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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00065
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: August 17, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00065
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text







Opera House
Stage Company
TO Present 'witness'

Story, Page 3
IM


LID;APRY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
4'-4 LIBRARY WEST
.IVFr.,T"y OF FLT.DA
IEFIqVTLJF. PT,. 32611
Help Teens
Stay Safe
Online

Editorial, Page 4


Clubs Get
Telescopes,
Learning CDs

Story, Photo, Page 6


Coaches Take
Precautions
In Hot Weather

Story, Page 10


Wednesday Morning


Mo


ti


cello
Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 20


A:;

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CINDY LEE, right, and her husband, Don
(background), have been vocal critics of the
fragmentation of the county via rezoning and
Comp Plan amendments. From left, Plan-


ning Official Bob Arredondo, former planner
Bill Tellefsen, and Don and Cindy Lee.,
(News Photo)


WENDY MOSS, a member of the Planning
Commission, talks with developer represen-
tative Alan Saucier during an earlier meet-
ing. Moss expressed frustration Thursday


with the several
projects to have
Photo)


foul-ups that have caused
to be re-advertised. (News


1,435 Acres Up For Rezoning


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Residents opposed to: piop,-.ed
land-use changes that would affect
some 1,400 acres in the county won
temporary victories Thursday night.
Planners rescheduled two of the
applications when it was discovered
that the developers' representative
failed to notify all adjoining prop-
erty owners of the proposed
changes.
Planners outright denied the third
application as incompatible with the
county's best interest.
Given that the Planning Commis-


sion's decision is only a recommen-
dation, however, the County Com-
mission may yet reverse the last out-
come.
The first application was for the
rezoning of 73 acres off US 19 and
south of 1-10 .from agriculture-5
(one house per five acres) to
residential-1 (one house per acre).
This is at least the third time that
this application has come before
planners, either because of improper
advertisement or associated prob-
lems.
Alan Saucier represents the devel-
opment, as he does many others in
the county.
Confusion exists as to the exact


number of acres to be rezoned. But the hearing had come Monday. This


Saucier on Thursday night put the
number at 13 wetland acres and 59
useable acres.
Opponents' objections include
concerns about the de elopment's
incompatibility with the rural char-
acter of the area; the project's poten-
tial impact on the wetlands and aq-
uifer, given its 50-plus septic tanks;
and alleged errors in the newspaper
advertisement.
But the one objection that stopped
the proceedings Thursday night
came from Wm. Gordon Dean,
owner of a property just'south of the
one to be rezoned. I
Dean said his first knowledge of


despite the fact that he has owned
the property for more than a year
and has had various contacts with
ihe ij,. collector,, piopert ,apprialer
and building inspector.
Verifying that Dean's name was
indeed absent from the list that Sau-
cier used to mail out notices, Plan-
ning Commission Attorney Scott
Shirley advised that the hearing be
continued 7 p.m. Sept. 8.
Planner Wendy Moss reacted to
the fact of yet-another foul-up with
frustration.
"I'm appalled," Moss said. "This is
an abomination. I'm humiliated."
The second proposal, which Sau-


cier also represented, calls for the
rezoning of 377 acres off US 27
near the Waukeenah area.
The property consists of two par-
cels, one zoned mixed-use tiiburbjn
residennal and the second zoned
agriculture-3 (one house per three
acres). The request is to rezone the
combined properties into
residential-1 (one house per acre).
"This comp plan amendment is
unique in that it will result in zero
net impact," Saucier said, adding
that the total number of houses
would be "under 250 units".
Again, the objections of surround-
ing property owners centered on en-
vironmental and density concerns,


the potential degradation of the
county's rural beauty, and the fiscal
impact on the county's services.
. "I'm not saying we shouldn't de-
velop," said one resident. "We need
to grow. I'm asking that you con-
sider the concept of moderation.
Density is the key word ... If you ap-
prove too big a density change, the
genie is out of the bottle."
"I know development has to come,
but let's honor this exquisite land,"
said Sallie Worley, whose ancestors
she said settled here in 1828. "Once
you lose it, you can't ever regain it.
Let's take' our time and plan. So
please, don't rezone to one house per
(See Rezoning Page 3)


Commissioners Eye Citations


AS Way TO Control Bad Dogs


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners made a little head-
way Thursday, in terms of address-
ing the animal control issue.
After much discussion on the pro-
posal submitted by the Responsible
Pet Owners of Jefferson County
(RPOJC), commissioners indicated
they favored issuing citations to vio-
lators and possibly adopting a leash-
and-registration law.
Commissioners, however, stopped
short of making any commitment.
They said they wanted to consider
the proposal submitted by Wendy
Moss before making any decision.


The latter proposal is scheduled for
discussion 4 p.m. Thursday.
The RPOJC is a group of con-
cerned citizens who organized about
six months ago to help the county
fashion a more effective animal con-
trol program.
After months of research, the
group submitted a proposal that in-
cluded as possibilities the imple-
mentation of a license fee, a $24
annual non-ad-valorem assessment,
and imposition of a half-cent sales
tax to help fund the program.
Commissioners immediately re-
jected the special assessment idea,
saying it would create an undue
hardship on elderly residents on a
_ fixed income.


"In my opinion, the license fee is
the way to go," Commission Chair-
man Skeet Joyner said more than
once.
His question was, how was the
county to ensure compliance, given
that many people would simply ig-
nore the law?
Sarah larussi, a member of
RPOJC, explained that enforcement
of the licensing requirement would
be a function ofthe entity responsi-
ble for animal control. The other
side of the coin, she said, was that
individuals whose animals were
found to be unlicensed would be
fined extra.
"In my opinion, $10 a year for a
dog is- not a lot," Joyner said. "And


$5 for a cat sounds fair and realistic.
My personal opinion is fees are fair,
if we can make sure everybody
pays."
He kept returning to the question
of funding, however. How was the
county to raise the necessary funds
to support an animal control pro-
gram, he kept asking.
Because absent a place to hold the
animals once impounded, the pro-
gram wouldn't work, he said.
, "To get this thing off the. ground,
we need to refine the revenue thing
and the rest of the things will fall
into line," Joyner said.
He liked the idea of informing the
public of the registration and licens-
-(See Bad Dog Page 3)


MEMBERS of the citizens group Responsible Pet Owners of
Jefferson County review their proposal prior to the start of
Thursday's workshop. From left, Bobbie Golden, Sarah la-
russi and Fred Golden. (News Photo)


Congressman Boyd Hopeful Political


System Will Self-Correct Given Time
the Democratic Party of Jefferson party in communicating our mes- and freedom to move up the soc


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Congressman Allen Boyd was the
guest speaker at a gathering of
Democrat faithful held at the
Women's Club last Tuesday in rec-
ognition of precincts 2 and 4.
The evening get-together, which
included an informal dinner, is part
of the ongoing effort to make the lo-
cal Democratic Party more viable
and cohesive.
Boyd praised Chairwoman Elea-
nor Hawkins for putting excitement
back into the local political party.
"Thank you for reviving interest in


County," Boyd said.
He. reminded his listeners that
Democrats had controlled local,
state and national politics for the
better part of the 20th Century, until
complacency set in.
"We got complacent and we for-
got what you had to do to meet the
needs of the people," Boyd said.
The Republicans, meanwhile, had
used that weakness to advantage, he
said. And the evidence was the tre-
mendous gains that the GOP had
made in the last 10 to 15 years, in
terms of controlling the state and
federal governments.
"We have been miserable as a


sage," Boyd said. "The other team
has done a better iob."
How else can the fact that Florida,
which had more registered Demo-
crats than Republicans, had a Re-
publican governor, Legislature, and
cabinet, as well as 18 of 25 congres-
sional representatives, Republican,
be explained? He asked.
Boyd went on to praise the great-
ness of the United States, a great-
ness he said was based on certain
fundamental principals established
by the forefathers in the Constitu-
tion.
Those principals, Boyd said, in-
cluded protection of minority rights


:ial


scale via the avenues of education
and hard work.
Boyd said the one abiding stan-
dard he applied to every piece of
legislation that came before him was
whether it would expand or shrink
the middle class -- the bedrock of
this country.
"Most of this century, this gov-
ernment has done everything to ex-
pand the middle class," Boyd said.
But no more, he said. At least not
since the Republicans had come to
power.
"The Republicans have played up
to the large corporations," Boyd
(See Boyd Page 7)


137TH YEAR NO.65, 50 CENTS


CONGRESSMAN ALLEN BOYD talks to a gathering of
Democrats at the Women's Club last Thursday. The event,
which was to recognize precincts 2 and 4, included an in-
formal dinner. (News Photo)


ow









Residents Attend

Pet First Aid Class


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Local animal lovers took advan--
tage of the area's first, and quite
possibly the first in the state, Pet
First Aid and CPR class, offered by
the American Red Cross, at the Hu-
mane Society shelter, Saturday.
Instructor Jessica Norris taught
the class and distributed an infor-
mative book called, "Pet First Aid"
by Bobbie Mamate, DVM, MPH.
Members of the class also each
received a CPR face shield and a
card stating that they had com-
pleted the class.
Many different areas of first aid
were covered during the four hour
session, including bleeding, prop-
erly stabilizing a protruding object,
properly securing and wrapping
and eyeball out of the socket,


JANE CLEVELAND practices the proper wrapping of pet ear
wound at Animal First Aid Class, Saturday.

Extension Agent Tells

Uses Of Carambola Fruit


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With a bumper crop of Carambola
Fruit expected this year, Consumer
Science Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland offers residents informa-
tion about how best to use the fruit.
Carambola is common called the
"Star Fruit," she explained, because
when cut in cross sections, the fruit
slices resemble a five point star.
"Like most tropical fruits, it is
"very juicy," Copeland notes.
"The flesh of the fruit has a deli-
cate, complex flavor that is often
likened to the blend of lemon,
apple, pineapple, and kiwi."
She offers some tips about the
fruit:
*When ripe, a carambola has a
fruity, floral aioma, and is golden
yellow in color. It yields to a little
pressure when touched.
*Avoid fruit that is brown, or has
shriveld ribs.
*Carambolas bruise easily and
should be handled carefully.



Citizens Urged
To Read
TRIM Notices

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Property Appraiser David Ward
reports that TRIM (Truth In
Millage) notices will be mailed Fri-
day.
The purpose of the notices.is to al-
low residents time to examine them
and to raise any questions they
might have.
"Read the TRIM notice. Don't.
wait for the tax bill to question it,
because by then it is often too late
to do anything," Ward stressed.
He explained that there is a 25 day
period, extending to Sept. 13 during
which residents may seek answers
to any questions they may have
about their TRIM notices.
Ward urges residents with ques-
tions about the TRIM notice to con-
tact him to assess the situation.
"If it is necessary to petition the
Value Adjustment Board, we have
the petition forms in the office,
which have. to be filed with the
Clerk of Court," Ward stated.
He said tax values were up 16 per-
Scent.
There is a $60 million rise in tax
.value, $15 million of which is in
new construction, Ward explained.
He stated that residents with
Homestead Exemptions were shel-
tered somewhat because their tax
rate increase is capped at three per-
cent.
"It is critical that residents be
aware of the necessity to return,
_%each year, the forms continuing
,,homestead and/or agricultural ex-
,emptions," Ward said, "because if
4 the exemptions are removed because
the forms were not returned, tax
bills will increase."


*Fruit that is a little green can be
stored at room temperature until it is
ripe.
*As with all produce, the fruit
should be rinsed with cold water be-
fore eating.
Copeland states that Carambolas
are an excellent source of postas-
sium and Vitamin C, and are natu-
rally low in fat and calories.
They are the perfect lunch bag
fruit, as they can be eaten out of
hand, seeds and all.
'Carambolas make an attractive
garnish to beverages and entrees,
and add color, crunch, and flavor to
dishes. They can also be stewed or
sauteed.


proper bandaging and splinting
techniques, and the proper respira-
tion and heart rates in different cats
and dogs, according to size.
Norris brought with her a
"Recessy-Fluffy", life sized cat to
be for practice use by class partici-
pants.
They learned how to check for
heartbeats, and the best positions to
feel them, and actual mouth-to-
muzzle rescue breathing, each prac-
ticing every technique on the cat.
The Hilltop donated sub sand-
wiches for lunch for the class.
All attending the class were ask-
ing questions and all felt that they
had gained a wealth of knowledge
in how to care properly for their
pets in the event of an emergency.
If additional interest exists in the
community, a second class will be
set.


Southern Soul Bash


Set Holiday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
A "Southern Soul Bash" will be-
conducted during the Labor Day
weekend at Lloyd Field.
The event is sponsored by David
Hall Entertainment, Inc., and will
feature two full days of coed soft-
ball action and performances from
four different Southern Soul
groups.
The Starlight Band and Ruben
Brewington will perform Saturday,
Sept. 3, and Nathaniel Kimble, per-
forming his hit "Can You Bagg It
Up", and Monti, will perform Sun-
day, Sept. 4.
Hall said the music will begin
following the games. The first
night of games is the elimination
series, and the second night of the
games is the Championship, in
which first and- second place win-


THANK A VET!!
We would like to recognize and honor all persons
currently serving on active duty in our nations military.
We need the names of our county's service members,
their branch of service, and their mailing address.
If you are a relative or loved one of a current military
member please call Michael Bishop at the Jefferson
County Veterans Affairs Office at #342-0211, and provide
what information you have. The American Legion wishes
to reassure all of our military personnel, regardless of6
Where they are assigned, that we in Jefferson County
.appreciate their sacrifices, and patriotism. We will be
sending care packages to military personnel in the near
future,
Please help us to collect the requested information in
order to honor our Service Members.
Jefferson County Veterans Affairs Office & Monticello American Legion Post #49




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Weekend
ning teams will receive trophies.
The gates open Saturday at 8 a.m.
and close Sunday at 9 p.m.
The price of admission is the pur-
chase of a new CD, which can be
purchased locally at Devine De-
signs, Inc., located at 230 N. Olive
St. for $15.
Purchase of the CD affords ad-
mission both days.
For further information or to sign
up a coed. softball team for the
games at no entry fee, call 646-
1659.
If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


LEE CANADY properly secures a protruding object and
splints a leg, during Pet First Aid/CPR Class. (News Pho-
tos)



THANK YOU

Sheriff Hobbs for having Deputy Jerry
Blackman check on the Lamont Baptist
Church Site which is under construction.

We Appreciate Good Law Enforcement!


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Norton Director Of District

Operations, Human Resources


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Jefferson County native Kelvin
Norton has been named Executive
Director of Operations and Human
Resources for District Schools, re-
placing Linda Hewett who ac-
cepted a position with DOE.
His duties include managing per-
sonnel issues, working with the
ESE program and responsibility for
overseeing all of the school proper-
ties within the district.
Norton brings with him, a total of
14 years experience in the educa-
tional field, 12 of which are in the
county.
He began his career a Jefferson
County High School in 1992 as a
math teacher, where he served for
five years.
"I had the opportunity to be a part


NORTON

of the solution to the problem cur-
- rently facing the school
district,"said Norton.
He became Dean of Students at
Howard Middle School, a position


which he held for five and a half
years.
He served as HMS principal for
one year, then went to JCHS, serv-
ing as its principal for one year.
Prior to returning to the county,
Norton served as the Principal of
Florida A & M University DRS for
two years.
He was prompted to come back to
Jefferson because it gave him the
-opportunity to give back to the
community and school system,
which had given him much.
"I was bom and raised here and I
.have full faith in the system that it
will once again be the number one
school district in the state of Flor-
ida."
Norton describes himself as being
self-motivated, goal oriented and a
purpose driven individual, who has
a love and a passion for children.
His hobbies include playing chess,
reading and working on the com-
puter.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Opera House is currently re-
hearsing its Fall Production, "Wit-_
ness for the Prosecution," by Agatha
Christie.
Performance dates are Sept. 16,17,
S18, 23, and 24.
Dinner will be available before
the show, catered by Carrie Ann and
Company.
Reservations are made by calling
the Opera House at 997-4242.
Directing the show are Jan
Rickey and Jack Williams.
The play is a murder mystery and
courtroom drama, filled with twists
and shocking surprises.
Audience's suspicions are focused



Clarification
Local resident Gabrielle Thomp-
son researched and contributed in-
formation for the article appearing
in the Wednesday Aug, 10 edition
of the Monticello News, titled: "Li-
brary Move Half Complete; Open-
ing Planned August 22."
Because of miscommunication, no
mention was made of her contribu-
tion to the piece.


on one suspect after another, until a
surprise ending, which almost no
one expects.
Williams remarks: "I've read all
of Agatha Christie mysteries, and
this one is the best."
Young and charming Leonard
Vole, played by Chris Peary, is ac-
cused of murdering an older lady
who befriended him.
Vole's wife, Romaine, is played
by Stephanie Funderburke, and is
his alibi, but even she has some
doubts.

Vole is represented by Sir
Wilfred, a barrister who goes after
the prosecution with a passion that
becomes quite personal.
Wilfred is played by Duncan
Hoehn, who has appeared often on
the Opera House Stage, most re-
cently as the lead in "Last of the
Red Hot Lovers."


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Sir Wilfred's opponent, prosecu-
tion barrister Nigel Myers is played
by Colin Rolfe, who has played of-
ten in Opera House Stage produc-
tions, ranging from Victor Lazlo in
"Casablanca," to tough guy Sam
Spade in "The Maltese Falcon."
Police Inspector Hearne is played
by Merry Ann Frisby.
Solicitor John Mayhew is played
by Ron Cichon, who returns to the
Opera House Stage after a long ab-
sence.
Pat Cichon makes her Opera
House debut as Greta, Sir Wilfired's
secretary.
George Hook plays the judge.
Hostile witness Janet MacKenzie
is played by Judi Persons.
Irene Steele plays medical expert
Dr. Wyatt.
Jonathan Counts plays the bailiff
and Marisa Bueschiel pli., Pcnn,.
SLisa Reisouer is the stage man-
ager.


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Locally Owned & Operated


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005 PAGE 3

Rezoning Affects 1,435 Acres
nr flt Jontim ljft IFr m Ina 11


acre. We will lose that charm and
serenity that makes this land so spe-
cial."
"A development of this magni-
tude will set a precedent," said Fred
Williams, whose 40-acre property
downhill of the proposed develop-
ment he said already suffers from
runoff problems.
But again, the thing that stopped
the proceedings was the developer's
failure to notify an adjacent property
owner of the proposed change.
Shirley advised that this applica-
tion also be rescheduled for Sept. 8.
"This is ridiculous," Moss said.
The St. Joe Timberland Company
was behind the last request, which
calls for the rezoning of 985 acres
off US 27 near the Leon County
line. The desired change is from


kt-ontinueu vrom rage i)


Bad Dogs Targeted By
(Continued From Page 1)
ing fees via the tax notices mailed cuss on on track.
"So we need to start issuing cita-
by the property appraiser each Octo- tons so we can begin getting fund-
ber, he said. ing," she said. "You need to decide
He also liked the idea of a nine- what will fund this. Maybe grandma
month grace period to educate the will sit with Fluffy on the porch for
public on the registration and li- 20 years without a license and noth-
cense fees. ing will happen. But if Fluffy barks
Commissioner Junior Tuten had a at the neighbor, grandma will have
slightly differtsviewnitdH at the neigo grad ma will hav
slightly different viewpoint. He to pay the fee. But we need to start
thought the focus should be on dan- it. We need to start issuing the cita-
gerous animals and enforcement of tons. And when you leave nuisance
the existing ordinance. animals out of the mix, you will
The problem, he said, was that the have to deal with that issue later."
Sheriffs Department couldn't en-
force the present ordinance because The discussion ricocheted back
it lacked citations. Give the Sheriffs and forth, touching on a host of top-
Department the appropriate citation ics, such as the possibility of setting
forms and the money would begin up a special fee schedule for breed-
coming in, Tuten said. ers and plantation owners and the
Bobbie Golden, another member possibility that many animal owners
of the RPOJC, tried to keep the dis- would abandon their animals rather


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191357le


acres) to agriculture-5 (one house
per five acres).
Company representatives offered
a pictorial representation of a com-
munity that would include clustered
houses, green spaces and meander-
ing paths to retain a rural flavor.
"We're cognizant of the natural
beauty," said one of the two repre-
sentatives. "We don't want to detract
from any of the county's natural
beauty."
But opponents pointed to the lack
of infrastructure in the area to sup-
port such a development, as well as
the lack of economic benefit to the
county.
"These people will work, shop and
send their kids to school ,in Tallahas-
see," Cindy Lee said.
And not to take anything away


from St. Joe or the pretty picture
they presented of the proposed de-
velopment, Don Lee said. But once
St. Joe got the rezoning, the com-
pany could sell the land and the next
owner would not be bound by St.
Joe's representations, he said.
Planners Bud Wheeler and Brad
Mueller voiced the-sentiments of the
commission, which voted 8-1 to
deny the application.
Wheeler called the proposed de-
velopment a satellite community
that would bring no benefit whatso-
ever to Jefferson County.
Mueller referred to the fragmenta-
tion of the region, if the application
was granted. It was his understand-
ing, he added, that the planners' job
was to protect the interest of exist-
ing residents, not only respond to
the wants of developers.



Workshop
than submit to the fees.
County Attorney Buck Bird even
jumped into the discussion at one
point.
"Once you go into strict enforce-
ment, you will eliminate the prob-
lem in two or three years...," Bird
said. "But you're going to have to
bite the bullet ... and front fund this
thing to get it started."
Joyner promised to invite to the
next workshop the property ap-
praiser, tax collector and other indi-
vidual with a possible role in the
successful implementation of the
program.
THANKS FOR MAKING US YOUR BUSINESS.

M 1 GARD RE







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)

Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Help Your Teens


Stay Safe Online


You warned her not to talk to peo-
ple she doesn't know and told her to
take a buddy to the mall. But when
you see your daughter chatting on-
line or instant-messaging, do you
know who is typing back?
Unfortunately, it may be someone
who's up to no good. Of the 24 mil-
lion children online, one in five
,,have received an online sexual so-
licitation, according to a U.S. De-
partment of Justice survey. Two-
thirds, of these solicitations were
'aimed at teen girls.
"Although the Internet offers
many benefits to youth, it gives
predators access to teens when they
,are supposedly 'safe' at home," said
Nancy A. McBride, national Center
for Missing & Exploited Children
(NCMEC).
Well-intentioned warnings from
parents about "stranger danger"
\ don't immunize your daughter-off-
line or online from coinact 'Jih po-
tential predators. Teen girls often
don't associate the seemingly
friendly, flattering and supportive
older guys they meet online. with
someone who means them harm.
And they don't think it can happen
.to them.
To help parents and teens realize
the potential dangers that exist on


the Internet, NCMEC and the Ad
Council recently announced the sec-
ond wave in a three-year public
service advertising effort designed
to raise awareness about keeping
children and teens safer online.
The television, magazine, Internet
and radio spots which are also
available in Spanish show girls
how easily someone can manipulate
their insecurities. The, ads end with
the tag line, "Don't Believe the
Type.",
S "Even if you don't know a lot
about Internet fads, if you talk.with
your teenager about online safety
and keep the lines of communica-
tion open, then you are taking a step
in the right direction," said
McBride.
Shutting off the computer won't
isolate your teen from the Internet's
influence. It's also important that
your children understand not to give
out personal information or to meet
in person someone the\ know only
fr online communication. "
Installing the latest security gadg-
ets on your .computer is no substitute
for dialogue and supervision. "Talk-
ing with a parent about Internet
safety can help teens develop aware-
ness and good decision-making
skills that will translate into safer
choices," said McBride. (NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
August 9, 1995-
The county finale has an annex,
even if it may be a while before the
facility is utilized.
A local man was arrested in Lloyd
on Friday and charged with three
.counts in connection with the recent
shooting of Patrick Campbell. of
Crawfordville in a local parking lot.
Qualifying dates for candidates
desiring to run for one of five city
offices coming up for re-election in
November have been set for Sept.
15-29.
The library is eagerly looking for-
ward to the arrival of a bookmobile
which will spend every third week
in the county when it arrives in Oc-
tober.
TWENTY YEARS
August 7, 1985
Jefferson County school teachers
signed a three year contract with the
Jefferson County School Board last
Wednesday. According to the terms
of the contract, the retirement plan
and teachers' salaries issues may be
reopened for negotiation again dur-
ing the fiext two school years.
Marian Sumner, Director of Jef-
ferson County Public Library for the
last seven years, will resign her po-
sition as of August 16. She has ac-
cepted a position with the Thomas
County School Board.
'A total of 67 young people
worked at the Summer Youth Pro-
gram this summer, earning approxi-
mately $400 each.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
August 7, 1975
In the early morning hours this
past weekend, the travels of the Eli
Rock Group came to a sudden halt
as the truck they Were traveling
overturned on I-10.
The Jefferson County Educational
Association and the Jefferson
County School Board Negotiating


Team are meeting every day this
week to try and finalize a solution to
a working agreement for the benefit
of all teachers, students and parents.
The Big Bend Health Planning
Council held its annual meeting in
Panama City on June 25, 1975. The
council membership for the year
1975-76 include Mrs. Lynn Blow of
Monticello.
There will be a Bingo party, Fri-
day, 7:30 p.m. August 8, 1975 at the
Jefferson High School lunch room.
All proceeds are to go to the Little
League Association. The merchants
of Monticello have all given prizes
so we have a lot to give away.

FORTY YEARS AGO
August 6, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. A.E. Ramsey Jr. of
Albany, Ga., announce the arrival of
a son, Steven Dean on July 28.
Miss Judy Threat was honored at a
farewell party Saturday night at the
home of Miss Mary Lynn Hamilton
on Mahan Drive.
Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Andrews of La-
mont, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Ruth, to David A.
Windsor, son of Rev. W.L. Windsor
and the late Mrs. Windsor, also of
Lamont.
Mr. and Mrs. O.D. Hunter, Iris
and Dixon, visited with relatives and
friends last week in Lake Alfred,
Arcadia, Mulberry, 'Orlando and
Casselberrty.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
August 5, 1955
The County voted overwhelmingly
to establish a Fire Council Unit.
William T. Anderson was ap-
pointed head of Jefferson County
Farmers Home Administration. He
succeeded Luther T. Fountain,
whose term expired. Others on the.-
committee were Bloxham L. Clay-
-ton, and Ernest C. McKown.


From Our Photo File


MEMBERS of Girls organized for alternative
lifestyles took part in a motivational work-
shop at Memorial MB Church, in Feb., 1990.


From left: Nikki Ransom, president; Erica
Mays, secretary; Katrina Manning, vice-
president. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment'




Americans Love Their Pizza


Do we like pizza? Yup, we do. In,
fact, Americans consume 3 billion
pizzas a year or 350 slices per sec-
ond.
Our favorite topping is pepperoni
and our least favorite topping is an-
chovy.
My wife and I like pizza but we
only get three or four (boo!) pizzas a
year since we are watching fat in-
take.
My staff likes pizza. Whenever we
celebrate something we have a pizza
lunch. Last time we did that we had
several pizzas lined up on a buffet
table and attacked them with gusto!
Several years ago, I cut my hand
while moving equipment. and went'
to the health department. which \.as
nearby where the nurse cleaned the.-
wound and bandaged my hand.. ;
The staff there was very nice so I
asked my assistant to send over a
box of chocolates for the health de
apartment workers. .
A few days passed and one of the'
ladies from the health department
saw me on the street and thanked me
for the chocolates, but said, next'


Publisher's

Notebook


complete without sharing my expe-
rience in a Panama City Beach pizza
place.
I walked in, ordered a large pizza
with mushrooms and the young lady
at the counter said, "One topping is
$11.95 and two is $9.95."
I said, "Would you repeat that?"
She repeated it so I asked who set
the prices and she shrugged.
I asked if the manager was in and
she bellowed, "Hey, Joe some guy,
wants to see you!"
Joe came over loaded for bear.
"What's the problem here?" he de-
manded.
"There is no problem," I said.
"I'm interested in 3 our pricing Who
sets the price?" f
He said.."It's in the computer." I
."Okay."\ I 'said "gi e me a large
mushrooni pizza and give the -ec-
ond topping to the next customer
and I'll pay $9.95." .
The manager frowned, sa\ ing,
"I'm gonna let this go, but I think
.you really are trying to pull some-
thing."
I got the pizza and we enjoyed it.
And, no, I haven't been back!



ular


.4


.Ron Cic/ion


time send pizza! You see, we like
our pizza!
The first American version of
pizza was developed in Chicago in
the 1941.1s and pizza sales ha'e sky-
rockc-ted since then.i
I recall stopping Jj a pizza place in
Tallahassee to buy pizza for my
daughter and her friends and in talk-
ing to the ,young man who took my
order, I. learned he was a recent FSU
grad with a degree in computer sci-
ence.
"Will you be working in your
field?" I asked. "Nope," he said, "I


want to stay in the pizza business
and become a store manager."
Ah, the lure of Pizza!
Then there's the frozen pizza in-
dustry. Americans are spending
some S5 billion a year on frozen
pizzas. '
The average American family eats
pizza at home 30 times a year or
more than once every two weeks.
By the way, consumer surveys
show thin crust is the most popular.
All of this may be more than you
want to know about pizza. I dunno.
But no column about pizza is


Buried Power Lines Pop


BY BRAULIO L. BAEZ
PSC Chairman

Some of the storm damage sus-:
tained in 2004 involved the infra-
structure of Florida's'
investor-owned electric utilities, in-
cluding power lines, poles, substa-
tions and transformers.
The five investor-owned utilities
under the jurisdiction of the Florida
PSC (Florida Power & Light, Pro-
gress Energy Florida, Tampa Elec-I
tric Company, Gulf Power,
Company, and Florida Public Utili--
ties Company) reported damages of
.$1.45 billion from hurricanes dhar-,
ley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne.
These utilities combined are :e-
sponsible for approximately, 78 per-,
cent of the state's retail electric
energy sales to about 8.6 million


customers.
-The extent of the damages and the,
power outages caused by the storms
led many in Florida to ask whether
the state should adopt a policy of
burying its power lines.
A statewide decision on this mat-
ter rests with the Legislature. How-
ever, the Public Service
Commission was asked by the Flor-
ida House of Representatives to pro-
vide an estimate of what it might
cost, over a 10-year period, to put
transmission and distribution lines
underground.
The preliminary estimates of the
cost of placing-transmission and dis-
tribution lines underground is $146
billion. This figure applies only to
the. lines owned ,by the investor-
owned electric companies and does
not include those operated by mu-


nicipal utilities or electric coopera- shorter distances.
tives. Distribution lines may take eleci-
Florida's investor-owned utilities tricity to "step-down" transformers
have a total of 14,566 miles of trans- for distribution directly to homed
mission lines, the value of which is and businesses. The estimated cosi
about $2.4 billion, only 183 miles of of burying distribution lines is $94
which are underground. billion. -
Transmission lines are those that Because these figures are pstii
carry high voltage current typically mates, they could change substan-
69,000 to 500,000 volts significant tially subject to a number ol
distances. variables.
A transmission normally ends at Some cities and counties in Flor,
an electric substation, where the ida require power lines in new resi,
voltage is reduced for distribution. dential developments be placed
The estimated cost to bury these underground. In addition, in th'
transmission lines is $52 billion, wake of the 2004 hurricane season
Those same utilities have approxi- a number of communities around,
mately 115,961 miles of primary .the state have initiated plans to bur4
distribution lines worth an estimated power lines.
$7 billion. Distribution lines nor-
mally transport lower voltage cur- (See Power Lines Page 5)
rent usually 2,400 to 35,000 volts -


Social SIecurity Needs


Privatization of Social Security
was one, of many .topics discussed,,
recently by a panel hosted by
Boston-based asset manager Eatont
Vance.
The panel of behavioral finance, .
economic, tax, and capital markets,,
experts discussed a range of issues;
facing investors, including tax re-,
form, social security, the national;
deficit, single stock concentration,'
capital markets performance, infla-
tion, retirement readiness and other
personal finance issues.
According to the sixth annual in-
vestor survey commissioned by Ea-
ton Vance, nearly 6 in 10 investors.
(59 percent) say they are not confi-'
dent that Social Security will be sol-.
vent when they retire.
The majority of investors (56 per-,,
cent) support privatization of Social,


Security.
Terry Odean, an associate profes-
sor of finance at the Haas School of
Business at the University of Cali-
fornia, Berkeley, said of Social Se-
curity: "At the moment, this fund is
not set up to pay all the benefits that
have been promised. The political
system is not going to let Social Se-
curity go bankrupt, but there is a
problem."
"If we could reduce benefits a bit
in the future and/or, increase the tax
flow into the fund, we would have
solved the problem. The magnitude
of this problem is such that if all the
benefits promised under Social Se-
curity are paid after the baby-
-boomers retire, Social Security's
share of GDP will increase by only
about two percent."
"After the boomers retire, things
kind of level off. This is not an ever--


Attention
we are consuming beyond out
ner U.S. means, running up huge debts to
sury for foreign nations and endangering our
chair of economic future. To fix this prob-
lear that lem, we need to cut the federal defi-
med. cit, add individual accounts on top
I fix the of Social Security, and shift more of
y 2025, the tax burden onto consumption,"
in this declared Alice Rivlin, a visiting pro'
that the fessor at the Public Policy Institute
lave the in Georgetown University and a sen ,
state of ior fellow in the economic studies
an in- program at the Bookings Institutioni
y in the The dialogue was based on the re-
us retir- sults and implications of Eaton
h which Vance's sixth annual survey, a de-
tailed study of attitudes and prac-
cknowl- tices about investing.
beyond The poll was conducted among
curity is 1,000 U.S. residents who have iii-
Ameri- vested in both qualified retirement
Instead, (See Social Security Page 5)


growing problem."
Mark A. Weinberger, forum
Assistant Secretary of Trea
Tax Policy and current vice
Ernst & Young, made it cl
Social Security will be reform
He stated, "clearly, we'l
Social Security problem. B
the demographic changes
country will be so profound
entire United States will h
same demographics as the
Florida today. We will see
credible shift in this century
population of workers verst
ees, and it's a problem wit
we must and will grapple."
Other panel members a
edged that the problem goes
Social Security. "Social Sec
not in crisis, but saving is.
cans just don't save enough.






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005 PAGE 5


Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Confirmed In County Horse


Change water in plant trays, in-
FRAN HUNT eluding hanging baskets, at least
Staff Writer once a week.
Remove vegetation or obstruc-
Because of a recently confirmed-
Because of a recently confirm tions in drainage ditches that pre-
case of Eastern Equine Encephali- vent the flow of water.
itis (EEE) in a Jefferson County Local DOH officials urge resi-
,horse, The Florida Department of dents to take advantage of the local
,Health (DOH) is encouraging resi- mosquito prevention programs
;dents of and visitors to Florida, to available in the county.
take a number of steps to protect The spraying program remains in
: themselves against mosquitos,
themselves against mosquitos, effect this year, and the county has
'which spread the disease.
which spread the disease. a 24 hour mosquito control hotline
The state monitors animals as that can be accessed 24 hours per
:sentinels for arboviruseg, including day, seven days per week.
EEE, West Nile (WN) and St. This hotline is for those who wish
: Louis Encephalitis (SLE) Virs, to to request spraying in particular ar-
,determine if any of those three vi- eas of the county. Requests should
ruses are present in a community. be made weekly for spraying these
Mosquito borne infections in peo- areas.
ple can cause, headache, fever, diz- he county also uses the Sentinel
The county also uses the Sentinel
ziness, confusion, movement Chicken Program.
'disorders and coma. There are four areas in the county
, To prevent mosquito bites and
T mos qad where these flocks of chickens are
Ymosquito-bomrne viruses, DOH of- exposed to mosquito bites.
#fers these tips: Blood is collected from the birds
i Minimize outdoor activities be- each week to determine if theyhad
;tween dusk and dawn when mos-
Iquitos are most active. Pow er Lines
When outdoors and mosquitos (Continued From Page 4)
are present, wear shoes, socks, long A decision to place power lines
.pants and a long-sleeved shirt.
Use mosquito repellent contain- underground is one that is carefully
ing Deet, as directed by the manu- weighed by those communities en-
facturer. gaged in the process.
Repair residential screening, in- Underground power lines may be
cluding porches and patios, if tears less vulnerable to wind damage, for
or other openings are found. example, but may be more suscepti-
Eliminate mosquito breeding ble to flooding.
,sites. Cost is a major factor as is the ad-
To eliminate mosquito breeding ditional time required to diagnose
,sites, DOH recommends: and repair underground facilities
Clean out eaves, troughs and when problems do occur.
gutters.
Remove old tires or drill holes Social Security
in those used in playgrounds to (Continued From Page 4)
,drain. plans and investments, outside of
Turn over or remove empty qualified retirement plans (stock
plastic pots. mutual funds, bond mutual funds,
Pick up all beverage containers individual stocks, individual bonds,
and cups. variable annuities and money mar-
Check tarps on boats or other ket funds).
'equipment that may collect water. This study was conducted by
Replace water in bird baths and Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates,
pet or other animals feeding dishes Inc. for Eaton Vance Corp. during
at least once a week. the third week of November 2004.
f, .,


4


been "Sero-Converted" and have_
contracted either West Nile, EEE,
SLE or Highlands-J.
Also in effect, the Gamboosia
Fish Program. This program is for


residents who have standing water-
on their property, such as ponds,
the county places the Gamboosia
fish into the water and the fish eat
the mosquito larvae.
Typically, mosquitos don't travel
very far from where they hatch and
that what the people do around
their homes to prevent breeding,
will go a long way in the battle
against the mosquito population.


Tb MIEG. LI ar and H alth
Ind ra r .m ,.n,
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800-290-3927
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3987 W. Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304
(850) 576-4111 www.tallahasseedcj.com
Open: Mon-Fri 9am-8pm Saturday 9am-6pm__
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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17,20051


Lifestyle


'N


Clubs Get Telescopes,

CD Education Disks


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County Boys and
Girls Clubs will be adding a new
Astronomy program for members in
the near future.
An Astronomy Club will be open
for members to learn about the sci-
entific study of the universe.
Four "Jupiter by Meade" tele-
scopes were donated to the Jefferson
County Clubs for their use.
They were donated to the Clubs
by Ken Morrison owner of Thought-
ful Shoppers of Tallahassee.
These 60 mm (24 inch) Altazi-
muth Refracting telescopes stand
three feet tall on a tripod.
Morrison also donated 20 "Learn-
ing 2000, the Advantage of a Life-
time" disk collections to the local
Clubs.
Each collection includes 15 indi-
vidual disks. On these disks are:
SAT Prep Course, Beginning Span-


ish, Merck Manual Home Edition,
Intermediate Spanish, Typing Tutor
Platinum Edition, World Book 2002
Premier Edition- Disk 1 and 2, and
Geography Principles- Physical Fea-
tures of the Earth.
Also, Webster's New World Dic-
tionary and Thesaurus, Vocabulary
Wizard, History of the United States
for Young People, 3D World Alas,
Discovery Channel Oceans, Discov-
ery Channel Solar System, and Dis-
covery Channel Human Biology.
Gerrold Austin, Director of the
Monticello/Jefferson .County Club,
says the Disk Collections will be up-
loaded on all the computers in the
four county Clubs.
The goal of the Club Leaders will
be to use the information on the disk
collection to better educate the stu-
dents, and, to help them improve
their grades.
"We want to make our county
schools "A" schools. This is a great
tool to help us to meet our goals,"
adds Austin.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Family and Consumer Science
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland,
has created and recently released
the first quarterly Extension Office
newsletter, "Living Well."
Copeland said that since her posi-
tion includes working with both the
4-H Groups, and Family and Con-
sumer Sciences, she feels fortunate
to be able to share her expertise in
both of these areas with members
of the community.
The title of the newsletter, comes
from the National Extension Asso-
ciation of Family Consumer Sci-
ence public' service of the samrne
name.
"My newsletter will highlight the
major program areas of Family and
Consumer Sciences that are impor-
tant to Jefferson County families as
well." said Copeland.
The first edition of the newsletter
contained topics including the


Homes Of

Mourning
James Ray Branch
Ray Branch, age 56, died Friday,
August 12, 2005 in Madison
County, Florida.
Funeral service were 11:00 a.m.
on Tuesday, August 16, 2005 at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel, Monticello, Florida. Burial
followed in Roseland Cemetery. The
family- received friends at the
Chapel one hour prior to the service.
He was a native of Monticello,
Florida and had lived there all his
life. He was born August 13, 1948.,
He was a farmer and a logger and
attended the Methodist Church.
He is survived by his mother, Inez
Edwards of Monticello, Florida.
Two sons Jamie Ray Branch, Jr. of
Perry, Florida, and Jerome Branch,
U.S. Navy, Kingsland, Georgia. One
daughter Lisa Branch of Boston,
Georgia. Three brothers, Jerry
Branch of Aucilla Shores, Florida,
Alton Branch and Marvin Edwards
of Monticello, Florida. Three sisters
Mary Jane Branch and Lena Faye
Shiver of Monticello, Florida, Caro-
lyn Horton of Helena, Arkansas, and
seven Grandchildren.


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


ABC's of the sun and exposure,
tasty and healthy summer salads,
family life and readying children
for school, Food Safety, Home En-
vironment and Hurricane Prepared-
ness and a warning about talking
out a pay day loan.
Copeland will continue her con-
tribution to the 4-H newsletter as
well.


DE-BBIE.SNARP -
SI \ ricer

Physical Education Program Co-
ordinator (PEP) Tequila Hagan,
with the Boys and Girls Club, re-
caps recent PEP Rally.
On Saturday, July 16 students,
staff and volunteers enjoyed a great
turnout for their first PEP Rally in
conjunction with community part-
ners.
The theme of this PEP Rally was
"Promoting physical activity in the
life of all youth and the community
by putting a little PEP in your step!"
In collaboration with the Teen
Center and 4-H, some 50 partici-
pants turned out.
These participants included par-
ents, club members, and teens from
surrounding counties such as Madi-
son.
The event began with SPARK
(Sports Play and Active Recreation
for All Kids.)
"My staff and I were thrilled that
parents actually participated in the
activities with their children," men-
tions Hagan.
After completing several activities
4-H Coordinator John Lilly Sr. pro-
vided free Sno-cones.
Health and Fitness brochures for
the health booth were donated to the
club by the Archbold Medical Out-
patient Cardiopulmonary Center.
The final entertainment for the day

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G CLUBS OF THE BIG BEND


FUTURE astronomers of Jefferson Elementary .Scho
and Girls Club are, from left: Jamari Green, Charle
tin, and Jonathon Myers. County Boys and Girls C

Summer SPARK Prog

Draws Good Attend


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Boys and Girls Club members
were introduced, this summer, to
the New PE concept of SPARK
(Sports, Play, and Active Recreation
for all Kids.)
"The staff did a great job on im-
plementing the program," states
PEP Coordinator Tequila Hagan.
More than 100 students per day
were reached through this program
this summer, and SPARK activities
were rendered throughout the day.


no -NIELW: :W,:-... .

ool Boys ceived telescope and sets of educational CDs donated by
ene Aus- Thoughtful Shoppers of Tallahassee.


'lubs re-

Iram

since


Also during the summer, and on a
weekly basis, the Student Health
Team which consists of Dorothy
Crumitie, Jackie Guyton, Fontella
Mitchell, and Latonya Scott, from
the Jefferson County Health Depart-
ment, presented healthy lifestyle
tips..
"PEP is very fortunate to have this
team as a community partner," Ha-
gan notes, "and I am really pleased
to have such a great PEP Team," she
said.
Hagan further states that nothing
would have been possible without
the efforts and leadership of An-
thony Graham, Muteteli Mobley,
Tiffany Ransom, and Angela Robin-
son.
"The children are so receptive to
this Team and I really appreciate
their diligence and dedication to our
children," she stated.


was three on three basketball, which
pArticipants enjoed. '. '

Caregivers Retreat Set

In Tallahassee, Sept. 15
while learning new coping and com-
Caregivers in Jefferson County arewhile learning new coping and co
encouraged to join other caregivers municating techniques.
in the area for the Bige caregivers Likewise, an opportunity to learn
in the area for the ig Bend Care- about new resourcesin the commu-
givers Retreat, 8 a.m., Thursday, ,
givers Retreat, 8 a.m., TChursday nity and share fellowship with othet
Sept. 15, at Ramada Inn Conference caregivers, is provided.
Center, in Tallahassee, sponsored by caregivers, is provided.
the Area Agency on Aging. The agency recognizes that care-
There is no cost to attend the re- givers are a special breed of people,
treat which continues to 3 p.n, and who need their own form of nurtur-
treat which continues to 3 p.m, and
includes a special luncheon. To reg- ing.
sister, call Lori. at 386-2778. Anyone who is caring for an eld-
The annual event is designed to early loved one can use a day for
The annual event is designed to hmlerf
himself/herself.
afford caregivers an, opportunity to For additional information con-
regroup, refresh and be pampered, tact Lori at the above number.
v' tact Lori at the above number.

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TO ALL INTERESTED CONTRACTORS

The Jefferson County SHIP Program
will be having walkthroughs of
homes to be repaired.

Please meet at the Grants Office on
August 18, at 9:OCLOCK AM
For more information


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1 If you are uninsured, you may
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Call Us If You're In Need Of Care In Your Pregnancy or
For Any Women's Health Care Issues


Copeland Prepares

'Living Well' Newsletter


Hagan Recaps


Recent PEP Rally


p., *p UCT PY CAL.]








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005 PAGE 7

'Back To School' Theme


Of Red Ladies Meeting


RED HAT LADIES decorated their Red Hats
with Back To School items ,for their August
meeting. L-R: Fran Black, Minnie Stokley,


Mary Connell, Irene Evens, Lee Condon, II-
leane Vorce, and Jacque Langford. (News
Photo)


Humane Society Posts Photos

Of Adoptables On Web Site


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society updates its
web site regularly in an effort to
find homes for the animals at the
shelter.
The site, which was created
shortly after the beginning of the
year, features photographs of dogs,
and cats, available for adoption,
background information on the ani-


mals including breed, and approxi-
mate age.
The site is found at Petfinder.com.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl'Bautista
said that the existence of the web
site has generated some inquiries
about adopting pets
Petfinder.com is the oldest and
largest online data base for home-
less pets. The site currently has
more than 160,000 area homeless
pets listed, and it is updated daily.


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Betsy Saul, president and co-
founder of Petfinder.com, con-
firmed that people often drive long
distances to get the pet that they
want.
"All of the information is right
there on the computer, and the po-
tential adopters can search their lo-
cal shelters from the comfort of
home."


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Red Hat ladies met for lunch
Saturday at Pizza Hut for the
monthly assembly.
Dressed in their signature purple
dress and red hats, ladies came
prepared for the "Back to School
Show and Tell" program hosted by
members Pat Muchowski and Jac-
que Langford.
Ladies brought in samples of their
hobbies, crafts, and/or collections to
share with the others.
Maggie Shofner brought in her
hand stitched tote and proudly mod-
eled her handmade purple blouse
decorated with Red Hat embroi-
dered appliques.
Muchowski has an afghan in pro-
gress, and brought in a few of the
completed crocheted squares She
also showed off her collection of
Santa Clauses.
Fran Black brought in a "Talking"
Feather to pass around to those next
in line to speak. Anyone wishing to
speak only needs to hold the feather
high, requesting the others to quiet
down just long enough to "say her
peace."
Janet Reaves brought in bags of
"Granny's Percheron Poo," aka
horse compost. This is a profitable
hobby of hers meant to help local
gardeners with their fertilizing
needs.
The ladies celebrated Reave's
birthday month with a candle topped
slice of dessert pizza.


1999 Pontiac Grand Prix [S 5V TS TO


CHOOSE!

6 cyl, AT, AC, PW, PL, PS, PB,
Alloys, CD, AM/FM, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: U276183
2003 Nissan Xterra XE


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AM/FM, CD, Tilt, Cruise, Stk: U554346


sujctt crediappoa.Alprcn


Mona Mackenzie could only tell
about her counted cross stitched art-
work as it was too large and cum-
bersome to bring to the dining table.
It hangs perfectly over her fire-
place at home and at first glance
looks like a painting. She also
brought the gold bracelet her father
presented to her mother prior to
their exchange of marriage vows.
It's dated 4-26-1913 with her
mother's and father's initials en-
graved.
Betty Wright demonstrated a spe-
cial gift she received from her son
on a trip to Japan. It can best be de-
scribed as a Geisha fan that folds
into a hat.
And, Dorris Uptain brought in a
pillow handmade by her mother.
The Red Hat Ladies outdid them-
selves with their decorated hats.
Fran Black chose to make a state-
ment by wearing .her Seminole hat.
Irene Evans had a hat full of alpha-
betss, and, Jacque Langford's back
to school hat was decorated with a
supply of pencil's, a ruler, and even
an apple for the teacher.
Betty Wright wore her hat that
seconds as a fan, for those hot Flor-
ida afternoons.
The ladies talked about a possible
name change for their group and
passed around a notepad for mem-
bers to jot down their thoughts and
ideas. This will be discussed at a fu-
ture meeting of the Red Hat minds.

After dining on a buffet of pizza
and salads the ladies parted ways


l. .

TAKE THE KEYS.

CALL A CAB.

TAKE A STAND. __ ___

u sI I I 'T


until next month's meeting on Sat-
urday, Sept. 10.

Boyd Hopeful
(Continued From Page 1)
said. "It's the idea that the guy with
the most money wins. You can't di-
rect government policy toward the
wealthy because you shrink the mid-
dle class."
"The Republicans in the late 20th
Century said we ought to be fiscally
responsible," he continued. "And
now we have the largest budget
deficit in the history of the country.
There is no tax cut they don't like.
That's irresponsible, and the young
neoDle will have to pay this bill."
"But I'm not pessimistic," Boyd
said. "I believe our system of gov-
ernment works and the people will
make the corrections when neces-
sary. The Democrats in the 80s went
too far to the left and the people
made adjustments in the 1990s. Just
remember that you're doing the right
thing. Stay focused on the underly-
ing institutions. Keep the faith and
keep working hard."
Social Security -- As currently
established, the system will not sur-
vive the Baby Boomers retirement,
he said.
"By 2018, we will pay out more
than we take in," Boyd said. "And
by 2042, there will be nothing left in
the trust fund. Those in our age
group won't have to worry about it.
It's the younger people who will suf-
fer. It's a very complicated issue and
the solutions are very difficult. But
the longer we wait, the more painful
the solution." '
Medicare -- a more difficult fiscal
problem to solve than Social Secu-
rity, Boyd said, and "it will be broke
pretty soon."
Health Insurance -- another crisis
that this country will have to come
to grips with and soon, he said.
"Every year more and more peo-
ple in this country are uninsured,"
Boyd said. "That's a bad trend."


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005



Coaches Take Precautions

With Athletes in Hot Weather


FRAN HUNT.
Staff Writer


With the opening of local schools,
and football teams going strong in
practices for the rapidly approach-
ing season, coaches are taking pre-
cautions to protect the athletes from
heat related illnesses such as heat
exhaustion, dehydration and heat
stroke.
Aucilla Christian Academy Ath-
letic Director Ray Hughes reports
that the usual precautions are al-
ready being taken for the protection
of the players.
"We keep them loaded up with
water, we give- them frequent
breaks and encourage them to
wear lightweight clothes in the
.heat, and we are practicing in
shorts."
According to Dr. Verle Valen-
tine of the MCG Sports Medicine
Center, there are tips to be followed
for exercising safely in the heat.
Athletes and others working out-'
side in the late summer months are
at risk for heat related injuries,
ranging from heat cramps to heat
.exhaustion to heat stroke, which
can be deadly.
To help avoid heat illness and de-
hydration, as well as improve per-



Benefit Tour

Barbecue Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Memorial Benefit Horseshoe
Tournament and Barbecue will be
hosted Sept. 3, to raise funds for
the family of the late Johnny Mor-
gan.
The tournament and barbecue
will be held at 130 Fred T. Road, in
the same location as the annual
King of the Hill Horseshoe Tourna-
ment.
Spokesperson Marjie Zylstra said



m g li '
:your


formance, follow these tips:
Prevention:
Heat and humidity are a bad com-
bination as humid air slows evapo-
ration of sweat from your skin.
Evaporation helps keep you cool
on hot days.
To help prevent heat illness, take
the following precautions:
Plan activities early or late in
the day or decrease the intensity of
the workout.
Stay in the shade if possible.
Wear lightweight and light-
colored clothing, preferably cloth-
ing that helps dry away the sweat. .
Minimize the amount of cloth-
ing that you wear.
Wear a hat and sunscreen.
Allow a few days to allow your
body time to get used to the heat
prior to strenuous activity.
People who are overweight or
have other medical conditions are
at high risk for dehydration and
heat illness.
They should consult their physi-
cian before starting any .exercise
program.
Hydration;
The biggest mistake made in
summer heat is not hydrating prop-
erly. Follow these guidelines be-
fore you exercise or work outside.
*Don't use thirst as your guide.-
If you wait to hydrate only when


nament,

Sept. 3
that a whole nog will be toasted
and coordinators will be supplying
a wide variety of covered dish
items.
Registration is $20 per team and
the tournament begins at 10 a.m.
Certificates will be awarded to
first, second and third place win-
ners in both the men's and
ornmgn's division.
All proceeds and donations will
be given to Morgan's family.
For further information, call T. Z.
and Marjie at 997-2937, or Huck
and Kathy at 421-7767, or Iris' at
508-6503.


American Heart
AssociationMs'
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke


Reduce your risk factors


you're thirsty, it is too late.
*Water is good for general hydra-
tion. If you are exercising strenu-
ously, salt/carbohydrate containing
drinks such as Powerade or Gator-
ade are a better choice.
*Drink 16-20 ounces of fluid one
to two hours prior to exercise to en-
sure that you are properly hydrated
before you go out into the heat.
*Take drink breaks every 20 min-
utes, especially if you are active for
longer than one hour.
*Weigh yourself to determine
your sweat rate, and replace every
lost pound with 16 ounces of fluid
(water or sports drink).
Avoid alcohol and caffeine, as
they can cause you to dehydrate
more rapidly.
Signs of dehydration:
Remember, heat illness can range
from heat cramps to heat exhaus-
tion to heat stroke. Heat stroke is
dangerous and requires immediate
medical attention.
Prevent a more serious problem
by knowing the early warning
signs, which include:, thirst,
cramps, irritability, headache,
weakness, dizziness, nausea, and
decreased perfromance.. .
If you experience signs of dehy-
dration, take yourself out of. the
heat immediately, cool down with a'
fan, and drink fluids to rehydrate.
.. .




p c, ... I .y a .



.H-C.
I .,



















,EMMERALDGRAHAM enjoys


4-H Day Camp.
4-H Day Camp.


ALANA CHAMBERS assisted
Archery Class during a recent


JCHS Will Ins

Pole Vaultin


Equipment

FRAN HUNT
Staff-Writer


Though Jefferson County High
School has received all of the pole
vaulting equipment needed to begin'
the program again after some 23
years, Coach Harry Jacobs said,
they are holding off on installing
the equipment until just before the
beginning of the season 'in January.
Assistant Principal and Track
and Field Coach Harry Jacobs said
they didn't want the equipment to
undergo any unnecessary damage
such as possible vandalism or
weathering:
He said that last year, there were
seven students expressing interest
i. (le sp.Qrt,,buL. hen th. s.esion
.approached, he u..pected thit there
would be many more.
Pole vaulting was last offered at
JCHS when Jacobs coached it years
ago. When he left to work at
FAMU and could no longer coach,
the sport was dropped, and the
equipment eventually fell into dis-
repair over the years.
The reason for wanting to bring
pole vaulting back to track and
field was that it would have a ten-,
dency to -draw more athletes into
track andfield, Jacobs explained.
The equipment purchased in-


S...USINE SS 9 -


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I teaching an camp Students had the opportunity to par.:
t 4-H Wildlife ticipate in a variety of activities.


;tall

ig


In Spring
cludes the pit, pads, safety. gear,
poles, cross bars, helmets, the box-
containing the pit and the standards
(uprights), and has to be profes-
sionally installed to standards.
Jacobs said he had never com-
peted in pole vaulting,, but he had
read up and studied track and field,
to include pole vaulting, in both
high school and in college.
"I know how," said Jacobs,
"And I'm willing to show them,
well, at least up to six feet."
He concluded that he will send
the team into specialized training
and that there are trainers available
to help them on a personal level, at
FAMU.


Norton JCHS :

Cheerleader
To clarify a story in the FridayA
Aug. 12 edition of the Monticello
News:
There is one ninth grader on the
squad, Malika Norton. ,
Laurenda Cuyler, along witfi
Sherita Ingram, and Robin Hamilj
ton, former JCHS cheerleaders
now college students, are assitini
with practices
Additional cheerleading tryouts
may be held again during basket
ball season.

MI I 'aqa


MANY k3HttNHUUZ>t bAZU) AZ) A LAH.
ENERGY STAR141 is sponsored
bythe U.S. Environ friental
.-Protection Agency and the
YS. Department, of Energy. -CN-ERGySTAR


AL. HallFuneral Directors, Inc. -

v i F -r + -n -F- o e


V 1 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
Monticello, FL. 32344

850-997-5553 : .
Alfonza "Al" Hall ~ William Tillman Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced -, Sewer &.Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs
I


10' S SebyS.t.M dso n85-93-40
Ca ito uret M serPu be,,,,,


STAR TEA
(MONTICELLO / TALLAHASSEE
SHAUNDRA M. BUGGS




LADY BUGO LIFESTYLES
Webslte: www.Iadybugglifestyles.biz


Northside Mower and
E) Small Engine Repair
1 ., .TFor Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
HOME: 850-997-2404
CELL: 850-264-5112 562-2962
Email: Idybuggis@aol.com


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service "




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


LUMART AVIATION
Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
Come fly with us!

LUTHER S. TURNER
2150 ELon Rd
Perry, FL 32347
Phone:(850)584-8867
Lumarts Stolport
N 30-07-51 W 083-32-58
E-maiI LST@gicom.net Classic Cessna 170-B


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming Mowing,
Stump Grinding Bush Hogging
Clean Up Debris Harrowing, Road
Aerial Device Maintenance :
Tree Removal Feed Plots


L For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


BETTER BODIES'
| AUTOMOBILE PAINT &, BODY REPAIR
EE ESTIMATES. i.OO NSR
FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
966 N. BARBER Hfil.I RD. LAMONT, Fl.
S997-4160
ANDY'& TLNA AMES. OWNERS


F1


COMPETI


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT I



850-997-5808


850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JoHN COLLINS RD.


ITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

Allstate Insurance Company
'3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.4

0ot 878-8077 :
OPEN Monday-Friday 8:30-5 30
3up Email:NORMANBARl-OOTid)allstatel,com


--Ir


I


, = I .


m


I


I
I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005 PAGE 11


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
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Each Additional Line....$1,00 .
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.$*


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To Place Your Ad





997-3568
*


Po o n fon On Ow YOu as an nnpbyer can help,
Cnoctyourt iteeatourw e Gror
EMPLOYER SUPPORTOF
THE GUARDANDRSERVE,


An accident left Kenny Denton
paralyzed below the waist After
intense therapy, Easter Seals turned
Kenny's glimmer of hope into a
bright new career. One in five
Americans has a disability, and"
Easter Seals is there with expert help,
hope and humanity Call Easter
Seals or visit www.easter-seals.org


Creating solutions,
changing lives.


SNOTICE: The Jefferson Count Board ol
County Commissioners will hold Work-
shop at 4:00 p.m., Thursday, August 18,
2005, at the Jefferson County Courthouse,
Courtroom, Monticello Florida, to review
animal control proposals from Wendy
Moss. Felix "Skeet" Joyner, Chairman.
S8/17, c
The Monticello Cemetery Authority will
meet Thursday, August 25, 2005 at 6:00
p.m. at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street
to discuss proposed rules and rate fees for
Oakfield Cemetery. Two or more Council
Members may be present at this meeting.
For more information, contact Emily
Anderson, City, Clerk at City Hall at
342-0153.
8/17, c


Some Gifts

Just Do More

Than Others.
Giving Savings Bonds can make
a difference in someone's future.
They're available through most banks,
your work, or automatically through,
the new Savings Bonds EasySavers"
Plan at www.easysaver.gov.
Call 1-800-4US BOND for recorded
rate information, or write to:
Savings Bonds Pocket Guide,
Parkersburg, WV26106-1328.


Creng SAVINGS
Ne "SavingsT uBOND
For complete Information
about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at
www.savingsbonds.gov.

A public service of this newspaper


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Use This Form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail

Payment In Advance Is Required


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3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
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DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday

PUBLISHING DATE(S)


CLASSIFICATION

WRITE YOUR AD HERE











Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, Florida 32344


Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer 'service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and hale the ability to
obtain a hazrnal & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
8/10, tfn, c
"Our Blessings" is now looking for
qualified teachers to join their
winning team. Must have 40 hrs., for
more info call 997-1110 or 342-1111.
8/17, 19, 24, 26,31, pd


Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Wanted: Kennel Tech. FT/PT
available. Must enjoy working with
animals. Call 877-5050.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Warehouse driver for Buddy's Home
Furnishing. Please apply in Person
1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, 6/12, s/d, tfn


As seen on TV Tread Climber -
excellent condition, 6 months old,
sacrifice at $600. Call 997-8961.
8/12, 17, pd
15 year old Quarter Horse $800 obo,
Call Mike @ 528-5614.
8/17, 19, 24, 26, 31, pd
1989 Sporty Probe, recently mechani-
cally overhauled, blows cold, good
tires, $1200. Call 997-7441
tfn


The Monticello City Council Finance
Committee will conduct a budget work-
shop on August 23, 2005 at 4:00 p.m. at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry St., Monticello.
8/17, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs.
EVA KRMOIAN, RAUL ALFONSO
FLOREZ, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS)
Defendant. SECOND AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION TO EVA KRO-
MIAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Jefferson County, Flor-
ida: Lot 30, Block D, of Aucilla Shores
Subdivision, a subdivision as per the plat
thereof filed at Plat Book B, Page 38, of
the Public Records of Jefferson County,
Florida. has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN
B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is Gardner, Wadsworth,
Duggar, Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300 Tho-
maswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32308, on or before September 16, 2005
(within 30 days of first publication), file
the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you
for relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED AUGUST 10TH, 2005.
DALE BOATWRIGHT, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court.
8/17, 8/24,c c

HELP WANTED
Monticello Da3s Inn. Nighi
auditor/front desk clerk needed with
computer and people skills. Start with
good pay. Apply in person.
8/12, tfn, c
Drillers Helper. Great pay and
benefits. Must be able to travel. Clean
FL license, CDL a plus. Drug Free
and EOE. Call 800-487-9665.
8/12, 17, 19, 24, c


Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
.considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn


Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn


Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
8/10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, 9/2, c
3bdrm, 1 / b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
7/13, tfn, c
RV or Mobile home lots for rent. Call
Liz @ 997-1638. No calls before 9 a.m.
& no calls after 7 p.m., please.
8/5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, c
REAL E T TE,.:--
ftE -V-5-'M
3 BR/2 BA MOBILE HOME in mint
condition with 5 new additions on 3
acres in Lloyd Acres. New A/C, 1345
sq. ft., landscaped yard; easy access to
Tallahassee, $119,900. 997-1223.
8/17, 19, pd

FOUND
Lg. white dog found in Lloyd area.
Call vet associates 997-0229.
8/17, 19, nc

SERVICES
Like other churches, we have our
'hypocrites, but hypocrites have to go
somewhere. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 AM.
997-4116.
8/17, c
Need a Maid 1-2 days a week.. Call
Karen at 850-997-8038.
8/17, 19, pd
Certified CNA looking to take care of
your loved one. Give me a call at
591-6433 or 997-1999.
8/17; 19, 24, 26, 31, pd
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. \\e bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
jour needs. 997-3553. U'PS available
1,'19. tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Government Farms Road 5 or 10 acres
buyers choice hillside planted pines
$15,000/acre
New Listing!!! 3.89 acres in Plantation
Woods south of Lloyd on SR 59 and
soon to be paved Plantation Woods
Road $46,500
Brand New Listing! 3 bedroom home in
town at East Anderson St. $155,000
Maqnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy
Road in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding
acres with a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hay-
field meant for galloping $150,000

Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bedrooms
2 baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile and hard-
wood floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace and
a screened porch, 1 acre Now $135,000
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big dou-
blewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in
remote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$295,000
Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, cor-
ner of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only
$150,000

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field near
US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000
Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bedroom
2 bath double wide with a bathroom that
won't quit on a high hill with a view in Aucilla
Forest and Meadows only $55,000

Check Out This One! 8 acres with big
doublewide and small house on a pretty old
hillside close to Leon County off Julia Road
$160,000
Biq doublewide with additions 12 rooms
quiet wooded lot $56,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000


Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside, county road $75,000
Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500
Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double
wide with new galvanized aluminum roof and
vinyl siding, 3 sheds, fish pond, fenced on
2.4 acres only $86,500


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for
acreage between Monticello and Lloyd
can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Simply the Best

Buyers looking for Homes and Land


ILET US DO YOUR
ELY & KLLY HOME WORK
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St
997-5516
* New Construction-3BR/2BA in town, open floor plan with
attached garage.................... ... ..................... $164,900
* Singlewide Mobile Home- good condition on 5 wooded acres
on the edge of town.................... ................. $82,500
" Madison County- mobile home in the country, 1 ac. $55,700
" Bungalow- one of a kind, wood floors, high ceilings, large
fenced com er lot................... ....................... $107,000
* Cooper's Pond- new construction, 1600 sq. ft. ........$169,900

ww. rhkk. nm


In Case Of Emergency

Dial 911


Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


MODEL YEAR END CLEARANCE


OF SALES SERVICE PARTS
OF THOMASVILLE
1630 E. Jackson Thomasville, GA [2291226-1106 Toll Free 1-800-333-9785


7-71
LE






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 17, 2005


-: .~. ijA4


-A'


Al

i A.J


JOHN LILLY range commander oversees 4-Hers during air
rifle shooting sports.


LEARNING to name the parts of a rifle are 4-Hers at camp.


KOURTNEY SHIVER shows off the fish
4-H Day Camp, recently.


she caught at the


~4P~* ~ .- 4
~
i~*:~Jil


4-HERS learn how to shoot at clay targets.


MIKE HUMPRHEY, county
plant trees.


forester shows 4-Hers how to


Do it for someone you love


Its her f uture.Do the math:"


Coaching a major league team is a full-time job
and so is my. responsibility to my family. That's
why I eat plenty of healthy foods like veggie
burgers, spinach and bean burritos, and
vegetable lasagna. The more vegetarian meals
you include in your routine, the better. So play
it safe for your team,
Tony LaRussa
Manager of the St. Louis Cardinals
Tonight, make it vegetarian


-m a ,--m- -g ,. _411 - I "m w _.I ll .9 1-g- O _b. .O m o ,. m


5 STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS


Rich Tradition






Jefferson County


"Tiger Football"


't4 IR 'L 4A


Booster Membership Drive


Please Call 997-8111


For Information About Becoming A

Booster And Supporting Our Youth!!!


We Meet Every Tuesday During Football Season

7p.m. at the Old Jefferson High

School Auditorium
OAM 110 41- OW-Gm 410. 41 .11 .ww 'IW MOM..1NW M-E.-1ME IO 411 Nw GOM ai_ -m MM" -0 -ai -MM


* (
A ~ 1.~.






~


*/ ..
I, .


PRIP, pal
,All You Can Eat Weekly,'Seafood Specials
Fried or Boiled Slirimp This Week
Fril. Sat 5pm to, Ilpm: $9.99
J-10 Hwy 59 EXif 2.1.7 .9,97-1202


Ph. :


. WP