L


I


. I


all: i0youggl5wtiulamill U


Complete game statistics wer,
not available before press time, but
Jacobs said there were some im-
pressive plays made by the Tigers.
Lucious Wade scored two touch-
downs on long runs, rushing for ap-'
proximately 150 yards and Jon
Dady ran back a kick off 99 yards
for a touchdown.
'Jacobs didn't have an exact
count, but he added that Robert
Nealy did have a lot of tackles dur-!
ing the game.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby
given that pursuant to Chapter 373,
Florida Statutes, the following
applications) for water use.permit(s) has
(have) been received by the Northwest
Florida Water Management District:
Application number I 06597 filed
-08/15/2005 Gem Land Company, 11418
Cherokee Plantation Court, Tallahassee,
FL 32312 Requesting a maximum
withdrawal of 1,440,000 gallons per day
from the Floridan Aquifer System for
Aesthetic use by a proposed facility.
General withdrawal locations) in
Jefferson County: T01S, R03E, Sec. 6A
Interested persons may object to or
comment upon the applications or submit
a written request for a copy of the staff
reports) containing proposed agency
action regarding the applications) by
writing to the Division of Resource
Regulation of the Northwest Florida
Water Management District, attention
Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management
Drive, Havana, Florida 32333-9700, but
such comments or requests must be
received by 5 o'clock p.m. on September
8, 2005. No further public notice will be
provided regarding this (these)
applicationss. Publication of this notice
constitutes constructive notice of this
permit application to all substantially
affected persons. A copy of the staff
reports) must be requested in order to
remain advised of further proceedings and
any public hearing date. Substantially
affected persons are entitled to request an
administrative hearing regarding the
proposed agency action by submitting a
written request according to the provisions
of 40A-1.521, Florida Administrative
Code. Notices of Proposed Agency Action
Willkbe mailed only to persons who have
filed such requests. .
8/24, c


940


m


ctay, iepi. i, against iviumuu, iia;;.







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad '





997 -3568
. -- ';


Y CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


(CASSIFIED ADVERTKJNGRAT
3 iewb editions ~Wednesda' a.F"iid"
'.:. Each Additional Lie....$i "
DiADLIEES'Monday N6on for Wednea ,:. .
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at: '
o .997-3568
"0


T,{ELI~9-ANT MO.


US Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be con-
tinued as necessary. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual ",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this, state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
- if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with respect, to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing he or she will
I need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. -
8/24, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE: Jefferson
County Board of County Commission will
< have a public hearing on the following
proposed land development code change
on September 18, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the
- courtroom of the Jefferson County court-
house located at the intersection of U.S.
Highways 90 and 19. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ORDI-
NANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE OF
^,JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA,
REPEALING AND AMENDING THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY LAND DEVEL-
OPMENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; REPEALING ARTICLE 1,
GENERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 3,
CONCURRENT, ARTICLE 4
RESOURCE PROTECTION,'ARTICLE 5
- DEVELOPMENT DESIGN, ARTICLE 7,
HARDSHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8,
BOARDS AND AGENCIES, AND ARTI-
CLE 9, ADMINISTRATION AND
ENFORCEMENT, OF THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE; ADOPTING ARTICLE 1 GEN-
ERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 3, CON-
CURRENCY, ARTICLE 4 RESOURCE
PROTECTION, ARTICLE 5, DEVELOP-
MENT DESIGN, ARTICLE 7 HARD-
SHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8 BOARDS
AND AGENCIES, AND ARTICLE 9,
ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCE-
.MENT, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIL-
IT.Y- -PROVIDING A REPEALING
CLAUSE; PRO\ IDING FOR INCORPO-
RATION INTO THE LAND DEVELOP-
MENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIA E DATE: AND PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY. From the "Florida
Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c:' each board, com-
mission or agency of this slate or of any,
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency con-,
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with. respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a. verbatim record of the, pro-.
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. Prior to the meeting
interested persons may contact the Jeffer-
son County Planning and Building Depart-
ment at 850-342-0223 or write the
Department at P.O. Box 1069, Monticello,
FL 32345 and provide comments. The pro-
posal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277' North Mulberry Street, Monticello.
Florida 32344. "
S8/24,c ,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
* SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
^ CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs.
t EVA KRMOIAN, RAUL ALFONSO
SFLOREZ, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS)
Defendant. SECOND AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION TO EVA KRO-
MIAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
,. action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
I lowing property in Jefferson County, Flor-
Sida: Lot 30, Block D, of Aucilla Shores
4 Subdivision, a subdivision as per the plat
I thereof filed at Plat Book B, Page 38, of
the Public Records of Jefferson County,
Florida.. has been filed against you and
, you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on ,GARVIN
' B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff's attorney,
. whose address is Gardner, Wadsworth,
SDuggar, Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300 Tho-
maswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32308, on or before September 16, 2005
(within 30 days of first publication), file
the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the plaintiff's
Attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you
Sfor relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED AUGUST 10TH, 2005.
DALE BOATWRIGHT, Clerk of the Cir-
Icuit Court.
8/17. 8/24.C ,


Fl^v.&u" I. waI U r r| i U Nm T I
Pine Lake Nursing Home. Job Title:
Social Services Director. Duties:
Responsible for planning, developing,
organizing, implementing, evaluating
and directing the Social Service
Department in accordance with
current existing federal, state, and.
local standards, as well as our
established policies and procedures, to
ensure that the medically related
emotional and social needs of the


residents are met/maintained on an
individual basis. Qualifications: A
minimum of HS diploma; bachelor's
degree preferred. A bachelor's degree
in social work or in a human services
field is acceptable. Salary and benefits
are competitive. Experience in this
field preferred but not required.
Applications may be obtained from:
Pine Lake Nursing Home, 13455 West
Hwy 90, Greenville, FL 32331,
850-948-4601, FAX 850-948-1702.
8/24, c
Huddle House: Experienced waitress
& cooks. Apply within, US 19 & I 10,
see Jack.
8/24, 26, 31, 9/2, c
Wanted: Experiences roofers or la-
borers. Pay by the hour or square. In-
dividuals or sub crews. Good roofers
earn $700 to $1000. Laborers start
$9.00/hour. Call Gene at 562-8366 or
251-7459.
8/19, tfn, c
Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners is seeking applicants
for Fire/Rescue Chief in the
department of Ambulance/Fire. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Room 10,, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida.
Salary range is $34,819.00 -
$52,229.00. Minimum qualifications
are: Knowledge of fire service and
emergency medical service
management principles and practices.
Knowledge of modern practices in fire
fighting, and emergency' medical
services. Ability to lead and motivate
an organization and group of people.
Ability to make decisions in
emergency situations. Ability to
communicate effectively in writing
and orally. Ability to delegate
authority and to supervise the work of
subordinates. Ability to establish
working relationships with employees
and the public. Ability to establish
and maintain an operating budget..
Education and experience needed:
Graduation from an accredited high
school or possession of an equivalency
diploma. Possession of a four (4) year
degree in Fire Administration.,
Business Administration, Public
Administration or a related field is
preferred. Five (5) years of
progressively more responsible
authority in the fire service with at
least two (2) years service as a
supervisor in a similar department. (A
comparable amount of training,
education or experience may :be
substituted for the above minimum
qualifications). Licenses,
Certification's or Registrations:*
Florida State Minimum Standards
Certification as a' Firefighter.'
Registration as an Emergency
Medical Technician. Possession of a
valid Florida Driver's License.
Essential Physical Skills: Must meet,
physical requirements as established
by department policy. Must meet
physical requirements as indicated for
State Certification. Must endure
sustained acts of physical exhaustion
and endure periods of duty under
unfavorable and life threatening
situations. Light (up to 15 'pounds)
lifting and carrying. Walking.
Standing. Environmental Conditions: .
Works inside and occasionally outside
in emergency situations. Reasonable
accommodation will be made for
otherwise qualified individuals with, a
disability. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m., August 29,
-2005, at the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer. Drug Free Workplace.
Drug testing is a required part of
preemployment physical. Applicants
.with a disability should contact the
above office for accommodation.
8/19, 24, c
Experienced WELDERS needed in
Thomasville. Full-time, two shifts,
long term employment, full benefits
plus bonus plan. Must pass welding
test, physical, drug test, and
background check. Call 850-322-7327
leave name and number.
8/19, 24, pd


Full-time or Part-time. Seeking
reliable office manager to help
organize small, but busy office.
Responsibilities include: fielding
customer telephone inquiries,
sourcing material from Vendors,
coordinating shipping and receiving,
computer input, filing and other
general office responsibilities.
Starting salary negotiable based on
skill level and experience. Please send
resume, including references, to Help
Wanted, PO Box 186, Lamont, FL
32336.
8/19, 24, c
Monticello Days Inn. Night
auditor/front desk clerk, needed with
computer and people skills. Start with
good pay. Apply in person.
8/12, tfn, c


Drillers Helper. Great pay and
benefits. Must be able to travel. Clean
FL license, CDL a plus. Drug Free
and EOE. Call 800-487-9665.
8/12, 17, 19, 24, c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an, air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
8/10, tfn, c
"Our Blessings" is now looking for
qualified teachers to join their
winning team. Must have 40 hrs., for
more info call 997-1110 or 342-1111.
8/17, 19, 24, 26, 31, pd
Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens.
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Wanted: Kennel Tech. FT/PT
available. Must enjoy working with
animals. Call 877-5050.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Warehouse driver for Buddy's Home
Furnishing. Please apply in Person.
1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, 6/12, s/d, tfn

GARAGE SALE-
Garage Sale All Star Mini Storage.
US Hwy 19S Friday 8/26, 9am?
Saturday 8/27, 9am? Curtains, books,
household items, chest freezer.
8/24, 26, pd

FOR RENT _
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 99741980.
8/10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, 9/2, c
3bdrm, 1 V2 b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
7/13, tfn, c
RV or Mobile home lots for rent. Call
Liz @ 997-1638. No calls before 9 a.m.
& no calls after 7 p.m., please.
8/5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, c

FOR SALE .


Bush Hog Mover 8ft. Model 3008.
New Condition- 'list for $5,700.00
offered for $3,600.00. FMC Pecan
Sprayer mounded on Chevy C65
truck. $7,500.00. 997-3947 or
933-2938.
8/24, 26, pd
15 year old Quarter Horse $800 obo,
Call Mike @ 528-5614.
8/17, 19, 24, 26, 31, pd


% Acre Mobile Home Lot For Rent.
I-10/Hwy. 59 in Lloyd, water/sewer
hookup, $200/month, 509-8401.
8/19, 24, 26, 31, 9/2, 7, 9, 14, pd


1989 Sporty Probe, recently
mechanically overhauled, blows cold,
good tires, $1200. Call 997-7441.
8/19, tfn

'. .,-',
Life is a blessing and a gift to be
celebrated. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 AM.
997-4116.
8/24, c
Certified CNA looking to take care of
your loved one. Give me a call at
591-6433 or 997-1999.
8/17, 19, 24, 26, 31, pd
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
'Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn


Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 ifn


Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


I


fW.r. 0.1 In rc.. m


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St
997-5516


LET US DO YOUR
HOME WORK


* New Construction-3BR/2BA in town, open floor plan with
attached garage....................... ...................... $164,900
* Singlewide Mobile Home- good condition on 5 wooded acres
on the edge of town....................................... $82,500
* Madison County- mobile home in the country, 1 ac. $55,700
* Bungalow- one of a kind, wood floors, high ceilings, large
fenced com er lot.................... ....................... $107,000
* Cooper's Pond- new construction, 1600 sq. ft. ........$169,900

www.cbkk.com






| Hl7Pgriitl |
I wk"ro/ifii


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Government Farms Road 5 or 10 acres
buyers choice hillside planted pines
$15,000/acre
New Listinq!!! Under Contract 3.89
acres in Plantation Woods south of Lloyd
on SR 59 and soon to be paved Planta-
tion Woods Road $46,500
Brand New Listinq! 3 bedroom home in
town at East Anderson St. $155,000
Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy
Road in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding
acres with a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000


Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bedrooms
2 baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile and hard-
wood floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace and
a screened porch, 1 acre Now only
$135,000
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, cor-
ner of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000


On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinc Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bedroom
2 bath double wide with a bathroom that
won't quit on a high hill with a view in Aucilla
Forest and Meadows only $55,000
Check Out This One! 8 acres with big.
doublewide and small house on a pretty old
hillside close to Leon County off Julia Road
$160,000

Bic doublewide with additions 12 rooms
quiet wooded lot $56,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000
Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside, county road $75,000
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double
wide with new galvanized aluminum roof and
vinyl siding, 3 sheds, fish pond, fenced on
2.4 acres only $86,500



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for
acreage between Monticello and Lloyd
can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Simply the Best

Buyers looking for Homes and Land
S--- ---_-----_------_.. ..... _n -- __, w r mJt r .


Are you Looking For A....


PRIME DOWNTOWN



OFFICE SPACE




Cherry Street Commons Bldg.




Available Now!!!


Call 997-1980

Jack Carswell







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 24, 2005
THE TIGSYU SHO L OS IDE


LITTLE UNIVE
Now Holding Or


VALUE v All ages lyr to 12yrs
v VPK Provider for 4 year o
QUALITY v Creative PreK Curriculum
WO/hRKMU AN IP iv Before school and after sc
WORKMANSHIP v Homework Assistance
v Hot & Nutritious meals se
C v Summer day camp for scP
.9.. Cv Tumbling Classes Offere
v Sibling Discounts
v Part-Time Care Available
'ev Experienced and Caring S
Sm Hours 7am-6pu
997-2970 315
Customize Over 70 Floor Plans
Call Today: 850-309-0800
Come visit our Showroom in the Royal Oak Plaza
1989 Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee, FL 32308
Sthirdoe. T:= --eewlbeL FLCR-c057203 L62



Robert's Backyard *Bar -'B-Q*
Formerly Panhandle Restaurant

NOB997-12020
6am llpm





Lunch Buffet

Sun. Fn. 11 --2 pm




















F inal sho of our Heatwave Circuit W ill be on September 17 2005. If you did not have
Sthe0 opportunity to visit us d during our first two shows wewould love toseeyou at the
third one. There will be a BBQ at the end of the day when the awards for the riders will
be givenout. Don't forget to bring your family and Triendsc to erilo the day, \atch the ,
riders, acindiends p uthe odayr ith atiBBQ.s t g
1 866-DRITON



Final sho of our He at wa ve'Circuitwill be on September 17. 2005. If you did ot have
the opportunity to visit us during our first two shows we would love to seeiyou at the
third one. There will be a BBQ at the end of the day when the awards for the riders will
be given out.e Don't forget'to bring your familyiand'friends. to enio the day, atch the
r riders and end the day with a BBQ-.


Our fall classes for local and out of town riders is forming no\. If you are a beginning .
rider or a novice rider, pleased call us to set up a time for indie idual or group lesions.
These spots are rapidly filling so please call as soon as possible to arrange a time that is





progress for our Thanksgiving.camp for all ages. This camp will include lessons, trail
riding, activities, campfires, camping out along with all of the other fun things that go
with camps. The dates are November 26, 27 and departing on the 28th.


The first weekend in December we are planning a horse show in combination with a craft
show. Any of you crafters that have an interest in setting up a booth, please give us a call
so we can reserve your booth for you. Space is limited.-o


Finally, our coaches are also in the process of organizing our week long Christmas Camp.
Likewise, this will be open to all ages, experienced or inexperienced riders. We will not
only have all the activities from our Thanksgiving camp, but will expand on all areas
including individual lessons, group.lessons, clinics, crafts and much, much more.


I l l1 1 1 1 1 1ll IHI II I I1 Il I I I I l I I I l l I l I ll I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I I

DRIFTON FARMS
2665 AUCILLA HIGHWAY
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344


AGE SEX


;RSITY COMPANY NOTICE OF CHANGE IN
en Enrollment for:
en Enrollmentfor:LIST OF PERMITTED USES

olds IN B-1
n for 3 years
School program ZONING DISTRICT

served w/two daily snacks (DOWNTOWN BUSINESS)
hoolagers
d


Staff The City Council of the City of
ii Monday-Friday Monticello proposes to adopt the
S. Mulberry St. following ordinance: ORDINANCE 2005-
07 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE
LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA TO ADD
TOWN HOMES AS A SPECIAL
EXCEPTION USE IN THE B-1
ZONING DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


It' Hanii _ri......... The entire text of the ordinance may be
NwaIiIowens inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry
RSoker-tkEg Street, Monticello, Florida between the
_.'a_ hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
"'!"r',' mMonday through Friday. Public hearing on
the ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, September 6, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at
Monticello City Hall. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.




NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT
CHANGES



AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL
AREAS OF THE FUTURE "LAND USE ELEMENT; PROVIDING
ADDITIONAL PERMISSIBLE LAND USES IN AREAS DESIGNATED
AGRICULTURAL; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.



Jefferson County will hold a public hearing to adopt text changes in the Comprehensive Plan for the agriculture 20,
agriculture 5, and agriculture 3, land use classifications that will add agricultural related activities, outdoor recreation,
bed and breakfast inns, and hunting lodges and clubs as land uses allowed by ordinance in Comprehensive Plan
Amendment 95-01. All of the agriculture areas of Jefferson County are included in the proposed changes. See map
below:









JF R N COUNT--Y





JEFFERSON COUNTY


The public hearing on adoption of the ordinance will be held on September 15, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. at the
courtroom of the county courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing may
be continued from time to time as may be necessary. Information concerning the amendment is available at the
Jefferson County Planning Department, 277 N. Mulberry St., Monticello, FL 32344. From the Florida
'Government in the Sunshine Manual'. Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect 'to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and .evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


*


NAME