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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00059
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: July 27, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00059
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



LIAP. OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAIELSVILLL, FL. 52bll


Parents Need Humane Society
rcts on IInrarE I vnlnrp


Drinking

Editorial, Page 4


n i In U i o %0
Fundraising Ideas

Story, Page 5


Foster Parents
Group Collects
School Supplies

Story, Page 6


'Porch De Salomon'
Monroe Family
Ministry

Story, Photos, Page 9


SMOn tWednesday Morning D





Monti

137TH YEAR NO.59,50 CENTS


I


cello
Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2005


rior Year


8.381


Exemption $167.62


This Year


8.219


$164.38


Increase/Decrease


(.162)


$ (3.24)


Decrease seen



In School Taxes


$80,00OHome $25,000
Exemption-


$460.95


$452.05,


$(8.09)


County is Eligible For


Storm Related Funds


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Jefferson County has qualified to
receive expanded funding from the
federal government to help pay for
the repair or replacement of public
property damaged by the most .re-
cent hurricane.
The Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency'(FEMA) last week an-
nounced this county's eligibility-for
the expanded funding, along with
Leon and Liberty counties. That
brings to 15 the number of Florida
counties that are now eligible for the
expanded federal assistance because
of Hurricane Dennis.
The 12 original counties eligible--
for the expanded funding were Bay,


Calhoun, Escambia, Franklin, Gulf,
Holmes, Monroe, Okaloosa, Santa
Rosa, Wakulla, Walton and Wash-
ington.
The expanded funding allows for'
the repair or replacement of
hurricane-damaged roads, bridges,
utilities, water-control facilities,
buildings, equipment, parks and rec-
reation areas.
The expanded assistance is in ad-
dition to t1e previously available
federal fuiidii fr eniergenc, serv-
ices and debri .removal. .
For projects that qualify for the
expanded assistance, FEMA pays 75
percent of the cost of the repair or
replacement and the state or local
governing entity must pay the other
-25 percent.
All told, Hurricane Dennis did ap-


proximately $100,000 worth of
damage here, according to the latest
assessment of Road Superintendent
David Harvey.
The damage, which was mostly
visited on the county's dirt roads,
was in the form of flooding and
washouts.
Dennis, a category 3 hurricane,
struck the Panhandle just east of
Pensacola a little more than two
weeks ago. But bands' from the hur-
ricane swept across the state as far
east as..Suawamnee C..ui, and b-,.
yond.' /
The county received' in the vicinity
of $155,000 from FEMA last year
for storm-caused damage, mostly to
dirt roads. Private insurance compa-
nies, meanwhile, paid more than $1
million to homeowners whose prop-
-erties were. damaged by the four
storms that swept the area last year.


State Funding
Falls $323,000

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The School Board recently ap-
proved advertisement of a tentative
budget which'will levy a total mil-
lage of 8.219, a decrease of .162
from 2004's millage of 8.381.
Finance Director Hal Wilson ex-
plained that this year's millage will
generate $3.6 million.
Total projected for general state
funding is $6,746,000, a decrease of
.$323,000 over 2004 funding of.


$7,069,000, attributed to a reduction
in student enrollment and a reduc-
tion in grants.
The capital outlay tax will gener-
ate $858,000, which will fund land
acquisition, furniture, equipment, re-
modeling and computers.
Wilson stressed that capital outlay
funds are categoricals. which, must
be used for items similar to the
above metnioned.
These funds cannot be used for
salaries.
Random examples of property
taxes based upon the decrease in
millage follow:
A property valued at $45,000, less
the $25,000 exemption, generates a
tax bill of $164.38, which is $3.24
less than in 2004.


Likewise, a property valued at
$80,000, less the $25,000
exemption, generates at tax bill of
$452.05, which is $8.09 less than
last year.
Wilson explained that the unre-
served fund balance for districts rec-
ommended by DOE is five percent,,
or roughly $500,000 for this district.
The unreserved fund balance for
this year is expected to be
$179,133.93.
DROP payouts this year are ex-
pected to be $150,000, Wilson said.
The proposed budget projects
slightly more income than expenses,
a reversal of the previous year when
expenses exceeded income.


Hopkin's Landing On Lake


Gets Replacement Co. sign


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Never-say-die Road Department
David Harvey appears determined to
upgrade Hopkin's Landing, no mat-
ter the obstacles.
Hopkin's Landing is a little known
public access point to Lake Micco-
sukee on the Jefferson County side
of the 6,000-plus acre lake. The
landing, in fact, is the only public
access to the lake on the Jefferson
County side.


A BULLDOZER sits in water several feet
deep at the rock pit in the south part of the
county, where the Road Department exca-


vates limerock for the repair of dirt r
The flooding is the result of Hurricane
nis. (Photo courtesy of Supt. David Har


Back in March, Harvey had his
crews construct and install a large
R sign on the site. The intent, accord-
ing to Harvey, was not only to iden-
tify. and give the landing a higher
visibility, but also to up the county's
involvement with the property.
Come the Easter weekend, how-
ever, a person -- or persons -- tore
down the newly-installed sign.
It's not the first time that signs
and other identifying markers have
Seen torn down, removed or de-
stroyed. The difference is that Har-
vey appears equally committed to
keeping the signs -- and the
oads. county's presence at the site -- up.
Den- On July 16, Harvey had his crews
vey) install a new sign at the landing. He
has since received feedback from at


-.-,, : -. o :. ,';: ..... :,'. ,- .. .

THIS SIGN replaces original sign, which some person or
persons tore down on Easter weekend.


least one citizen who appreciates the
county's efforts on behalf of keep-
ing the site open to the public.
County crews have been maintain-
ing the mile-long lane that leads to
Hopkin's Landing for at least five
years, according to Harvey. That in-
cludes picking up litter alongside
the lane and maintaining trash bar-
rels' at the site itself.
As Harvey envisions it, the scenic
woodland lane that leads to the land-
ing would make an excellent hiking
and biking trail. Harvey, in fact, has
been talking 'with Health Depart-


ment Director Kim Barnhill about
the possibility of seeking a grant
that would finance the creation of
such a hiking and biking trail.
"We have only one landing on
our side of the lake," Harvey says.
"I want to preserve it."
Hopkin's Landing is accessible
from West Lake Road. To get there,
travel west on the road, go past the
Ft. Chapel Church, and turn left on
the Hopkin's Landing Road.
West Lake Road, by the way, is in
the process of being paved. Harvey
reports that half mile of the road has
now been paved.


Cracker Cattle Embody


Florida's Early History


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Former Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture Doyle Conner takes spe-
cial pride in a small herd of 20 or so
native cattle that he keeps on his
650-acre horse-and-cattle ranch in
Jefferson County.
Not only do the cattle represent a
piece of Florida history that Conner
particularly cherishes, the very pres-
ervation of the native breed -is due in
large part to Conner's efforts when
he was commissioner of agriculture
between 1961 and 1991.
Indeed, but for Conner's initiative,
Cracker Cattle -- as the breed has
come to be called -- might well be


extinct today.
"When I, was a kid, native cows
still roamed on the open range in
Florida," recalls Conner, 76, who
grew up near the small town of
Starke in north Florida. "We lived in
the country and all the people had
what were then called scrub cattle or
piney wood cattle or Spanish cattle;
what's now called native Florida
cattle or Cracker Cattle. They were
nondescript, multicolored descen-
dants of Spanish cattle."
The counterpart of the better-
known Texas Longhorns, Cracker
Cattle are smaller in size and have
less extreme horn lengths. But they
are every bit as colorful in patterns
and as wily in the wild.
The name Cracker Cattle is a rela-


tively new moniker assigned the
breed, according to Conner. It de-
rives from the name of Florida pio-
neers, called Crackers because of
the long whips they employed in the
handling of cattle. It's recorded that
when these individuals popped their
whips, the sound carried for miles.
The Crackers used the whips to hunt
the cattle out of Florida's scrublands
and drive them to market.
It's a little known fact, given the
state's popular association with the
tourism industry, that Florida is and
has been cattle country far longer
than any other state in the Union, in-
cluding Texas. But Florida, in fact,
had the first-ever cattle in what is
now the United States.
(See Cracker Page 2)


-1 4


DOYLE CONNER, Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture from 1961 to 1991, checks on
one of 20 or so Cracker Cattle he keeps on
his 650-acre ranch near Lloyd. The cattle,


- 7 .;---. ,, .
.. ,
;: /' .-, .-. :
& .


descendants of Spanish cattle brought here
in the 1500s, roamed wild in the state until
the late 1940s. (News Photo)


Millage

$45,00OHome $25,000


I Im. --. ----


^ ..-. .*"








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005


Event Aims To Begin

Community Dialogue


,DOYLE CONNER with one of the several
:hundred horses he keeps on his ranch here.
Conner has downsized his cattle operation


Cracker
(Continued From Page 1)
According to the historians, Span-
0ih explorer Ponce de Leon brought
Andalusian cattle on his second trip
to Florida in 1521 -- 99 years before
the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth
Rock and 77 years before cattle
herds were established north of the
Rio Grande. It was the descendants
of these and other Spanish cattle that
later mixed with descendants of
English longhorns and ultimately
evolved into the small, hardy native
cattle -- a breed uniquely adapted to
Fl.uida's humid climate, parasites
6nd poor native forage.
o As late as the 1940s, these native
cajtIt roamed wild in Florida and
formed the basis of most cattle herds
in the state. Then fence laws enacted
in 1950, along with advances in vet-
prinary medicine and improved for-
age, allowed for the importation of
Brahman and Brahman crossbreeds,
which eventually swept the state and
significantly altered the genetic
rhakeup of the native cattle.
By the time Conner came to office
in 1961 (after serving 10 years in
the Legislature), native cattle were
well on their way to being bred out
of existence, with the exception of a
few isolated herds here and there.
"As agriculture commissioner, I
wrote a letter to the Florida Cattle-
mfen Association saying that the old
native cattle were fast disappearing
from the scene," Conner relates. "I
wanted the Cattlemen Association to
'tart a project to preserve them be-
fore it was too late."
In response to Conner and the Cat-
tlemen Association's efforts, de-
scendants of a Florida pioneer fam-
ily with the purest of native cattle
donated five heifers and a bull to the
jlorida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services in 1970 for
fhe preservation of the breed.


in recent years and is thinking of downsiz-
ing his horse operation also. (News Photo)


Cattle Embody


"We brought the five heifers and
bull up to the agriculture complex in
Tallahassee and kindly forgot about,
theo," Conner says. "Pretty soon,
we had a little herd established.
Later, when the numbers increased,
we moved them down to Withla-
coochee State Forest near Brooks-
ville."
Not satisfied with merely estab-
lishing a state-protected herd of na-
tive cattle, Conner lobbied for
establishment of an organization
that would dedicate itself to the
preservation and perpetuation of the
breed. His efforts led to the forma-
tion of the Florida Cracker Cattle
Breeders Association (FCCBA),
which sets the standards for native
cattle and selects the animals to be
registered as foundation stock for
the continuation of the breed. Since
its inception in 1988, the FCCBA
has registered more than 600 head
of cattle as foundation stock.
One of the highlights of Conner's
association with Cattle Cracker
came in 1995, during Florida's bi-
centennial celebration. As part of
the festivities honoring the 150th
year of statehood, participants from
the state's 67 counties reenacted an
1800s cattle drive, complete with
1,000 head of cattle, 500 trail riders
.and 30 wagons. Called the Great
Florida Cattle Driver, the event
lasted five days and covered' 70
miles, from the Bud Adams Ranch
near Yeehaw Juriction to the Silver
Spurs Rodeo Arena in Kissimmee.
"It looked real authentic," Conner
says. "I brought along a small herd
of my Cracker Cattle. I was there
the whole week, from Monday to
Saturday. I rode my horse a little,
but mostly I drove a wagon, giving
rides to the VIPs and other dignitar-
ies, including the Governor, mem-


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Passions
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Dear Fellow Workers in Christ,

Thank you for your ministry of love and dedication in the
North Florida Area. Living Fountain Ministries is
-sponsoring Passion's Pursuit Conference with Guest
SSpeaker Cherrie Kaylor from Gateway Vineyard Fellowship
of Coral Springs, Fl and Gobal Awakening's resource
team. To be held Thursday August 4th and Friday August
5th at 7 pm and Saturday August 6th at 10 am at New
Bethel AME Church of Monticello, FL. We would be
honored to have you and your congregation be apart of this
conference. The passion of our hearts is to pursue the Love
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Buy, Sell, Rent With A
Monticello News Classified


bers of the Cabinet and descendants
of pioneer families.
Since his retirement from public
office in 1991, Conner has mostly
dedicated himself to the .manage-
ment of his ranch. He keeps the
Cracker Cattle as a reminder of his
and the Florida cattle industry's
heritage.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

An idea that has long been in the
works is finally about to be put into
action.
At the initiation of the Chamber of
Commerce, elected officials from
the .city, the county and the school
district are scheduled to meet 6 p.m.
Thursday for a roundtable discus-
sion of sorts. The topic of discussion
will be "Increasing School Enroll-
ment as a Means to Economic De-
velopment".
The purpose of the discussion, ac-
cording to the event's promoters, "is
to begin a dialogue, develop ideas,
and hopefully, (plant) the seeds for a
plan of action to increase public
school enrollment."

Selected members of the business
community, moreover, will also be
invited to be part of the "think tank
aind strategy session," according to
the promoters.

"The participation and input of all
three bodies of local government is
critical to the success of this initia-
tive," states the chamber commu-
-niqu6. "And the Chamber of-
Commerce anticipates their enthusi-
astic response to this first intergov-
ernmental effort."
Needless to say, the public is in-'


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP TO WHICH THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED

Date: August 1, 2005
Time: 5:00 p.m.
Place: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Bldg.

SUBJECT: District Assistance Plus Plan and
Jefferson Elementary School School Improvement Plan
- -- --w** ...-(>>>ww>**lw>w- -- -. .


vited to attend the discussion, wnicn
will include a brief public comment
segment.
The event will be held at Willow
Pond Plantation, located at Willow
Pond Road, about a mile north of
town off US Highway 19.


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL MEETING TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED

Date: August 1, 2005
Time: Immediately Following the 6:00 Public
Hearing on the Budget
Place: Desmond M. Bishop Administation Bldg.

RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. District Assistance Plus Plan and Jefferson Elementary
School School Improvement Plan for Approval


Your Newspaper

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005 PAGE 3


Lamont Church Construction

Going Fast Despite Setbacks


A AL'-


i i !- s

g,; ~ ,SF. 1,.- -. :


it... 2..


CONSTRUCTION rapidly taking shape at La-
mont Baptist Church. Foundation was


poured two weeks ago, and trusses were ex-
pected to go up Friday. (News Photo)


State Gives School Dist. 'D' Average


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

State officials reports the District
School grade as a "D."
The "D" is calculated by averag-
ing the grades of the individual
schools, released in June, based on
student performance on the FCAT.
Grades for District Schools were:
Jefferson Elementary School, "F;"
Howard Middle School, "C;" and
Jefferson County High School, "D."
Comparing the current District
School Grades to those of 2004:
. Jefferson Elementary School fell
from a "C," which it held for two
years, to an "F."
Howard Middle School rose to a
"C," after two years of "D" grades.
Jefferson County High School is
off the "F" list, with a "D" grade
this year.
Following the resignation of JCHS


I


Principal Michael Bryan, to accept
an assistant principal position in
Tallahassee, Chalmus Thomas has
-been hired as principal.
Former JES Principal Kathy Joy-
ner, has been named Director of
Technical Support Services, replac-
ing Billy Epting, who resigned to
accept a position in Leon County.
Sandra Collins has been hired as-
principal of JES.
During the summer, tutoring for
students scoring at Level I (lowest
level) on the FCAT in Reading, has
been ongoing in a program fflnded
by the State.

While the State did not fund a
similar program in Math, the Dis-
trict has funded tutoring in Math for
students scoring at Level I on the
FCAT.
Currently principals at all three
schools are meeting with their staffs
to discuss personnel assignments


and methods and materials to help
students improve their FCAT scores
in the coming school year.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


After a 15 month of setbacks
since the church was destroyed by
fire, construction at Lamont Baptist
is moving along rapidly.
About two weeks ago the founda-
tion was poured and immediately
after the concrete hardened, decora-
tive block walls began to go up.
To date, all of the outer block
walls have been completed and
spokesman Gerald Bailey said
Wednesday afternoon that .they ex-
pected to have the crane come in
and start placing the trusses, on Fri-
day.
'.'The construction is going full-
steam," said Bailey. "There's a lot
of excitement going on."
He said that they have already ac-
quired the shingles and theN have
located the windows and doors re-,
quired for the building.
The main fear ofThe congregation
is not having enough funds to fi-


nance completing the project.
"We have enough for most of it,"
said Bailey, "but we don't wish to
go over budget."
Presently the possibilities of ei-
ther having the Campers on Mis-
sion, the group who comes south
every year for the fall and winter
months to build churches and fel-
lowship halls, and who built the
Elizabeth Baptist Fellowship Hall
nearly two years ago, or even ac-


quiring the assistance of a team of
men from the Middle Florida Bap-
tist Association, to finish the inte-
rior, are under consideration.
"A lot of them are carpenters and
blue collar workers with a lot of ex-
perience," Bailey added.
He said that the Lamont Baptist
Fire Fund is still active at Farmers
and Merchants Bank, and all dona-
tions are appreciated.


1 ,Adopt Tentative Millage Rate Resolution for 2005-2006
2. Adopt the Tentative Budget Resolution







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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
August 1, 2005 6:00 p.m.

PURSUANT TO PROVISIONS OF SECTION 1011.03 OF
THE FLORIDA STATUTES, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BY THE
DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA ON AUGUST 1, 2005 AT 6:00 P.M. IN THE
DESMOND M. BISHOP ADMINISTRATION BUILDING,
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Parents Need Facts

"On Underage Drinking


Some parents may believe it's a
good idea to host a party and let
their teens and teens' friends drink
at home but these parents might
benefit from more facts about the le-
gal issues surrounding underage
drinking.
1 According to a new survey, con-
Oucted by Kelton Research and
commissionedd by Miller Brewing
Company, 88 percent of parents say
they don't know everything they
need to know about the legal conse-
quences of underage drinking for
their teens.
"Parents need to familiarize them-
selves with their role and the poten-
pial liabilities involved," said Chuck
Canterbury, president of the Na-
tional Fraternal Order of Police.
"Sadly, some parents and older
adults still believe underage drink-
ing of alcohol is a rite pf passage or
is okay as long as the car keys are
taken away. These beliefs send kids
mixed and dangerous messages."
The survey explored the issue of
underage drinking for parents and
teens.
"We wanted to know what was
missing from prevention education,"


said Diane Wagner, Miller Brewing
Responsibility Initiatives manager.
"This survey gives us insights to
create programs that directly and ef-
fectively reach parents."
The survey reveals that 55 percent
of parents believe their kids "defi-
nitely don't drink," although re-
search says at least 64 percent of
tenth graders have tried alcohol.
"Studies show most minors get al-
cohol from noncommercial sources..
Parents need to be aware and honest
with themselves about what is hap-
pening in their own homes what
alcohol is in the house and what 21-
year-old siblings on college break
may be providing to younger friends
and siblings," said Kari Kinnard,
state executive director, Wisconsin
Mothers Against Drunk Driving.
Miller's Respect 21 program is de-
signed to help prevent underage ac-
cess and promote responsible
decision-making with parents and
teens. ., I. ,
Specifically, "Let's Talk and Let's
Keep Talking" help parents open a
dialogue about alcohol with younger
children and then continue that con-
versation with their teens.


From 'Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
July 19, 1995
Commissioners are seriously con-
sidering an increase in the fire tax to
generate enough money to make the
Fire Department self supporting.
Commissioners have a bone to
pick with representatives of Sprint-
Centel.
The county may yet get an en-
hanced 911 system.
TWENTY YEARS
July 17, 1985
On Sunday night, 225 black resi-
dents met and decided they will not
boycott Jefferson County High
School, but instead will withdraw
black athletes from the school.
Gov. Bob Graham has signed an
executive order suspending City
Councilman Bailey Sloan from of-
fice. The July 3 order indicated the
action was taken because on July 2
the state charged Sloan with one
count of carrying a concealed
weapon and one count of aggravated
assault.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
July 17, 1975
Three members of the Jefferson
County 4-H Trailriders won awards
at the Florida State Horse Show held
on Sat., July 12, at Ocala. They were
Jennifer Yaun, Bookey Salas and


Stan Monroe.
John Cobb, son of Mr. And Mrs.
James Cobb of Monticello is the
happy owner of a new bicycle do-
nated to the AFS fundraising cam-
paign held during the Watermelon
Festival..
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 16, 1965
Mrs. T. L. Clarke entertained the
members of her bridge club at a
bridge-luncheon last Thursday at her
home on South Waukeenah Street.
Bernard Alligood was in Jackson-
ville Thursday and Friday f6r his
physical for the Army.
Mr. And Mrs. Stan Arline of San-
ford visited over the weekend with
their parent, Mr. And Mrs. Tom Ar-
liine and Mr. And Mrs. J.C. Nix.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 15, 1955
Peggy Wells was crowned Queen
of the Watermelon Festival by the
previous year's Queen, Marie De-
mott.
Nate Curtis, Mack Wright, Jimmie
Griffin and Shelly Plymale held a
weekend reunion in Munich, Ger-
many. The boys were all serving in
the Army and stationed near
Munich.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
July, 1945


From Our Photo File


66r


FIRST BABY of 1990 was Kevin
born Jan. 3 to Gary and Victoria
Grandparents are Frances and Ben


Hodges,
Hodges.
Lindsey,


and Betty and Jim Hodges. L-R: Victoria
Hodges, Kevin, and Jennifer Hodges. (News
File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Aging Is
Older fellow in our office notched
another birthday so the obligatory
card came around for me to sign.
I gave it to him straight. I said de-
spite the wheezing, drooling, drip-
ping, mumbling, groaning, 'and
shuffling caused by his advanced
age, I was glad he was on the staff.
He got a good laugh out of what I.
wrote.
Truth is, this aging business is
kinda interesting. It sneaks up on
you and blind sides you. Stuff hap-
pens.
Although I am not oldid enough, at
least I don't think I'm old enough, I
have discovered stuff happening like
waking Lip in the morning with a
sore knee.
I get .-LI ofbed a d limp 'd.rd'' "h
hall wondering what it was I did in
my sleep that was making my knee


Same thing happened with my
.. ,


necK.
One mtoming, I discovered it hurt
to turn my head. What is this? I
wondered.
So, I am increasingly sensitive to
the perils of age.
There is a 93 year old woman in
my church who is remarkably spry
and alert. Everybody admires this


a
t


11
f

1
d


Interesting Journey


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cih/ion


amazing woman.
When my neck was malfunction-
ing and it hurt to turn my head, I
:houili about her. I wondered if her
neck hurt from time to time. If it
does, she.never mentions it.
I finally had surgery to remove a
herniated disc. At this writing, my
neck is fine.
Funny thing about the operation
on my neck was I discovered I was
allergic to the surgical bandage and
had the dandiest rash on my neck
or a couple of weeks.,
The thing about a rash is people
ook at you funny. I guess they won-
der if it is contagious.
I went back to work a week. after


Investors Need
Investors' general lack of knowl- temative Minimum Tax and less
edge was one of many topics dis- than one third know about tax man-
cussed recently by a panel hosted by aged investing.
Boston-based asset manager Eaton' This lack of investor knowledge
Vance. has repeatedly shown up in Eaton
The panel of behavioral finance, ;Vance's investor surveys.
economic, tax and capital markets "With the.growth of defined con-
experts discussed a range of issues t'ribution pension plans, and now
facing investors, including tax re- with the President's proposal to cre-
form, social security, the national ate private Social Security accounts,
deficit, single stock concentration, the American worker is being in-
capital markets performance, infla- ,creasingly required to make invest-
tion, retirement readiness and other ment' decisions that are going to
personal finance issues. determine his or her standard of liv-
The panelists addressed leaders in ing in retirement. I think a lot of
the investment management industry Americans are neither psychologi-,
who attended the event. cally nor educationally well pre-
According to the sixth annual in- pared to make these decisions,"
vestor survey commissioned by Ea- stated Terry Odean, a member of the
ton Vance, investors say that the tax panel and an associate professor of
implications of their investments are finance at the Haas School of Busi-
important to them; however, inves- npess at the University of California,
tors' actual level of knowledge 'Berkeley.
about the subject is low. In addition, many investors are
Nearly one in four surveyed are making investment choices that may
unaware of current tax rates, more :not be the wisest decisions.
than half are unfamiliar with the Al- Citing the survey as an example,


surgery and endured the rash and
stares.
The only telltale sign of my neck
problem is a scar from the surgery. I
can't see the back of my neck so T
don't think about the scar .
However, one day at the beach, a
youngster walked up behind me and
asked, "Mister, did they put some-
thing in your neck?"
At first, I couldn't imagine what
he was talking about and then it
dawned on me he was looking at the
scar.
I told him, "No, they took some-
thing out." That seemed to satisfy
him 'cause he ran over to his mother
and reported what I.said.
I don't know for sure, but I think


Education


Odean advises against preferring to
hold municipal bonds in a qualified
plan rather than in a taxable
account, such as 39% of respondents
said they currently do.
"I think we need to' provide a basic
level of education about investments
for Americans. Individual Ameri-
cans are going to have to make these
very critical decisions on their own,
whereas the previous generations
had many of these decisions made
for them. Most people were in de-
fined benefit plans and the corporate
treasurer was making investment de-
cisions. Things are different for in-
vestors today," Odean affirmed.
Duncan W. Richardson, senior
vice president and chief equity in-
vestment officer of Eaton Vance
Management, as well as portfolio,
manager of Eaton Vance Tax-
Managed Portfolio, believes that
education on investing should start
in the early years. "24/7 availability
of financial news, several years of


she began staring at my neck.
Not too long ago I heard from a
long lost friend. I inquired about his
father.
He said his father was fine but "he
falls down a lot."
I admit I didn't know quite what
to say to this.
By my calculations, his father
must be in his late 80's -or early
90's. So it's nice he's still around to
fall down.
I have noticed older people do
pretty well, for the most part. They
may drool a little, mumble and
wheeze, but they get where they
want to go.
One old fellow shocked his family
at the age of 92, he announced he
was planning a trip to Poland, the
country of his ancestors.
His children did their best to dis-
suade him. "You'll fall down," they
said. "You'll forget to take your
medicine. Who will take care of
your laundry? What happens if you
get sick?"
The old man was not convinced.
He went to Poland for a couple of
weeks and had a great time. His kids
were a nervous wreck, but he was
fine.
So what that he drooled and
wheezed a little!


improved disclosure and new regu-
lations have done little to save typi-
cal investors from themselves. If
given to our children before they en-
ter the work force, a "No Investor
Left Behind" course that covers
some basic principles to follow and
potholes to avoid could improve
each investor's chance of lifetime
success," said Richardson.
The dialogue was based on the re-
sults and implications of Eaton
Vance's sixth annual survey, a de-
tailed study of attitudes and prac-
tices about investing. The poll was
conducted among 1,000 U.S. resi-
dence who have invested in both
qualified retirement plans and in-
vestments outside of qualified retire-
ment plans (stock mutual funds,
bond mutual funds, individual
stocks, individual bonds, variable
annuities and money market funds).
This study was conducted by
Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates,
Inc. For Eaton Vance Corp. during
the third week of November 2004.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.
500 words or less.


P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


Hospice Provides Many Services


BY CATHERINE ARNOLD
Community Relations

"I never realized what hospice
was all about until I was confronted
with a mother's worst nightmare.
The doctor diagnosed my son's dif-
ficulty breathing as a life-
threatening lung disease. Doctor af-
ter doctor told us that our
wonderful, full-of-life fifteen year-
old was going to die. They told us
that there was no hope. As I col-


lapsed in the 'arms of a neighbor
sobbing my heartbreak, she gently
asked if I had thought of calling
hospice. Of course not, my son did
not have cancer, plus he was only
fifteen not an old person! Hospice
wasn't for him."
Tragic. So many patients and
families suffer at the end of life sim-
ply because they do not know that
help and hope are as close as a
phone call to Big Bend Hospice.
Many people do not realize that


the only criterion for admission is a
medical diagnosis that the patient
has less than a year to live, if the
disease follows a normal course.
Fortunately, the neighbor insisted
that this young mother call Big
Bend Hospice and she found the
support that was needed to help her
son and her family through this dif-
ficult journey.
Big Bend Hospice was there to
add more life to his days when doc-
tors and medicine could no longer
add days to his life.


Big Bend Hospice, a community-
based nonprofit organization
founded in 1983 by local volunteers
looking for a better way to care for
their loved ones at the end of life,
provides services to those in our lo-
cal area Jefferson, Madison,
Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty,
Gadsden and Leon counties.
Last year Big Bend Hospice
served more than 15,000 patients
and their families. in our eight-
county Big Bend region. Anyone
(See Hospice Page 5)








. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005 PAGE 5

Hospice Providers


(Continued From Page 4)
with a life-limiting illness is ac-
cepted without regard to age, race,
sex, nature of illness, national origin
or ability to pay.
When a patient is accepted for
hospice care, a Big Bend Hospice
team is assigned to work with the
patient and the patient's family. In
addition to the patient's personal
physician, a hospice nurse, a social
worker, a home health aide, and if
the family wishes, a chaplain, a mu-
sic therapist and trained volunteers
become the patient's care team.
This team works together to alle-
viate not only the physical pain and
symptoms associated with. the termi-
nal illness, the team provides emo-
tional, spiritual and psychological
support for the patient and family
members.
Each team has a local medical di-
rector who is experienced in end-of-
life care. In our community, Dr.
John MacKay serves as the local
medical director for Jefferson
County.
Confronted by a life-limiting diag-
nosis, the patient, the family and
loved-ones need the specialized
services that can help the patient en-
sure that wishes and goals for the
end of life are supported and that the-
patient is comfortable enough to en-
joy as much as possible the time left
with family and friends.


Big Bend Hospice offers unique
services that have far-reaching bene-
fits for the patient. One such service
is music therapy.
Board certified music therapists
work with the patient to help reduce
pain and increase the patient's well-
being through the therapeutic use of
music.
From relaxation to memory recall,
the music therapists develop pro-
grams to meet patient-specific
needs.
While most patients remain in
their homes, and many are able to
enjoy their daily routines within the
limits of their illnesses, some pa-
tients find it is not possible to stay at
home. For those patients, Big Bend
Hospice offers Hospice House.
Hospice House is a place for
short-term crisis care when 24-hours
medical support is required. This
homelike setting provides critical
patient care for problems like ag-
gressive treatment for pain control,
respiratory distress that has become
unmanageable and complex wound
care.
Hospice House also teaches the
family about complex medications
and treatments and offers a tranisi-
tion between hospital to home, nurs-
ing home or assisted living facility.
As a nonprofit organization, Big
Bend Hospice depends on commu-
nit5 support for all non-.
reimbursable expenses.


FELINE PAIR seeks loving home. Checkers, Both kittens are fun loving and playful.
left, and Gopher, right are Pets of Week. (News photo)
Mole, center has already been adopted.


Humane Society Members

Brainstorm Fundraising Ideas


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Fundraising was the major topic
of discussion at the recent com-
bined general and Board of Dirc-
tors meeting of the Humane Soci-
ety:
President Caroline Carswell re-
minded members of the need for
the fundraisers to enable the shelter
to run smoothly.
She said the most profitable of
all fundraisers has been the now.
annual "Bless the Beast Feast."
Members Jane Cleveland pro-
duced an article she located about
the Tallahassee animal shelter con-
ducting a large garage sale and re-
quiring donations.
"We-can do something like that,"
she added.
Members agreed that it would be
a good idea. One member suggestt-
ing that it may be a good idea to
also host a fish fry as the American
Legion does iiiinuall', during their
sale. .
"Let's find out when the Legion'
is 'hosting ,theirs, we don't want,
ours ,to conflict with theirs," said,
Carswell. She asked Cleveland to
oversee the event and Cleveland
agreed.
Carswell also advised that she
would need an average of six
weeks to properly prepare the event
and take up donations. They agreed
that the sale would be conducted in
either the end of Oct. or the begin-
ning of Nov.
Cleveland is leaning toward the
date of Nov. 5 as a. possibility for
the event.
Anyone interested in donating
items for the sale .can contact'
Cleveland at 997-3841., ,
Additional brainstorming during
the meeting included Martha Ca-
nady suggesting that the shelter_


.sponsor an Arts and Crafts show.,
"I know the art community well,"
said Canady. "I coordinated it
when the Lloyd Community Trust
did it and it made a lot of money-.
She added that all shelter mem-
bers had, to do was determine a
place to hold the event and sell the
spaces
The individual artists would pro-
vide their own tents, tables and re-
quired items.,
Members agreed that the event
,would be best held in the Spring,
and Canady agreed to coordinate
it.
Martha Jean Martin suggested the
sale of Humane Society T-shirts
during adoption booths and other
events. '.'It would be great to get
the kids in the community
involved," said Martin.
"We can have the kids draw ani-
mal related art, Eero.%ne loves
lhai." she added. "Then we can
award prizes for first, second and
third place winners'"

Lane Closure

on -10 Wed.

Florida Department of Transporta-
tion alerts motorists of a temporary
lane closure on 1-10 at the Aucilla
River Bridge, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Wednesday.
Motorists traveling eastbound on
1-10, near the Jefferson/Madison
County line will encounter delays.
Weather permitting, Peavy Con-
strution crews will make asphalt re-
pairs in both eastbound lanes at the
Aucilla River Bridge approach, near
mile marker 234.
One lane of traffic will be main-
tained.


Martin said the winners picture
could be-used on the T-shirts and
they-could even have all submitted
art work printed on a calendar,
Christmas cards, thank you notes
and other related items and sell
them.
Members were fond of the idea
and suggested that Martin and Tina
Ames work on it together.
Caroline Carswell added that she
would coordinate the "Bless the
Beast Feast", a chicken and iib din-
ner sale,'a trail ride on her property
and mentioned the possibility of a
tractor raffle.
At the conclusion of the meeting,
members agreed that they were all
going to be very busy coordinating
these worthwhile events to benefit
the homeless animals at the shelter.
Anyone wishing to assist with
these events, make donations to-
N\ ard an, of them or requiring addi-
tionfal information can contact the
shelter at 342-0244


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With school opening on the hori-
zon, the American Optometric As-
sociation stresses the need for
regular screening.
While most schools offer vision
screenings periodically, these tests
are not adequate because they are
generally not administered by op-
tometrists, focus on visual acuity
(clarity at a distance) and few
schoolsffteste'er, ear :
The American Foundation For
Vision Awareness (AFVA) reports
that school screening systems only
identify one out of every four chil-
dren who have vision problems.
To succeed in' the classroom,
children must be able to do more
than simply read the background
from 20 'feet away (the standard
gauge in the Snellen test most often
used in eye screenings).
Many learning tasks involve up
close reading that requires a variety
of focusing, scanning, and visual
coordination skills to make sense of
the words on the paper or computer
screen.
Since vision is a learned skill,
children with vision problems often
are not aware of them because they_

County

Represented

At Convention
Jefferson County Farmer, Ernest
Fulford, of Fulford Farms, repre-
sented the County Farm Bureau at
the Young Farmers and Ranchers
Convention at Walt Disney World.
As the Farm Bureau recognizes
the need to provide opportunities for
educational and leadership develop-
ment for younger members, the
Young Farmers and Ranchers Pro-
gram is designed to provide a con-
tinuous source of leadership for the
agricultural industry.
Mason Smoak, president of the
group, relates: "As agriculturists, we
understand the value of the Ameri-
can farmer, and the role of agricul-
ture as it relates to our nation's
national security, health, environ-
nment, and economy."

Please

volunteer

today.


Muscular
Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis,
'National Chairman
'1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


lack a frame of reference for their
experience.
Early detection is important be-
cause the sooner treatment begins,
the greater a child's chance of de-
veloping normal vision., Some
signs to look for are:
Complaints of only being able
to read for brief periods of time.
Headaches, eye strain,, nausea,
dizziness or motion sickness.
Double vision.,
Holding books or other items
unusually close to the face.
Closing ,one eye or covering itv
with a hand when reading. '
Twisting or tilting the head to
favor one eye.
Tiring easily after short reading
sessions and/or rubbing the eyes.
Using a finger, when reading
and/or often losing his/her place.
Poor eye-hand coordination.
Excessive blinking or squinting.
One eye drifting in a different
direction, even if this only happens
when the child is tired or stressed.
Poor reading comprehension.
Disorganization and frustration
when studying visual information.
Difficulty remembering spell-
ing words.
Inability to stay on task.
'Vision screening by an optome-
trist can help identify the specific
.problem and correct it.



Anef iiHer
Asocato



i t l


Feline Pair

Adoptable

Pets Of Week
The Humane Society has named
,"Checkers" and "Gopher" as its
adoptable feline Pets of the Week.
They are both females, approxi-
mately four months old, and have
been spayed, with all vaccinations
up to date.
Checkers is a black and white do-
mestic short haired cat, and Gopher
is a tortoiseshell tricolor calico with
long hair.
Both are described as being very
playful and longing for love and at-
tention. When the shelter has visi-
tors; kittens reach through the bars
to gain attention.
To. adopt one or both of these
kittens, or any of the other many
animals at the shelter, call 342-
0244.



Women's Health
-Centers of North
Florida

located at
1702 S. Jefferson St.,
Perry, FL 850-223-1744
now has a second location at
1885 Professional Park
Circle, Suite 60 in
Tallahassee, FL
850-421-7600.
We have been providing
'quality health service to the
Taylor, Jefferson, Madison,
Suwannee and Dixie Counties
since 2003.
Please call us to schedule
your next appointment if
you're in need of care in your
pregnancy or for woman's
health care issues.
We look forward to serving you.


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba
V IT o F 1-( vine/
jY 620 York St, P.O. Box 425,
^ y ,'Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall -William Tillman -Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets




L N p gp p A


LIMITED TIME
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---, gEE DEALER
FOR DETAILS


C COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
O E..WT- INCLUDES:
Normal Installation
SM115.00 6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas
LJ

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


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Call Today: 850-309-0800
Come visit our Showroom in the Royal Oak Plaza
1989 Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee, FL 32308
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When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous--healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a


strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844



Vision Screenings


Help Kids Succeed


Monticello Christian Academy
Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
--Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005


Lifestyle


Rev., Mrs. Henry Griffin

Retirement Banquet Set


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Quincy District Retirement
Committee will host a retirement
banquet for Rev. Henry Griffin, pre-
siding elder, of the Quincy District
of the Florida Conference of the
llth Episcopal District of the Afri-
can Methodist Episcopal Church,
and his wife Alberta Griffin, dis-
trict's consultant.
The semi-formal banquet takes
place 7 p.m., Friday, Aug. 5 at the
Quincy Conference Center.
Contact members of the Retire-
ment Committee below for tickets.
The couples itinerant ministry be-



Christian Cer

Participants

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tri-County Ministries, also known
as Harvest Christian Center, is plan-
ning a Food Giveaway in October.
The group is involved in minis-
tries in Jefferson, Madison, and
Taylor counties and wishes to en-
courage residents of surrounding
counties to participate in this event.
Plans 'are to make this event a
community fun day, and have tents
set up for the purpose of promoting
children's health and safety, health,


Homes of


Clark McKinnon Joiner Jr.
Mr. Carl McKinnon "Mack"
Joiner Jr., age 63, he was a self em-
ployed farmer. He died Friday, July
22, 2005' at Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital, Florida.
Funeral Services were held Sun-
.day, July 24, 2005 at Elizabeth Bap-
itist Church beginning at 3:00 p.m.
:Family received friends after the
:service at the church.. Donations
can be made to Big Bend Hospice:
1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahas-
see, FL 32308-5428.
Mack was a native of Monticello,
Fl. He has been a lifelong resident
of Jefferson County. He was of the
Methodist Faith and a member of
First Methodist Church of Monti-
cello.
He is survived by his wife Patricia
Ann Joiner of Monticello; 2 sons,
Carl M. "Ken" Joiner III wife Leslie
of Madison, FL, and Cole Joiner of
Monticello, FL; 1 daughter, Jessie
Joiner, of Monticello; 1 brother,
Don Joiner, of Monticello; 3 grand-
children, Jennifer Walker, Bo
Joiner, and Brooke Joiner.
William "Will" Morris
William "Will" Morris, age 80, of
Tampa, FL. died July 20, 2005 in
Tampa, FL.
Morris was a native of Jefferson
County and lived in Tampa for
many years.
He was the son of the late Rosetta
and Perman Morris.


gan at Elizabeth AME Church, Jen-
nigs, FL, some 40 years ago.
Since then, they have served New
Bethel AME Church, Monticello;
Old Greenville AME Church, Ash-
ville; Mt. Pleasant AME, Dills Com-
munity; New Bethel AME Church,
Quincy; Greater Tanner Chapel,
AME' Church, Quincy; St. John
AME Church, St. John's Commu-
nity, and St. James AME Church,
Quincy.
Serving on the Quincy Retirement
Committee are: the Reverends
Elizabeth Yates, M. Div Chair; Wil-
lie Hagan, co-chair; Clifton Riley,
Helen Johnson-Robinson, Louisa
Thomas, Marque-Woodard, and Sis-
ter Patricia Gallon.


enter Seeks

In Fun Day
screening for high blood pressure
and diabetes, the Red Cross Safety
nmbile, and similar community
sponsored programs.
Also planned are activities for
children such as face painting, ring
toss, and the like.
Groups, organizations, and
churches, are sought to join in an ef-
fort to make the event fun and in-
formative.
Contact' Becca at 997-8856 to set
up a meeting to answer any ques-
tions about becoming involved in
this or other events connected with
Tri-County Ministries.


Mourning


He is survived by his wife Louiese
Morris and children of Tampa, FL.;
1 brother, Virgel Morris of Auburn,
NY.; 2 sisters, Susie Morris of Mon-
ticello, FL. and Maggie Mickens of
Tallahastee, FL.; a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, and sorrowing
friends.
Funeral services will be Saturday,
July 30, 11:00 a.m. at Progress M.B.
Church, in Tampa, FL. Wilson Fu-
neral home is handling arrange-
ments in Tampa, FL.
John Richard Mays
John Richard Mays, 64, of Green
Cove Springs, FL passed away July
19, 2005.
John served in the U.S. Air Force
for eight years and retired from Fed-
eral Civil Service in 1995.
He is survived by a sister, Lois
Betty Mays; brother-in-law, Bodo
Zukierski; nieces, Terry Eashoo, Ce-
lia Johnson, Susan Phillips, Dana
Zukierski, Mary Harris, Beth
Powner, and Peggy Harris; nephew,
John Harris; several great-nieces
and great-nephews.
Funeral services in celebration of
his life were held at 1:00 p.m..Satur-
day, July 23, 2005 in the chapel at
Jacksonville Memory Gardens, Fu-
neral Home, 111 Blanding Blvd.,
Orange Park, FL.
Interment was held from', the grave-
side at 10:00 a.m. Monday, July.25,
2005 at Roselawn Cemetery in
Monticello, FL -.


Special Public Announcement

By the Monticello/Jefferson Chamber of Commerce
Our three local government bodies have been invited to a
public meeting. The subject of the meeting is

"Increasing School Enrollment as a Means to
Economic Development".

The meeting will be at Willow Pond
at 398 Willow Pond Road, Monticello
On July 28, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.
We expect members of the Monticello City Council,
Jefferson County Commission and Jefferson County School
Board to be Present. The public and the Press are invited to
observe.
For further information, contact the
Chamber of Commerce at 997-5552



In Case Of Emergency,


Dial 911


REV. AND MRS. HENRY GRIFFIN


AMANDA CONNELL AND ANDREW TAYLOR


Amanda Connell To

Marry Andrew Taylor


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Jacquie and Wade Connell of Wa-
cissa announced the upcoming mar-
riage of their daughter Jessi Amanda
"Mandy" Connell to Andrew Wil-
liam Taylor.
Her grandparents are Dona and
Edgar Connell of Wacissa.
Taylor is the son of Col. William
"Roger" Taylor of Oak Creek, CO,
and Peggy Stillwell of Tallahassee.
The bride elect is a graduate of
Florida State University School.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tri-County Foster Parents Asso-
ciation, Inc. (TCFPAI) is once again
collecting back-to-school supplies
for the foster 'children in their pro-
gram.
A collection box has been set up
inside the Winn Dixie Store.
Tommy Wilson, spokesperson for
the group, says that a representative
for the group will pick up the items
in the box weekly.
He can also be contacted at 838-
2815 to make arrangements for pick
up.


stro
the
age
the

The
and
thei


TCFPAI includes the counties of
SJefferson, Madison, and Taylor.
Receiving new school supplies
helps foster children develop a feel-
ing of self worth and a sense of con-
fidence. The items they receive are
appreciated, and the children are
proud to have their own new school
supplies.
Mosi of these children come into .'
foster care with nothing other then
the clothes on'their backs.
All school items are needed, in-
cluding backpacks, pencils, calcula-
tors, notebooks, journals, and the
like.
\\ilson can also be contacted for
meeting dates and information on f .,..
upcoming events and other fundrais- .
ers
Because TCFPAI is growing
A
Agency On Aging John
urda
TO Meet July 28 Gua
The Area Agency on Aging for ,Par
A'
North Florida,. Inc. wil. hold 'its
Board of Directors meeting, 10:30 July
a m, Thursday, July 28 at 2414 Ma- 110
han Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Interested partiesI are encouraged 7-159
to attend the meeting.
m,) 4*' w Aw^T ..' .- H sii


ng in the Jefferson County area,
group is looking for a local stor-
area for collections throughout
year.
"This is all about the children.
ey need their community's help
support at this difficult time in
r lives," adds Wilson.





A


PASTOR V.J. JOHNSON
k funeral service for Pastor V. JL
nson will take place 1 p.m; Sat-
ay, July 30, at the .National
ird Armory; 2049 Pat Thomas
kway, Quincy, FL.
A '.i e ing '. ill be held 5-7 p m.,
y 29 at Betsey Funeral Home,
S. 9th Street, Quincy.
' Memorial.Service will be held
p.m., July 29, at Harvest Center,
9 Springhollow Rd, Monticello.


I



The groom elect is a graduate of
Mountain View High School in
Mountain View, WY, and Flagler
College. He served in the US Air
Force.
Both are employed by the Leon
County Sheriffs Department.
The wedding is planned for 6:00
p.m. Saturday, Ailg. 6, 2005, at the
Wacissa Pentecostal Holiness
Church, in Wacissa.
A Reception will follow at the
church.
No local invitations were sent but,
all family and friends are cordially
invited to join the celebration.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005 PAGE 7


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005 PAGE 9
'mW* i-9


Monroe Family Ministry



'Porch De Salomon'



Planned In Guatemala


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Monroe Family, of Wau-
keenah has been involved in mis-
sion work, dating back to the
1980's, when Betty Monroe many
mission trips to Haiti.
This planted the seed with her
oldest son, Lloyd to carry out such
work with his family.
With his wife, Melanie, and chil-
dren Daniel and Asa, Lloyd will de-
part for Guatemala, Aug. 18, to
undertake their multifaceted minis-
try, "Porch de Salomon."
Their brochure explains that
Christ worked in "Solomon's
Porch," (John 10), as described in
Acts 5, as a place for believers to
meet for ministry, and a sending
point for them to take Christ's mes-
sage into the world.
Joining the Monroes in this minis-
try are Lloyd's sister Suzanne
Smith, and her husband Bill, who
,,left Sunday for Guatemala.
The two families, along with their
friend, Mark Ford, are leaving their
i homes and jobs to do missionary
work in Panajachel, Guatemala.
Lloyd is a successful trial lawyer
with the firm of Coppins, Monroe,
Adkins, Dincman, and Spellman, in
STallahassee.
The Smiths own the Higher
Grounds Cafe, where they operate
Solomon's Coffee and Tea Com-
pany. They roast their own coffee
beans which are sold in restaurants
and health food stores.
Monroe describes their mission
group as an organism, because it
constantly grows and changes, and
,.challenges other Christians to be
'obedient and do whatever God calls
them to do.
"I've not always been obedient,"
Monroe said.
His wife, Melanie, went to Cuba
in 1999, and the couple returned to
Cuba in 2000 to visit a sister church
Sof their home church, Waukeenah
United Methodist.


"We saw what we .thought Chris-
tians should be," he said.
"Cuba is lively, daring and fun,"
Melanie said. "We hope to bring a
little of that contemporary service to
Gautemala.
It was while working in Guate-
mala with the Smiths, who moved
there in 2001 to perform missionary
work with the poor in Panajachel,
that Lloyd became aware of what he
called the "expatriate" community.
These are the many Anglo-
Americans who have fled there for
whatever reason.
When he learned that no one was
serving these people, he devised the
plan for "Porch de Salomon."
The two families received permis-
sion to use an abandoned United
Methodist Church building, where
they will hold worship services and
house missionary teams.
The Monroes will use primarily
their own financial assets for living
expenses, and will rent out their pas-
ture and an apartment over their
barn.
Patricia and David Morrissey will
rent the apartment, and manage the
coffee business to fund the Smith's
expenses.
The organism will be self sustain-
ing, and all donations will go toward
the missions.
The mission will also receive help
from the 15-20 different churches
that support them....
Originally the. Smiths wanted to
start a ministry for the homeless in
the United States .
However, they felt a strong con-
-nection to Guatemala, which was
the second international move for
the couple, who returned to this
country to have their son in 2003.
They have done full time volun-,
teer mission work with the United
Methodist Volunteers in Missions
since 1998.
They were resident missionaries in
France, in 1999, and have worked
short and long term missions in
Nicaragua, Cuba, Honduras, and
Mexico, doing construction projects,
and assisting medical teams.


It was from a Christian family i
Guatemala, who invited the Smiti
to their home, that Bill learned ho'
to roast coffee.
The families describe their minis
try in Guatemala as multifaceted be
cause they plan to operate
Christian Coffee House and nigh
club to offer a different view of lif
to the expatriates, offer clothing
and feeding programs through stre(
ministries for the poor, and to pr<
vide support for individuals ar
missionary teams who come to hel
One aspect of the families' mini
try will focus on the "Anglo" exp
triates and tourists who flock
Panajchel, where there is a stror
need for culturally-current loc
ministries.
The Monroe family consists
gifted musicians, and has much
offer the expatriate population
Panajachel and people of the su
rounding Lake area.
The Christian Coffee House/Chl
will be used as a coffee house,
club, and a worship area for a mus
driven ministry.
Mission Team support will pr
vide staging/living areas and logis
cal support for short term missic
teams interested in ministering
native villages around Panajachel.
Individuals and congregation
who will covenant to pray for t
families and their ministry
sought.
They are interested in shari
their ministry with other church
and mission-minded individuals a
groups.
Financial support is sought in t
form of tax-deductible, montt
pledges, or one time gifts.
Donations will fund the missi
expenses with virtually no admin
trative expenses.
Citizens are asked to consider hi
they can help support the "Porch
Salomon."
Donors will receive a montl
newsletter, "Porch Talk."
Check www.porchdesalomon.or
for a list of current needs a
second-mile giving opportunities.









< ^E^" '.Vk


SMITHS, MONROE families comprise
"Porch de Salomon" Ministry. L-R: Liam
Smith, Suzanne Smith, Bill Smith, Hannah
.F


Monroe, Daniel Monroe, Asa Monroe, Mela-
nie Monroe, Lloyd Monroe.


1.~*


POVERTY the 2003 Guatemala team en-
countered in Chuisamayac, Guatemala was
overwhelming. The team returned in 2004.


ind i'i
Avw:


rp




So


Dr. Wes Scoles will head a team serving
there in Oct. 2005.


. .. AA







'..g., ztell


MELANIE AND LLOYD MONROE were on a
construction team in Manznillo, Cuba, on
9/11/2001, away from that day's terrorist


tragedy and their family. They later served
in Cuba Jan, 2003 and Nov., 2004.


SMITHS guided a local June, 2003
medical/construction Bible School Team in
the highlands of Guatemala. Indigenous folk


waited in long lines for medical care pro-.
vided by Dr. Wes Scoles.


Monticello Christian Academy


TO Hold Dedication Ceremony


litm


* *-...


I. .a2L


IN 1999, the pastor's family in the Monroe and Smith's
sister church in Cifuentes, Cuba, lived in a cramped rear
portion of the sanctuary, with no running water. Construc-
tion funds from Waukeenah UMC built a second story par-
sonage.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Christian Academy
(MCA) will celebrate its opening
with a dedication ceremony at 3
p.m. on Sunday, July 31, 1590
North Jefferson Street.
Rev. Carl Hanks is the guest
speaker, with Pastors John Dodson
and Mike Burke presiding over the
ceremony.
Teachers Debbie Lingle and Dan- .
ielle Matthews will provide the mu-"
sic for this special occasion.
Light refreshments will be served
in the Family Life Center.
Limited space is still available for
the upcoming school year.
Grades K to 5 are filled, and a
waiting list is avialable.
Some seating is available in
grades 6-12.
A total of 46 children are enrolled
to date.
Each teacher will work with up to
13 children.


Information and a registration
packet is available from Burke at
997-6048.
Open house will be held from 6-8
p.m. on Monday and Tuesday,
August 1 and 2.
As a ministry of the Monticello
Church of the Nazarene, the acad-
emy will offer affordable, quality
education based on Biblical truth for
grades K-12 in an atmosphere where
students can mature spiritually, aca-
demically, physically, and socially.
Areas of study will include Lan-
guage Arts, Mathematics, History,
Geography, Science, Bible lessons,
and electives such as Art, Civics,
Health, Computer Literacy, Spanish,
Literature, and Home Economics.
Lessons will be taught based on
L.I.F.E.P.A.C. curriculum, which
organizes five core subjects into one
year units composed of ten work-
books per subject.
The flexible curriculum allows
students to work through the mate-
rial at their own pace and can be
customized to fit their particular
needs.


As lesson plans are already pro-
vided, teachers have much more
time to encourage learning and
Scripture will be used as a basis for
all that is taught and done in the
school.



Gospel Benefit

Set Saturday

A Southern Gospel Benefit Con-
cert featuring His Grace The Mas-
ters and The Reapers will be held 6
p.m. Saturday, July 30 at the New
Hope Church of God.
The community is welcomed to
join in for some southern hospitality
and friendship. Bring family and
friends for an evening sure to be en-
joyed by all.

Admission is free. A Love Offer-
ing will be received for Sylvia
Amert who recently underwent sur-
gery.
The church location is 415 East
Palmer Mill Road, 997-1119.


MCA has chosen royal blue and-,,
silver as the school colors and the,.,
"Chargers" as their mascot.
The school year begins Monday,;.'.,,
Aug. 15. :-.'

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005


Sports


Tallahassee Defeats Demons

28-19 In Sunday Action


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Demons softball
team fell to an 11-3 record, when-
clobbered Sunday by Tallahassee ,
19-28.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said Tal-
lahassee jumped out to a 7-5 lead
and maintained it throughout the
game.
Johnny River went four for four.
Joe Andrews, Willie Thompson,
Warren Allen, Vincent Gentle, La-
mon Ulee and Wilbo Ellis, Jr., all
went three for four.
Allen also ripped the skin off the
ball while at the plate for a home
run.
Andy Burley and Kevin Jones
both went two for four, and Nick
Russell and Monterious Rivers
both went one for four.


RECEIVING awards on the Farmers and
Merchants Bank Little League Team are: L-
R: Elliot Capers, sportsmanship; Trent Rob-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Tiger football team has been
working diligently over the past
weeks, meeting four days per week
in preparation for the upcoming
season.
Head Coach Harry Jacobs said
that approximately 34 players have
been working on conditioning, en-
durance skills and strength, to in-
clude such exercises as weight lift-
ing, running and the obstacle
course.
"That's good for building the
team back up to strength after be-
ing out for the summer," said Ja-
cobs. "We've got to keep it up and
go right into the season."
Recently, the Tigers participated
in a passing league (7-on-7) with
teams from both Perry and Madi-
son, playing each team twice. If
the results of the four games reflect
the' upcoming season, the Tigers
will do very well.
"We beat Perry twice and we beat
Madison once," said Jacobs.
He added that he expects the sea-
son to be as good if not better than
this year, with many players return-
ing.


Only five of last year's starters,
all seniors, are not returning. They
include Darnell Brooks, Carlton
Hill, Markyce Larry, Freddie Scott
and J. R. Sloan.
Those Tigers expected to return
next year include Marcus Benja-.
men, Jitavian Bennett, LaMarcus
Bennett, Chris Branham, Brian
Brock, Marcus Brown, Quantez
Burke, Camell Cooksey, Jonathan
Dady, Clarence Fead, Ron Graham
and Demetrius Hicks.
Also, Desrick Jones, Robert
Nealy, Malcolm Norton, Scotty.
Norton, Breon Parker, Mario Riv-
ers, Monterius Rivers, and Joshua
Sego.
Also, Antwan .Tim, Dondre Ty-.
son, Lucious Wade, William Wade,
Reginald Watkins, Kris Wilson and
Darnell Young.


ROTARY T-BALL Champions include, L-R: Thaddeus Fran-
cis, most improved; Alex Campb.ell, MVP; Thomas Swick-
ley, sportmanship. (News Photo) .


The Demons are slated to go up
against Mayo, 4:30 p.m., Sunday,
there.

LEGAL NOTWIQE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JEF-
FERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA GEN-
ERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE
NO. 05-2005-24-CA CITIFINANCIAL
SERVICES, INC., SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CITIFINANCIAL SERV-
ICES, INC., 344, LLC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO ASSOCIATES FINAN-
CIAL SERVICES COMPANY OF FLOR-
IDA, INC., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER
TO ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES OF AMERICA, 'INC., PLAINTIFF,
VS. ELLA MAE PETERSON, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS. NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: JOHN
L. GREEN whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be
dead, the unknown defendants who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and
all parties, claiming an interest by,
through, under or against the Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the property
described in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property: THAT CERTAIN
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITU-
ATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE
OF NW 1/4) OF SECTION 21, IN
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST,
WHICH IS ENCLOSED WITHIN THE
FOLLOWING BOUNDARY LINES, TO-
WIT: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTH-.
WEST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN



Cive1he Gift

That Grows

Creating T SAVINGS
New e savings i.BONDS

For complete information
about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at
www.savingsbonds.gov. f )
A public service of this newspaper


LGAA NOWUi77


TWO ACRE TRACT OF LAND WHICH
WAS CONVEYED UNTO LUVENIA
WILLIAMS BY BEN EDWARDS, JR.,
AND MINNIE EDWARDS, HIS WIFE,
BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 1ST
1938 AND OF RECORD IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN DEED BOOK
"YY" PAGE 251 AND TO WHICH REF-
ERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY
MADE AND RUNNING THENCE IN A
SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION,
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
LANDS SO CONVEYED AS AFORE-
SAID TO SAID LUVENIA WILLIAMS, A
DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, AND TO THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID TWO ACRE TRACT
CONVEYED AS AFORESAID TO THE
SAID LUVENIA WILLIAMS, THENCE
RUNNING SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 420
FEET, THENCE WEST A DISTANCE
OF 630 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND
TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID SE 'A OF
NW OF SAID SECTION 21, TOWN-
SHIP AND RANGE AFORESAID,
THENCE RUNNING NORTH A DIS-
TANCE OF 420 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
AND TO A POINT DUE WEST OF THE
POINT OF BEGINNING AND THENCE
RUNNING EAST A DISTANCE OF 208.7
FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY BEING THE.
SAME PROPERTY DEEDED TO JOHN
HUNDLEY AND LIZZIE HUNDLEY,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY BEN
EDWARDS, JR., AND MINNIE
EDWARDS, HIS WIFE, BY DEED
DATED THE 14TH DAY OF FEBRU-
ARY A.D. 1953 AND OF RECORD IN
THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN DEED BOOK
"000" PAGE 420 AND TO WHICH REF-
ERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY
MADE. SAVINGS AND EXCEPTING
FROM THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
PROPERTY: ONE (1) ACRE OF LAND,
MORE OR LESS, IN THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LAND MEASURING 210 FEET MORE
OR LESS NORTH AND SOUTH AND
210 FEET MORE OR LESS EAST AND
WEST. THIS BEING THE SAME ONE
ACRE OF LAND MORE OR LESS
DEEDED BY WILLING LANE JOINED
BY HIS WIFE, MATTIE B. LANE, TO
JOHN HUNDLEY, JR., BY DEED
DATED THE 8TH DAY OF AUGUST
A.D. 1975. Has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DAVID J.
STERN, ESQ. Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 801 S University Drive #500,
Plantations, FL 33324 on or before July
27, 2005 (no later than 30 days from the


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Aerial Device
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005 PAGE 11


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
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997-3568


LEGALS
date of the first publication of this notice
of action) and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition filed herein. WIT-
NESS my hand and the seal of this Court
at JEFFERSON County, Florida, this 19th
day of July, 2005. CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT. LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF 801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE
SUITE 500 PLANTATION, FL 33324 05-
37264(TCFMH) IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT, persons with disabilities
needing special accommodations should
contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the JEFFERSON County Courthouse at
904-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
7/27, 8/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL JUVE-
NILE DIVISION CASE NO.: 04-18-DPA
IN THE INTEREST OF: J.J. 02/06/2004
MINOR CHILD; NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jessie Joiner and Unknown Father
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills
Road, Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above
styled court for the termination of paren-
tal rights and the permanent commitment
of J.J. a male child born on 02/06/2004 in
Leon County, Florida to the State of Flor-
ida, Department of Children and Families,
Adoption and Related Services a licensed
child placing agency for subsequent adop-
tion and you are hereby to be and appear
in the above court at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, County Courthouse, Room 10
Monticello, Florida 32344 on Monday
August 22nd at 4:00 p.m. for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should
not be granted. You must appear on the
date and time specified. FAILURE TO
PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVI-
SORY HEARING CONSTITUTES YOUR
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD.
IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETI-
TION. WITNESS my hand and official
seal as the Judge of said court this 8th day
of June, 2005. /s/
7/1-3, 7/20: 7/27, 8/3,c
JEFFERSON COUNTY FIRE RESCUE'
WILL BE ACCEPTING BIDS FOR A
USED MOBILE HOME TO BE SET UP
AT JEFFERSON COUNTY FIRE RES-
CUE, LOCATED AT 1456 S. JEFFER-
SON ST. FORMS CAN BE PICKED UP
AT JEFFERSON COUNTY EMER-
GENCY. MANAGEMENT OFFICE,
LOCATED AT 1240 N. JEFFERSON ST.
BIDDING CLOSES AUG. 4, CALL
342-0178.
7/27, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK, vs. EVA KRO-
MIAN, RAUL ALFONSO FLOREZ, AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS) Defendant.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO
EVA KRMOIAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property- in Jefferson
COUNTY, Florida: Lot 30 Block D, of
Aucilla Shores Subdivision, a subdivision
as per the plat thereof filed at Plat Book B,
Page 38, of the Public Records of Jefferson
County, Florida. Has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy
of yopur written defenses, if any, to it on
GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is Gardner, Wad-
sworth, Duggar, Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300
Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32308, on or before July 27, 2005 (within
30 days of first publication), and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered aginast you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion. Dated July 20th, 2005. DALE BOAT-
WRIGHT, Clerk of the Circuit Court.
7/27, 3/3, c
The Jefferson County Planning Commis-
sion will hold a regular meeting on August
11, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be
held in the Courtroom of the Jefferson
County Courthouse located at the intersec-
tion of US Highway 19 and US Highway
90 in Monticello, FL. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
7/27, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE: Jefferson
County Planning Commission will have a


;public hearing on the following proposed
!land development code change on August
'25, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. In the courtroom of
'the Jefferson County courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 90 and
:19. The meeting may be continued as nec-
'essary. JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLOR-


LEGALS

IDA BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE
NO. AN ORDINANCE OF JEF-
FERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVID-
ING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMEND-
ING LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE
SECTION 2.04.02H, RESIDENTIAL
DENSITIES IN THE MIXED USE
SUBURBAN/RESIDENTIAL LAND USE
CATEGORY; AMENDING LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION
2.04.07, TABLE OF DEVELOPMENT
STANDARDS; PROVIDING FOR SEV-
ERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CON-
FLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COM-
PREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
nepd a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
7/27, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE. Jefferson
County Planning Commission will have a
public hearing on the following proposed.
land development code change on August
25, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of
the Jefferson County courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and
19. The meeting may be continued as nec-
essary. JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS. ORDINANCE, NO.
AN ORDINANCE OF JEF-
FERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVID-
ING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PRO-
VIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING
THE LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE
SECTION 9.02.07, NOTICE REQUIRE-
MENTS; CHANGING NOTICE
REQUIREMENTS FOR PRIVATELY
INITIATED COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITN; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCOR-
PORATION INTO THE COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual".
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-
spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. 7/27, c
NOTICE OF LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE PROPOSED CHANGE. Jefferson
County Board of County Commission will
have a public hearing on the following
proposed land development code change
on August .18, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County court-
house located at the intersection of U.S.
Highways 90 and 19. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. ORDI-
NANCE NO. AN ORDI-
NANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY
FLORIDA, REPEALING AND AMEND-
ING THE JEFFERSON COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING
FOR PURPOSE; REPEALING ARTICLE
1, GENERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE
3, CONCURRENCY, ARTICLE 4,
RESOURCE PROTECTION, ARTICLE'
5, DEVELOPMENT DESIGN, ARTICLE
7, HARDSHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8,
BOARDS AND AGENCIES, AND ARTI-
CLE 9, ADMINISTRATION AND
ENFORCEMENT, OF THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE; ADOPTING ARTICLE I, GEN-
ERAL PROVISIONS, ARTICLE 3, CON-
CURRENCY, ARTICLE 4, RESOURCE
PROTECTION, ARTICLE 5, DEVELOP-
MENT DESIGN, ARTICLE 7, HARD-
SHIP RELIEF, ARTICLE 8, BOARDS
AND AGENCIES, AND ARTICLE 9,
ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCE-
MENT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIL-
ITY; PROVIDING A REPEALING
CLAUSE; PROVIDING FOR INCORPO-
RATION INTO THE LAND DEVELOP-
MENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE; AND PROVIDING
FOR AUTHORITY. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine Manual",
page 36, paragraph c: Each board, com-
mission, or agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if
notice of meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency, con-


spicuously on such notice, the advice that,
if a person decided to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to


LEGAL NOTICE
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
7/27, c

HELP WANTED :
Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hire a Grants
Director. Job description and
applications are available from Clerk
of Circuit Court, Room 10, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida and
at http://co.jefferson.fl.us/iobs.html.
Grants Director is responsible for
technical grant writing, and
supervision, documentation,
administration and reporting of
grants awarded to the county. Salary
range: $28,000 $ 37,000. Minimum
qualifications are: Knowledge of
grant procedures and experience with
the grants process. Knowledge of
Federal and State grant regulations.
*Knowledge of the sources of grant
funding. Education, experience
needed: College degree in
appropriate field. Five (5) years
experience in a responsible
administrative position. *
Documented experience successfully
seeking and administering grants with
preference for economic development,
recreation, infrastructure for county
or municipal grants. Applications will
be accepted until September 12, 2005,
at the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, address above. Equal
Opportunity Employer. Applicants
with a disability should contact the
alb,ve office for accommodation.
7127, 29, 8/2, c
Adolescent Male Residential Program
now accepting apps for the following.
Exp w/juvenile justice, therapeutic
programs, & mgt of youth* pref.
Reliable, honest candidates only may
apply for: Program Supervisor: 2+
yrs supervisory exp, mgt of youth &
delinquency pref. BA/BS in Human
Services' I pref. Organized,
self-sufficient, & responsible a must.
Recreation Therapist: Outdoorsy ind.
W/2+ yrs exp in designing therapy
activities for youth reqd. BA/BS,
CPR/1st Aid pref. Therapeutic most
impt quality. Team Leader/Therapy
Assistant: Diploma/GED reqd. Must
manage adol, delinquent pop. Shift
work/hours. Counseling bckgrnd a
plus, integrity a must. Clinical
Coordinator: Counseling position.
BA/BS reqd MA pref. Able to provide
grp/ind sessions. Strong org/time mgt
skills and team concept. 2+ yrs
w/youth, pref delinquent pop. Exp
w/BHOS doc a plus. Counselor:'
Provide grp, ind, and fam sessions for
committed youth. Strong clinical
skills, documentation ability needed.
BA/BS reqd. Serve on Trmt Team
and able to address issues in
population served. Data Entry:
Diploma/GED reqd. Key BHOS
billing. 2+ yrs exp. Strong org skills
and basic app knowledge' in Excel,
Word reqd. Exp w/billing pref. Please
mail resume, references, position
desired, and salary request to:
Greenville Hills Academy, Personnel
Dept., 742 SW Greenville Hills Road,
Greenville, Florida 32331.

Parking Lot & Asphalt Maint. Co.
Now taking applications. Salary
D.O.E. 545-1776.
7/1 ,, tfn, c
Registration and Records Specialist
(part-time 25 hours per week). Duties
include: Assisting with the day to day
record keeping in the department of
Enrollment Services. Complete job
description on web site.
Qualifications: Must be High School
Graduate, AA/AS degree preferred.
Proficient in Microsoft software.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. A complete packet includes:
resume and application (available at
www.nfcc.edu). Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet
must be received by 07/29/2005. EOE.
7/15, 20, 22, 27, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn,c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. IJ1? S. Jefferson St.
6/3, s/d, tfn

AUTOMOTIVE

1999 Jeep Wrangler Sport. 6 cyl., a/c,
P.S., P.B., cruise, 5 spd., tilt, sound


bar, soft top, highway mileage only.
Very clean. $8000.00. 997-2725.
7/13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c


AUTOMOTIVE.r
2002 Dodge SLT Quad Cab 2wd, 52K
miles, $15,900. Call David
229-225-2318.
2004 Chev. Cavalier 26,000 miles,
$9,986. Call Kevin 229-224-4857.
2000 Mustang GT, black, extra clean,
50K miles. Call Jeff 229-413-0009

FOR RENT': .-'m 1
3BR/1BA Cottage style-kitchen/dining
combo, LR, laundry. Hardwood
floors, enclosed front porch. 2 / mi. S
of Monticello. References required -
$450/MO-lst & last months rent
300-252-2755 or 800-535-8729.
7/27, 29, 8/3, pd
3bdrm, 1 I b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167
7/13, tfn, c
House in country for rent. 3 BDRM, 1
Y b w/extra room. 997-3365.
6/22, tfn, c
1 bed, 1 bath with pasture in country,
$500.00 a month 997-' S3.
7/6,8, 13, 15,20,22 27, 19, oc
Shop / Warehouse Space. Four large
roll-up doors. 1200 sq ft with
standard utilities included. Easy
access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
*August 1st Call 997-4150.
6/15, 17, tfn, c

FOR SALE
4 r225-:/ Mid.. .0.O
997 -0135.50


FREE
File kittens, males and females call
850-264-6922. Free tiger-striped 2 yr.
spayed cat. Call 850-264-6922.
7/22, 27, pd

SERVICES
Little's Lawn Care. Vince Little:
Owner/Operator. Phone
850-342-1162. Mowing, weed eating,
lv'dge. trimming, and debris clean up.
7.27, 2), 8/3, 5, pd
Ours is a seeker friendly church. We
believe that God will meet us
wherever we are on our spiritual
journey. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 AM.
997-All16.
7/27, c
Wc read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
10:00 AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment" -
Jackson's 'Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you, can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn


75-100 acres at reasonable cost for
released quail hunting in North


Florida during 2005-2006 hunting
season. Land must be open enough to
allow quail hunting. Call
850-878-1670 eves or e-mail
dbrububba@aol.com.
7/13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd


KELLY & KE]
PROPERTIES


Spacious home in the country $215,000
a Duplex lot in town S15,000
LLYa Roomy in town ho 5,000
SE Leon Co. ho'e-,s $380,000
a West. J 5 ac. $243,900
a Frame of town $74,900
A 6+ acres hville Hwy. $49,000
a 6 acres Lloyd Road $60,000.

GET RESULTS
Let Us List Your Property!

215 N. Jefferson St
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 ww.cbkk.com


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000


Magnificent Acreaqe off Bassett Dairy
Road in Bellamy Plantation 10 commanding
acres with a beautiful view,
lovely home site in a grove of ancient pecan
trees and a hayfield meant for galloping a
bargain at $150,000

Price Slashed!! Like New Home built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths, 1964 sq. ft., ce-
ramic tile and hardwood floors, cathedral
ceiling, fireplace and a screened porch on
one acre not far from town $IB9,5'" Now
$135,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote, big oaks, pond, located north of
Greenville a real opportunity for the horse
owner only $295,000


Near Leon County 10 mostly open acres
on the corner of Paul Thompson and Julia
Road only $150,000

Beautiful Home on the Top of a Hiqh
Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted pine
near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in planted
'pines, swimming pool, detached garage,
barn nice field all very convenient to Talla-
hassee for only $1,200,000


Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bedroom 2
bath double wide with a bathroom that won't quit
on a high hill with a view in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows only $55,000


Nice Packaqe 8 acres with big doublewide
and small house on a pretty old hillside close
to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Big doublewide with additions 12 rooms
quiet wooded lot $56,500


Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders
Mart $650,000

Close to Tallahassee 5 acres mostly
open on a hillside with graded county
road $75,0Beautiful Home on the
Top of a High Hill Lovely 3 bedroom
2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with
10 year old planted pine near US 90 and
SR 59, 50 acres in planted pines, swim-
ming pool, detached garage, barn nice
field all very convenient to Tallahassee
for only $1,200,000


Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for acre-


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
. agp-,-r-an*-ar*-B-ra-wr-a-=a-e a-B..=-i.s=ssB=sas=siB= r:=aeB=*


...... ...


............. .......... .. ........... .. ..... .... --- ..... ...... .... -----







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 27, 2005
~ ~ ~ ~ S .-' wiwsiiWF, --Vv-^ .t ,^r t-" *

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A ~
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IN TOWN to look at real estate are Leslie, in town, outside the Courtyard Restaurant.
Bruce and son Kevin Thiele, the family stop (News Photo)
to rest a minute on one of the new benches


In Case Of Emergency
Dial 911


Streamline
Roofing
Wants You!
Are you tired of your old job?
Are you ready for a career
change? Do you like the
outdoors? Streamline Roofing
needs Full Time Metal
Roofing installers.
POSITION OPEN "NOW"
Great pay, Paid vacations,
holidays and health insurance
Weekend work optional
Experience preferred
BUT WILL TRAIN
reliable and hard
working individuals.
Drug Free Workplace!
Call 575-1168 or
Toll Free
1-800-226-1168


Housing Vouchers
WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities
575-6571


HIRING
Now accepting applications for store
managers for
Waco Food Stores
Salary based on experience. Great benefits.

Mail resume to Ware Oil, Inc.
2715 S. Byron Butler Pkwy., Perry, FL 32348 or
call David Burgess @ 850-584-6666 (ext. 14)


CLH RY L UEr

EXCELLENT DEALS
with SMALL TOWN
PRICES on DODGE,
CHRYSLER & JEEP
VEHICLES!
Also Great Deals On Used Vehicles!
229-220-4422

Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Locally Owned & Operated


Why work for someone else's business,
when you can build your own?
Comprehensive Training
Direct Manufacturer Accts.
Professional Marketing
I Low Investment / Overhead
1-800-DEC-DENSC iNt;?rLo


N15SAN.~


Lady Diamonds Defeat
Tallahassee 10-6, Sunday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello Lady Diamonds
climbed to a 10-4 season after clob-
bering Tallahassee Sunday for a
10-6 victory.
The Lady Diamonds jumped out
to a 5-1 lead and kept it throughout
the game.
Tasha Samuel went four for four
and smashed a home run. Kidra
Thompson went four for four, and


Nikki Cooks went three for four.
Alana Anderson, Keandra Seab-
rooks, Felice McDaniel, Sharice
Brooks and Diane Robertson all
went three for three.
Tonya Young went two for two.
Shericka Parrish went two for
three, .and Cynthia Steen went one
for one.
Coach Roosevelt Jones added
that Thompson pitched a good
game.
The Ladies play against Mayo
4:30 p.m., Sunday, there.


WARD INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS, INC.
<--


4856 Blounistown Highwa
701-0111 0R 1-800-846-9218
Also in obe & rA nsacola
Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM
Sales


MV51075


Buddy's Home furnishings
Monticello, FL

25 inch Color TV
$4.95 a wk
While Supplies Last


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