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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00061
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: August 3, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00061
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
    Lifestyle
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
    Sports
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text



!:~~Y jF FLORIDA HISTORY
-i LJI3:ARY VWEST


C A

Boys Oblivious

To Cancer
Threat

Editorial, Page 4


.I
i.1


SVILLE, FL. 32611 i

Back To

School Rally
Saturday

Story, Page 6


Park Receives

$200,000 For
Improvements

Story, Photo, Page 12
IMff


JES Tells Supplies

Students Need

In Each Grade

Story, Page 14


Wednesday Morning
j>


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.61, 50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


>ws
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2005


REPRESENTATIVES of the three local gov-
erning boards discussed mutual issues at
Thursday night's program. Officials repre-


sented here are Coriimissioner Skeet
Joyner, School Board Member Ed Vollertsen
and Mayor Julie Conley. (News Photo)


ONE THING the different officials agreed
upon Thursday night was that the dialogue
needed to be kept going. Speaking here are


School Superintendent Phil Barker, Com-
missioner Junior Tuten and Councilman
Tom Vogelgesang. (News Photo)


Chamber Hosts Government Talks


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

"It's a start," is the way David
Frisby, president of the Chamber of
Commerce, characterized Thursday
night's chamber-sponsored roundta-
ble discussion involving representa-
tives of the three local governing
bodies.
Frisby was putting the event in its
best light, given that only six of the
15 public officials invited turned out
for the session, titled "Increasing
School Enrollment as a Means to
Economic Development."
The invited public officials attend-


Plan Is To Start Dialogue

Among Governing Bodies


ing the discussion -- held at the Wil-
low Pond Plantation off W. Lake
Road -- were County Commission-
ers Skeet Joyner, Junior Tuten, and
Jerry Sutphin; City Council mem-
bers Julie Conley and Tom Vogel-
gesang; and School Board member
Ed Vollertsen.
School Superintendent Phil Barker
also attended, although administra-
tors were not specifically invited.
All told, the discussion drew 20
people, including the several cham-
ber representatives there to facilitate


the discussion.
For the first part of the program,
representatives of the three govern-
ing boards were divided into three
groups, with each group containing
at least one member of each board.
The plan was to have the different
groups brainstoriT and identify com-
mon problems and strategies, if not
reach common ground. A chamber
facilitator monitored each of the dis-
cussions.
After about 15 minutes, members
reunited with their own boards (in


the case of Vollertsen, he got to-
gether with Barker) and discussed
the findings of their intergovern-
mental groups. Some 15 minutes
later, representatives of the three
boards shared their findings with the
public.
Vogelgesang spoke for the City
Council; Joyner for the commission,
with an addedum by Sutphin; and
Vollertsen for the School Board. All
essentially agreed that the just-
started dialogue needed to be con-
tinued, in the hope that common
goals could be achieved.
"The relationship between the
three government boards is better
than it was years ago," Joyner said.


"But that's not to say that we don't
need to continue to work on it...I
like the idea of continuing the dia-
logue."
As to the solution for "Increasing
School Enrollment as a Means to
Economic Development", Joyner
confessed he didn't have an answer.
"I don't know the answer to the
problems with the school system,"
he said. "But if we continue to work
on good growth, with good growth
will come a better school system
and better government."
Sutphin was more blunt in his as-
sessment. He expressed disappoint-
ment that only one School Board
had attended the session. Informed


that one School Board member had
experienced a death in the family
and another was out of state, Sut-
phin somewhat softened his initial
criticism.
Still, he pointedly asked why cer-
tain educators employed by the
school system chose to enroll their
own children in outside schools; and
was the school district putting more
emphasis on sports than education?
Sutphin's specific questions went
unanswered; Vollertsen, however,
attempted a broader response.
He pointed out that the problems
with the school district weren't lim-
ited to this district, but appeared to
(See Chamber Page 3)


Regional Landfill Plans


I Tonnage Fee Increase


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The county appears ready to pro-
ceed with the purchase of the TMH
building on East Washington Street,
formerly the home of Tallahassee
Memorial Family Medicine Monti-
cello.
County Attorney Buck Bird in-
formed commissioners recently that


TMH and should have the document
ready for execution by Thursday.
The Legislature awarded the
county $250,000 for the purchase of
the building in May.
Actually, the $250,000 came from
the Health Departmeht, but it re-
quired a legislative proviso for the
department to be able to transfer the
money to the county.
Once the county purchases the


calls for the Health Department to
be able to use the building rent-free
indefinitely..
The Health Department has been
leasing the building from TMH for
more than a year. It became neces-
sary for the department to expand
into the TMH building when its pro-
grams and personnel exceeded the
capacity of the original building.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Aucilla Area Regional Land-
fill recently voted to raise its tipping
fee a total of $4 over the next two
years.
County Commissioner Junior
Tuten, who represents Jefferson
County on the four-county regional
board, informed' commissioners of
the decision July 21.
Tuten said that the decision to
raise the fee came after three years
of back-and-forth discussions on the
issue. He said that even though the
landfill presently had $11 million in
cash assets, the facility's board of
directors worried that the reserve
was losing ground. He said the trig-
ger to the recent decision, was the
continuing low interest rates.
"We have fallen behind on our re-
serve for the closure of the landfill,"
Tuten said. "We've been knowing
for a while that we needed to up on
the fee, but with the low interest
rates, we've really fallen behind."
He.said the increase would apply
only to the per-ton tipping fee on
Class I materials, commonly defined
as household garbage.
"The tipping fee is $41 a ton
now," Tuten said. "We go up to $43
a ton on Oct. 1 and up to $45 a ton
on Oct. 1, 2006."


He said the increase was estimated
to generate an additional $106,000
annually.
Tuten said the money will go into
a special account for the eventual
closure of the landfill, "so that we
don't, get caught like we are now
with our own landfill, where we
have to close it out of our general
fund," he said.
That closure, he said was not ex-
pected to come until another 60
years, according to the latest assess-
ment.


It takes about 20 years to close a
landfill, an extremely costly process
that involves constant monitoring,
sampling and venting of the gases
that built up as the garbage decom-
poses.
Tuten did not address what
impact, if any, the .tipping fee in-
crease might have on the landfill as-
sessment that county residents here
pay annually.
The Aucilla Area Regional Land-
fill is made up of Jefferson, Madi-
son, Taylor and Dixie counties.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners recently
approved another residential devel-
opment, this time in the northern
part of the county.
The Bellamy Pecan Groves Subdi-
vision No. 1 is located off the Bas-
sett Dairy Road, off the Ashville
Highway. Carla Wheeler is the de-
veloper.
The plans call for a 131-acre prop-
erty, which is zoned agriculture-5
(one house per five acres) to be di-
vided into approximately 26 five-


acre lots of single-family residences.
Wheeler indicated to the commis-
sioners that all roads will be paved
to county specifications and that the
subdivision will include a home-
owners' association.
She said she was eager to begin
the project, which will include the
paving of the roads and the sale of
the lots.
The Planning Commission, which
earlier reviewed the development,
recommended its approval, as did
Planning Official Bob Arredondo.
Commissioners approved the sub-
division following a brief public
hearing that lasted all of 10 minutes
at most.


L ~&


THE OLD LANDFILL on Tyson Road has
been closed for years now. But the county is
having to spend hundreds of thousands of


dollars each year in engineering and other
costs to monitor the progress of the closure.
(News Photo)


County Ready To Proceed With Purchase

Of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Building
he had received the contract from building, it will own it. But the deal


Commission Approves 131-Acre
Subdivision in North Of County


CO











'Let's Murder Marsha' Draws


71 Good Turnout At Opera House


,. RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


i


,-.. .



WINN DIXIE Employees Sierra Vinson, left, and Mary Sin-
gleton, display school supplies donated in drop box pro-
vided at the store by Tri county Foster Parents
Association. (News Photo.)


Humane Society


Outlines Needs


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Though much has been accom-
plished at the Humane Society
Shelter since the new Board took
over, much remains to be done and
needs remain constant.
During their recent meeting,
members discussed those needs.
Monetary funds and donations
are a must for the shelter to operate
properly and to continue to operate.
Needs met from those incoming
funds include medications, veteri-,
nary care, repairs, upgrades of
equipment, such as kennels, utili-
ties, labor, .telephone, office -sup-
plies, building lean-tos in the out-
side dog runs, and other related
items, and removal of large tree
limbs overhanging the cat trailer.
Items that are needed and can be
obtained through grants and large
donations include indoor/outdoor
enclosed kennels, a storage build-
ing for cages, outdoor fencing, con-
crete pads for outdoor runs, and an
automatic open and close security
gate.
Repairs remaining include seal-
ing the concrete floors, roof repairs,


and expansion of indoor dog runs,
outdoor exercise pool, landscape
maintenance, cat and dog transport
cages and pads, finish the puppy
palace, and finish the cat room.
Tina Ames stressed the need for
the donation of a large storage
building. "We need some place to
put the transport cages," she said.
"It will help prolong the life of the
equipment and supplies which we
do have."
Foster Chair Martha Jean Martin
stressed that it would greatly help if
someone could donate a couple of
folding tables and chairs to be used
at the local adoption booth, to be
conducted after the temperatures
cool down a little..
Ames stressed the constant needs
for more volunteers to both assist at
the shelter, and with the adoption
booths.
"We need volunteers to wash the
dogs and especially need someone
to coordinate dog washes before
the booths," she added.
Anyone wishing to make a mone-
tary donation to the shelter can
send it to JCHSI, PO Box 559,
Monticello, FL 32345 or call the
shelter at 342-0244 for donations
of materials needed or to volunteer
for specific projects.


The Opera House Stage Company
presented its Summer Theatre Pro-
duction of "Let's Murder Marsha,"
over the weekend .
Friday and Saturday performances
were preceded by a dinner catered
by Carrie Ann and Company, fea-
turing a tasty chicken dish, titled
Arroz con Pollo.
At Friday's performance, the din-
ner was a near sellout.
Directed by Judi Persons, the
seven member cast worked dili-
gently to perform the comedy by
Monk Ferris.
Experts say that comedy is al-
ways a difficult genre to perform,
because of the necessity for perfect
timing and the importance and use
of the nuance. This comedy of man-
ners requires considerable skill to
keep the plot moving and interest
heightened.
While all the characters did their
best and performed as directed, for
this critic, the play belongs to Bill
Tellefsen, who plays Virgil Baxter,
the next door neighbor of leading
character Marsha Gilmore.
Tellefsen plays an unassuming,
laid back, inconspicuous, kindergar-
ten teacher, who seeks stature by de-
claring himself a pharmacist.
When he thinks Marsha is in love
with him, he promises to whip up a
deadly cocktail which will eliminate
Marsha's husband, Tobias, whom
she believes is trying to kill her.
Tellefsen performs well in his


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The Jefferson County

School Board

Announces the regular school board meting to
which the public is invited. The meeting will be
held at the Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building on Monday, August 8, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.


Agendas may be picked up at the district office
at 1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL.
Monday through Friday between the hours of
8:00 a.m. ands 4:00 p.m. A copy of the school
boards packet will be available for review at the
district office.


ters, she seems most unphased by-
developments. She's young and has
her life to live and is eager to go
about doing so.
Jonathan Counts as Police Officer
Ben Quade and Bianca's boyfriend,
is both stem and understanding, as
circumstances demand.
In his youth, he is flexible, and
doesn't mind picking up Bianca in
the ambulance, as he leaves work.
Carol. Bynum, as Lynette Thoren,
Marsha's mother, tries in vain to
bring some semblance of normality
to events in the Gilmore household.
Kent Rickey has once again de-
signed a set to suit the play. It is
minimalistic, yet functional for the
action required.
George Hook is the stage manager
who keeps all the props at the ready
and ensures they are where they
need to be.


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August 10, 2005
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Mulberry Street.


role, and in his undying loyalty to
Marsha, he is something of a puppy
dog, doing all he can to please her
and help her, albeit reluctantly.
He's not above producing a gun,
which he later says was confiscated
from one of his pupils, and appears
ready to use it, if necessary.
He demonstrates his stagecraft,
when he falls to the floor effort-
lessly, when the action requires it, as
well as in his consistency as the
somewhat bumbling neighbor. He
remains in character throughout.
Marsha Gilmore is played by Ve-
nessa Persons, who is on stage al-
most throughout the play, always a
demanding position. She is both
lightly and irresponsible, yet cold
and calculating.
Tobias Gilmore, a Wall Street
broker, is played by Jon Taylor,
who brings the distance and cool-
ness the role demands. He can be
passionate about his views, and
equally indifferent to his surround-
ings.
Stephanie Meadows as Persis De-
vore, is like Marsha, a reader of
Blood and Thunder novels.
Having read the latest novel which
bears strong resemblance to the ac-
tion of the play, she knows what has
to happen, and what lines have to be
delivered by whom. She remains al-
most detached as she views, yet is
part of, the action.
Marsha is reading the same novel,
but unfortunately for her has yet to
finish it.
Lindsey Scott as Bianca, maid for
the Gilmores, brings spark to the
play with her fiery retorts and re-
lated comments. Of all the charac-


I1989
1f El""..
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005 PAGE 3


g-s 'w i '*i-- '... -. ..,-S. -': .. .. -. -
TRI COUNTY MINISTRIES Pastor Marvin and shipping clothing for the relief effort to
Graham, left, directs volunteers packing Haiti and Tsunami victims.


Johnny Reid Promoted To

Assistant Warden At JCI


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson Correctional Institution
(JCI) has a new assistant warden,
Johnny Reid.


work."
He recalls working his way up
through the ranks over the past 21
years.
His entire career before JCI, was
spent at Mayo CI, where he began
as a correctional officer in August


Recently promoted Reid, 44, ot 1984.
came to JCI in July, 2003, when he In December of 1985, Reid was
was promoted to Colonel. He promoted to Sergeant, and in June
brings to the position, 21 years of of 1990, he was promoted to Lieu-
experience with the Department of tenant.
Corrections. -- He reached the rank of Captain in
His philosophy is to be firm, fair 1994, Major in June of 2000 and fi-
and continually work on staff mo- nally, Colonel at JCI in July of
rale and improvement, by motivat- 2003.
ing through appropriate Reid said he worked his way
supervision, rather than intimida- through the ranks, but never forgot
tion.
"I believe in keeping up staff mo- H n r
rale," said Reid." Working the corn- Center Honor
pound is stressfiil enough without Past
supervisors adding to it," he said. i aSt Officers
Reid makes hbit of walking the.
Reid mak ahbit of talking the Tim Peary, vice-chairperson; an(
compound daily, getting to know David HPearvey, vic-chair of budget in; a
the staff better. David Harvey, chair of budgeting
He also visits staff in the dorms, vestments & insurance committee
confinement and in the towers each were among outgoing officers hon
day. "If you get to know your peo- ored recently by Apalachee Center
Inc. Board of Directors, at its annua
ple, and do them the right way,
they'll do great things for you," he meeting.
added. Others honored include: Ken Kat
a e asks staff for input concerning saris, chairperson; and Edwin Fleet
He asks staff for input concerning immediate past chairperson.
improvements, and takes any and Officers were recognized for dedi
all suggestions into serious consid- cated service tothe organizatio a
erationcated service to .the organization am
to the individuals and communities
"I believe in motivating staff to
it serves.
do well," said Reid. "After all,
they are what makes the system


where he began, thus his reason for
working on morale and motivation
of staff.
Though he has worked here for
two years, he still continues to
commute from Mayo.
"I'm really enjoying JCI. I love it
here," said Reid. "I hope I stay
here."
He replaces Rick Anglin.


Chamber
(Continued From Page 1)
be broader based, stemming from
larger societal issues.
One reason the district was losing
students, he suggested, was that par-
ents wanted the schools to instill
Christian value in their children,
something the public schools were-
n't charged with doing.
"I think it's a combination of
things," Vollertsen said of the issues
facing school districts.
He took hope, however, from the
new and highly qualified people that
the district was hiring, he said.
"Hopefully, they will help turn
things around," Vollertsen said.
He also took hope from the new
direction that the School Board was
taking, a direction that he described
"as different from where we were in
the past."
Finally, he took encouragement
from joint efforts such as the present
one.
"I'm encouraged that the city, the
county and the school district are
working together," Vollertsen said.
Frisby said Monday that no spe-
cific date exists for a follow-up in-
tergovernmental discussion -- at
least not during his remaining two
months as president of the chamber.
He said it would be up to the
chamber, and the respective three
boards, to decide if, when and
where future discussions are held.
He maintained that Thursday night's
meeting was an important and posi-
tive first step in the right direction.

THANKS FOR MAKING US YOUR BUSINESS.

a KEMOYT SUPPOFl COF


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JCHS TO Hold
Open House

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Jefferson County High School
invites students, parents, and com-
munity members to attend the An-
nual Fall Open House, 6-8 p.m.,
Thursday, in the cafeteria.
Students may pick up their sched-
ules at that time and visit their
classes to meet their teachers.
Everyone is also invited to meet
the new Principal, Chalmus Tho-
mas.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

C, EME~Ma, RON CICHON
g Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida, $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Boys Oblivious To


Cancer Threat


The old adage "boys will be boys"
has been used to sum up the reckless
way many boys view life whether
it's racing dirt bikes without a hel-
met or spending hours on the beach
without sunscreen.
A recent study by the American
Academy of Dermatology found
that teenage boys were the least
likely to protect themselves from the
sun. Fortunately, learning -more
about the dangers now may reduce
their risk of developing skin cancer
later in life.
"Teenagers don't equate bad be-
havior in the present with bad things
happening later," said dermatologist
Darrell S. Rigel, M.D., clinical pro-
fessor, New York University Medi-
cal Center in New York City. "Skin
cancer is no exception."
The Academy study found that
older teen boys (aged 15 to 17) are
the least careful when it comes to
protecting their skin from sun expo-
sure only 32 percent reporting that
they are very or somewhat careful.
This may explain findings from a
previous study published in the
January 2003 issue of the Journal of
the American Academy of Dermatol-
ogy. The study concluded that the,
majority (44 percent) of people di-
agnosed with melanoma the dead-
liest form of skin cancer were
white men over the age of 50.


"Invasive melanoma, the hardest
type of skin cancer to treat, is the
fifth most common cancer in men,"
said& Dr. Rigel. "While skin cancer
can take years to develop, we need
to convince teenage boys to change
their behavior now and reverse this
alarming trend."
The survey also compared the sun
protection attitudes of boys and
girls.
Older teenage boys were less vigi-
lant than younger boys and girls of
all ages. Both younger and older
teen boys were less cautious in the
sun than teenage girls.
Fewer boys reported wearing pro-
tective clothing and seeking shade
compared to girls, and only 33 per-
cent of boys said that they apply
sunscreen when going out in the sun
vs. 53 percent of girls.
Among all teens, younger teens
(age 12 to 14) tend to be more vigi-
lant about protecting themselves
from the sun. .. .; -
"With younger teens, parents still
have influence on their child's be-
havior which makes them more
likely to be smart in the sun," added
Dr. Rigel.
"Older teens stirt exerting their in-
dependence and tend to ignore their
parents' advice. Skin cancer is pre-
ventable but until teens change their
behavior, we'll continue to see skin
cancer rates rise." (NAPS)


'Gopher' Helped Youn


He was a former captain who was
now a sergeant thanks to the Air
Force's Reduction in Force
program.
A couple more years and he could
retire with his pension based on his
former rank of captain.
I guess we drew the short straw
because the former captain now ser-
geant Bill Clark was assigned to our
office.
I'm not exactly sure why that was
since he had no journalistic skills
and our office produced the weekly
base newspaper.
Well, whatever the reason, we had
him and now had to figure out what
to do with him.
Actually, Clark sort of found his
owh niiche without much help from
the rest of us. You see, he was an
expert at not doing anything but
looking very, busy.
He would pick up a file folder and
head out of the office like a man on
a mission. The file folder was empty
and what he was really doing was
heading for the coffee shop.
Or, he would sit at his desk with


Publisher's

Notebook


-Ia


Ron Cic/ion


some official looking papers and pe- with another former captain who


ruse them with serious
concentration. Was he really work-
ing? Naw, he was just killing time!
YOi wonder how 'he quld carry
this off? It was quite simple.
Clark had a deep, booming voice
and a commanding presence. He
was believable.
If he said he had to run over to the
personnel department to check
something, you believed him.
Sure he went over to the personnel
department although it was not to
check on anything but to bull skate


had been assigned there.
A few minutes before quitting
time Clark would arrive back at the
office. '
Truth is Clark was a highly deco-
rated pilot who flew in both World
War II and Korea. He spent a year in
German POW camp. He needed
about 24 months to retire.
After he was in our office just a
few weeks, I was promoted to editor
of the paper and Clark was assigned
to the newspaper staff. Now he was
my headache!


Editor
Clark saw it differently. He saw
me as a wet-behind-the-ears kid who
had no right to be his supervisor and
I was his headache.
I asked him what he would like to
do on the newspaper. He grinned
and said drink beer and play gin
rummy.
We don't have a job like that, I
said, how about writing sports?
Clark quickly told me he didn't care
for sports.
How about some features? Nope.
Maybe he could go over to the
photo lab and learn about taking pic-
tures? Nope.
Both of us knew this conversation
was going nowhere so we had a
long pause.
Finally, Clark broke the silence
and said, "I'll tell you what, kid. I '11
be your assistant."
And then he delivered this won-
derful line: "If there's anything you
want to know, just ask me."
Clark and I had a ball.'He became,
something of a gopher, although we
never used that term, and I learned a
lot about World War II from him.
Seemed like a fair trade to me!


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
July 19, 1995
The courthouse annex may yet
come to fruition, but not as origi-
nally envisioned. The idea now is to-
purchase two old buildings just
north of the courthouse, revitalize
them, and turn them into an annex.
The expeditions construction of a
US 19 by-pass around the city is
more and more being promoted by
the business segment of the commu-
nity.
Commissioners were scheduled to
begin wrestling with the budget
Monday evening.
The last stages of the sewer/water
extension project are proceeding
smoothly, with completion projected
for August 15.
TWENTY YEARS
July 24, 1985
Several public officials in Jefferson
County agree that a recent U.S. Su-
preme Court ruling is going to cost
the county more money, but hardly
anyone knows exactly how much.
Pul. Trina Lawson resigned from
the Monticello Police Force on July
5.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
July 24, 1975
Forty members of the Jefferson
High 1965 graduating class at-
tended their tenth reunion here over
the weekend.
Three Boy Scouts have qualified
for the Order of the Arrow Award.
All three scouts, members of troop
#808, Monticello, fulfilled the 're-
quirements camp at Camp Wall-
wood at Lake Talquin recently.
Those qualifying are: Gary Marsh,
Willie Whilt and Allen Witting.
The youth group of First Baptist
Church returned to Monticello last
Saturday following a ten day mis-
sion trip to Warren, Ohio. While in


Warren, youth revival meetings and
backyard Bible sessions were con-
ducted.
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 23, 1965
Mrs. W.B. Dunn spent several
days in Atlanta at the Furniture
Mart.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Shepherd re-
turned home from a week's vacation
in the Carolinas and North Georgia
mountains.
Miss Kay Montgomery was hon-
ored at a tea-shower at the Terry
Day residence. Hostesses along with
Mrs. Day were J.L. Hagan, Mrs.
W.F. Roth and Miss Patsy Williams.
Mrs. Wilmer Bassett Jr. and Carol
spent a few days with her father,
H.L. Collins in Umatilla, GA.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 22, 1955
Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Bassett had
four of their sons and their families
home with them for a reunion.
Robert H. Jenkins was accepted as
a pre-registrant at the University of
Miami School of Medicine.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
July 20, 1945
George Wood Arrants volunteered
with the Marines and left for Parris
Island, S.C.
Reuben Brooks of Wacissa was
promoted to Tech Sergeant in San
Quentin, France.
Alvin E. Montgomery was ad-
vanced to chief storekeeper, USN.
He had seen action in Okinawa and
was a veteran of four European in-
vasions.

Letters To The Editor
Welcomed
Limit Letters to 500
Words or Less


Effort H
A new resource is now available
for the approximately 2.5 million
adults and children in the United
Sates who have epilepsy, a disorder
that causes seizures and is often
confusing and frightening to the
people who live with the condition
and those around them.
Growing up, actress Neve Camp-
bell witnessed first hand the impact
epilepsy can have as she watched
her cousin Coleen struggle with
managing the condition. Ms. Camp-
bell's aunt, Coleen's mother, has
also been living with epilepsy for
most of her life.
That's why Neve and Coleen have
joined with other advocates and
leaders in the epilepsy community to
launch The Bill of Rights for People
Living with Epilepsy, a first-of-its-
kind national campaign to inform
and empower those touched by epi-
lepsy and to increase understanding
of epilepsy and to increase under-



Today's
Wind in hair, radio blasting and
the wide, open road. the 1950s
automobile obsession inspired
Americans to get out and "hit the
highway" in their new wheels.
Ever since, seeking out fun and fa-
mous roadside landmarks, every-
thing from quirky diners on Route
66 to larger-than-life monuments,
has been an all-Ainerican tradition.
More than half a century later,
road trips are as popular as ever.
In fact, nine out of 10 summer
trips are taken in personal vehicles
today, according to a recent Na-
tional Household Travel Survey.
But with people so frequently tak-
ing driving vacations, travelers may
feel a need to modernize their road
trip to avoid the "been there, done
that" syndrome. The classic road


lelps Epi
standing of epilepsy in the general
public.
Ms. Campbell and her cousin are
working with sponsor Novartis
Pharmaceuticals Corporation to
launch the program, which is being
conducted in conjunction with the
Epilepsy Foundation New York
City (EFNYC).
The core of the program is The
Bill of Rights, a guide to managing
life with epilepsy that was created
by the epilepsy community for the
epilepsy community.
A team of adults with epilepsy,
parents of children with epilepsy,
epileptologists, neurologists, nurse
practitioners and social workers
came together with Novartis and the
EFNYC to develop the Bill of
Rights, which offers information to
help people become more involved
'in managing many aspects of their
condition and includes guidance on


ilepsy Victims


topics such as rights at school and in
the workplace and current informa-
tion on epilepsy and treatment op-
tions.
Epilepsy can affect many different
aspects of a person's daily life,
which is one of the reason s kind
of information is so important.
"After she was first diagnosed, I
watched Coleen struggle to maintain
her confidence and. her self-esteem,"
said Campbell. "Although she has
been able to manage her epilepsy
successfully for many years, getting
to that point was difficult and I wish
my family had access to more infor-
mation and better resources about
the condition."
Results from a nationwide survey,
conducted by Harris Interactive,
highlights the need for more infor-
mation about managing epilepsy.


aware of the rights and resources
that may be available to them.
The survey of 507 adults with epi-
lepsy and 149 parents of children
with epilepsy found that almost half
of adults and parents (45 percent
and 49 percent respectively) do not
know or understand the legal rights
and protections for people with epi-
lepsy.
"It is important for patients and
caregivers to have access to the
most up-to-date information to help
them address the many challenges
associated with epilepsy," said
Blanca Vazquez, MD, director of
Clinical Trials and Out-Patient Serv-
ices at New York University Epi-
lepsy Center.
"People living with epilepsy must
learn all they can about their or their
loved one's condition so they can be


The survey showed that many strong advocates and take an active
people living with epilepsy are un- role in managing their health care."
(NAPS)


Road Trips Different


trip can get a dashboard-to-taillights
makeover.
You can rev up your next road trip
with these 21 st century tips:
Nothing gets everyone in the vaca-
tion spirit quite like listening to
much-loved tunes. Before your trip,
create a road trip CD full of fresh,
upbeat songs or load your iPod with
sounds inspired from the sand or
pool with Reggae, Hawaiian or Ca-
lypso melodies.
Trying to drive too far in one day
can rob you of an enriching experi-
ence.
Each year people already spend
more time in their cars commuting
to work (approximately 100 hours)
than they do on vacation (approxi-
mately 80 hours), according to the
U.S. Census Bureau.


So break for breaks. Get out of the
car, stretch your legs, take in some
fresh air and truly experience your
trip rather than watch it pass you by
in the rearview mirror.
Directionally challenged? Toss
those bulky, fold out paper maps
and use modem-day tools such as
www.hamptonlandmarks.com to
discover the exact locations of
unique destination ideas. This Web
site unveils fun road-trip ideas,
called "DriveAbouts," with themes
including "Diamonds in the Dust,"
(all things baseball with stops at fa-
mous fields such as those featured in
the "Field of Dreams" and "A
League of Their Own" flicks); "The
Weird and the Wonderful" (think
Bigfoot sightings and lavender
fields); and "Star Sightings" (every-


thing from the Happy Days house to
numerous locales Marilyn Monroe
once called home.)
The site electronically maps the
routes so you can toss those clumsy
fold-up maps and guidebooks.

Great photo opportunities are
plentiful across the U.S., so if you
haven't yet posed next to the tower-
ing Hobo Joe in Buckeye, Ariz. or
the original American Bandstand in
Philadelphia, Penn., you've got
some exploring to do.
Capture your precious moments
on a digital camera and then down-
load photos on a travel blog so
friends and family back home can
live vicariously through you.


From Our Photo File






Lim.
& .. ~ ;r


IN JAN, 1990, members of the Mignonette Wright, FMB president Mrs. Foster, Mrs.
Garden Circle planted trees in the FMB Harris, Mrs. Wallace McLeod. (News File
south parking lot in memory of members' Photo)
husbands who died in 1989. L-R: Gary


Opinion & Comment


I












Letters...


Chamber President Thanks


Participants At Meeting


Dear Editor,
Last Thursday Jefferson County
experienced something new.
Representatives of our three local
governments sat down together and
had a positive exchange of ideas
about mutual local problems.
Those government officials who
were invited and missed the
meeting, missed something very
special and absolutely unprece-
dented. in Jefferson County history.
As the 2004-2005 President of the
Chamber of Commerce, I would like
to extend my thanks to all members
of our three local legislative bodies
who participated.
These include: Julie Conley and
Tom Vogelgesang from the City;
Skeet Joiner, Jr. Tuten and Jerry


Suthpin from the County; and Ed
Vollertson from the School Board.
I extend a particular thanks to
Superintendent Phil Barker who
came as a member of the public but
agreed to sit in for an absent School
Board member in order to assist our
meeting.
All five of our Chamber of Com-
merce facilitators, were present as
well as our two facilitator alternates.
This level of participation by the
Chamber is an indication of how se-
riously the Chamber values, and is
committed to intergovernmental co-
operation and those officials who
support it.
My special thanks goes to
Gretchen Avera, Stella Ellis, Dick
Bailar, Dot Innman-Johnson and


Karen Colbert, our facilitators and
to both Frank Blow and Buddy
Westbrook who were present as al-
ternates.
Lastly, I wish to express my grati-
tude to Clyde Simpson for donating'
the facilities of Willow Pond so that
our government officials would
have a remote and neutral place to
meet.
Last Thursday's meeting was a
first step. We do not know where
this first step may eventually lead.
What we do know is that some of
your local elected legislators took
time out of their schedules, drove
out to Willow Pond and tried to "y
make a difference. wt
That is what good elected officials yo
do. It was a good first step.
David Frisby,
Chamber President


tion


d
riod, especially groups representing
socially disadvantaged farmers or
ranchers.
Nominations and elections are
open to all eligible candidates and
voters, without regard to race, color,
religion, national origin, age, sex,
marital status, or disability.
The nomination form (FSA-669A)
is available at USDA Service Cen-
ters and online at:
http://www.fsa.usda.gov/pas/publica l
itons/elections.
Producers should keep in mind
several important dates regarding
upcoming county elections.
Producers can request, fill out and
submit nomination forms up to Aug. N'
15, 2005.
Ballots will be mailed to eligible
voters by Nov. ;4, 2005.
-Deadline td return ballots is' Dec. ,
5, 2005. '
Elected committee members and A
alternates take office Jan. 1, 2006.


OU BET I'M FIESTY! But I'm al
o10 just needs lots and lots of TL
u won't be sorry."


County Executive Director for
USDA's Farm Service Agency
(FSA) Mark Demott, reports that
the deadline to nominate eligible
candidates to serve on USDA Farm
Service Agency (FSA) county com-
mittees has been extended to Aug.
15, 2005.
"Our goal is to have as many eligi-
ble candidates nominated to, serve
on FSA county committees as possi-


JCHS Tells

School

Calendar

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Jefferson County High School-
has released its schedule for the
2005-06 school year.
Preparations begin Aug. 4 with
the annual Open House at 6 p.m. in
the cafeteria.
Students will be able to pick up
their class schedules during this
event, and the first day of school is
Aug. 8, which is an early release
day.
Aug. 24 is also early release.
Sept. 5 is the Labor Day Holiday.
Sept. 16 is a teacher planning day,
Sept. 20 is the end of the first six
weeks and Sept. 21 is an early re-
lease day.
Oct. 13 and 14 are the Fall Break
and Oct. 19 is an early release day.
Nov. 3 is the end of the second
six weeks; Nov. 4, teacher planning
day; Nov. 16, early release; Nov.
23-25, Thanksgiving Holidays.
Dec. 15 and 16 are early release
days, Dec. 16, end of the first se-
mester; and Dec. 19-30, the Winter
Holidays.
Jan. 2 is a teacher planning day;
students return to school; Jan. 5,
the end of the third six weeks; Jan.
16 is the Martin Luther King Holi-
day; and Jan. 18, early release.
Feb. 15 is early release, Feb. 17,
teacher planning day; Feb. 20,
President's Day Holiday; and Feb.
21, end of the fourth six weeks.
March 15 is early release and
March 20-24 is the Spring
Holidays.
April 11 is the end of the fifth six
weeks period; April 13, teacher
planning day; April 14, holiday for
teachers and students; and April 19
is early release.
May 15 is a teacher and student
holiday, May 25 and 26 are early
release days, May 26 is also the last
day for students and the end of the
sixth six weeks.
Teachers begin a four day work
week May 30 and 31 are teacher
planning days.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


ble', especially minorities and
women," Demott said.
"This two week extension will
give USDA personnel, community
based groups, farmer organizations,
and others, more time to continue
their outreach efforts so FSA county
committees can truly reflect Amer-
ica's agricultural landscape," he
continued.
Committees apply their judgment
and knowledge to make decisions
on county commodity price support
loan eligibility, establishment of al-
lotments, and yields, conservation
programs, disaster programs, em-
ployment, and other farm related is-
sues.
Individuals may nominate them-
selves or others as a candidate. In
addition,, eligible ,candidates: canbhe
nominated by community based and,
other, organizations in the county
where the election is being held, be-
fore the close of the nomination pe-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3,2005 PAGE 5

Spark Named
Adoptable

Pet Of Week
The Humane Society has named
"Spark" as their adoptable feline Pet
of the Week.
Spark, named for her playful per-
sonality, is a female domestic short
hair tabby with white chest, neck,
chin and white boots on each paw.
She is also described as being very
talkative, and vocal when she longs
for attention and TLC.
When anyone visits the shelter,
she reaches through the bars of her
cage in an attempt to gain attention
and talks to visitors with a soft "look
at me" meow.
She has a lively personality and is
extremely playful, lovable and af-
fectionate, and is recommended as
an indoor cat.
Spark was born on April Fool's
Day, 2005, is spayed, and has all
Iso a nice, lovable kitty vaccinations up to date.
LC. Take me home and To adopt Spark or any of the
many other loving available animals
at the shelter call 342-0244.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts


the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

Hl cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
aundry detergent bpes, shipping boxes, etc.

II glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries


*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


USDA FSA Nomina


Deadline Extende


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^ .. e .... o
,1 ., T

Fall Flax Arriving Daily
:|Come See





109 S. Broad St. 228-0510
-" '-.i Thomasville .,,






PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3,2005


OO L


BUDDY SYSTEM
Make sure they walk to
and from school with
others a friend,
nei oF brother or

on by:


Wendy's Exxon E5(ON
Travel Center
. Highway 19
(Just past 1 -10)
997-9628


sister.


C CAR POOLING
When car pooling, drop
off and pick up children
as close to school as
possible. Don't. leave until they have
entered the school yard or building.
SA. SPonsored by:

Burger King
342-1050


F FIRE SAFETY
Design and practice and
escape route and teach
your family members to
stop, drop and roll if their
clothes catch fief.


i'mlovin'it. 997-4979
Monticello, FL 32344


l INTERNET USE
Create guidelines for
Internet usage or place
parental blocks on those
sites you don't want your
child to view.
Sponsored by:
Jefferson County
High School

"Home Of The Tigers"


waist or
sweatshirts
1


DRAWSTRINGS
on Jackets and Sweatshirts
- Remove drawstrings on
hoods or around the neck.
Cut drawstrings at the
bottom of jackets and
to 3 inches.
Sponsored by:


E EVENING
PREPARATION
In the evening, help your
child pick out school
clothes and pack their back pack for the
next day.
ill -2r n d by:,
A.L. HallF Tuneral Director, J:NC
'Tiinau 'FTuneral :Honle
620 \lork Streel

997- 5553


SHAVE A SAFE
H place to wait for your bus,
away from traffic and the
street.


Sponsored by:

HERTIAGE MANOR APARTMENTS
997-4727



K KNOW what time
your child should get home
and call bim/her, have
them call ,-ou or arrange
for ionie check on
them and alsq he/ e is safely
home.
Pizza Hby:ut
Pizza Hut


A AWARENESS
Be aware of the street
traffic around you. Drivers
are requtd to follow
certain rules of the roadtoncerning
school buses, ow.ver, .hot all do.
Protect y6urs an matqli out!
Sno e I by:
Philip Sheats
'Framing (0o.
S545-8493


McDonald's


G GOOD
NIGHT'S SLEEP
Make sure your child gets
a good night's sleep and
eats breakfast in the morning, so you'll
have, lots qf energy.
/ f9 ponsored by:


Robert Plaines
County Judge


JAYWLKING
Never jaywalk! Always
cross the street where
there is a cross guard
present.

Sponsored by:

VMS, INC.
1455 N. Jefferson St.
997-5000


4liito


1403 S. Jefferson St.
997-8533


S. QNSHMM .-XUID-dm ..-


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1l





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005 PAGE 7


~zr
~ ti~i


L LISTEN "
Take time to listen carefully
to children fears and
feelings about people or
places that scare them or
make them feel uneasy. Tell tfem to trust
their instincts.t Ta .aints about
bullies and other co -riously.
sgo-n ei by: f

Lois Howell-Hunter
Tax Collector



O OBEYwhether walking,
biking, or riding the bus to
school -- to obey all traffic
signals, signs, traffic
officers, and safety
patrols. Remind them to be extra careful
in rainy, or foggy weather.
Sponsred. by:

Aucilla Christian

Academy

-.. .- .- ----. --,--


incoming


REFLECTORS
If you are a bike rider, be
sure that you are equipped
h with the proper reflectors.
This ensures visibility to
traffic.


sponsored by:


FMB Insurance Services


997-9981


with good be
term your best


S


EXCEPTIONAL
STUDENTS is what you
should be this 2004 school
year. You can achieve this
.havior and giving this school
i


.pd b
Sponsored by:


Sorenson Tire Center
1300 N. Jefferson St.
997-4689


MIND ALL
TRAFFIC SIGNALS
and, or the crossing guard -
never cross the street
against a light, even if you don't see
any traffic coming.
sponsored by:

George Miller
Accounting, Inc.
997-2645


P PHONE NUMBERS
Be sure your child knows
His/her home phone number
(including area code) and
address, your work number,
the number of another trusted adult, and
how to use 91 I for emergencies
Sponsored by:

DAYS INN of Monticello
US 19-110 ex. 225
997-5988



STAY AWAY
FROM THE BUS
until it comes to a
complete stop and the
driver signals you to enter.

Sponsored by:
Law Offices of Sherry Walker
386-5656
Toll Free 800-458-5514



V VACANT LOTS
Tell him or her to stay
away from parks, vacant
lots, fields, and other
places where there aren't
many people around.

Sponsored by:

Monticello News
997-3568
"You can't he without it."


V YELLOW ALERT
Yellow flashing lights: means
W a bus is preparing to stop,
and you should do the
same. Red flashing lights
or an extended 'stop sign indicates you
should stop until the, As starts. moving.
spon |ed5 by:

Badcock m
HOME F U R N IT U R E LI reL.
FREE BACK To SCHOOL PACKS
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!!


time will
more.


I1


I'


QUIET
ATMOSPHERE
Having quiet surroundings
during homework or study
enable you to concentrate


Sponsored by:


Jefferson Elementary
Sandra K. Collins, Principal
Faculy & Staff
"TEAM JES"


T TURN OFF
DISTRACTIONS
Cell phone, use and loud
music-can negatively affect
your driving and.Odncentration.

Sponsored by:

FARM BUREAU INSURANCE

997-2213



W WALKING ROUTE
Plan a walking route to
school or the bus stop.
Choose the mbst direct
way with the fewest street
crossings and use intersections with
crossing guards. Test the route with
your child.
Saongsired by:


America's Propane Company

997-3331


Z ZONES
Every school has 'School
Zones'. These zones are
set for the safety of our
children. The speed limit is
posted upon entering school zones and
should be obeyed.
Sponsored by:

Keaton Tire Repair
54 Capps Hwy., Lamont, FI 32336
997-0903


NNEVER TALK
TO STRANGERS
Teach your child never to
talk !f strangers or accept
rides or giftlrfrowatraigers. Remember, a
stranger f' anyone you or your children
doesn't low well oiAlesnt trust.
S Spaon. ed by:

B&T Fencing
942-1003

F


U USE YOUR HEAD!
Look Behind You Before
backing out of a driveway or
parking spot, check behind
you for children who may be
walking or biking rto school. Children on
bicycles could be approaching quickly.
sponsred by:


REGISTER'S MINI STORAGE
997-2535


mmod


L di


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PGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3,2005


Lifestyle


Rev. Thermon Moore Speaks


At Triple L Club Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Triple L Club
heard Pastor Thermon Moore speak-
ing as a former Air Force Chaplain,
at their July meeting, Tuesday.
Moore gave his perspectives on a
Christian nation under God, what it
meant to him and how it affects
servicemen and servicewomen.
He spoke about the ways one
looks at the flag and what every fold
in the flag means.
Before a flag is handed to the
family of a deceased serviceman or
servicewomann it is ever so slowly
,folded. He describes how proud we
should all feel when look upon the
flag and how honored we should
feel.
Moore spoke of the origin of


"Taps." He told how a Union soldier
wrote the words and the music for a
Confederate soldier that lay dying in
his sight, only to find out later that
the Confederate soldier was his son.
The words were written to the
sound of a trumpet. The trumpet ex-
presses the soldier's sorrowful
words from deep in his heart.
In another vein, Moore suggested
leaving memos for God. He said: "If
you have a request, make note of it
and leave it out for God to take care
of, so you get that burden off your
shoulders, and put it in God's
hands."
Lois Goode and Sissy Kilpatrick
entertained the audience with patri-
otic songs and piano music. They
included the audience in a sing-a-
long. Song sheets were handed out
for the audience to follow in song
though, most knew the words to
every song sung.


SHARE Program Rai


Funds For New Wai


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The SHARE site for Jefferson
County is the Aucilla Baptist
Church on Tindell Road, 997-2220
or 997-2631.
Director Tim Caske reports the
SHARE program, is in its 15th year,
and that a freezer and a cooler as old
as the program itself, needs to be re-
placed.
He also said that the warehouse is
located in an area that is redevelop-
ing from industrial to retail and resi-
*dential, and that the future of con-
4tinuing in this location beyond the
nextt two to three years is uncertain.
: SHARE has started a building
,campaign with a goal of raising
$200,000. Once this initial goal has
"been reached, a construction loan
*will be taken out and the building of
ta new warehouse will begin.
$14,000 has been raised to date.
SHARE is a not-for-profit organi-


zation which offers savings on food.
Everyone who volunteers just two
hours a month is welcome to partici-
pate.
There are no income requirements.
In return for volunteering two hours
of service per month, you may pur-
chase as much food as you wish
over the minimum $18 purchase.
Pick up your SHARE food at your
host site on distribution day, as
posted month in the NEWS.
Basic packages are $18, with a
guaranteed retail value of $36 with
an average retail value of $41.24.
Double meats and produce pack-
ages are available as well. Specialty
packages and Select items are priced
separately.
The cost of the packages are bro-
ken down to include the food cost,
operating costs, and the capital fund.
As an example, the Basic Package
for the month of July was: one
pound of ground beef 80/20, one
pound fully cooked bratswurst, one
and a half pounds of Chefs Choice


There was a patriotic trivia game
played by all, and members wracked
their brains trying to remember what
a particular presidents name was,
and what president lived where, and
with how many children. Everyone
came out a winner.
In trip and travel news, President
Mary Helen Andrews shares infor-
mation for a few upcoming events.
In August the group will venture
to Steinhatchee. In September they
will take a trip to Bellingraph Gar-
dens in Mobile, AL.
In December a group of members
and friends will tour a few sights in
Georgia.
They will visit Warms Springs,
Calloway Gardens, the travel a bit
further to Lake Lanier.
Around the Christmas holiday,
when the lights are glittering and
Tallahassee is glowing with decora-
tions of the season, members will
-travel together for the see the sight.


sing


rehouse
Shrimp Alfredo, 1.62 pounds of
chicken wings (tray pack,) one
pound of ready to cook chicken ten-
derloins, one and three quarter
pounds of chicken drumsticks, plus
a selection of fruits and vegetables.
An example of Specials for the
month of July was called The
Breakfast Bonanza, for only $14.
It included: 6 three ounce Bagelers,
one and a half pounds of shredded
hashbrowns, 1.56 pounds of Aunt
Jemima waffles, one pound of
breakfast sausage links, 14.88
ounces of fully cooked pork sausage
patties, and 10 two ounce omelets.
Also, 10 five ounce bacon wrapped
sirloin filet steaks can be purchased
for just $16.
SHARE has been serving com-
munities since 1990 and is trusted
by thousands every month.
The SHARE News Letter is pub-
lished monthly and is distributed
with the food pickups.


Plaines donated the hot dogs for
the event and Barker donated cook-
ies.
Shirley Washington. donated
crayons for pre-kindergarten and
kindergarten students.
John Nelson donated coloring
books and Tequila Hagan donated
folders.
JROTC will present the Colors,
and the JCHS cheerleaders will
provide a demonstration.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

- A "Back To School Pep Rally" is
planned 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday
at the new Jefferson County High
-School cafeteria.
The event is sponsored by com-
munity members with special inter-
est in the public school system.
Parents and teachers will be able
to meet with the principals of each
'of the three district schools, and
elected officials.
Students will receive free school
.supplies. There will be several
,guest speakers, and a free lunch
will be provided.
Spokesman C. P. Miller said
;there will also be many booths,
with educational materials on dis-
'play.


Booths will feature: the county
Sheriffs Department, Healthy Start
Coalition, Teen Center, Boys and
Girls Club, Judge Bobby Plaines,
FAMU College Prep, Chamber of
Commerce, FMB Community Part-
ner, and the Health Department.
Speakers will include Blazin
102.3 in Tallahassee, who will
bring their vans to broadcast, along
with some of the DJ's from the sta-
tion, who call themselves "The
School Boys".
Chris Plummer and his photogra-
pher will also speak, as will the
JES, HMS and JCHS principals,
Superintendent Phil Barker, Diana
Hall, 2005 Valedictorian Shandla
Brown and Laurenda Cuyler.
VFW Post 151 donated 1,000
pencils and Concerned United Peo-
ple, Inc., purchased and donated
1,000 writing tablets.


SR Homes Of

41Mourning
I William Robert Sapp
...:. Mr. William "Bill" Robert Sapp,
age 76, was a retired Serviceman
fl- T'- "with Florida Power Corporation,
S: ":'- ". died Sunday July 31, 2005 at his
home in Monticello, Florida.
.... .. dFuneral Services will be Wednes-
day, August 3, 2005 at Beggs Fu-
neral Home Monticello Chapel,
6; '.Monticello Florida beginning at
11:00am. In lieu of flowers donation
can be made to Big Bend Hospice:
1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahas-
see, Florida 32308-5428.
A native of Greenville, Florida,
Mr. Sapp has lived in Monticello,
Florida for 51 years. He was an avid
hunter and fisherman; he was honest
to a fault and lived by the Golden
Rule. He was of Presbyterian faith
and a member of the First Presbyte-
rian Church, Monticello, Florida.
._ He is survived by his wife Anita
Sapp of Monticello, FL., one son
William Robert Sapp Jr. wife Mar-
sha of Tallahassee, FL, three daugh-
ters Holly Sapp of Tampa, FL, Janet
i . Russo, husband Jeff of Parkland
FL., Regina Lucille Spivey of Jack-
sonville FL., Sherry Pafumi, hus-
band Frank of Sarasota FL., and one
brother Frank Sapp of Homestead
FL., one sister Sara Brown, hus-
band J.W. of Perry FL and one half
sister Dorothy Mae "Dot" Simmons,
husband Chesley of Jacksonville,
ai'-a- .. FL., eight grandchildren Jake and
Jia Russo, Erika Hinks and Jan, Lo-
REV. THERMON MOORE was the guest speaker at a recent gan, Clay Bullard, and Mikela, Kai
meeting of the Triple L Club. L-R: Lois Goode, Moore, Spivey and three great grandchil-
Sissy Kilpatrick. (News Photo) dren Carmen Hinks, and Meghan,
Nicholas Bullard.


Boys, Girls Club,

Teen Center TO

Host Luncheon
The Boys and Girls Club PEP pro-
gram, and the Jefferson Teen Center
will host a luncheon for Law En-
forcemere and Healthcare Profes-
sionals, noon to 2 p.m, Thursday, at
the Teen Center. I "
Directors of both organizations
planned the event to become better
acquainted with, and express appre-
ciation to local law enforcement and
healthcare professionals.
The mission of a positive, safe
and healthy environment is shared
by the above mentioned entities.
Directors request and RSVP for
the luncheon no later than 7 p.m.,
Wednesday.
Formal invitations were delivered
within the county, Monday.
Contacts include Chairpersons:
Deveda Evans-Bellamy, Teen Cen-
ter Director at 997-5262, or Tequila
Hagan, Boy and Girls Club PEP Co-
ordinator, at 519-1200.


VBS Planned At lands of the "Serengeti Trek," where


Waukeenah UMC
Waukeenah United Methodist
Church will hold its Vacation Bible
School Monday, Aug. 8 through Fri-
day, Aug. 12.
Refreshments will be available
from 5:30-6 p.m. with Bible School,
6 to 8:30 p.m. Join in on the grass-


kids are wild about God.
There will also be an adult Bible
Study.
Participants will enjoy exciting
games, experience thrilling Bible
stories, hear unforgettable music,
and meet new friends.
Kim Norman is the contact per-
son for more information at 519-
1473.


r N W Kmm


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We accept Medicare, Medicaid
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Located at 1702 South Jefferson St. in Perry, Florida
850-223-1744

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850-421-7600
Call Us If You're In Need Of Care In Your Pregnancy or
For Any Women's Health Care Issues


Back To School


Rally Set Saturday


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION
of the Big Bend
Serving Persons -with Epilepsy
Community Education
Diagnosis and Treatment

Case Management

Support Groups


1108-B East Park Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777


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American Stroke
Associations.
A Division of American
Heart Association W.

Time M-c.Ihees On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


ANTHONY PFLIEGER works at the welcome turns working at the welcome station.
station at the Jefferson Elementary School (News Photo)
Club Boys and Girls Club. Members take

Passion Pursuit Conference

Set At Bethel AME Church


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Living Fountain Ministries is
sponsoring a Passion's Pursuit Con-_
ference 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 4
and Friday, Aug. 5, continuing at 10
a.m. on Saturday, August 6 at New
Bethel AME Church of Monticello.
As part of the Passion's Pursuit
Conference, those at Living Foun-
tain Ministries will honor and bless
the Pastors and Evangelists in this
area by treating them to a luncheon
-to be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 5
at the New Bethel AME Church.
This will give the community
and the Living Fountain Ministries
an opportunity to meet and greet the
Pastors and Evangelists in this area.
Guest speaker is Cherrie Kaylor
from Gateway Vineyard Fellowship
Of Coral Springs and Global Awak-
ening's resource team.


For further information or direc-
tions phone 545-8837.
Cherrie and Mike Kaylor are sen-
ior pastors, international speakers,
and worship leaders.
They are also members of the
Global Awakening's resource team
and have been in ministry for thirty
years.
Pastor Mike remarks "In the last
two years of ministry, I have been a
part of more supernatural ministry
and witnessed the power of God far
greater then I had seen the first 28
years of ministry."
Pastor Cherrie serves with her
husband, and is an international
speaker and walks in the reality of
revelation and empowering.
She teaches with an understanding
and zeal that empowers those who
hear with fresh prophetic under-
standing and encouragement.
She is also an artist whose paint-
ings have been said to be "deeply


prophetic."
Her experience in the world of
modeling, commercials, beauty pag-
eants and working with Fortune
Five Hundred companies is nothing
in comparison to the prophetic reve-
lation and experiences that she has
been given by the Holy Spirit.
By choosing to give her life to the
call of God, she has been used to
transform countless lives with the
reality of prophetic impartation and
healing for the whole person.
The couple founded Gateway
School of Supernatural Ministries
located in South Florida.

A c
It Pays
To Advertise!
Monticello News
997-3568


* Sudden severe headache
with no known cause.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005 PAGE 9

Lyle Herrick
Donna Herrick




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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005






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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005 PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3,2005


Sports


King Of Hill Horseshoe

Tournament Scheduled


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Eighth Annual King of the
Hill Horseshoe Tournament is
scheduled 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug.
13, at 130 Fred T. Road.
Registration is from 8:45 a.m. un-
til 9:45 a.m.
The entry fee is $20 per team,
and trophies and cash prizes will be
awarded for first, second and third
place winners.
The first place winner will re-
ceive 50 percent of the takes, sec-
ond place will be awarded 30


Take Huntinc

Summer, Off

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) is
encouraging would-be hunters to
sign up and take their mandatory
Hunter Safety Course this summer
and not wait until the fall.
This time of year provides the best
opportunity to get into a class, as
slots are more readily available.
During hunting season and just
prior, classes usually fill up fast.


percent and third place will be
awarded 20 percent.
The dollar value of the cash
prizes will be determined by the
number of entries, minus the cost
of the trophies.
Door prizes will be awarded.
Last year's event saw 23 men's
teams and six women's teams com-
peting for the title, and included a
team from the Jacksonville area.
Those wishing to pre-register can
call Marjie Zylstra at 997-2937.
Early registration helps coordina-
tors to better plan the event.
Entry fees can be paid on tourna-
ment day.


g Course In

icials urge
The FWC Hunter Safety Course,
or similar approved course by an-
other state, province or organization,
is a requirement to obtaining a Flor-
ida hunting license for anyone born
on or before June 1, 1975.
Even though the course is not re-
quired for persons born before that
date, it is recommended, especially
for beginning hunters.
For more information on the
Hunter Safety Program or to learn
when the next available class or
field day will be offered in this area,
'visit MyFWC.com huntersafety.


RECEIVING awards for State Farm Insur-
ance Coach Pitch Team are: L-R: Ashley
Schofill, sportsmanship; Tanner Aman,


MVP; Capus Kinsey, MVP; Winston Lee,
most improved. (News Photo)


REP. WILL KENDRICK presented the County missioner Skeet Joyner, Legislative Asst.
with a $200,000 check for improvements at to Sen. Nancy Argenziano Steve Larson,
the Recreation Park. L-R: Kendrick, Corn- Park Director Kevin Aman. (News Photo)



County Receives $200,000


JAROD JACKSON, MVP for Jefferson
League Team. (News Photo)


Farmers Market Little


Ladies Tennis Team

Changes Its Name


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As the time quickly approaches
for the start of the Fall Season, the
Monticello A-league women's ten-
nis team is gearing up and ready to
go.
The ladies have changed their
dame from Simply Smashing to
Monticello Mood Swings.
Team Captain Patty Hardy said
the ladies have been getting together
to practice every Thursday during
the summer.
The roster has also been changed
to include two new players, Lorei


Salie and Susan Goodwin.
"We're hoping to do a lot better
this year," said Hardy. "We'll be a
lot more familiar with the league
this time around."
Their first matches are set 9:30
a.m., Aug. 25, with opponents to be
announced when the official sched-
ule is released Aug 16.
The roster includes:
Team #1, Katie Brock and Lisa
Jackson, team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, and team #3,
Lorei Salie and Susan Goodwin.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff and
Angie Delvecchio, team #5, Linsey
Taylor and Trisha Wirick and team
#6, Maxi Miller and Jennifer Ellis.


For Park Improvements
271 different projects, that were ap- six shelters and ex
FRAN HUNT plied for, which received the entire ($11,500), playgrou
Staff Writer amount of the grant application. ($500) and renovation
Though the Legislature was un- room facility ($10,00
Jefferson County last week, re- able to fully fund the lists .of all the
ceived a check for $200,000 from applicants, each did, however, re-
the Division of Recreation and ceive some funding for their pro-
Parks of Florida Recreation Devel- jects.


opment Assistance Program, to be
used for improvements and up-
grades at the county Recreation
Park.
Rep. Will Kendrick, presented the
check to County Commisioner Chair
Skeet Joyner.
"This is one of the best managed
programs as far as grants go," said
Kendrick. "The funds are based on
a particular county's needs, so there-
fore, counties are not having to
compete with each other."
He added that since Jefferson is
eligible as a rural economic devel-
opment community, the county will
not have to match the amount of the
grant.
He said that Jefferson was the
only applicant for the grant, of the


isting pavilion
,nd equipment
ons of the rest
0).


Mayo Edges

Demons 12-11

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Demons softball team lost a'
close one to Mayo Sunday, 11-12.
Warren Allen went four for five;
Wilbo Ellis, Jr., and Nod Thomp-
son; three for five; and Nick Rus-
sell and Kevin Jones both went two
for five.
Eldon Jennings went two for
four; Darren Young and Joe An-
drews,one for four; and Frankie
Steen and Monterious Rivers, 0 for
five.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said that
Russell pitched his first game of
the season and performed well and
Steen played first base for the first
time and he also did a good job.
The Demons now stand at an
11-4 season.



Lady Diamonds

Fall TO Mayo


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Diamonds softball
team fell to Mayo Sunday, 9-14.
Kidra Thompson, Keandra Seab-
rooks and Cissi all went three for
four, and Thompson hit a home
run.
Tasha Samuel, Cynthia Steen and
Nikki Cooks, went two for four;
Shericka Parrish, one for four; and
Felica McDaniel, Juliette and
Sharice Brooks, went one for three.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said that
Thompson pitched a good game
and she was named the MVP of the
game.
The Lady Diamonds now stand at
a 10-5 season.

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"It's a great day when you can
spread the love and bring the bacon
back into the county," said
Kendrick. "We were able to double
the available funds this year and
we're returning the money back into
the communities which need it the
most,"
Steve Larson, Legislative Assis-
tant 'for Senator Nancy Argenziano,
added, "This is a good example of
hdw the program allows counties to
help themselves."
Projects to be covered by the grant
include a new picnic pavilion
($45,000), and renovations of four
baseball fields ($36,000), four ten-
nis courts ($2,000), resurfacing of
the track/fitness trail ($15,000), the


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department al:
f 997-3568


The Jefferson County Board of Commis-
sioners is soliciting the services of a Flor-
ida Certified Architectural firm. The
project constitutes consultation, design
and renovation of the old high school
buildings located on West Washington and
Water Street for the relocation of govern-
ment departments. The work will consist
of exterior and interior modifications
including space organization, electrical,
plumbing, mechanical and accessibility
issues. Interested firms must submit quali-
fications and proposal by September 12th
2005 at 12:00 noon. Project information is


A lawn tower. Power
tools. Recorded music
through headphones.
Live music without
headphones. Repeated
exposure to these noise
levels (85 decibels) can
cause gradual or sudden
hearing loss a condition
thal affects one in ten
Americans. For an
evaluation of the noise
levels in your work or
home environment, and for
a complete assessment
of your hearing health, call
a certified
audiologist. For
more information,
contact the American V
Speech-Language-Hearing
Association at 1-800-638-
TALK or visit www.asha.org.


AMERICAN
SPEECH LANGUAGE
HEARING;
A ASSOCIATION


LEGA.LS" '

available at: Submit to the Jefferson
County Building Department, 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Fl. 32345.
Ph. No. 850-342-0223, ext. 104.
8/3, 8/5, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL JUVE-
NILE DIVISION CASE NO.: 04-18-DPA
IN THE INTEREST OF: J.J. 02/06/2004
MINOR CHILD; NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jessie Joiner and Unknown Father
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills
Road, Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above
styled court for the termination of paren-
tal rights and the permanent commitment
of J.J. a male child born on 02/06/2004 in
Leon County, Florida to the State of Flor-
ida, Department of Children and Families,
Adoption and Related Services a licensed
child placing agency for subsequent adop-
tion and you are hereby to be and appear
in the above court at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, County Courthouse, Room 10
Monticello, Florida 32344 on Monday
August 22nd at 4:00 p.m. for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should
not be granted. You must appear on the
date and time specified. FAILURE TO
PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVI-
SORY HEARING CONSTITUTES YOUR
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD.
IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETI-
TION. WITNESS my hand and official
seal as the Judge of said court this 8th day
of June, 2005./s/
7/13, 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK, vs. EVA KRO-
MIAN, RAIL ALFONSO FLOREZ, and
UNKNOWN TENANTS) Defendant.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO
EVA KRMOIAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Jefferson
COunty, Florida: Lot 30 Block D, of
Aucilla Shores Subdivision, a subdivision
as per the plat thereof filed at Plat Book B,
Page 38, of the Public Records of Jefferson
County, Florida. Has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy
of yopur written defenses, if any, to it on
GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is Gardner, Wad-
sworth, Duggar, Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300
Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32308, on or before July 27, 2005 (within
30 days of first publication), and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered aginast you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion. Dated July 20th, 2005. DALE BOAT-
WRIGHT, Clerk of the Circuit Court.
7/27, 8/3, c


F! E L


Boyd Sod Farm is looking for a CDL
licensed part-time driver for local
deliveries of agricultural products.
Contact us at 877-388-3977.
7/29, 8/3, c


HELP 'WANTED> AG G-EWK S -


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This Form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail

Payment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 Lines, One Edition $4.00 Each Additional Line $1.00
3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
30 Characters Per Line


DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday

PUBLISHING DATE(S)


CLASSIFICATION


WRITE YOUR AD HERE












Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hire a Grants
Director. Job description and
applications are available from Clerk
of Circuit Court, Room 10, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida and
at http://co.iefferson.fl.us/iobs.html.
Grants Director is responsible for
technical grant writing, and
supervision, documentation,
administration and reporting of
grants awarded to the county. Salary
range: $28,000 $ 37,000. Minimum
qualifications are: Knowledge of
grant procedures and experience with
the grants process. Knowledge of
Federal and State grant regulations.
*Knowledge of the sources of. grant
funding. Education, experience
needed: College degree in
appropriate field. Five (5) years
experience in a responsible
administrative position. *
Documented experience successfully
seeking and administering grants with
preference for economic development,
recreation, infrastructure for county
or municipal grants. Applications will
be accepted until September 12, 2005,
at the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, address above. Equal
Opportunity Employer. Applicants
with a disability should contact the
above office for accommodation.
7/27, 29, 8/3, c
Adolescent Male Residential Program
now accepting apps for the following.
Exp w/juvenile justice, therapeutic
programs, & mgt of youth pref.
Reliable, honest candidates only may
apply for: Program Supervisor: 2+
yrs supervisory exp, mgt of youth &
delinquency pref. BA/BS in Human
Services pref. Organized,
self-sufficient, & responsible a must.
Recreation Therapist: Outdoorsy ind.
W/2+ yrs exp in designing therapy
activities for youth reqd. BA/BS,
CPR/lst Aid pref. Therapeutic most
impt quality. Team Leader/Therapy
Assistant: Diploma/GED reqd. Must
manage adol, delinquent pop. Shift
work/hours. Counseling bckgrnd a
plus, integrity a must. .Clinical
Coordinator: Counseling position.
BA/BS reqd MA pref. Able to provide
grp/ind sessions. Strong org/time mgt
skills and team concept. 2+ yrs
w/youth, pref delinquent pop. Exp
w/BHOS doc a plus. Counselor:
Provide grp, ind, and fam sessions for
committed youth. Strong clinical
skills, documentation ability needed.
BA/BS reqd. Serve on Trmt Team
and able to address issues in
population served. Data Entry:
Diploma/GED reqd. Key BHOS
billing. 2+ yrs exp. Strong org skills
and basic 'app knowledge in Excel,
Word reqd. Exp w/billing pref. Please
fax resume, references, position
desired, and salary request to:
Greenville Hills Academy, Personnel
Dept., 742 SW Greenville Hills Road,
Greenville, Florida 32331.
8/3, c
Parking Lot & Asphalt Maint. Co.
Now taking applications. Salary
D.O.E. 545-1776.
7/15, tfn, c
Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.

Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, s/d, tfn

AUTOMOTIVE'
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c

FOR RENT '
3bdrm. I 'i b n/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
7/13, tfn, c


Big Garage Sale at Royal Mini
Storage, US #Hwy. 19 South. Two
miles south of Courthouse. Sat.
August 6th. 8:00 'til 1:00. Furniture,
toys, H/H items, clothes, books, etc.
All proceeds will go to Monticello
Christian Academy.
8/3, 5, c

Anitiques/Household tag sale. Friday,
,August 5, 3pm-6pm & Saturday,
August 6, 8am-4pm. St. Rd. #149 (off
U.S. 19 N), Monticello, FL. Older
couple down sizing, selling lifetime
treasures: antique LR/DR furniture,
vintage glassware, pottery, porcelain,
quilts & quilt tops, many kitchen
items, bric-a-brac, linens, 100's of
books, piano, N gauge model train set,
steel safe, shop/hand tools. Follow
signs from Courthouse. Action Sales,
850/528-4517.
7/29, 8/3, 5, c


SERVICES
We're a church that values tradition,
but we're not fundamentalists. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
8/3, c
Little's Lawn Care. Vince Little:
Owner/Operator. Phone
850-342-1162. Mowing, weed eating,
hedge trimming, and debris clean up.
7/27, 29, 8/3, 5, pd
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase enerev levels resulting in
considerable weight loss" over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stumping: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn

Great Opportunity I- .


Seeking Technician
and Assistant Manager
candidates to fill immediate
Openings in the Tallahassee
and surrounding areas.

We offer competitive compensation,
paid training, a great benefits
package, flexible schedule and more!
Please apply at Super-Lube's Main
Office, 401 E. Virginia St. in
Tallahassee or fax your resume to
850/222-5152.
Valid Drivers License required.
Applicants must pass a drug test.


Buyers looking for Homes and Land


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Brand New Listinq! 3 bedroom home in
town at East Anderson St. $115,000

Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy Road
in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding acres with
a beautiful view, lovely home site
in a grove of ancient pecan trees and a hayfield
meant for galloping $150,000

Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bedrooms 2
baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile and hardwood
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace and a screened
porch, 1 acre Now $135,000

Terrific Buy! 3 bedroom 2 bath 1995 Fleet-
wood home on 1 acre in Christmas acres -
only $34,995-call now

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Near Leon County 10 mostly open ac, corner
of Paul Thompson and Julia Road only $150,000

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bedroom 2
bath double wide with a bathroom that won't quit
on a high hill with a view in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows only $55,000

Check Out This One! 8 acres with big double-
wide and small house on a pretty old hillside
close to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Biq doublewide with additions 12 rooms quiet
wooded lot $56,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders Mart
$650,000

Near Whitehouse Road 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside, county road $75,000

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for acre-
age between Monticello and Lloyd can you
help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Simply the Rest


I ~S~I i


LET US DO YOUR


KEL.Y & KELLY HOME WORK
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St
997-5516
Charming Modular Home- 3 BR/2 BA spacious living, 1/2 ac.
lot north of town.................. ........................ $123,000
a Spring Hollow Rd.- 4 BR/ 3BA, 20x20 master suite, quiet loca-
tion, berber carpet and tile..................................$174,900
LOCATION- comfortable cottage fronting on Hwy-90 and the
Old Lloyd Rd., additional guest house...................$225,000
Immaculate Brick Home- gorgeous 3 BR/ 3BA on 5 acres,
meticulously maintained, many nice features............$262,900


www.cbkk.com


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Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


I


I







PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., AUGUST 3, 2005

JES Lists Supplies


Students Require
Kleenex, Elmer's Glue, wet wipes,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With the first day of school rap-
idly approaching, Aug. 8, Jefferson
Elementary School has prepared
for parents, a list of supplies re-
quired by students in each grade.
The supply list for kindergartners
includes one box of Crayola Cray-
ons, 8 or 16 size box, Elmer's
School Glue, Fiscar scissors with
blunt end, one small package of #2
pencils, a back pack and a school
box.
Also, three Duo Tang two pocket
folders, no center fasteners, plain
colors and no pictures, one red, one
blue and one yellow, and one box
of Kleenex.
First graders will require Elmer's
Glue, one box of Kleenex, round-
tip scissors, crayons, glue stick and
one box of gallon size Ziploc bag-
gies.
Second graders will require pen-
cils (no brads), pocket folders, one
red, one yellow and one orange,
pointed scissors, one box of


and one box of colored pencils.
Third graders need yellow #2
pencils, notebook paper, a box of
crayons, one box of Kleenex, and
one bottle of soap.
Fourth graders require pencils,
notebook paper, crayons (pack of
16), ruler, colored pencils, scissors,
two folders with pockets, three
ball-point pens, one box of Kleenex
and one glue stick.
Fifth graders will require pencils,
notebook paper, crayons (pack of
16), ruler, colored pencils, round
tip scissors and three ball-point
pens.
Administrators also report the
hours for the school day have
changed. School begins at 7:45
a.m., and closes at 2:30 p.m.
Annual Open House is scheduled
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Friday,
Aug. 5. Parents are encouraged to
bring their children to meet their
teachers.
An early release day and students
will be dismissed at 1:30 p.m.,
Monday, Aug. 8.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Humane Society has go
enough people together to have
Red Cross come here and teac
class on Animal First Aid and CI
- The class will be conducted n
until 4 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 13
the shelter. Lunch will also be 1
vided.
In order for lunch to be provi
with the class, those who with
take the class, must let spokespe
Martha Canady (997-2087) knox
August 10, otherwise no lunch
be provided.
: Canady said the article in the IV
ticello News had generated intel
and some last minute interest n
be forthcoming.
"The techniques in the course
not meant to replace emergency c


SPEED






LIMIT


by a veterinarian," warns Tallahas-
see Red Cross Public Support
Spokesperson Jessica Norris.
"The course teaches what to do to
sustain an animals life before trans-
port to a veterinarian."
The course will entail where on a
cat or dog to take a pulse, how to
properly perform CPR, what to do
about imbedded objects, severe
bleeding, treatment for shock and
how to properly move an animal at
the scene of an accident.
The cost of the course is $25.
"It could save an animal's life,"
said Tina Ames. "It will be helpful
and informative to all those who
love their pets."
Canady concluded that if more
people show interest in attending the
class, the location may be changed,
and if so, the location will be an-
nounced before hand.


There's no limit to what
we can do with your help.


Muscular Dystrophy Association

1-800-572-1717
People help MDA...because MDA helps people.


Quilters Bid Moving

Member Farewell


-- "7


CRAZY QUILTER Rose Klemp is moving out of the area and
was feted recently by the quilters. Here she works with the
group on the North Carolina Lily Quilt, soon to be raffled.
(News Photo)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Crazy Quilters said farewell
to one of their most attentive and
avid quilters last Tuesday evening at
the home of Barbara Sheats.
Sheats had invited quilter Rose
Klemp to join her for dinner. What
Klemp did not know was that all the
Crazy Quilter members had been in-
vited to the home of Sheats for an
after dinner dessert party, much to
the surprise and delight of Klemp.
She was deeply moved by the
love, attention, and special caring of
her friends.
The Quilters brought an array of
sweets to share at the party.


Klemp is moving from the Monti-
cello area to Biloxi, MS. this week.
She promises to come back to visit
her friends and invited them to
"come out and visit me anytime."
In Quilter notes, members are sell-
ing tickets for their most recent
North Carolina Lily Quilt. The raffle
will take place in December at the
"Christmas in Monticello" event.
Tickets are $1 each and six for $5.
They can be purchased from any
member of the Crazy Quilters.
The quilt is king size with bright
red lilies and green leaves and stems
on a snow white background.
The members meet at 6 p.m. on
Tuesday and Thursdays. Sheats can
be contacted at 997-8732 for times
and locations.


FURNISHINGS,





RET TO O


GRILL

NO CREDIT NEEDED H9M"k s9



NO LORE TERRY 08LitATION



NO LONO TERM OBLIGATION


LAWN


ASK*' US~


MOWER


CIP uo~zke~


TANK NOT INCLUDED

kn DTTT


VISIT US AT
WWW.BUDDYRENTS.COM


.............-..-............................-.-........-......................-.-....-...V+:. :t:
...............................................................................::: ;


J US NESS Cai 997,





_____ DIRECTORY Ncee


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
-... Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced ~-Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~-
Water Heater Repairs- All Repairs
10 S..SelyS.Maio
CalonBreteMstrPume.,6I-


STAR TEAM
(MONTICELLO / TALLAHASSEE)
SHAUNDRA M. BUGGS CR7.SEL'&



HOME: 850-997-2404
LADY BUGO LIFESTYLES CELL: 850-264-5112
Website: www.ladybuggllfestyles.biz Email: Idybuggls@aol.com


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


I I I


LUMART AVIATION
Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
Come fly with us!


LUTHER S. TURNER
2150 Ellison Rd
Perry. FL 32347
Phone:(850)584-8867
Lumart's Stolport
N 30-07-51 W 083-32-58
E-mail: LST@gtcom.net


Classic Cessna 170-B


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, .Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT I I l ')1U;OR


850-997-5808


850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


JE u rtsMrans'aa ,ic


PART-TIME SUPPLEMENT OR
FULL-TIME INCOME POTENTIAL.
NYSE Listed Company
Training Provided


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


__1


Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax


Be Your Own Boss Not valid with any other offer.
[1. Wellness Industry
237325099 -2 9
.
AskforJoh Toma 158 Jefeso
8504 9426S 1 b


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll H.ill) 229-226-0717


BAETT ER BODIES


I AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BOD'' REPAIR I


REE EST1MATES!J


J FREEPACI-S
LOCATIONN SERICVlcC


PROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORE ATION!J
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
966 N. BARBER HIl.I. RD. LAMONT, Fl.
I 997-4160 I
ANDY & TLNA AMES. OWNERS


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE
^*^^*


Norman L. Barfl'
Exclusive Agent
Barefoot Insurance G(iro


Allstate Insurance Company
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 13C
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

oot 878-8077
Oil'IN MNlnday-JrTulay 8 3U-5 0)
uIp 1-mail 'NORMAN A I-. oI" ralltlUR I'i0n


Pet First Aid, CPR

Class Planned Here


-d-"


940