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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00063
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: August 10, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00063
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
    Sports
        page 14
    Classified
        page 15
        page 16
Full Text

"'. I -0


U


Construction
Jobs Attract
Youths

Editorial, Page 4


S- w w *-.- **


ID1RAR? OF FLORIDA HISTORY
04 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



Church Youth
Group Travels
To Atlanta


Story, Photos, Page 7


Sandra Collins
New Principal
At JES

Story, Page 12


Local Boys
Bike 1700 Miles
Into Canada

story Photos Page 14


Wednesday Morning


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.63, 50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

-WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2005 :


......I iWF 1.City Proposes




4iTo Hike Taxes
J'ii^^i ^ e"1^l| t^^- | W^


CITY COUNCIL members want to take steps left, Councilman Tom Vogelgesang, City
to ensure that they don't run into the same Clerk Emily Anderson and Mayor Julie Con-
budgetary problems next time around. From ley. (New Photo)


City May Opt To Piggyback

On County Fire Impact -Fee


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city may soon be piggyback-
ing onto the county's recently im-
posed impact fee for fire protection.
County Attorney Buck Bird, who
sat in for City Attorney Bruce Lein-
back last week, suggested the idea
to the City Council.
Bird noted that the county's im-
pact fees for fire and ambulance
services went into effect Aug. 1.
It was possible, he said, that the
city could impose a $90 fire impact
fee within its boundaries, given that
the county did not collect the fire
,impact fee within the city.
To do so, Bird said, the city would
merely have' to enter an interlocal
government agreement with the,
county and possibly pay the county
an administrative fee for the latter's
collection of the fee.
City council members expressed
an interest in pursuing the arrange-


ment, given that it .'ooumd bring the
city additional re% enues.
The impact fee w would apply only
to new construction. And the monies
raised could only be used for capital
improvements that are related to the
new growth. ...
The County Commission adopted
the impact fees by ordinance on
June 16. The ordinance sets the fire
and ambulance impact fees at
$96.32 and $123.72 respectively per
residential house. It sets the fees for
commercial, industrial and institu-
tional structures on a per-footage
basis.
It cost the county $15,000 to hire a
consultant to do the study that was
necessary to justify the fees, draft
the ordinance and help implement it.
Impact fees, by definition, are
one-charges levied against new con-
struction -- both residential and
commercial -- to help pay for the
cost of the increased government
services made necessary by growth.


Officials Eye

Other Items

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Faced with a potential $170,000
budget shortfall, the City. Council
last week voted to raise the millage
rate half a point -- from the current
7.5 mills to 8.0 mills.
The proposed millage rate repre-
sents a 23 percent tax increase over
the rollback rate of 6.5932 mills, the
percentage rate that the state re-
quires that taxing agencies adopt.
The rollback rate is calculated to
produce more or less the previous
year's revenues, by taking into ac-
count the rising values of property.
By law, taxing agencies that opt not


to adopt the rollback rate must ad-
vertise a tax increase.
The half-point increase is ex-
pected to produce about $100,000 in
additional revenues. That translates
into $30,000 more than the almost
$70,000 that the current rate of 7.5
mills would have produced in addi-
tional taxes over last year's reve-
nues, if left intact.
But even with the additional
$100,000, it still leaves officials
about $70,000 short of the mark.
City officials tried to put the in-
crease in historical perspective
Tuesday night by noting that the rate
had been as high as 9.2 mills in
2000 and 9.03 in 2001. In effect,
city residents had gotten a break in
recent years, they said.
"It's not the end of the world,"
Councilman Brian Hayes remarked
of the increase.
The process, moreover, had yet a



-, A


S -__ a
BOBBIE GOLDEN, of Responsible Pet Own-
ers of Jefferson County, discusses the ani-
mal control ordinance with Sheriff David


Hobbs. Golden and her group has been do-
ing research into the animal control prob-
lem for several months now. (News Photo)


ways to go before the budget was fi-
nalized, other officials pointed out.
Meaning that it was possible that the
rate could be lowered once the fig-
ures were finally adjusted.
The Department of Environmental
Regulation (DEP), for example, just
last week informed city officials that'
no match will be required on the
$250,000 grant it awarded the city
for the extension of sewer service
into the Cooper's Pond Subdivision..
That waiver of the match represents
a saving of between $25,000 and
$28,000 to the city, an expenditure
that is reflected in the $170,000
shortfall.
Officials are also hopeful that the
city will be able to save about
$11,000 on employees' health insur-
ance coverage, depending which
plan is ultimately selected.
Then there's a possibility that the
city may be able to use part of
$150,000 that is sitting in a special
- account administered by the US De-
partment of Agriculture on behalf of
the city.
The idea is that the money, which
is earmarked for infrastructure im-
prot events related to the sewage
treatment plant, may 'possibly be
used for the purchase of a needed
Sacutim truck.
Liimnately, however, city officials
%.ill have to forego some of the
items on the wish list. Among the
competing items on this list: a 3.5
percent pay 'increase for city em-
plo. ees; a $1,000 salary increase for
each of the five council members;
$&.,5ii) for Internet expenses; and
$15,)000 in contributions to private
organizations.
But even after officials balance the
budget, the fact remains that the
sewer and water operations -- enter-
prise account that are supposed to
generate sufficient monies to be
(See Tax Page 16)


CITY OFFICIALS are considering taking advantage of the
county's impact fees workmand applying the fire impact fee
within its boundaries. (News Photo)

Man Killed in Auto Accident _
A county man died early Sunday His vehicle then exited the road-
morning in a one-vehicle accident way on the east shoulder of SR-59,
off SR-59. crossed the entrance to Willis Road
Thomas W. Drawdy Jr., 30, died and reentered the east shoulder of
about 12:25 a.m. Sunday when his SR-59.
Ford F-250 vehicle overturned as it The vehicle next traveled 300 feet
was coming around a curve on SR- and struck a driveway dirt embank-
59 near Willis Road. ment. It then crossed the driveway
According to the Florida Highway back onto the grass shoulder, where
Patrol (FHP), Drawdy was traveling it overturned in the grass ditch.
north on SR-59 when he came to a The vehicle overturned several
series of curves. He completed the times before coming to rest on the
first curve but failed to complete the east shoulder, upright and facing
second. south.


Commission Sets Workshop


To Explore Animal Ordinance


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Comes now another concerned
group with a proposal for improving
the county's animal control
program.
Bobbie Golden, president of Re-
sponsible Pet Owners of Jefferson
County (RPOJC), presented county
-commissioners with the proposal
last week.
The RPOJC is a citizens initiative
group organized about six months
ago to help the county fashion and
enforce an effective animal control
program.
Its report, the result of months of
research, includes a history of ani-
mal regulations in the US, deficien-
cies with the current ordinance,.
recommendations for improving it,
and a budget, among other things.
Commissioners have set a 9 a.m.
Thursday workshop to discuss the
RPOJC's proposal. They have also
set a 5 p.m. Aug. 18 workshop to
discuss an earlier proposal submit-
ted by Wendy Moss, a government
operations consultant with an inter-
est on the issue.


Officials To
Consider
Proposals
From Two
Groups




Some highlights of the RPOJC's
report:
The problem of dealing with a
growing population of dogs has
plagued cities and counties in this
country since its inception, with the
earliest regulations dating to the mid
1800s.
This community's animal popu-
lation -- as well as the number of
animal nuisance and animal attack
complaints -- will continue to in-
crease as the county grows.
Approximately 50 complaints
were reported to the Sheriffs De-
partment during the six-month pe-


riod between January and June of
this year. Yet, although the present
ordinance provides for the issuance
of citations to violators, not one ci-
tation has been issued since the ordi-
nance's adoption in 2000.
Absent the often-voiced -- and
in the thinking of the RPOJC, unre-
alistic -- recommendation that citi-
zens shoot animals that are
endangering their persons or domes-
ticated animals, citizens are left with
very limited options for dealing with
the problem. I
The current ordinance is defi-
cient in that it does not provide for a
permanent animal services division
or authority to facilitate an adequate
animal services program; does not
provide an adequate funding mecha-
nism to maintain and enforce such a
program; and does not provide any
recourse for citizens who have prob-
lems with animals considered a nui-
sance.
The ordinance, moreover, is not
adequately enforced due to the lack
of resources and the lack of direc-
tion, knowledge, resolve or re-
sources by key county offices or of-
ficials, per the RPOJC.
Among the solution the group of-


fers, via the amendment of the cur-
rent ordinance:
Provide for the formation of ani-
mal services division with specific
duties and responsibilities.
Provide for mechanisms to deal
with the handling of nuisance ani-
mals.
Provide for the licensing of ani-
mals (with appropriate fines and
penalties for failure to comply), as a
way to fund the animal control pro-
gram.
The RPOJC further recommends
that the County Commission solid-
ify the roles and duties of various
county offices to ensure an effective
and well-coordinated animal control
program.
Among the offices that the pro-
posal would affect:
The Sheriffs Department -- it
would be asked to issue citations for
violations of the ordinance and to
"chemical capture" certify its depu-
ties so they are better able to deal
with nuisance or vicious animals.
Clerk of Court -- it would be-
come instrumental in ensuring that
citations are paid and that appeals
are properly handled.
Tax Collector -- it would perform
(See Animal Page 12)









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005

Library Move Half Complete;

Opening Planned August 22


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Set backs in moving the Library_.
-'Trom the old Cherry Street location
to the new Water St. location, are
Largely attributed to Hurricane
'"Dennis.
Library Director Linda Hamedani
tports the new projected opening
date is now set for Tuesday, Aug.
23, with an Open House planned-
on Monday, Aug. 22.
More information will be forth-
Z:oming when the events are solidi-
:Tied.
S Hamendani explained that an in-
mate squad from Jefferson Correc-
tional Institution, was assisting with
the move, but because of Hurricane
tennis, inmate .labor was not avail-
S-ble for three weeks.
Hamedani added that inmates
from JCI and the County Jail are
0 ow working to complete the move
nd etrup at the new location.
S"e are only about halfway com-
:leted." .she said. "Some shelves
are up. The rest have to be put in
^lace, and there is still some paint-
3ng to do."
-; In addition, some 40,000 books,
reference materials, other related
7'ems, and furniture have yet to be
vioved from the Cherry Street Lo-_
iation.
:- 1 Hamadani said that as of
:-uesdav, volunteers from the com-
: unit' u Il be sought to help com-.
b'lete the setup of the new location.
: She added that about Aug. 15,
residents who still- have books
-.rhecked out, can then start drop-
:ping them off at the new location
'took drop.
. No fees i- ill be implemented un-
:fil Sept.

Humane Society
Fundraiser
Ends Aug. 31

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

| The Humane Society will con-
viiue its Tupperware Sale through
lkug. 31.
r The eent is a fundraiser to help,
provide for the care of the animals
-t the shelter.'
6 Tammy Peck, who proposed the
fundraiser, said that 40 percent of
the sales will go to the shelter.
Anyone wishing to purchase the
upperware can contact Peck at
t97-6455 or approach any Humane
ocietr Board Member.


Among the renovations at the
new library site are interior and ex-
terior painting, and new carpeting.
The library will be able to offer
more services than ever for the
community.
In addition to the services pro-
vided previously, the new building
will offer a Florida Room, show-
casing reference materials, micro-
films of the Monticello News since
the turn of the century, Florida art
work, the State Archives' PALM
collection available through the
computer terminal, Florida History
and family ancestry references, and
the works of local and state
authors.
It will also feature a larger Com-
munity Room, with its own en-
trance, which will be more accessi-
ble for the public.
The former Community Room.
hosted an average of six to nine
meetings per mopth, including
Head Start, the Crazy Quilters, the
local FSU Booster Club and the
Women's Support Group.
Hamedani said.
Some services already imple-
mented, will be expanded to reach
a larger portion of the population.
The Weekly Toddler Time, for
children ages thliree and up, will
take place 10:30 a.m.; Wednesda\
mornings, and \\ill feature stories.
read by a staff member.,
There will be activities and inter-
action, with other children of a'
similar age.
In order to reach older children,
and those in the community who
may not be able to get to the library
itself, the Bookmobile will con-
tinue making its rounds of the local
day cares and local public access
areas, and the library will still offer
guided learning tours for children
through their school s. stems.



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It will also continue to offer their
Summer Program Services, offer-
ing activities, book groups, and
crafts for children from third to
.twelfth grade, and working closely
with JES and the Boys and Girls
Club.
Employment Connections, the
full-time career counseling and job
search program will still be avail-
able to help people find jobs,
change careers, teach students in
the local area how to improve their
employment opportunities through
a shadowing program, which al-
lows students to follow people in
various careers and learn realities
of the job, and formulate resumes.
The computer lab will also con-
tinue their skills training in use of
such programs and Microsoft
Word, Excel, Internet Explorer and
e-mail for those who would like to
learn them.
Staff will also be available to
help students prepare for standard-
ized testing, the postal exam, law
enforcement testing, and other 6m-
ployment qualifications through a
program called Leaning Express.
In addition, they will* be able to
help individuals apply for state and
federal assistance on line.
Still, there remains much \ ork to
be done. Displays and reading areas
have to be' coordinated and in addi-
tion to the basic housekeeping, there
.are new programs to be researched,
and implemented.
Staff Would like to pursue more
literacy grants to offer after school
programs, in conjunction with the
efforts of the School Board and lo-


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cal youth organizations.
With illiteracy affecting approxi-
mately 30 percent of the county
population, there is also a need for
adult literacy support.
Additionally, there is a fluctuat-
ing migrant population in the area,
mandating English as a Second
Language programs, to serve both
adults and children.
Staff also wishes to add a web
page design course to the computer
lab, to teach HTML and web proto-
col and assist with finding and
maintaining web page hosting sites.
For further information or to vol-
unteer with completing the setup,
call 342-0205.

Women's Health
Centers of North
Florida

located at
1702 S. Jefferson St.,
Perry, FL 850-223-1744
now has a second location at
1885 Professional Park
Circle, Suite 60 in
Tallahassee, FL
850-421-7600.
We have been providing
quality health service to, the
Taylor. Jefferson, Madison,
SuN\ annee and Dixie Counties
since 2003.
Please call us to schedule
your next appointment if
you're in need of care in your
pregnancy or for woman's.
health care issues.
We look forward to serving you.


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Schools Open With


17 New Teachers
Resource; Martine Fanfan, fourth
FRAN HUNT grade; Gregory Otto, Special Edu-
Staff Writer cation (ESE); Linda Butler-Stewart,
third grade; and Norma Shotwell,
Joining the staffs at Aucilla--fourth grade.
Christian Academy and Jefferson They join new JES Principal,
County District Schools, are 17 Sandra Collins.
new teachers. Howard Middle School has four
One veteran teacher is returning new teachers, including: Lynda
part time, and two additional teach- Davis, middle grade math and sci-
ers are to yet be hired, as of ence; Paula Heller, Spanish; Der-
Wednesday afternoon. rick Martin, Jr., Eighth Grade Math


At ACA, new teachers include
Brenda Brown, first grade; Chris
Smith, Spanish I, Spanish II, Ele-
mentary Spanish and Creative
Writing; Stasey Whichel, Algebra
I, Algebra II, Geometry and Sev-
enth Grade Math.
Veteran teacher Mary Hartsfield
will be return to teach one Biology
class per day.
At Jefferson Elementary School,
there are six new teachers, includ-
ing: Tanishia Barnhart, K-5; Bette
Carswell, who began teaching well
into the 2004-05 school year, Math


Drake Named

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has named
"Drake" as its adoptable canine Pet
of the Week.
He is a "Monticello Mutt", red in
color with a dark, muzzle and mark-
ings above both eyes.

Drake has been neutered, with all
vaccinations up to date, and he is
approximately one year old.
He is described as being good
with other dogs, however, it is un-
known how he does with cats.
Drake is a really social, lovable,
affectionate and playful pet, who
sometimes forgets he is a big dog.
He is house broken, deemed an
indoor/outdoor animals and he re-
quires a fenced yard.
To adopt Drake or any of the
many other lovable animals at the
shelter call 342-0244.


and Algebra; and Sandra
Wakefield, reading.
Jefferson County High School
has four new teachers, two of
whom began teaching well into the
2004-05 school year.
New personnel includes Paula
Heller, Spanish; Laura Phelps, Sci-
ence and Biology.
Returning teachers include:
Shaunissy Brown, Science and Bi-
ology; and Victoria Roberts, Math.
They join new Principal, Chalmus
Thomas.
A reading teacher and ESE
teacher are still sought.


.'' "v '"
S.. *
P /. ..
^ *.*: .


DRAKE


News Without

Fear or Favor



Monticello


News


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 3

Forms Available At


Hospice Web Site
Big Bend Hospice Community themselves.
Relations Coordinator Catherine Ar- The two forms available
nold reports that Advance Care Di- "Florida Living Will Dec
rectives are now available at its web and "Florida Designation
site: www.bigbendhopsice.org Care Surrogate."
She explains that on the main page These advance direct
of Big Bend Hospice's web site, if must be witnessed by at
visitors click on the "about us" but- individuals.
ton, in the lower right hand comer Arnold encouraged c
of the page, downloadable advance talk to those closest to tt
directive forms are available, are concerned about th(
Florida and federal laws give medical care, prior to c
every competent adult, 18 or older, the forms.
the right to make his/her own health She notes that individual
care decisions, including the right to wish to consult with their
decide what medical care or treat- as well.
ment to accept, reject or Forms are available b
discontinue, writing: Big Bend Hosp
IThe forms on the web site meet Catherine Arnold, 205 N.
Florida's legal requirements. Street, Monticello, FL., 3
Residents are urged to complete clude name and address w
the forms and make their medical quest.
care wishes known to their doctor For additional inform
and family, so there is no confusion, tact Big Bend Hospice at
if they are not able to speak for 5310.


LKERAH HAIRE of Jefferson Elementary School Boys and
Girls Boys Club enjoys a break from the physical fitness
program. (News Photo) ;



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are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions of service. Monthly fee does not include usage for Directory Assistance, foncard"' service or operator services. Service
not intended for commercial use, Internet, data or facsimile service. If Sprint determines that usage is not consistent with residential voice conversation, the service may be assessed a data usage
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when converting to new unlimited long-distance plan. Contact Sprint for details. @2005 Sprint. All rights reserved. Sprint and the diamond logo are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L.P


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-6291
:Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

CMEM RON CICHON
,IDPublisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

:Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 petyear.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
:Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
:Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.riet
a *. --'-


FrmOrPooFl


From Our Photo File
v3 1W


... '; .- ~ .. ..


COnStruction JObs I free tax assistance to the elderly, in Feb., lams.(NewsFilePh


,Attract Youths Opinion & Comment


The construction industry contin-
,ues to provide a growing number of
Sjob opportunities. Especially in the
summer months, we see more teen
,workers employed in this field.
Summer job opportunities in con-
struction may be the first job experi-.
.ence for some young people.
- The best way to make sure it is a
:rewarding experience is to be sure
. it's a safe and healthy one.
Under the Leadership of Secretary
?Elaine L. Chao, the U.S. Department
:of Labor (DOL) developed the
-YouthRules! campaign to promote
;positive, safe experiences for teen
workers.
YouthRules! provides valuable in-
?formation online so that every em-
iployei, teen and parent has the
;ability to access information on
:youth employment rules.
Because of the special needs and
regulations of the construction in-
dustry, DOL is launching a new
|phase of the YouthRules! program
'dealing with youth working in con--
,struction.
The new YouthRules! Youth
,Working in Construction resource
will provide valuable and easy to


understand information so that:


understand information s" that:
Employers can ensure that they
are in compliance with the law and S .
most importantly maintain a safe
workplace; ..* a
And young workers also can un- What's in a name? For me, it's
derstand the protections that apply been mispronunciation.
to them. -. I mean, who can get "She-on" out
This is important because, in De- of Cichon? Nobody that I've ever
cember 2004, the Departmernt pub- met!
lished new regulations to expand So, from elementary school for-
protections for young ,.orkers. ward, the person calling my name
These regulations made significant did something like this Chi er Cho,
changes affecting and construction Chicken, Cocheese, how do you
industry. pronounce your name?
The interactive presentation the 'My -training instructor in basic
-Department created details the Fair training looked at my name on the
Labor Standards `Act's youth -em- squadron roster and asked, "What
plohyment resulitions and includes: the hell kind of name is this?"
videoo clips depicting real lie. I said, "Sir, it's the only one I,
examples of violations: "--- '.. got!"
Prohibited items and a-ctivities. He said, "Well, it's a hell of a


are clearly explained.
While this year there is a greater
emphasis on the changes in con--
strucnon protections, the department
remains committed io ensuring that
young,, .workers are legally
employed, _especially in industries
such as restaurants and retail, which
hire the greatest number of youth.


From Our Files


name!"
I admit to envying folks with
names that-. are easily pronounced.,
They don't have to go through ihe-
explanations time and again likely
those of us with names difficult to,
pronounce.
Often, after struggling with my
name, people ask, "What nationality
is that?' .
With a straight face I would re-
'spond, "Bulgarian."
Their-eyes would go blank and I


Publisher's

Notebook


.Ron Ciclion


knew they were trying to figure out
where Bulgaria is. I offer no help.
Over time I learned to respond to
anything that was even remotely
close to the pronunciation of my
.name.
A college professor would say,
',Chee" and I would say, "Here."
When I was in my late teens, I
dated a girl whose nickname was
"Red" because of her flaming red
hair.
Instead of friends saying: "Ron
and Red are coming to the party," or
whatever, they would say: "Red
Chicken will be at the party."


,1

I


WI'


I don't know who started that, but
I didn't like it. Naturally, it stuck
and Red and I were referred to as
"Red Chicken."
That may be the reason our ro-
mance was short-lived, I don't
know.
She moved on to a guy named
"Biff' while I was looking around
for Carol or a Sue who didn't have
flaming red hair.
If pronouncing my name is tough,
spelling it is equally difficult.
The tendency is to put an extra "h"
so it comes out Chichon.
I was awarded a couple of plaques


from the Chamber over the years
and we had to send the plaques back
to correct the spelling of my name.
On the second try with one of the
plaques, my name was engraved
Ron C. Cichon. My middle name
begins with an "A" and not a "C"
but who cares?
As much as my last name has been
butchered over the years, I should
worry about a mistake in my middle
initial?
Some people are pretty creative
when it comes to pronouncing my
name. They don't even try.
They say something like, "This is
Mr. Ron from the Newspaper
office."
Or: "This is our Newspaper Pub-.
lisher."
And: "Ron, pronounce your last.
name for these folks."
You have to admit, that's pretty
creative!
My daughters, having run the
name gauntlet for a long time, mar-
ried men with names like Rogers
and Medina.
They say, "Hey Dad, people can
pronounce our names now!'?


TEN YEARS AGO
August 2, 1995
Texaco and Colonial are gone,
but the ramifications of their contro-
versial and ill-fated petroleum fuel
terminal near Lloyd continue to re-
verberate.
City Police rounded up three lo-
cals in traffic checks Saturday, re-
$ulting in charges of possession of
drug paraphmalia in each of the
separate incidents.
A fire at Jefferson Arms Apart-
ments on Sunday afternoon caused
an estimated $8,000 in damage.
TWENTY YEARS
August 2, 1985
: The National Labor Relations
Board has called a union election for
August 16 at the Artistic Creations
apron factory.
Wages, overtime pay, and work-
iig conditions are some of the issues
to be resolved by way of a contract
between the Monticello Police De-
pprtment and the City of Monticello.,
With all the attention focused this
pist week on movie idol Rock Hud-
son's case of AIDS, people in Jef-
fdrson County are wondering if the
disease has found its way to this
community.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
July 31, 1975
The 4-Her's have certainly been
bi4sy this summer and some of them
arb gone again. This time it's to 4-h
Congress which is being held in
Gainesville at the University of
Florida.
According to Head Coach Earl
Swann, two players on the Ameri-


can Legion Post 49 baseball team
have been awarded scholarships.
Don Barfield and Glenrr'Ratliffhas
both signed baseball scholarships to
attend Enterprise Junior College in
Enterprise Alabama.
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 30, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. Cap Shuman and
children are on a week's vacation in
Charlotte and the North Carolina
mountains.
Miss Mary Bassett left Sunday
with a group of- Presbyterian young
people from Tallahassee to spend a
week at Montreat, NC.
Mr. and Mrs. James Pafford and
children are spending their vacation
in the mountains of North Carolina.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 29, 1955
Robert Daughtrey and Jimmy
Blunk were representing Jefferson,
County at Forestry Camp at Camp
O'Leno State Park. .
Bonnie Shuman was named best
"all around camper" at 4-H Camp at
Cherry Lake -
SIXTY YEARS AGO
July 20, 1945
Mrs. Ophelia C. Wells resigned as
home demonstration agent of the
county to become general supervisor
of Jefferson County Schools.
Cpl. Williams S. Peters on a r10-
day leave enroute for Las Vegas,.
Nevada to Lincoln, Nebraska, and
his fiance, Miss Jean Hall of Ster-
ling, Colorado, visited with his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. P.R. Peters at
Lamont.


Solon Blasts CAFTA Effort


BY CHARLIE NORWOOD
US Congressman

Gporgia chicken farmers are try-
ing to sell poultry in Central Amer-"
-ica- under a 160 percent tariff, while
Central American farmers sell their
chicken in America tariff-free. Any
five-year old will tell you that's
cheating. So what are we going to
do about it?
The global trade crowd says we
ought to reward these "competitors"'
by offering them the chance to. cheat
us on textiles and sugar, by approv-
ing the Central American Free Trade
Agreement, or CAFTA.
In return, they agree to stop cheat-,
ing us on chickens after another 18
years during which they put ourl
poultry industry out-of-buisness.
Amnesty for trade cheats, just like
the same crowd's proposals on am-!
nesty for illegal aliens.
,,"Let's open foreign markets to
American goods". That battle cry,
has been the mantra of the globalists
for the past decade. It was their
whole rationale for pushing the
United States against public opin-
ion away from America's histori-
cally proven bilateral trade agree-
ment system.
We enjoyed our last trade surplus -
$12.4 billion in 1975. Decades of


government regulation, trade union
demands, and the unfair trade poli-
cies of the international competitors
like Japan were finally taking their
toll.
By 1994, the United States was
posting consistent trade deficits, re-
cording a $98 billion dollar deficit.
That brought the globalists into
play, negotiating multi-nation
Megaa deals" in which other coun-
tries were allowed to ship either
low-tariff or completely tariff-free
goods into the United States, while
wve agreed to continue tariffs on our
goods to their countries, like the
chicken cheating deal we agreed to
as part of the Caribbean Basin Ini-
tiative.
The argument then and now for
this economic stupidity is the same.
We lose some jobs and markets,
but overall, our exports will
increase, as foreign countries that
currently protect their markets
through high tariffs agree to lower
them on some things as long as we
agree to lower ours more, or elimi-
nate them entirely.
The first, the granddaddy of all the
giveaways, passed Congress in 1994
-.The North American Free Trade
Agreement, NAFTA. Mexico and
Canada were our largest trading
partners, and this deal would further
'"open their markets to American


Good Customer


Think about the last time you had
a negative buying experience. Did'
'an e-commerce site fail to respond
to your e-mail?
Did a sales associate treat you as if
he didn't really want to help you?
Were you left on hold for a long
time when you called a mail-order
house?


almost always linked to shoddy cus-
tomer service.
These days it's rare to find good
customer support, even though most
businesses claim that they put peo-
ple first.
But customer service is making a
revival because business managers
are realizing.good customer service


Negative buying experiences are- is essential for all businesses, ac-


goods."
In 1994, we still had a $1.3 billion
trade surplus with Mexico. Today as
a direct result of NAFTA, we have a
$45 billion trade deficit. In 1994, we
had a $14 billion trade deficit with
Canada. Today, we have $66.5 bil-
lion deficit.
But to the globalists, this is all
good. For while we lost good paying
manufacturing jobs and markets,
U.S. exports did in fact increase.
Exports to Mexico jumped from
$51 billion in 1994 to $111 billion
in 2004. Exports to Canada grew
from $114 billion in 1994 to $190
billion in 2004.
It's just that imports grew a lot
faster than exports. So while our
sales to Mexico grew 118 percent,
our purchases grew 215 percent.
Sales to Canada went up 66 percent,
imports from Canada grew 100 per-
cent.
The undeniable end result is a net
loss of dollars and jobs to Ameri-
cans. A few people gained; the ma-
jority lost.
NAFTA alone is bad enough, but
the globalists have piled one bad
trade deal on top of the next ever
since.
Congress approved U.S. member-
ship in the World Trade Organiza-
tion (WTO) in 1995, and the
Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership



Service
cording to AllBusiness.com, one of
the Web's leading business sites.
AllBusiness.com also offers expert
advice, such as the following 10
rules for excellent customer service:
Commit to quality service. Eve-
ryone in the company needs to be
devoted to creating a positive expe-
rience for the customer. Always try
to go above and beyond customer


Act and the Africa Growth and Op-
portunity Act in 2000.
But that still wasn't enough. We
still needed to "open more markets
to American goods."
So we approved Permanent Nor-
mal Trade Relations to Communist
China in 2000, in spite of the fact
we knew they used slave labor in
their Red Army-owned factories.
The result? The percentages were-
n't as bad as Mexico and Canada
due to the fact we sold little to
China to begin with. But the result
in real dollars is appalling.
Between 2000 and 2004,'U.S. Ex-
ports to China grew $18 billion;
U.S. imports shot up $97 billion. We
ended with a net loss of $162 billion
for 2004 alone.
China further rewarded our trust
by passing a new law giving ad-
vance approval for the Red Army to
invade our ally Taiwan.
Then we gave the President Fast
Track Trading Authority in 2002 to
get us into these messes more
quickly in the future. No point drag-
ging our feet down the road to ruin.
That $98 billion trade deficit in
1994 has now exploded to $618 bil-
lionr last year, thanks to these poli-
cies.
The essence of stupidity is defined
in those who simply cannot learn
from experience.



Rare
expectations.
Know your products. Conveying
knowledge about products and serv-
ices will help you win a customer's
trust and confidence. Know your
company's products, services and
return policies inside out. Try to an-
ticipate the types of questions cus-
tomers will ask.
(See Good Customer Page 5)


I


"i'f
j.#"


1990. L-R: Barnes, Mary Williams, King Wil-


AARP VOLUNTEER Don Bar gives


to)


U


In A Name? Confusion


Letters to the Editor

Welcomed 500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include

phone number of writer











Letters...


Writers Alert Residents To


Coming Rezoning Requests


Dear Editor:
We would like to alert the citizens
of Jefferson County about three
property applications for rezoning
by Comprehensive Plan amend-
ments this month.
These amendments for rezoning
are scheduled to go before the Plan-
ning Commission 7 p.m. Aug. 11, at
the courthouse, for their approval.
This Board is the first step for the
people to voice their concerns. Citi-
zens need to contact their Commis-
sioners and plan to attend this
important meeting.
A rezoning request on South 19
will take in 73 acres of agricultural
land. It is currently zoned Ag-5 ( 1
unit per 5 acres) and the applicant
wants to rezone it to R-1 (1 unit per
acre).
The possibility goes from 14 units
to 73 units on the same parcels with
wells and septic tanks. The applica-
tion was originally reviewed last
October, but was withdrawn by the
applicant at the County Commission
level on June 16.
In Waukeenah, 377 acres is being
requested for rezoning. It is cur-
rently zoned agricultural and mixed
use suburban residential land.
The applicant is asking for rezon-
ing from Ag-3 (1 unit per 3 acres)
and Sub/Res (2 units per acre with
water) to R-1 (1 unit per 1 acre).
This includes 77 acres of environ-
mentally sensitive land. With central
water and no sewer, this rezoning
goes from 204 units to a possibility
of 424 units.
At the Jefferson/Leon County line
on Highway 27, the applicant is ask-
ing for 985 acres of agricultural land.
to be rezoned.
The applicant is requesting the
land to be rezoned from Ag-20 (1
unit per 20 acres) to Ag-5 (1 unit
per 5 acres.)
The possibility goes from 49 units


to 197 units on the same parcels
with wells and septic tanks.
The applicant also owns adjoining
lands that are currently zoned Ag-20
and could come up for future rezon-
ing.
If approved, these re-zonings will
have a major impact on the County.
With a swipe of the pen, Jefferson
County will be changed forever.
More and more land will be rezoned
without regard to the future.
Our country does not have the in-
frastructure to support the rezoning
of these lands. Growth and develop-
ment have to be planned for and
managed.
It needs to be in the proper zoning
and areas allowing for it. There is a
reason these lands are zoned as
such.
In the last year, the Commission


has given many approvals for devel-
opment of major subdivisions.
Some have not begun construction,
but it is coming. The County already
has enough acreage zoned for these
building purposes.
We need to learn from our neigh-
boring counties and their mistakes.
South and central Florida are classic
examples.
Developers buy land, rezone it to
fit their needs, fill their pockets, and
leave the problems for us to resolve.
For project managers, it is "all about
money."
Only developers and large compa-
nies have much to gain, while the
County has much to lose. Please
don't let greed destroy Jeffersoni
County.
Don & Cindy Lee


REAL

ESTATE

COURSE

Sept 7 Oct 24
Mon/Wed/Fri: 6-9 p.m.

Prepare for the Fla.
real estate exam
For college credit or audit
Cost: $184 + text
NFCC, Madison, FL

North For information:
Florida 850/973-1637
w l or
,;i9 MazzoneE@nfcc.edu

Subscribe Today!
Monticello News
In State: $45.00 (yr.)
Out of State: $52.00 (yr.)


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 5'.


Are you Looking For A........




PRIME DOWNTOWN


OFFICE SPACE



Cherry Street Commons BIdg.



Available Now!!!

Call 997-1980

A Jack Cars well


Good Customer Service


(Continued From Page 4)
Know your customers. Try to
learn everything you can about your
customers so you can tailor your
service approach to their needs and
buying habits. Talk to people and'
listen to their complaints so you can
get the root of customer dissatisfac-
tion.
Treat people with courtesy and
respect. Remember that every con-
tact with a customer whether it's
by e-mail, phone, written correspon-
dence, or face-to-face meeting -
-leaves an impression. Use phrases
like "sorry. to keep you waiting,"
and "it's been a pleasure helping
you."
Never argue with a customer.
You know dam well that the cus-
tomer. You know dam well that the
customer isn't always right. But in-
stead of focusing on what went


wrong,in a particular situation, con-
centrate on how to fix it. Research
shows that seven out of 10 custom-
ers will do business with you again
if you resolve a complaint in their
favor.
Don't leave customers hanging.
Repairs, callbacks and e-mails need
to be handled with a sense of ur-
gency. Customers want immediate
resolution, and if you can give it to
them, you'll probably win their re-
peat business. Research shows that
95 percent of dissatisfied customers
will do business with a company
again if their complaint is resolved
on the spot.
Always provide what you prom-
ise. Fail to do this and you'll lose
credibility and customers. If you
guarantee a quote within 24 hours,
get the quote out in a day or less.


-










Jefferson County 4-H would like to recognize and thanks the following sponsors for
sending needy kids to 4-H Summer Camp

CAMP SPONSORS 2005




Bill & Brenda Nelson
Dale & Margaret Boatwright
Rev. & Mrs. Dick Bailar
Pete Rossi, New Leaf Farms
Herbert Demott, Pinckney Hill Plantation
Ferd Naughton,,Morrow Insurance
Kiwanis, Youth, Inc.
Buck Bird, Attorney
Emil & Sharon Bilinski
Tim Peary, Realtor
Sloan Walker, Waukeenah Fertilizer
Almeda Tillman Lane
Ron Cichon, Monticello News
John & Jo Morris, Morris Petroleum
Jefferson Soil Conservation District
Mrs. Dorothy Lewis
Amaryllis Garden Circle
Mrs. Willa M. Seabrooks
Mrs. Dorothy Barnhart
Altrusa Club of Monticello
Jan Wadsworth
Butch CoCroft, Jr.
Carol Austin
Men's Golf Association
Gary Wright, Farmers & Merchants Bank
Mitch McElroy
Frank Purvis, Avalon Plantation
Fred Beshears, Simpson Nurseries
Nick & Elaine Prine
Mary Ann VanKleunen
Mike Gramling's Electric
Cindy Roe Littlejohn
Boyd Family Farms, Inc.


The Jefferson County Recycling Proqram accepts
the following items for recycling-


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc. r

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.. .

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown &green'ri,

Residents can' bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at'
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


El











PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10. 2005


Lifestyle


Tracy Harper Marries

Shawn Matthew Daily
of Carbondale, CO. and John
DEBBIE SNAPP ; McClure of Clearwater.
Staff Writer The groomsmen were the groom's
brothers Chris Daily, Jeff Daily, and
Tracy Lynn Harper and Shawn--Ryan Daily of Atlanta, GA.; and
Matthew Daily were married on Sat- Kevin Daily. of Clearwater.
urday, May 14, 2005 in the First The ring bearers were the groom's
Presbyterian Church of Tallahassee. nephew Reese Daily of Clearwater,
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and the bride's cousin, Logan Ham-
and Mrs. Johnny Harper of Craw- rick, of Ocala.
fordville, and Mrs. and Mr. Charles The bride wore a strapless floor
Littlejohn of Tallahassee. length gown with a chapel train, and
The groom is the son of Mr. and a cathedral length ivory veil wvith
Mrs. Michael Daily and Mr. and pearls sewn along the edges.
Mrs. John Herndon of Clearwater. The reception was held at the
:The bride is the paternal grand- bride's family home under a ham-
daughter of Cliff and Ruth Harper mock of live oaks on Lake Jackson. :
of Crawfordville, and maternal The decorations were in the
:granddaughter of the late William T. bride's chosen colors of sea mist
"Geechie" Roe and Johnelle Roe of and creme with an Old South theme.
Monticello. Centerpieces included green hy-
The maids of honor were the drangeas, Queen Anne's lace, white
bride's sister Jamie Harper of Alex- roses and belles of Ireland in Mason
andria, VA., and the bride's college jars.
friend, Kathryn Stolzman, of Clear-.. There was dinner and dancing un-
water. der: the white lights, which were
The bridesmaids were the bride's around the porches, along the court-
cousins Kristin Young. of Mesa, yard fence line, and under the tents.
AZ., and Crystal Raker ofTallahas- During the reception the bride's
see; the groom's sister Kelly Daily cousin Jason Young. of Davidson,
of Clearwater; and the bride's high NC., toasted the union and wel-
school friends, Melissa Joiner and comed Shawn into the Roe family,
Kara Thornberry ofTallahassee." which is in short suppl of males.
. Flower girls were the bride's cous- Jason, age 22, as the first and the
:ins Savannah and Hannah McDon- last male Roe born into the Geechie
aid, of Tallahassee and Riley Roe family, since 930 .
Hamrick of Monticello. The couple honeymooned on a
SThe bestmen were the groom's cruise to the Cayman's, Belize, and
-long time friends, Scott McClung Cozumel and are living in Dunedin.



Homes Of Mourning


Thomas Waring Drawdy,
HI
Thomas Waring Drawdy, III, age
30, was the owner/operator of
Drawdy's Backhoe Service Inc. died
Sunday. August 7, 2005 in Jefferson
County, Florida inm a single vehicle
accident.
Funeral Services will be Wednes-
d4.. August 10, 2005 at Wacissa
'United Methodist-Church of Wa-
cssa. Florida beginning at 2:00pm
Te Burial will be at Roseland
Cemetery. Visitation for the family
tCj II be held Tuesday, August 9,
2. 05 from 6:00 to 8:00pm at Beggs
F jneral Home Monncello Chapel,
.tbnticello Florida.
S Waring was a native, of
Monticello, Florida, and was born
rfa\ r24, 1975. He was a lifelong.:
resident of Jefferson County. He
Vs a graduate of Jefferson County
l-6gh School..He was of Methodist
fa'th and a member of First United
\Iethodist Church of Monticello,
.Flrida.
,He was survived by his wife To-
nia Brumbley Drawdy of Wacissa,
FL, father 'Thomas "Tomm\"
Drawdy of Monticello, one brother
Vnrice Drawdy of Tallahassee, one
!sister Brigit Drawdy of Tallahassee:,
niece and nephew Talyn Allard and
ASden Allard of Daytona.
Mario John Di.Biase
Nlano John Di Biase, age 83 of
Fpgewood Plantation Monticello,,
Florida and Las Vegas, .Nevada,
dbed peacefully,' and with dignity
surrounded by his family. Sunday.
August 7,2005.
S Born January 9, 1922 in
Rochester, New York,: his .family
moved to Los Angeles, CA. where
he grew up and attended uhgh school
IA 1940 he moved to Las Vegas, Ne-
vada, he enlisted in the US Navy
eabees in the 91st Philippines
Squadron during World War II and
served in New Guinea.
He is survived by his loving wife
of 58 years, Ruth Gambill Di Biase,
c4e daughter Susan Di Biase Sim-
aons and her husband Sherman
Simmons of Las: Vegas,. Nevada,
and one granddaughter. Sierra Sim-
mons, who is attending the Univer-
sity of California, Los Angeles.
I From his earliest days as a painter
if California and later moving to
IEas Vegas, Nevada, he started his
business as a painter with his wife,
IRuth, as his partner. He .then,
branched out into the wholesale/re-
tail paint business later starting his
own contracting business M.J. Di
]iase Contracting" 56 years ago. His
career in business has been instru-
rniental in the development of Las
\'egas and to this day the result of


his efforts are still being appreciated
in many of the hotel/casinos and
public buildings.
In 1995 he was selected as the
AFL-CIO Employer of the Year.
His company, M.J. Di Biase/Sim-
mons Contracting.'has been honored
as being one of the top 100 private
companies for several years.
John was a member of the Ma-
sonic Lodge, The Shriner's Lodge,
and Painting and Decorating Con-
tractors of America and an avid
golfer and pilot.
Services will be at 11 am, Thurs-
day, August 11 at First Baptist
Church of Monticello, Florida. In
Lieu. of flowers, the family asks that
contributions be made to the new
sound system for the First Baptist
Church, Monticello, Florida.


Over 55 and
Unemployed?
Interested in working in the
healthcare field?
If you quali f,'Experience Works
has paid CNA training and job
opportunity funded by grants
from SBA.

Call Georgia at
850-973-9922
A national nonprofit
organization. EEO/AA
"These U.S. Small Business Administra-
tion (SBA) Grant' Awards, #SBAHQ-02-1-
0034 and #SBAHQ-03-1-0058, care funded
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investigators are racing to
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.1


First Baptist Church To
.Host New Children's Program


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


I


.7


TRACY HARPER AND SHAWN MATTHEW DAILY

Foreign Students

Seek Host Families


A few more local host families are
needed for foreign high school stu-'
dentsscheduled to arrive soon for
academic semniester and year pro-
gram homestalls. .
Pacific ,Inter cultural Exchange
(PIE) Executive Director, John
Doty, relates that the students are:
between the ages of 15 and 18, Eng-
lish speaking, and have their- own
spending money, carry accident and
health insurance, and are eager to
share their,cultural experiences with
their new American families.
PIE currently has programs to
match almost every family's needs,
ranging in length from a semester,
to a full academic year, where the
students attend local high schools.
PIE representait ies match students
with host families by finding com-
mon interests and lifestyles through
an informal in home meeting.
Prospective host families are able
to review. student applications and
select the perfect ,match. As there
are no "typical" host families, PIE
can fit a student into almost any
situation, whether a single parent, a
childless couple, a retired couple, or
a large family.
Families who host for PIE are also,
eligible to claim a $50 per month
charitable contribution deduction on


their itemized tax returns for each
month they host a sponsored
student.
Doty encourages families to con-
tact the program immediately, as it
will allow proper time for the stu-
dents and hosts to get to know one
another before they actually meet
for the first time.
Jefferson area families interested
in learning more about student ex-
change, or arranging for a meeting'
with a community representative,
should call PIE toll free at 800-631-
1.818.
The agency also has travel/study
program opportunities.available for
"'American high school students.



iClationi

Protection
Protect your savings from (the
ups and downs of inflation with
the new Series I Bond from
the U.S. Treasury
And I Bonds are available at
most financial institutions. Call
S 1-800-4US BOND for more
S." f ,-,r_ i. ore.i _-


I IN -- -'O1 [ Y M- "1 I


LIMITED TIME.
OFFER


- SEE DEALER
FOR' DETAILS


Him," said Pastor Roger Joyner.
Signs pointing the way to the
church are posted on both Old
Lloyd Rd. and SR-59. '
For further information contact
Joyner at 878-1760 or call the
church at 997-5309.

St. Jude, may the Sacred
Heart of Jesus be adored, glo-
rified, loved, and preserved
throughout the world now and
forever. St. Jude, Sacred Heart
of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude,
worker of miracles, pray- for t
us. St. Jude, help of the hope- I
-less, pray for us. Thank you St.
Jude for prayers answered. LS


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
Sdba
ra^vww1 r Futeral ontel
" 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
Monticello, FL. 32344
.- 850-997-5553 .
.ona "Al"Hall William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets




















"Where Pharmacy i- Phamily"
Home Health Care Free Blood Pressure
Gifts *Coimselig on Medication
z Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello *997-3553


By Encore Senior Living
Tallahassee's Original Assisted Living Community
Assisted Living Respite & Adult Day Service
850-562-4123 X3207 North Monroe St. ~


License #99


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
INCLUDES:
ORi Z.. Normal Installation
1M5.00 6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas
LJ u
AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


GOT-LAND?


Let's Build S
-.__ ,

,- ,- 1


Melal Roof is optional, Copyright Home Store Plans and Publcations
Call Today! P)
(850) 224-0614 : N W J
TolFee 1-800-771-0614 P WHhomes.com
iTi aisee A Division of Pennyworth Homes, Inc.
Visit Our New Home Design Center Today! Open Moo.- Fri. 9am- 6pm Saturday 9am 1pm
9335 West T'ennesee Street .FLl.i. kCRCO58477 M


I1


I

I


I


i


wwwencoresl.com


Deep-tissue massage, using heat and less physical
pressure to release tension. *

Introductory price: $65 in August
.($10 off.regular price) _
Certified Massage Therapist Jennifer Ryan V

Call the Archbold Integrative Medicine Center (229)228-7008

TR OUT FAMIYHALT ARE


193 NW US HWY. 221, GREENVILLE, FL, (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify) for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison,. Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984.....
~T We accept Medicare, Medicaid Linda Blle ARNP
Hes D.O. & most insurance plans


Located at 1702 South Jefferson St. in Perry, Florida
850-223-1744
1885 Professional Park Circle Suite 60 in Tallahassee, FL
850-421-7600
Call Us If You're In Need Of Care In Your Pregnancy or
For Any Women's Health Care Issues


rw-


l


M-


The First Baptist Church of
Lloyd will offer a new children's
program at the church, beginning 5
p.m., Sunday, Aug. 21.
It will be conducted every Sun-
day evening afterward and will fea-
ture games, classes and counseling
time for all children, from kinder-
garten through sixth grade.

The church provide the children
with a meal during the programs.
"Our mission is to touch those
children's hearts with the Gospel of -
Christ, and train them to serve


I





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 7



Thmsvle GeorgiaA


VISITIOG the Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Home are
Janet ,ones and Gloria Cox-Jones.

Church Youth Group

Travels To Atlanta


DEBBE SNAPP
Staff writer
Greater Fellowship MB Church
Youth Department, directed by Dan-
iel Jones,' Sr., and Norman Mack,
traveled ap Atlanta, recently for its
annual st.nmer trip.
The gpup of 54 left via chartered
bus, Jul) 28 and visited Whitewater
Adventtie' Park.
"The kids really had a great time
with the many water games," adds
Gloria Cok-Jones, spokesperson for
the group
After checking in at the Ameri-
Suites Hctel and dining, it was back
:in the wzer again at the hotel pool.
Day two began with a breakfast
buffet at the hotel and off to the
Martin Liuther Kine Center.
I !


The MLK.Center offered a time to
reflect on black heritage. The group
could see and actually feel the expe-
-rience of the black struggles through
the various exhibits.
The MLK Center provides
movies, art books, including an ar-
ray of speeches and %works by Mar-
tin Luther King. Jr.
The group \\ as escorted by a tour
guide through the King family
.home.
The next stop was Underground
Atlanta and "shop till you drop" ex-
claimed Cox-Jones.
The group then returned to the ho-
tel for a pool side birthday party for
Belle Parish, one of the group.
They departed for the trip home
on the third day, and lunched in
Cordele, GA., before continuing on
to NMonncello.


THIE EASY WAY TO SELL, PLACE YOUR AD IN
THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THE:
MONTICELLO NEWS 997-3568


- UUEEEII EIIEEEb~ ~
".9
A
I,.,



I

I'

Ii


I

I

I

I

I
I


YOUTH of Greater Fellowship MB Church
visit Martin Luther King Center in Atlanta,


,fr," ,


AUSTIN
First Birthday,
Sani Gerrold Austin celebrated his
First Birthday August 3, 2005.
He is the son of Yolanda and Ger-,
rold Austin, Sr. and younger brother
of Gerrold II and Charlene.
Paternal grandparents are Willie
Mae and the late Sam Austin, of
Monticello.
Maternal grandparents are the late
Charlene Hart. of San Antonio TX.


1- .
during a recent summer trip. The group
also visited the ML King, Jr. Family Home.


ANNOUNCES


TUMBLING CLASSES

Coming September 2005
For Children Ages

3 10


Call 997-4253
for more information-

Jamie Cichon Rogers,

'Instructor


FANTASTIC FOUR
(PG13)
Fri. Sat. 7:05 9:40 Sun. 7:05
Mon. Thurs. 7:05
NO PASSES
CHARLIE
&CHOCOLATE
FACTORY (PG)
Fri.- Sat.. 1:00 4:05 7:10 -
9:45 Sun. 1:00 4:05 7:00
Mon. Thurs. 4`05 7:00
WEDDING
CRASHERS (R)
Fri. -Sat. 1:20 4:20 7:25 -
10:05 Sun. 1:20 4:20 7:25
Mon. Thurs. 4:20 7:25
STEALTH (PG13)
Fri.- Sat. 1:30 -4:15- 7:15 -
10:00 Sun. 1:30 4:15 7:15
Mon. Thurs. 4:15 7:15
NO PASSES
HUSTLE & FLOW (R)
SFri. Sat. 1:50 4:30 7:30 -
10:10 Sun. 1:50 4:30 7:30
Mon. Thurs. 4:30 7:30
NO PASSES
SKY HIGH (PG)
Fri. Sat. 2:00 4:40 7:20 -
9:50 Sun. 2:00 4:40 7:20
Mon. Thurs. 4:40 7:20
NO PASSES
DUKES OF HAZZARD
(PG13)
Fri. Sat. 2:15 -4:45- 7:40 -
10:15 Sun. 2:15 -4:45 7:40
Sun. 2:15 4:45 7:40 Mon.
SThurs. 4:45 -7:40
NO PA-SSES
BAD NEWS BEARS
(PG13)
Fri. Sat. 1:45 -4:25 Sun. 1:45


S. -- .- 4:25 Mon. iThurs. 4:2 '
and Desuvi Ho ard, of Shorter, AL. | I
5 STAE.CHAMPN :;ONSHIPS,., "s- -"WON-'-



5 STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS."


Rich Tradition







Jefferson County


S"Tiger Football," '







Booster Membership Drive


Please Call 997-8111




For Information About Becoming A

Bposter And Supporting Our Youth!!!



Organizational Meeting August II, 2005 at

7:00 p.m. at Old JCHS Caferteria


I


-Iqmpp
440-







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005






Rea Estae





S& ore(10


Pat Gaver 100% Lending 80/20 Programs
Mortgage Loan Originator
. tl-, 89 .14. Qualified if no home
a. ; 6,m!. 4970 ownership in last 36 months.
-11 8i50 'i'-2768 Florida Housing Bond Program
p .r.:kga'-r.p.eoplesfirst.com TLC Program

Theet anmkintyhe b
The best bank in the neighborhood


FRITH ABSTRACT

& TITLE CO.


Owners & Mortgage Title
ii:.i .N ~Insurance POlicies
Title Searches Real Estate Closings ,I.
Ai V 011St ot'o 501 N. Byron Butler Pkwy. Perry, FI.
tSO i850-584-2672

HEAT IR CONDONING
1. 24 hour Service, 7-days Wh;* wait when you don't have to? Call now.
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired right by skilled, neat technicians.
3. Free Energy Survey for new systems can save you big.
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: 4. Two-year repair warranty Most stop at 30 days! Benson's
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5. 10-Year warranty on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy financing to suit you! Just call.
7. Free Air Quality Check Let us check what's lt y A
-in your air for your health.
SII 8. Up front pricing No surprises, just honesty *
Sthe way it should be. Florida Realty
A'"n. "*ll^^^^ff For over 20 years, thousands have chosen F ri Rea
l\ l'I the caring comfort of Benson's. Look for the Red Roof ,- 1*
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our value to you.-O 562-3132 j_.mu
11.8 Acres on 95th Street, Lake City,$79,000

i. Mobile Home on 2.69 Acres on Gum Swamp Road, Lake
-,,"- ,, i City, $141,900 $110,000
Mobile Home on 5 Acres on'47th Drive,
y .Serving Jefferson County Residential & Commercial Mobile Home on 3.7 Acres, Lake City, $59,500
AW Barry W. Wyche, Sr. .85 Acres on 79th Drive, Lake City, $29,900
PO Box 167, Monticello, 32345 11.37 Acres on CR 136 & 1-75, Lake City, $1,137,000
WIN Office: 850-997-3271 Fax: 850-997-3345 -C
Cell: 813-477-8113 e-mail: wpm1232@aoL.com at
Swww.lakecityfloridarealty.com
www.buyerbrokerusa.com
,, (386) 754-0800 or (877) 231-0080











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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 9


Indoor
environmental
ea i"Ls problems?:
JL-H IIi '^LL 'i.^ "
Jonm D. Hassler
-II Certified Indoor
Environmentalist &
Mold Remediator
SIndoor Air Quality (IAQ)
SInspections and Consu ling
a^ te a a a 000 a V Residential &cComnirciral Buildng
I"I Diagnostics
i TV Water Intrusion Control Measures
V Mold Remediation
d, V Building Analysis w/ Infrard
Theirnmoraphv (e.g., roof leaks,
I 1 hotwires)
383-6653 ..
S.-'-682 I.

Lindal Cedar Homes is the
largest manufacturer of quality,
custom, post and beam and
.II timber homes. We offer a -
lifetime structural warranty on -
Air% ^all Lindal Homes. And we help
you each step of the way, from
Sue2planning to turn key.
,i' Walden Classic Homes LLC

':" "" Z-= %" ^ "----- _. 850 907-9596
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,m5 n Your Hometown Electrical Services.
ABe prepared for hurricane season.
Sales and Instalation of
IAutomatic & Manual Generator Systems
A.'" 850-509-7914
1"^ ,'eth 850-933-8167
i. Lic. & Insured EC13001894 I "

m -- I 53 5- ...., ,1-,.850.322.5826.. ,

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005




SFine Fabrics and Furnishings




s. &More B


.* W "Helping You is What We Do Best.
S-4 Health 4 Farm 4 Home
4Business 4 Auto 4 Life,,-.
Report All Claims (800) 330-3327 NEW LOCATION
soP Call Us For A Free Quote! W CH OVIA 224-2924
Madison Monticello Perry 355 Market St. @ Timberlane Rd.
7 973-4071 997-2213 584-2371 A T Hours: M-F 10-6 Sat. 10-4
503 W. Base 105 W. Anderson 813 S. Washington GARRY THOMAS
www.floridafarmbureau.com Mortgage Banking Leader
garry.thomaswachovia.com ,
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Wanted! Wanted! Wanted! ,. .
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I have BUYERS Metal Roofing ,,,
Call me TODAY with your information $ SAVE $
Mary Youngblood-Shaw, Realtor !!Buy Direct From Manufacturer!! .
(850) 556..1142 N "New Profiles & C1lors to Choose from
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so i CALL TOLL FREE FOR QUOTE! 1888-393-0335 "

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Free Estimates wants you to
Licensed & Insured
Member of Tallahassee E PREPARED
.1, Chamber of Commerce B''E'P E

Keith Hargrove or the hurricane.
State Farm Select Agent
-Here are some Ways you can help minimize damage from the storm.
.Board up windows or cover them with protective shutters.
Move garbage cans, awninigs and other large outside objects ..
indoors or anchor them securely. A
.- Store or garage vehicles you plan to leave behind.
N "Moor boats securely, or,. if possible, place inside a building.
Shut off water, electricity and gas prior to leaving your house if you evacuate.
Cover the pump filter on your swimming pool.
If you are a State Farm policyholder, and your home or car is damaged by
h Contact your State Farm agent at 973-6641
Call 1-800-SF CLAIM (1-800 732-5246) to
reach our catastrophe operators; or
Visit statefarm~com@ to initiate a claim online.
Helping people recover' from the unexpected is what being a good neighbor is all about.


For any kind of government information,
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buying surplus government property, LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR STATE FARM IS THERE: ,
go to www.FirstGov.gov. Need more help? INSUANC
SE-mail usor call 1 (800) FED INFO.l Co., on





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 11
*~r* .....e~i~*#*****@*)****** .**.* ~**t***.*------**..Poo***.*O*j


All About







Dairy Queen
VUSHwy.19-S
Thomasville,Ga.
1-229-226-1559
OPEN FOR BREAKFAST


Blake's,


Specialty Food's Corp.
Monticello, FL


Is Growing and in need
of
Experienced Server's
Male & Female

Dishwasher's


Experienced Cook's



SNew Restaurant Opening Soon
Blake's, is known for its r1pannpss. & Ahnve Avpragn
Quality Food
We're Also Known for hiring Above Average.
Team Member's
If You feel you have what it take's and want to be a part
of a Growing Company, No Phone Call's
Please Apply in person from Ram till 10 am








Rareoor
S" C/ierry Str. M4onticelTo, f,
850-997-3133


7e' Specia/ze in Breakfast
SDaily Lunch Pfate '
,and ... .
\ Evening line 'Dining
Sres/i Seafood& Steak
S at J4ffordabe Price '

SWe invite your Famicy ancd-Friendcs
Sto comejoin us in 'BeautifulC
Downtown Monticello for
SBreakfast, Lunch or Dinner.

Monday -Saturday am tiCCgypm


Restaruant
1257 S. Jefferson Monticello, FL
997-5561


Robert's Backyard *Bar -'B-Q*
Formerly Panhandle Restaurant

"997-1202
6am -11pinpm
~C U\S W8A1


I VAT OI(WW


$4o


The Best fizzes Under OLne Rof!
Thin 'n Crispy Pan Pizza ~ Stuffed Crust Pizza
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Lover's Line Supreme ~ Super Supreme


Choose Your Toppings
Pepperoni Italian Sausage Beef Topping Anchovies
Bacon Pieces Pork Topping Red Onions Mushrooms Green Peppers
Black Olives Tomatoes Chicken Ham Pineapple Jalapenos


Dine-In or carryout
1403 Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL
(850)997-8533
S- '------------ -,-- -----------------~---
-I
2 Medium Pizzas 1 Topping $10.99
Kid's Night Buffet Every Tuesday 6pm 8pm!! I
.. ----------------------------
------------------- 7


WendySEXX,
Travel Center .


US 19 South
Just Past I-10


Introducing Our New Monterey
Ranch Chicken & Burger

Pa-smWE

L,* r a ~f im a1n1 '*a^N **


- - - -







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005

Rotarian Muchovej Attends


Study Exhange Group


-DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

James Muchovej has recently re-_
Sturned from a five week trip to Bra-
'2zil, as part of a Group Study
Exchange sponsored by the Founda-
*tion of Rotary International.
The trip was hosted by Rotary
SDistrict 4740, which is located in
Sthe western part of the state of Santa
'Catarina, which is the southern part
'of Brazil.
The team consisted of Muchovej,
as team leader, and professor from


Florida A&M University; Chad
Call, information technologist from
Tallahassee Community College;
Greg Gordon, police officer from
the Pensacola Police Department;
and Jason Candler, a property ap-
priaser, from Lake City.
Each team members is sponsored
by a local Rotary Club.
The team departed Tallahassee on
April 13 and arrived in Florianopo-
lis 24 hours later.
They were received by a delega-
tion of Rotarians and then toured the
city.
During the exchange, the team
*i.


JERRY SUTPHIN receives his certification as a County
Commissioner from Director Chris Holley.
















GENE HALL receives his certification as a County Commis
sioner from Chris Holley.

Hall, Sutphin Certified


County commissioners
The Florida Association of Coun- pro6 ide information, and enhance
ties (FAC) recently honored Corn- skills relevant to a commissioner's
Smissioner Gene Hall and Jerry duties and responsibilities as an
-Sutphin with the Certified County elected official.
"Commissioner (CCC) designation, The CCC program coursework
I ,following their completion of a covers a variety of topics, such as
Comprehensive study program de- county government roles and re-
, veloped by the association. sponsibilities, county government
t CCC certification is not a require- structure and authority, financial
Sent to serve as a county commis- management, ethics and sunshine
sic'ner in Florida, but county law, negotiation skills, economic de-
'commissioners voluntarily enroll in velopment, and effective communi-
Ithe program and complete a series cation.
"of courses totaling 36 hours. Completion of all coursework av-
: The coursewoik is designed to erages.18 to 24 months.
; t-__________________________________________* ____ >-I


visited 11 cities, with a service pr&
ject in each city.
The most notable service project
was the Verde Vida (green life) pro-
gram. This consortium of many
service clubs and businesses deals
with giving at risk teenagers a place
to go to when they are not in school
so that they can get instructional
help as well as vocational training.
Students are required to keep a
"B" average at school, and partici-
pate four hours a weekday in the
program.
The program generates funds by
purchasing "recyclables" (plastic,
paper, cans,) separating and selling
them.
This helps the environment, while
generating jobs. Many business do-
nate their scrap office paper.
Another notable project was one
that was funded almost entirely by
the Rotary Club of Canoinhas,
which built a 50 bed alcohol and
drug rehabilitation center. This pro-
ject is scheduled to go on-line early
next year.
While the language of Brazil is
Portugeese, "What was very surpris-
ing to us, was that German was al-
most a second language, especially
in the later part of the trip," relates
Muchovej.
The food was often that of what
you might expect in Germany or
Austria, with the flavors of tropical
fruits mixed in.
The main meats that were served
were chicken, pork, and lamb.
"One of the most,intriguing as-
pects was the small size of the cars
and the dimensions of the roads.
"Most interstates had the quality
of US 90, with one lane each direc-
tion. Place these in mountainous ar-
eas with curves and trucks, and
riding in a car becomes a whole new
experience," adds Muchovej.
The Group Study Exchange pro-
gram of Rotary International is a
cultural/vocational program in
which, young professionals between
the ages of 26 and 40 are accompa-
nied by a Rotarian to another Rotary
District, where they will learn about
how their occupations are carreid
out in that country, as well as what,
the culture of that country is like.
During the stay, the team mem-
bers are housed in the homes of Ro-
tarians, which gives an in depth look
at the culture of the hosts.
Next year's Group Study Ex-
change will be with a Rotary Dis-
trict in India, and will occur in
January 2006.
Those interested in participating,
who are professionals between the
ages of 26 and 40, and gainfully em-
ployed in their profession during the
past .two years, can contact
Muchovej or any member of the
Monticello Rotary Club.


TEAM at the District 4740 Conference, from District 4740 Governor, Jason Candler,
left: James Muchovej, Greg Gordon, Paulo Chad Call.
Sturmer, District 4740 GSE Chair; Josemar,


Sandra Collins Assumes


Principalship At JES


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson Elementary School be--
gins the school year with a new
principal, Sandra Collins, who
brings a combination of 23 years of
educational and administrative ex-
perience with her.
Collins received her Bachelor's
Degree in Elementary Education
and Political Science from Moore-
head State University in Kentucky
and earned her Masters Degree in
Educational Leadership at Nova
University.
She is presently taking graduate
courses at FSU.
Collins is a native of Florida,
whose father was in the military,
giving her the opportunity to travel
all over the world in her youth.
Collins has 14 years of teaching
experience in kindergarten through
grade eight, beginning her career in
St. Lucie County in 1989 and later
teaching in Hillsborough at Egypt
Lake Elementary and Brevard
County schools.
Those schools include Garden
City Elementary in Fort Pierce, and
Morning Side Elementary, St. Lu-
cie Elementary:
In the nine years that she served
as an administrator, Moore worked
in schools all over Brevard County,
including Hans Christian
Anderson, Roy Allen, South Lake


4'


~ :~


COLLINS

Elementary and Cambridge Ele-
mentary.
Collins left Brevard in 2004 and
came to Tallahassee, where she
now resides, to take courses at
FSU.
"I looked around and I saw that
this opportunity was available,"
said Collins.
Her goals and plans for JES, "To
do whatever it takes to make Jeffer-
son Elementary and A-school and a
model school in the state of
Florida," said Collins.
Assessing her situation, Collins


said: "Not everything here was go-
ing bad. What is working, we'll
keep the same, but the things that
aren't working, will be changed and
we'll try going a different way."
Collins is married to Dr. Emanuel
Collins, and professor in College
Engineering at both FAMU and
FSU.
Between them, they have three
children, two boys, Chason, 22 and
Caleb, 12, and one girl, Tiye, 11.

Collins' favorite hobby is "buy-
ing shoes" She said she has down-
sized her collection from about 300
pairs to 150 pairs.

"I have to down-size even more,
as my husband said no more then
80 pairs," she quipped.
She stated: "I love it here at Jef-
ferson, I love a challenge and this,
is going to be fun."


Animal
(Continued From Page 1)
the task of sending license applica-
tions to all households in the county
at the same time as the ad-valorem
notices to ensure compliance with
the licensing requirements.
Impoundment facility -- the county
would either have to establish its
own facility or partner with the Hu-
mane Society in this area.,


D BUSINESSDI97,3,56





DIRECTORY ___
I I I


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Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced -
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs





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Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
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STAR TEAM
(MONTICELLO / TALLAHASSEE)
SHAUNDRA M. BUGGS



H(
LADY BUGG LIFESTYLES C
Webslte: www.ladybugglifestyles.biz Email


m


)ME: 850-997-2404
;ELl: 850-264-5112
l: Idybuggis@aol.com


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE I I


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
V-__A Di _#


Tree Removal reed rPots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


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"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


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S AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY' REPAIR I


FREE ESTIMATESi


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FROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATION.
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
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I 997-4160 I
ANDY & TLNA AMES. OWNERS


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

S, Allstate Insurance Company
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

lorman L. Barfoot 878-8077
Exclusive Agent OPIFN Monday-Flrday 8:30-5 30
arfoot Insurance Group Eimail:NORMANBARIOOT'0'alIstate.com_
. .. .. . . .


y


-









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE,13


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005


Sports


Local Boys Take Part In


1700 Mile Bike Tour


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Eric Anderson and Kyle Barnwell-
recently spent 23 days from June 18
to July 10, on a 1700 mile bike tour
from the United States into Canada.
The local pair began their trip
when they were dropped off in
Bloomington, IN. where they trav-
eled east with a group of 80 other
bicyclists to New Brunswick, Can-
ada. -


On the return trip they biked to
. Portland, ME., where they dipped
their front bike wheels into the At-
lantic Ocean at the end of the trip,
-before bussing back to the outskirts
of Bloomington, IN.
There, buses dropped them off on
the outskirts of town, along with
their bicycles so that they could suit
back up, and bike into Bloomington,
with a police escort, complete with
sirens.
The townspeople marked their ar-
-rival with a celebration and parade,


two squeakers, 12-13 and 4-5.
Samuel went four for five; Young
went three for four; and Cissi, Al-
anna Anderson, and Cooks went
three for five.
Thompson, Steen, Seabrooks,
Parrish and McDaniel went two for
four. *
In the second game, the Lady/
Diamonds jumped out to a 4-0 lead,
but came up short of the win in the
end.
Seabrooks, Cook and Steen went
three for'three. L
When the Lady Diamonds went
up against Tallahassee, they wal-
loped them for a 16-6 win.
The ladies jumped out to a 10-3
lead and never looked back.
Cissi went four for four; Seab-
rooks went three for four; Cooks
went two for four; and Young,
Steen and Parrish went three for,
three.
McDaniel and Thompson both
went two for three; Anderson and
Brooks both went one for three.
Jones named Young the game



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and the bikers ended the evening
with a banquet hosted by one of the
local churches.
This was the first leg of a 4100
mile bike tour across the top north
part of the United States to Canada.
The boys did not continue on the
second leg of the trip.
The pair learned about the deCy-
cles Indiana Canada 2005 Tour by
word of mouth.
They were given the web site ad-
dress, checked it out, and signed up
for the tour.
They are experienced in mountain
b. iking, and trick biking but had to
work out more strenuously before
leaving for this tour that took them
through the states of Indiana, Ohio,
Pennsylvnia, Maine, Quebec, and
Canada.
The deCycles is a nonprofit.ecu-
menical youth development pro-
gram offering high spirited summer
bicycle trips for teenagers and
young adults. .
Cyclists ride in groups of six on
roads chosen for the best combina-
tion of riding surface, safety, facili-
ties, and scenery.
Several motorized support vehi-
cles monitor and the group through-
out the day.
Rest stops with food, juice, arid
water are planned every 20-25
miles.
A cargo truck transports all lug-
gage, equipment, and supplies.
Overnight accommodations are
provided by churches or gyms and
are prearranged.
The group will often have free
time in the evenings to tour the
town, see a movie, or talk to to%% rFi-
people about their .adventures..
Evenings are also spent singing
songs, sharing, ha% ing heart to heart
,talks, and writing letters back home.
On the final day of the trip, a
homecoming ceremony is scheduled
for parents, relatives, friends, and
interested.tow nspeople );,."
The deCycles bicycle trips are de-
signed for participants to learn more
about themselves physically, men-
tally, and spiritually.
During entire trip, the deCycles
trip program help cyclists focus on
maximizing their potential, and dis-
covering their own inner strength.,
Teamwork and attitude helps get
them down the road, and ultimately,
they gain a clearer understanding of
themselves, of others, and of their
place in this world.


American Heart -
AssociationU
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke

It keeps
more than
memories
alive.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Diamonds softball-
team now stands at. 12-7 season af-
ter winning two of four games over
the weekend.
When the ladies faced off against
Greenville Saturday, they ham-
mered Greenville for a 15-1 win.
Cissi and Keandra Seabrooks
both went four for four; Nikki
Cooks went three for four; Tasha
Samuel, Juliette and Felica McDan-
iel and Sharice Brooks, all went
three for three.
Shericka Parrish, Cynthia Steen
-and Tonya Young went two for
.:three; and Kidra Thompson went
one for three.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said that
Young, Seabrooks, Samuel,.
.Thompson and Cooks all played a
good game.
Seabrooks was named the MVP
of the game.
When the Lady Diamonds faced
;off in a double-header against
-Green County Spring, they lost...in,


Locals To Play

in Agency

Softball Game
Councilman Gerrold Austin and
Superintendent Phil Barker will
pariticipate in th Captial Area Com-
.munity Action. Agency, Inc. (CA-
CAA) Softgall game, 6 p.m.,
Thursday, Sept. 1 and Tom Brown
Park, in Tallahassee.
Proceeds from sponsorship
pledges are tax deductible donations
0o the (CACAA) to provide oppor-
hinities for low income families to
live quality lives.



2'

I.


i-
9t

S*'M


ERIK ANDERSON


KYLE BARNWELL


$10,000 Donated To Fireworks


Fund; $1,600 Still Outstanding


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

More than $10,000 in donations
from 85 different sources towards
the July 4 Fireworks show have
come in, and $1,600 is still needed
to meet the $11,600 cost of the
production.
Chamber of Commerce Director
Mary Frances Drawdy said contri-
butions continue to be sought to
help pay for the event. Donations
can be made at the Chamber.
"We would like to thank all of
those who contributed," said
Drawdy. "Without them, this event
would not have been possible."
... .Coun Com.rissioners i iade ihe
.largest donation of,$750.

Contributors of at least $500 in-
clude: George Gutcheson, Sprint,
Farmers and Merchants Bank, and
Riley Palmer.
Simpson's Nursery donated
$400.

Contributions of at least $200,
were made by: Morris Petroleum,
North Florida Abstract and Title
Company, Jefferson County Ken-
nel Club, Andy Rudd Construction,
American legion, Max Bilinski, Ki-
wanis, Gramling Electric, and
VMS.

Donors of at least $100 include:
Great Adventure Outfitters, Capri
Lazy Days, Inc., Sorensen Tire
Center, Inc., Campbell's Plumbing,
Steve Walker Realty, Monticello
Rotary, Courtyard Cafe, BoBo
Chancey, Skeet Joyner, Daniel
Ward, Mike Carney, Broadbay
Contracting, Fred Williams, David


and Merry Ann Frisby, Don
Taylor, Brian Hayes, Bird & Lien-'
beck, Waukeenah Fertilizer, Ful-
ford Farms, Malloy's Nursery, Lu-
ther Pickles, Caminez, Brown &
Hardee, Pickney Hill, and Florida
Insurance Consultants of Monti-
cello, Inc.
Other contributors include: Carrie
Ann & Co., Robert Crew and Ann
Wickman, Tom and Julie Conley,
Terry and Dora Simkins, Southern
Package, Monticello Printers, Joe
Land and Krystal McManis, Marty
Bishop, David Hobbs, Badcock,
Andy Rudd Appliance Repair, Kent
and Jean Pickles, and Franklin


Hightower.
Also, Delta Land Surveyors,
Mary Branner, Dick and Friedel .
Bailer, Gene Cooksey, Monticello'
Hairlines, Fantasia Enterprises,
Avera-Clark House, Emily and
Chris Anderson, Nancy Kinaw,
Patrick Stiff, John and Eleanor
Hawkins, George Miller, Jackson's
Drug, Blankinship, Butler Walker,
Mays Powle Plantation, Geral4
Hacking, Jerry Boatwright, Boyd
Family Farms, Inc., Bobby Plaines,'
Jefferson Builders Mart, Bill Bip-:-
pus, Morrow Insurance, Curtis

Morgan Garage and Bridel and ^
Clement.
'4


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NTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005 PAGE 15

.CLASSIFIED ADVERTING IRAT,
ilies,.Two editions Wednesd-y.ndL"Frid," )"".
:-:' -..". .-':.-.E.ach Additional'Lixae.$1'$l10!_"..'-.,^ tl^

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^ 997-3568:


Pentaque Games At Cottage


Draw Local Teams To Sport


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer.

The construction of the new Pen-
tanque Court at the Cottage Bed
and Breakfast, has proven to be a
successful area event, with the
popularity of the sport catching on
quickly.
There have been two matches
conducted thus far, the first bring-
ing out some 20 people and the
most recent, 12 including Martha
and Jean-Michel Cravanzola, CO-
owners of the Cottage.
Five teams have been formed to
participate in future events, and
there is room for five more teams
during the events.
Jean-Michel said the participants
included males, females, teenagers
and children, and families, all hav-
ing a good time.
The overall winner of each event
is awarded with one of a large vari-
ety of prizes, which includes, din-
ner, or a room at the Cottage,
money, dinner at a restaurant in
Tallahassee, tickets to Wild Adven-
tures, cash, and art work.
The next event is scheduled'2 to
7 p.m., Aug. 14. The overall win-
ner will be awarded a large paint-
ing. Matches are scheduled for
every other Sunday afternoon.
He added that no skills are re-
quired for the game of Pentanque,
and it is not a stressful sport, but
rather a relaxing and enjoyable one.


There is no cost to participate in
the games. The purpose behind the
matches formed here, Martha ex-
plained during a recent interview,
is "Just for the fun of it, and to get
together and play."
The French Lawn Bowling game
is a lot like horseshoes crossed with
lawn bowling with elements of bil-
liards, chess or crochet and even
the children's game of marbles.
It's similar to Italian Bocce,
played with steel balls about the
size of large oranges, as opposed to
Bocce's bigger resin orbs. It is also
considered an intensely social ac-
tivity.
The game is played by teams of
one (tete-a-tete), two (doublette) or
three (triplette) players, and some-
times teams will have four players.
In tete-a-tete and doublette
matches,' each player gets three
boules (balls). Players in triplettes
get two balls each..
After a coin toss to determine
who goes first, the winner starts by
throwing a small wooden ball,
called the but, or cochonette,
French for "piglet".
Then the team begins the game
by throwing a boule toward the co-
chonette. The opposing team then!
bowls until it places a ball closer to'
the pig. When a team runs out of
boules to throw, the other team gets
to go.
The more boules a team has
nearer the cochonette, then the op-
posing team, the more points it


scores.
The first team to score 13 points
wins the round and gets to throw
the cochonette to start the next
game.
At the Cottage matches, each
game is played to nine points. The
team winning three matches is then
determined to be the overall
winner.
Players usually use one of two
ways to pitch the ball. Pointers
place the boule as close to the co-
chonette as they can by lobbing it
or rolling it.
'Shooters are aerial specialists
who aim at an opponent's boule and
try to knock it out of play in one
swift-fell swoop. A bulls-eye de-
livery that lands with a spot-on,
steel-on-steel "thock", is one of
pentanque's most thrilling plays
and is known as a carreau.
Trash talking is allowed, as well
as friendly arguing over which ball
is closer to the cochonette and sub-.
sequent measuring to determine
closely contested placements.



LEGALS
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North Flor-
ida Community College will hold its regu-
lar monthly meeting Tuesday, August 16,
2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 1000
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of
the agenda may be obtained by writing:
NFCC, Office of the President, 1000
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations, con-
tact the NFCC Office of College Advance-
ment, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal
access/equal opportunity employer.
8/10, c


NOTICE: The Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioner will hold Workshop
at 9:00 a.m., Tuesday, August,11, 2005, at
the Jefferson CohihtyC Gourthouse, Court-
room, Monticello, Florida, to review ani-
mal control proposals from The,
Responsible Pet Owners Association. Felix
"Skeet" Joyner, Chairman
8/10, c

HELP WANTED
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
8/10, tfn, c
Come join our, growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Wanted: Kennel Tech. FT/PT
available. Must enjoy working with
animals. Call 877-5050.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c


Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, s/d, tfn .


1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c

FOR- RENT.
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
8/10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, 9/2, c
3bdrm, I V' b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
7/13, tfn, c
RV or Mobile home lots for rent. Call
Liz @ 997-1638. No calls before 9 a.m.
& no calls after 7 p.m., please.
8/5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26,31, c

FOR SALE
3BR 2BA. Mobile home in mint
condition with 5 new additions. New
A.C. 1345 sq. Ft. Landscaped yard, on
'3 acres. Easy access to Tallahassee,
997-1223.
8/5, 10, pd

FREE
Golden Retriever: Free to good home.
AKC registered, spayed, female, d.o.b.
11/04/01. Call for appointment
997-1017.
8/10, 12, pd

GARAGE SALE
Moving Sale. 326 Julie Lane. 4 miles
East from court house on Hwy 90,
turn left on Julie Lane. Furniture,
household, garden and more.
Saturday, August 13, 9a.m. 3p.m.
8/10, 12, pd -

SERVICES
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn


Home. Health ,Care -Equipment --
Jackson's Drug Store. 'We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19,.tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact. Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a. cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.,
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn


Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
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Need a Maid 1-2 days a week. Call
Karen at 850-997-8038.
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(850) 997-4340

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Government Farms Road 5 or 10 acres
buyers choice hillside planted pines
$15,000/acre

Brand New Listinq! 3 bedroom home in town
at East Anderson St. $155,000

Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy Road
in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding acres with
a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hayfield
meant for galloping $150,000

Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bedrooms 2
baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile and hardwood
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace and a screened
porch, 1 acre Now $135,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, corner
of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only $150,000

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bedroom 2
bath double wide with a bathroom that won't quit
on a high hill with a view in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows only $55,000

Check Out This One! 8 acres with big double-
wide and small house on a pretty old hillside
close to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Biq doublewide with additions 12 rooms quiet
wooded lot $56,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders Mart
$650,000,

Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside, county road $75,000

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double
wide with new galvanized aluminum roof and vi-
nyl siding, 3 sheds, fish pond, fenced on 2.4
acres only $86,500


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www.TimPeary.com
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LET US DO YOUR


KELLY & KELLY HOME WORK
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St
997-5516
* New Construction-3BR/2BA in town, open floor plan with
attached garage.................... .....................$164,900
" Singlewide Mobile Home- good condition on 5 wooded acres
on the edge of town.......................................$82,500
* Madison County- mobile home in the country, 1 ac. $55,700
a Bungalow- one of a kind, wood floors, high ceilings, large
fenced com er lot........................................... $107,000
* Cooper's Pond- new construction, 1600 sq ft. .........$169,900

k.. I i -.I -


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PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 10, 2005

Aucilla Christian Academy

Tells Schedule Of Events


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Academy has
Released its schedule for the 2005-
406 school year.
Principal Richard Finlayson re-
ports that class information packets
and student class schedules are be-
ing mailed out some time this
week, so they will be in hand for
the opening of school, Aug. 8.
New family orientation will be
conducted 10 a.m., Friday, Aug. 5,
-vith the annual Open House will
be scheduled 7 p.m., Monday, Aug.
22.
The Book Fair will be conducted
Aug. 22-26, and three-week reports
will be issued Aug. 31.
Sept. 5 is the Labor Day Holi-
day, and Sept. 16 is the end of the
first six weeks period.
Sept. 19 is a teacher planning
day, and Sept. 21, report cards will
be issued.
SHomecoming will be celebrated
Oct. 7, and three-week reports will
be issued Oct. 12.
Annual Fall Festival is planned
3-6 p.m., Oct. 28, the last day of
the second six weeks period, and
Oct. 31 is a teacher planning day.
Report cards will be issued, Nov.
:19 is the Annual Board Raffle and
Dinner. Nov., 22 three-week re-
ports will be issued and Nov. 23-25
is the Thanksgiving break.
The Christmas Musical will be
conducted at 7 p.m., Dec. 8, and
Dec. 14-16 are semester exams.
Dec. 15 and 16 are early release
-ays at 1 p.m., and Dec. 16 is the
last day of the third six-weeks pe-
riod, with, Christmas Holidays will
be observed.
Jan. 2 is a teacher planning day,
with students returning to school
Jan 3.
Jan. 4, report cards will be issued,
and Jan. 16 the MLK Holiday will
be observed, with three-week re-
ports will be issued Jan. 25.


Feb. 10 is the end of the fourth
six weeks period, and Feb. 13 is a
teacher planning day.
Feb. 15 report cards will be is-
sued and Feb. 20 is the President's
Day Holiday.
March 8, three-week reports will
be issued, and the Annual Spring
Musical will be conducted at 7
p.m., March 16.
March 20-24 is Spring Break
and March 31 is the end of the fifth
six-weeks period.
April 3 is a teacher planning day,
,and April 5 report cards will be is-
sued.
The Stockholders Meeting will
be conducted at 7 p.m., April 10,
with April 14 and 17 Easter Holi-
days.
April 18-21 achievement testing
will be conducted and April 26 the
three-weeks report will be issued.


The academic awards program for
grades 7-12 will be conducted at
8:30 a.m., May 5, and May 6 is the
Annual Board Auction.
May Day Program is at 7 p.m.,
May 11. May 12 is the last day of
school for seniors and the Athletic
Awards Banquet is at 6 p.m, May
19
May 16 is the last day of school
for PK-3, PK-4 and K-5 students,
and the Kindergarten graduation
will be conducted at 7 p.m..
May 17-19 Semester Exams will
be conducted,, and May 18 and 19
will be early release at 1 p.m..
May 19 is the Academic Awards
Program for students grades 1-6 at
8:30 a.m., and the end of the sixth
six-weeks period, the last day of
school for students and the Bacca-
laureate Service will be conducted
at 7 p.m.


Tax Hike For City


(Continued From Page 1)
self-sustaining -- have not been per-
forming well in recent years. Which
explains in large part the reason for
the current shortfall.
The reasons for the two accounts'
poor performance are many and var-
ied. They range from inefficient and
inoperable water meters that prevent
the city from charging accurately for
water usage to lack of impact fees
and overall low rates.
Officials are hopeful of remedying
some of these problems in the not-
so-distant future. Thus, the recent
drafting by officials of a priority list
that identifies the top projects the
city will pursue, if it's successful in
acquiring the $1 million it is
seeking.
Among the four top projects on
this list are the extension of water
service north on US 19, which is ex-
pected to bring in additional reve-
nues; and the citywide upgrade of
water meters, also expected to bring


MEDICARE,


in additional revenues.
At the same time, officials are
talking more and more of imposing
an impact fee or system's charge on
the sewer and water service and
also raising the connection fees for
both services.
Then there's proposal that owners
of properties outside the city that re-
ceive city sewer or water service
must commit to annexing into the
city, if ever their properties become
contiguous with the city.


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include phone numbers.



500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, F1 32345


As see

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, onT.l
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for St--tu .Settlements!


n
.


PATIENTS


There's a lot in the news today about possible changes in our healthcare system.
If you're 65 and older Medicare already works.


"S Medicare is a system that:
1. Lets you choose your own doctor.
2. Provides healthcare at minimal rnst to you.
S If you are a Medicare patient who has met your deductible for 2005, you could save a considerable amount of
out-of-pocket expenses on cataract or eye surgery that you may be needing if performed before January 2006.
q If you have a cataract or a vision problem, use your Medicare Benefit now. The system that works for you today might
not be here tomorrow.
Contact Dr. Thomas Lawrence today and we will be happy to answer your questions or assist you in scheduling your
surgery before the year runs out and you are faced with the expense of a new deductible.


Thomas L. Lawrence MD, PA
3401 Capital Medical Blvd Tallahassee, Florida
(850) 942-3937 (EYES)


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