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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00057
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: July 20, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00057
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Sports
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text

L ipAY? OF FLORIDA HISTORY
.4 ^LI3ARY WEST
U;!VLRSiITY OF FLORIDA
GtTS' rLLE, FL. 32611


Better Job
Climate For
College Graduates
Editorial, Page 4


Garden Club
Board Plans
New Year Events
Story, Photo, Page 6
IE


.School
Meal Program
Applications
Story, Page 10


Festival
Tennis Tournament
Winners
Story) PhotoS,Page 11


Wednesday Morning


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.57, 50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


City Internet Service Ready


Online,


To Go




. .i .


* t"


WORKING on the high speed Internet connection is Mi-
chael Gramling, of Gramling's Electric, in bucket, and Tony
Ellis on the ground. (News Photo)


Building, Planning

Fees TO Increase


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
As part of the budget considera-
tions for the Planning and Building
Inspections departments, commis-
sioners have agreed in principal to
raise the fees that the two depart-
ments charge for their services.
Meaning that effective Oct. 1,
building permits and minor and ma-
jor subdivisions reviews, among
others of the two departments' func-
tions, will cost more.
Officials' stated reasons for the
rate increases are threefold: to re-
flect more accurately the present
cost of doing business; to make the
local rates comparable with the rates
of surrounding counties; and to al-
low possibly for the addition of staff
to the two departments.
In arguing for the fee hikes,
Planning Official Bob Arredondo
pointed out that the fees hadn't been
raised since 2001, while the depart-
ments' costs for doing business have
increased.
He said that unless he and Build-
ing Inspector Wallace Bullock re-
ceived additional help, there was no
way they could keep up with the in-
creased demands being put on their
departments by the population
growth.
A sampling of the changes to
come:
A minor or major subdivision
review, presently $300 and $500 re-
spectively, will go up to $1,000
each, with an additional $50 charged
per lot.
The $1,000 does not reflect the


Fees Mirror
Costs Of
Doing
Business

$1,000 fee the engineer charges for
his review of the project.
Citizens requesting written con-
firmation of their zoning status will
be charged $75 for the service.
"We're not charging for verbal
confirmation," Arredondo said. "But
if they want written confirmation,
the charge applies."
Home occupation licenses, pres-
ently $15 for new licenses and $10
for renewals, are going up to $50
and $35 respectively.
The Planning Department will
henceforth charge $350 to post signs
on a property notifying the public
that the property is slated for a
Comprehensive Plan amendment.
* The department will charge $200
for a newspaper legal ad and $300 if
the ad includes a map.
The fee for electric pole connec-
tion is going up, from $18 to $60.
Madison County reportedly charges
$150 for this service, while Colum-
bia County charges $50.
Building permits fees, presently
figured at $55 per square foot, will
go up to $70 per square foot.
Citizens interested in a complete
listing of the proposed rate increases
should contact the Planning and
Building Inspections departments at
342-0223.


Can Serve 240


Conceivably, the system eventually
System's Dom af NNam e will be incorporated into a citywide
MyyntIe llo Ne t I network that will be able to monitor
' pump stations and other equipment
TO Be MyMonticello.Netand enhance law enforcement offi-
cers' capabilities, among other


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
By the time this story appears, the
City of Monticello will be very near
to providing high-speed, wireless
Internet service, if it is not already
doing so.
Technicians were busy last week,
installing the final components of
the system, with the expectation that
the service would be tested and
made available to customers by as
early as the middle of this week.
Last week, the City Council ap-
proved the system's domain name,
which will be MyMonticello.net, an
echo of the state's MyFlorida.com.
The council also adopted the
monthly rates and deposits that sub-
scribers will have to pay for the
service.
A complete listing of the rates is
available from City Hall. But essen-
tially, the monthly rates are $29.99
for the basic service and $39.99 for
the premium service, with corre-
sponding one-time deposits of
$29.99 and $39.99.
The council considered and ulti-
mately rejected a proposal to give a
$5 rate discount to the first 40 sub-
scribers. Opponents of the proposed
discount were able to argue success-
fully that the monthly rate was al-
ready lower than any other competi-
tor.


able to check on their billing ac-
counts, download water usage and
other pertinent information, and get
their e-mail via the system.
As for the city, it will reap finan-
cial rewards, as well as ensure more
efficient and secured operations.


things.
If the federal government and in-
dustry statistics can be believed,
broad band service currently com-
mands 53 percent of America's
communications market and is ex-
pected to continue growing, accord-


ing to the experts. They say that it
the city is able to attract but 30 per-
cent of the available local
customers, that number could easily
translate into monthly revenues of
$45,000.
And the cost to the city -- the
monthly charge it pays the tele-
phone company for providing the
Internet connection -- will be about
$2,060.
Per the city's vision statement,
(See Internet Page 2).


p
~: ~.
r -.

U MUII~~YL


A


PROPONENTS of the high speed wireless
Internet service discuss the City's system,
following a recent meeting. L-R Helen Love,
City Attorney Bruce Leinbeck, Tom Love and


Frank Luft, project manager for Graybar
Electric, which is selling system to the City.
(News Photo)


Hurricane Claims Here


The goal of city officials is to at-ceed $1M Last Year
tract a maximum of 240 customers,
the magic number that is calculated EXc e ed $IM Last Year
to make the system economically
feasible and self-sustaining. The FOIR statistics show residents two of them for total losses, with
As part of last week's action, the LAZARO ALEMAN here filed a total of 260 claims for $327,772 paid out; and Hurricane
council approved an agreement with Senior Staff Writer Hurricanes Charley (which struck Jeanne, with 74 claims, one of them
the Jefferson County Communities the state Aug. 13, 2004), Frances for a total loss, and $319,777 paid
Water System to place one of the Recent figures released by the (which struck Sept. 3), Ivan (Sept. out.
system's antennas on the top of the state show that insurance companies 13), and Jeanne, Sept. 24. They A comparison of the total pay-
water tank on Water Mill Road. paid more than a million in claims show the insurance companies pay- ments made in surrounding
This antenna will allow the city to here for four hurricanes last year. ing a total of $1,006,389 in claims counties: Franklin, $509,608; Gads-
offer the Internet service to residents The figures, compiled by the as of June 17 of this year. den, $910,021; Leon, $6,930,358;
within the Lloyd area. Indeed, ac- Florida Office of Insurance Regula- A breakdown of the local claims Madison, $1,202,288; Taylor,
cording to City Superintendent Don tion (FOIR) -- formerly part of the and the payments per storm: Hurri- $867,677; and Wakulla, $486,808.
Anderson, residents within a four- Department of Insurance Regulation cane Charley, 19 claims filed, with All told, the insurance companies
mile radius of the water tower will -- are based on information provided payments of $69,863; Hurricane paid $18,317,235,299 in claims
definitely be able to get the service, by private insurance companies, ac- Frances, 71 claims filed, one of statewide, according to the FOIR
And possibly, he said, residents cording to Beth Scott, FOIR director them for a total loss, with $288,977 figures.
within an eight-mile radius of the of communications. paid out; Hurricane Ivan, 96 claims, (See Hurricane Page 2)
water tank will also have access to
the service.- "
In its final action related to the .
Internet provider service, the coun-
cil authorized the city to borrow the
$227,644'43 needed for the pur- ..'.
chase and installation of the system. "",
Frank Luft, a network system spe- ";.
cialist and project manager for. 4 -
Graybar Electric Company (which is. .
selling the system to the city), as- ..
sured officials last week that every- i
thing was proceeding smoothly. ., ..
"I suggest you start signing peo-
pie up," said Luft, who is overseeing ...- v .. i
the installation of the system.
He said the service could be up .
and running as early as late last "'
week, depending on the delivery of ... .
two generators and a couple of other. '.-" --. .'
minor details that needed to be e... .
worked out. "
As represented by proponents of -'-'-. .
the system in earlier discussions, us- THIS FALLEN TREE on South Cherry Street clock to keep roads open. Despite the many
ers of the service will not only get was one of several hundred downed by Hur- downed trees, the County was spared a ma-
faster and cheaper Internet service, ricane Frances, around the City, last year. jor disaster.
but city residents, at least, will be City and County crews worked around the


D


col







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005





.F r
,-













JOHN TICE, Rotary District Governor, was From left, Bill Beaty, president, Tice, Sylvia
;the guest speaker at the Rotary Club Friday. White, assistant Rotary governor.


Rotary District Governor


Guest Of Local Club


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Rotary District Governor, John
Tice, was the guest of Rotarians Fri-
day.
Tice was introduced to the club
members as a good friend of Presi-

Internet
(Continued From Page 1)
"the aggressive plan developed by
cil staff seeks to fulfill locally the
mission statement of the Federal
Communication Commission and
President Bush's directive that each
household in America have access
to affordable high-speed Internet
service.
"By filling the gap in broad band
availability that the private sector
cannot -- or will not -- provide, the
city has committed to eliminate the
disparity between technological in-
frastructure in urban and rural
America.
"This will be accomplished by the
installation of a municipally-owned
system providing both first-tier
minimum speed broad band for
causal users, as well as increased
speed tiers of service for users re-
quiring advanced technological ap-
plications."-

Hurricane
(Continued From Page 1)
. Scott said her office only com-
,oled the information, as provided
b' the private insurance companies.
She did not know tlhe nature or the
ektent of the damage that was re-
ported,
; She could not explain why Char-
ley, which struck the center of the
state, caused $69,863 in damage
here. Or why the damage in Jeffer-
son County was greater than in
nearby coastal counties, such as
Taylor, Wakulla and Franklin.
:The FOIR numbers don't take into
account monies that came into the
county from the Federal Emergency
Management Administration
(FEMA) for disaster relief.
: According to Carol Ellerbe, direc-
tor of Emergency Management,
FEMA paid out about $155,000
here for two of the storms. The
money went for the reparation of
county dirt roads daiimageu oy mhe
stormss.
" The FOIR figures also don't take
into account monies that FEMA
,paid directly to homeowners for
property damage.


dent Bill Beaty.
Tice spoke- about his vision of
what this Rotary year is about, his
goals and his accomplishments.
Since moving to Florida, Tice has
been active in his profession as an
architect, in his community, and in
Rotary.
Professionally, he has served as
President of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects and as Director on the National
Board of the American Institute of
Architects, representing Florida and
the Caribbean.
In 2001 he was elevated to Fellow
in the Americai. Institute of Archi-
tects.
Tice has served on numerous
boards throughout the Pensacola
community. He is Past President of
the Committee of 100 and Past
Chairman of the Pensacola Area
Chamber of Commerce.


Tice joined Pensacola North Ro-
tary Club in 1984. In 1986 he trans-
ferred to Pensacola Five Flags
Rotary where he served as its Presi-
dent in 1992-1993. In 1995 he trans-
ferred to the Rotary Club of
Pensacola, downtown.

From 1999-2002 he served as As-
sistant District Governor and until
this year he served as the Chair of
the District's Youth Exchange Com-
mittee.
"Tice exemplifies the Rotary
motto of 'Service Above Self.' He is
soft spoken, knowledgeable, and


willing to serve," says James
Muchovej, international service di-
rector.
The Rotary will meet noon,
Friday, at the Chamber of Com-
merce.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Local law enforcement agencies
arrested a city man Thursday on
drug charges.
Officers from the Jefferson
County Drug Task Force and the
Sheriffs Department charged Solo-
mon Geathers with possession of
marijuana, among other offenses.
Bond was set at $160,000 for
Geathers, who was being held in the
county jail last Friday.
According to Major Bill Bullock,
investigators raided Geathers' city
apartment in response to reports of
heavy drug traffic coming in and out
of the area.
"A search warrant obtained by in-
vestigatots Dewayne Hayes and
Chris Eades was executed, to gain
entry into the apartment," Bullock
reports. "The deputies located ap-
proximately 190 grams of marijuana
inside, as well as firearms and over
$6,000 in cash. The marijuana had a
street value of $1,000."
In addition to the marijuana found
in the apartment, officers recovered
a stolen rifle. They also found ,a


sawed-off shotgun and a rifle that
had the serial numbers removed.
Bullock says criminal investiga-
;ions hIae beuRi jas a result of the
recovered weapons.


June Rainfall

Above

Average

Rainfall for the County in June
was at 9.27 inches, above the 2004
June rainfall of 8.87 inches.
The avera-,e rainfall for the
County in June is 6.09 inches.
The Suwannee .(iver Water Man-
agement District (SRWMD) average
rainfall for June was 9.60 inches, in
the 14 counties comprising the Dis-
trict.
Counties comprising the SRWMD
include: Alachua, Baker, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamil-
ton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor and
Union.
Cumulative rainfall for the past
12 months is 69.23 inches, com-
pared to the long term average an-
nual District rainfall of 55.2 inches.
The District surplus over the past
year is 14.0 inches.
At the Aucilla River in Lamont,
rainfall in June was 50.90 inches,
slightly higher than the average June
rainfall of 48.06 inches.
The District recommends that wa-
ter conservation be an ongoing ac-
tivity for all water users.
Water is conserved by using the
minimum amount needed for spe-
cific applications and by irrigating
lawns, plants and crops only when
necessary, and in the morning be-
fore 10 a.m., and in the evening af-
ter 4 p.m, when lower temperature
and wind velocity reduce the
amount of water lost to evaporation.


The Monticello
City Council
Finance
Committee
will conduct a budget
workshop on
Tuesday,
July 26, 2003
at 3:30 p.m.
at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Flori*a


A Special School Board Meeting

will be held on
Thursday, July 21, 2005 at 5:01 p.m.
at the Desmond M. Bishop Building.

The Proposed 2005-2006 Tentatative Budget
will be presented at that time along with
permission to approve the newspaper
advertisements on the 2005-2006 budget and
proposed millage rates.

An agenda may be picked up at 1490 W.
Washington Street between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Thursday.


Ot; or members of the Monticello
City Council may be present at
an Intergovernmental Meeting on
July 28, 2005
at 6:00 p.m.

To discuss economic development
strategies. The meeting will take place at
Willow Pond, 398
Willow Pond Road, Monticello.

For more information, contact the
Chamber of Commerce at 997-5552.







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Monticello Man Arrested

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20. 2005 PAGE 3


'Let's Murder Marsha' Opens


July 29 At Opera House


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

"Let's Murder Marsha," an Opera
House summer dinner theatre pro-


July 30 and 31.
Doors open at 6:30 for evening
performances, with dinner at 7, and
show at 8: Sunday, doors open at
2:30 p.m.


duction, opens 8 p.m., Friday, July Dinner/Show packages, with din-
29. ner by Carrie Ann and Co., are
Other performances are scheduled $22.50 for members; $25 for non-
8 p.m. Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday, members.


"I SAID I do not want my picture taken," says Molly, "but I
DO need a loving home. (News Photo)


Molly Humane Society

Canine Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has named -
Molly as its adoptable canine Pet of
the Week.
She is a lab/chow mix, approxi-
mately six months old, and has
been spayed, with all shots up to
date.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes her as extremely sweet
and playful, although she some-
times likes to play a little sh. ,
Molly is also a natural-born clown
at heart, showing off, makifig some
funny faces and doing silly things
when, she is given attention.
"She wants attention all the
time," she added. She also "hams"
it up for a camera.
Molly is wonderful with other
animals and children and is an


indoor/outdoor animal.
To adopt Molly or any of the
other many adoptable pets at the
shelter call 342-0244.












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Monticello Christian Academy
Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


Show only, and matinee tickets
are $10 for members; $12 for non-
members.
Reservations are required for din-
ner at 997-4242.
Currently in rehearsal, "Let's
Murder Marsha" is a light comedy,
featuring Marsha Gilmore, a highly
imaginative woman, who is a faith-
ful reader of "blood and thunder"
mysteries.
When Gilmore overhears a conver-
sation between her wealthy stock-
broker husband, and an attractive
young woman, who are planning a
spectacular birthday surprise for her,
she jumps to the conclusion that
they are planning her murder.
In a plot remarkably similar to the
latest mystery she read, Gilmore en-
lists the aid of a neighbor and con-
cocts a plot to kill her husband, and


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his accomplice, before they can do
her in.
A hilarious sequence of mishaps
and misunderstandings follows, un-
til the truth is at last revealed, and
everyone remains happily alive.
The cast includes: Venessa Per-
sons and Jon Taylor as Marsha and
Tobias Gilmore; Stephanie Mead-
ows as interior designer Persis De-
vore; Carol Bynum as Marsha's
mother, Lynette Thoren; and Bill
Tellefsen as Marsha's naive accom-
plice Virgil Baxter.
Rounding out the cast are Lindsey
Scott as the Gilmore's maid, Bianca;
and Jonathan Counts, as Bianca's
police officer boyfriend, Ben Quade.
Judi Persons directs the produc-
tion, and George Hooks is the stage
manager.
V.


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MAHAN

JEFFERSON START MENTORING PROGRAM

MENTORING ON THE MOVE
Date: 07/23/05

Time: 8a.m.- 12p.m.
Helping KIs Prepare For life











Partner up with the Jefferson Start Mentonng Program as we walk
for successful students and better education in Jefferson County
Community Partners, Mentors. Educators, Parents. Staff and Stu-
dents are all invited to participate in our I st Walk-A-Thon

Walking for a PURPOSE!
JEFFERSON HIGH TRACK FIELD
JEFFERSON START MENTORING PROGRAM
$2 00 per lap-Sponsorship
Funds will oe usea to reward mentored students fro
academic achievement
contact Persons Mr Allen 342-0322. Mrs
Sic.r4a n i 92. 355.exi. .LS..Ms.H enry-i3A 2- -.
0340


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----


HELP YOUR DOCTOR


HELP YOU
IN THREE EASY STEPS.
When you have a chronic illness,
there are steps you can take to
support your health care team, and
help them do their very best for you.
Ask questions.
There's no faster way to
understand your symptoms, your
treatment, your dos and don't.
Remember, your doctor, nurses, and
therapists all work for you. They're
there to listen and answer your
questions.
Educate yourself.
Read up on your illness and your
medicines. Your library and the
Internet are great sources. Smart
patients stop acting like patients-
and become partners in their health
care treatment.
Network with others.
Whatever your illness, there are
others out there, just like you. In
fact, it's assured there's a national
agency to help people with your
condition. Groups like the National
Osteoporosis Foundation and the
American Cancer Society can put
you in touch with people who
know what you're going through.
Ask your providers who to call.

It's your health.
You call the shots.



NAItONAL HEALTH COUNCIl
fui as qiarice or more information, visit
wVw NationalHealthiiCouncil org or write the
Nat ond l Health Council at 1730 "M" Street NW,
Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036-4505
This message made possible by an educational grant
from the Pfizer Health Literacy Initiative.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620) /
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
: P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net ,
-.,-OWoR '.i: ,o--'R F,; lt;;oo MM&,;;'=o "o-iao........ "-2o8''2 o.o-''=;*'o '''


Better Jo


For Collec
:This year's college graduates face
a better r job market compared to the
pais few years more employers are
hiring and entry-level job seeker
sentiment is confident.
According to the leading career
site for college students and alumni,
64 percent of employers plan to hire
2005 graduates this year, and 83
percent of 2005 graduates expect to
receive at least one job offer upon
graduation (compared to last year's
survey, which showed that 51 per-
cent of college seniors didn't expect
a single offer).
However, grads shouldn't just sit
back and relax; the competition for
jobs still remains strong, with more
people graduation from college than
,ever.
Smart seekers will get organized
early and allot a certain amount of
time each week to job searching.
"The most successful entry-level
job seekers tackle the search with
gusto and creativity," said Michelle
Forker, senior vice president, Mon-
ster Campus.
"Grads should diversify their job
search by not only scanning online
job postings, but also attending ca-
reer fairs and workshops and tap-
ping into their network of friends,
classmates, colleagues and profes-
sors."
Graduates should also utilize their
on-camhpus career centers to help
guide a job search, tailor resumes
and set up interviews. In addition,
use these strategies to increase the


SOME 25 people took part in the county's
annual Farm-City Week Tour in Feb., 1990.
1 P- lR nn Msirnhv I qrrh M4lu h L H^rA


Brown, Ann Mullis.
Farm and Subers'
Dh ntn


They toured Ladd Dairy
Deer Farm. (News File


: o n urp y, arry a sey, Clifford o o)

b Climate I


e Grads Opinion & Comment


chances that you'll find, and land, a
satisfying first job:
S No employment history? New
grads without traditional work expe-
rience should include an "Experi-
ence" section on their resume rather
than "Employment." Volunteer po-
sitions, class projects and independ-
ent study fit into this category and
will show employers work ethic and
ambition.
Mock interviews. After the re-
suirnme has been tweaked and the ap-
plication sent, practice those
interviewing skills with family and
friends. Entry-level seekers should
be able to provide a concise over-
view of their background and
thoughtful answers about why they
are interested in a particular com-
pany.
Research, research, research. In
today's information age, there is no
excuse for going into an interview
without properly researching a com-
pany. Investigating corporate Web
sites as well as online databases of
corporate profiles is a great way to
learn about prospective employers.
Don't give up! If you're not get-
ting the results you desire, try a new
strategy.
Consider taking an internship; 59
percent of 2005 grads surveyed have
already completed at least one.
It's a valuable way to get a
behind-the-scenes glimpse into your
desired field and increase your
chances of getting a full-time posi-
tion with that company. (NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
July 12, 1995
Recent changes in an act relating to
child support and providing for sus-
pension of driver's licenses for de-
linquent parties prompted the local
office of the Division of Revenue,-
Child Support Enforcement.
Three unrelated incidents kept city
police busy over the weekend, re-
sulting in the arrest of two local resi-
dents and one out-of-towner.
A full house greeted US Senator
Connie Mack during his brief lun-
chtime visit at the County Restau-
rant on Friday.
TWENTY YEARS
July 10, 1985
As prompted, North Florida Junior
College will be bringing a wide se-
lection of college courses to the Jef-
ferson County High School campus
this fall.
In an effort to "control, preserve,
and protect the ecology" of the Au-
cilla and Wacissa Rivers, members
of the Planning Commission and the
County Commission are joining
forces.
Monticello resident Dana Wallace
"Miss Tallahassee" competed in the
Miss Florida Pageant held in Or-
lando.
It took County Commissioners
about one minute July 3 to decide
they want Apalachee Regional Plan-
ning Council to be in charge of a re-
quired local hazardous waste man-
agement assessment.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
July 10, 1975
Beak DeVanem Monticello News
photographer was awarded a plaque


for his outstanding service to the
1975 Jefferson County Watermelon
Festival. Working in many areas of
the festival during the months of
May and June, DeVane traveled to
many towns in Florida and Georgia
-giving out the brochures. He spent
many hours with the festival beauty
pageant on stage and off.
Mary Walker, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. George Walker, Monticello re-
ceived a bachelor of science degree
in elementary education, magna
cum laude.
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 9, 1965
Mrs. Thomas Bird was hostess
when her bridge club met at her
home on Pearl Street.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wilder and son,
Fred left for New London, Conn.,
where Fred will enter the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy.
Mrs. L.R. Rainey was high score
winner of the afternoon at bridge
and Miss Mary Bud Holmes won
low score prize.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 8, 1955
James Temple who had been
called to the pastorate of Elizabeth
Baptist Church was to be ordained.
Polly Clarke and Dorothy Mathis,
Jefferson County representatives to
Girls Statp gave an interesting report
on their activities.
The annual, farm tour, which was
attended by over 100 interested peo-
ple was declared a huge success. A
much-needed rain made the demon-
strating farmers happy and the tour
ended with a fish fry at L.G. Morris
camp.


Attacker .Now Under Attack


The king of attack is under attack.
What aan irony!
Karl Rove, the architect of Presi-
dent Bush's political career, is feel-
ing the heat as a result of an
investigation into who leaked the
name of an undercover CIA opera-
tive.
His involvement in the case,
whether appropriate or
inappropriate, has the White House
doing a two step.
When the investigation began two
years ago, President Bush said he
wanted to know if anybody in his
administration was involved and if
so, they would be dealt with.
His press secretary, Scott McClel-
lan, made similar statements even
going so far as to say nobody in the
White House was involved.
Now, it turns out Rove is involved
in the case and the White House
says it can't talk about it because the
investigation is ongoing.
It may be that Rove, did nothing
wrong but the White House dance is
causing political damage.
What Rove has apparently admit-
ted to is that he told a reporter Am-


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cic/ion


bassador Joe Wilson's wife was a
CIA operative, but he didn't release
her name.
That's some distinction, isn't it?
Time will tell if the Special Prosecu-
tor buys that kind of reasoning.
Naturally the Democrats are jump-
ing all over Rove. The Republicans
are howling it's too early to deter-
mine Rove's complicity or guilt.
Of course back in the Clinton
years, the Republicans hollered
complicity and guilt very often
when there was no complicity or
guilt.
You'll recall Whitewater, Vince


Foster's suicide, Travelgate, etc. all
dry holes but that didn't deter the at-
tacks.
Such is the game of politics these
days.
Rove is an inviting target'for
Democrats because he's caused
them nothing but heartburn.
Rove is a master at demonizing
opponents and the Democrats have-
n't yet learned how to handle the at-
tacks.
Most recently Rove told a conser-
vative group that conservatives pre-
pared for war after 9/11 while some
liberals wanted therapy for the at-


tackers.
While that line played well with
the right wing, it was dead wrong.
The record is after 9/11 liberals and
conservatives stood together in sup-
porting the war on Al Qaeda. That's
the record.
Rove is an expert at turning any
question about White House policies
into attacks on the questioner.
If you question the wisdom of the
Iraq war and the shifting reasons for
the war, Rove would have you in
league with traitors and deserters.
Trouble is, it is our freedom of de-
bate and discussion that contributes
to the greatness of America.
Rove and his crew call any mem-
ber of Congress who disagrees with
Bush an "obstructionist."
When Republicans disagree with
Presidents, they are principled pub-
lic servants.
It is a wonderful game of seman-
tics.
I have no idea how the investiga-
tion will go but it is interesting to
note the king of attack is under at-
tack and his minions are crying foul.
My, my!


New Health Specialty Evolved


Webster's Dictionary "partner" as
"one who is associated with another
in a shared activity."
When that shared activity is main-
taining your good health and pro-
moting a healthy lifestyle for you,
your family and community, many
experts believe that a nurse practi-
tioner (NP) is the best partner you
can have.
NPs empower patients to maintain
and improve their health by provid-
ing both comprehensive health care
and health counseling. Through pre-
vention and promotion, they treat
the whole person not just the ail-
ment.


Nurse practitioners practice ac-
cording to their specialty and pro-
vide a unique blend of nursing and
medical services to individuals,
families and groups. In addition to
diagnosing and managing illness,
they emphasize health promotion
and disease prevention. As a partner
in health, they aid in overall health
maintenance.
Teaching and counseling individu-
als, families and groups are impor-
tant parts of NP practice.
These professionals practice indi-
vidually and in collaboration with
other health care providers. Nurse


practitioners also conduct extensive
research and are health care consult-
ants and patient advocates.
As a consumer of health care serv-
ices, you and your family should
know that:
On average, NPs spend 31 per-
cent more time with patients than do
physicians.
Patients with an NP primary-
care provider have a lower rate of
emergency room admissions and a
lower average hospital length of
stay.
NPs are more likely to suggest
therapeutic approaches that reduce


health care costs.
NPs counsel patients on promot-
ing health and preventing disease,
which reduces health care costs.
NPs provide patients with the in-
formation necessary to make healthy
lifestyle choices and educated health
care decisions.
A primary care physician shortage
in the 1960s created an optimal en-
vironment for a change in nursing.
Over the past 40 years the role of
the NP has grown and now members
of this dedicated group of health
care professionals, number more
than 106,000 strong in the U.S.


UN Agenda Targets Mayors


BY TOM DEWEESE
Column is-

We've all seen the bumper stick-
ers, "Think Globally Act Locally."
It's a creation of those who seek to
impose international guidelines, rule
and regulations on how we all live.
Americans are about to find that it's
not just an empty slogan.
From June 1 through 5, 2005, the
city of San Francisco was the site of
an international conference called
"World Environment Day." But the
agenda of this conference was much
bigger than just another hippy dance
in the park.
This meeting of the global elite
had a specific target and an agenda
with teeth.
The goal was the full implementa-
tion of the UN's Agenda 21 policy
called Sustainable Development, a
ruling principle for top-down con-
trol of every aspect of our lives -
from food, to health care, to com-


munity development, and beyond.
This time, the target audience is our
nation's mayors.
The UN's new tactic, on full dis-
play at this conference, is to ignore
federal and state governments and
go straight to the roots of American
society. Think globally-act locally.
As. prt f thcir participation in the
conference, mayors were pressed to
commit their communities to spe-
cific legislative and policy goals by
signing a slate of United Nations ac-
cords. Two documents were pre-
sented for the mayors' signature.
The first document is called the
"Green Cities Declaration," a state-
ment of principles which set the
agenda for the mayors' assigned
task.
It says, in part, "Believing as May-
ors of cities around the globe, we
have a unique opportunity to pro-
vide leadership to develop truly sus-
tainable urban centers based on
culturally and economically appro-
priate local actions... "
The raw meat of the agenda is out-


lined in detail in the second docu-
ment, called the "Urban Environ-
ment Accords." The Accords in-
clude exactly 21 specific actions (as
in Agenda 21) for the mayors to
take, controlled by a time table for
implementation.
Here's a quick look at a few of the
21 agenda actions called for.
Under the topic of energy, action
item number one calls for mayors to
implement a policy to increase use
of "renewable" energy by 10%
within seven years. Renewable en-
ergy includes solar and wind power.
Not stated in the UN documents is
the fact that in order to meet the
goal, a community would have to
reserve thousands of acres of land to
set up expensive solar panels or
even more land for wind mills.
Consider that it takes current 50
megawatt gas-fired generating plant
about 2-5 acres of land to produce
its power. Yet to create that same
amount of power through the use of
solar panels would require at least
1,000 acres.


Using wind mills to generate 50
megawatts would require over 4,000
acres of land, while chopping up
birds and creating a deafening roar.
The cost of such "alternative" en-
ergy to the community would be
vastly prohibitive. Yet, such un-
workable ideas are the
environmentally-correct orders of
the days that he mayors are being
urged to follow.
Energy Actions two and three deal
with the issue of reducing energy
consumption. Both of these are
backdoor sneak attacks by the UN to
enforce the discredited Kyoto
Global Warming Treaty, which
President Bush has refused to imple-
ment.
Kyoto would force the United
States to reduce its energy consump-
tion by at least 30 percent, forcing
energy shortages and severely dam-
aging the nation's economy.
Kyoto is the centerpiece of the
UN's drive to control the world
(See UN Agenda Page 5)


From Our Photo File


-L
'I

~g


. ':.- .* -










Day Insurance Agency

Opens In Jefferson Square


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Day Insurance Agency, re-_
cently opened its doors in the Jeffer-
son Square Shopping Center.
Located in the former Fairy Tale
Photo spot, business hours are 8:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through
Friday, and 9 a.m. until noon, Satur-
day.


The Day Agency is owned by the
mother and daughter team of Dar-
lene J. O'Brien and her daughter
Kimberly Day-Spivey, both long
time local residents, with a total of
more than 30 years of experience
between them in the insurance in-
dustry.
They formerly owned and oper-
ated the Day Agency on Apalachee
Parkway, in Tallahassee, for eight


and worker's compensation insur-
ance.
O'Brien said with their many
available carriers, they can place
special risk clients easily.


years.
O'Brien said that they are thrilled, "Since insurance rates vary so
.,, .' lince Insurance rates vary so
with the positive response they have uch in the insurance industry, ha-
been getting from county residents chine insurance iustry, hav-
and look forward to many years of ing many different A-rated carriers,
serviand look forward to many years of gives us the advantage of being very
competitive," says O'Brien.


The Day Agency specializes in
small business protection, and has
expertise in the needs of the con-
struction industry.
They have many A-rated markets
available for both general liability


Some of their many carriers in-
clude: AIG Insurance Auto, Ameri-
can Strategic Insurance Co., and Fi-
delity National Insurance Co.
For a free quote, call 997-8175.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005 PAGE 5

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'7^-- Monticello, FL. 32344
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Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
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UN Agenda Targets


(Continued From Page 4)
economy and redistribute, wealth to
Third World nations. It would do
nothing to help the environment.
Yet, the mayors are being pushed to
help implement this destructive
treaty city-by-city.
Perhaps the most egregious action
offered in the Urban Environmental
Accords deals with the topic of wa-
ter.
Action number twenty calls for
adoption and implementation of a
policy to reduce individual water
consumption by 1.0% by 2020.
Interestingly, UN 'begins by stat-
ing: "Cities with potable water con-
sumption greater than 100 liters per
capital per day will adopt and imple-
ment policies to reduce consumption
by 10 percent by 2015."
There is no basis for the 100 liter
figure other than employing a very
clever use of numbers to lower the
bar and control the debate. One
must be aware that 100 liters equals
about 26 gallons per person, per
day. According to the UN, each per-
son should only have 10% less than
26 gallon each day to drink, bathe,
flush toilets, wash clothes, water
lawns, wash dishes, cook, and more.
According to the U.S. Geological
Survey, Americans need about 100
GALLONS per day to perform these
basic functions. Consider also that.


there is no specific water shortage in
the United States.
The rest of the Accords deal with
a variety of subjects including waste
reduction, recycling, transportation,
health, and nature. Perhaps the most
blatant promise of action is Action
number sixteen in which the mayors
are supposed to agree to: "Every
year identify three products, chemi-
cals, or compounds that are used
within your city that represents the
greatest risk to human health and
adopt a law to eliminate their sale
and use in the city."
There you have it. Every year, our
nation's mayors are to promise to
ban something! What if there isn't a
"chemical or compound" that poses
a risk? Gotta ban something
anyway. That's not an idle threat. In
the 1990's Anchorage, Alaska had
some of the most pristine water in
the nation. It had no pollution.
Yet the federal government or-
dered the city to meet strict federal
clean water standards that required it
to remove a certain percentage of
pollution.
In order to meet those require-
ments, Anchorage was forced to
dump fish parts into its pristine wa-
ter so that it could then clean out the
required quotas. Your city's mayor
may have to ban the ink in your
fountain pen to meet his quota and
ban it he will.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20,2005


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


County volunteers are sorely
needed for the 23 local children in
the Guardian Ad Litem Program.
Guardian ad Litem is a court ap-
pointed program for abused, ne-
glected and/or abandoned children
that have been placed in foster care.
Help is needed to provide a voice
for these children who need that
special someone to speak for them-


in difficult times, to monitor situa-
tions, and report to the court deci-
sions that will affect the life of the
children.
A new training class is scheduled
to begin 10 am. to 1 p.m., Thursday,
July 28, in the conference room, at
208 South Range Street in Madison.
The class is designed to recruit
volunteers to work with the children:
involved in the program.' ,
Registrations can be made by con-
tacting Sandy Tice at 1-866-341-
1425.


Homes Of Mourning


Margaret L. Woods
Margaret L. Woods, age 82, a
homemaker, passed away Saturday,
July 16, 2005 in Tallahassee,
Florida.
There will be a graveside service
It 11 am Wednesday, July 20, 2005
at Oakfield Cemetery in Monticello,
Florida. Family will receive friends
from 6 'til 8 p.m. on Tuesday, July
19, 2005 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel.
A native of West Virginia, and
former resident of Kingwood, W.
Va., she had lived in Monticello
since 1986. She was a member of
Macedonia Baptist Church in
Drifton.
Margaret L. Woods is survived by:
3 sons John Sutton of Monticello,
Gene C. Sutton of Fort Myers and
Steve Sutton (and wife Sharon) of
,Oakland, Maryland. 1 daughter
Peggy Smith (and husband E.J.) of
Monticello. 4 brothers Luther Wil-
son of Aurora, W. Va., Walter Wil-
son of Kingwood, W. Va., John
Wilson of Leesville, La., and How-
-ard Wilson of Bruceton Mills, W.
:Va., 1 sister Ellen Feressa of King-
wood, W. Va., 9 grandchildren and
.6 great grandchildren.


LJouis Rothman
-ouis Rothman died
Thursday, July 14, 2005, in Grady
County, GA. A private family me-
morial service will be held at his
son's home, William R. Rothman, in
Monticello, FL. at a later date.
Louis Rothman was born
March 3, 1917, in New York City,
New York. Born into the family of
the late Abraham and Bertha Abra-
mowitz Rothman, of Tallahassee,
FL.
Louis Rothman was a plumber
for various contractors and inspector
for cities of North Miami and Miami
Beach, FL. He was also a member
of the United Association of Plumb-
ers & Pipefitters, in Local 519, Mi-
ami, FL. Mr. Louis Rothman also
devoted himself to the U.S. Army
Field Artillery from 1944-1946.

He is survived by his wife Betty
Anne Rothman, of Tallahassee, FL.,
married December 1940; Son Wil-
liam R. Rothman and wife,
Katharine of Monticello, FL.;
Daughter Anna Louise Rothman,
of Orlando, FL.; Granddaughter -.
Emily R. Rothman, of Monticello,
(See Home Of Mourning Page 7)


'if


Garden Club Board


Plans For 2005-07


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Board members of the Monticello
Garden Club (MGC) met at the
home of Isabelle deSercey to dis-
cuss plans and activities for the next
two years.
President Dianne Braren an-
nounced that past president Jan
Wadsworth has accepted the posi-
tion of Alternate Vice President.
Members reviewed the Survey Re-
sponses sent out in a mass mailing
to the membership in June, and
some good ideas were gleaned.
Plans for the General Meeting in
October are underway. A "Fun With
Flowers" workshop, and a Deco-
rated Hat Contest are in the works
for the event.
The Board expects this luncheon
event to be informative and well at-
tended.
Reminders of dues payable went
out Monday.
Members will be informed by
Aug. 5, of plans made by the
Board.
Directories will take on a new
look, as a small 3-ring hinder, so it
can, be used over again with pages
added or deleted as needed.
Club and Circle Officers are asked


to attend the Sept. 7 seminar at the
Tallahassee Garden Club.
This workshop is intended to help
and inform new officers of the Gar-
den Clubs of their positions and du-
ties.
The Board has been considering
ideas for the 2005-2007 year.
The Board is seeking members to
become committee chairs.
Interested parties are asked to con-
tact the Club President at 997-3729.
A chairman is needed to direct the
Membership Drive, which the Board
would like to see begin as soon as
possible.
The National Garden Clubs, Inc.
theme for the new 2005-2007 year
is "Embrace Gardening's Tapestry."
The Deep South Region theme is
"Insuring the Legacy" and -the
theme for the Florida Federation of
Garden Clubs, Inc. is "Keys To Har-
mony."
The District III theme was not
known at the time of the Board
-Meeting. Members are asked to give
some thought to a theme for the
Monticello Garden Club.
One of Braren's goals for her
Presidential term is to keep the
membership up to date with MGC
news and to get them involved with
their Club and Circles and to keep
them involved.


Triple L Club Plans


Patriotic Program


GARDEN CLUB BOARD met for 'an organizational meeting
for the 2005-2007 term. Here Isabelle DeSercey,left, and
Jan Wadsworth, receive notes from President Dianne Bra-
ren (seated.) (News Photo)











k












PLAYING at Our Blessings Learning Center, Nyjae Free-
man shows her blue tongue ;aftee eating some blue candy.
(News Photo)


Jefferson Nursing

Activities in July


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Residents at the Jefferson Nursing
Center have been kept busy this
month, with events and entertain-
ment.
Recent events at the Center in-
clude: a pizza party which began
Friday, July 1.
July 4, members of VFW Post
251 shared breakfast with the Vet-
erans at the Center. Later that day,
residents were treated to a cookout,
and that evening some of the resi-
dents took a trip to the Fireworks
Celebration at the Recreation Park.
"Our residents really enjoyed July
4 events," exclaimed Activities Di-
rector Voncell Edwards.


Line Dancers performed for the
residents on the evening of Monday,
July 18.
Friday, July 29 residents and staff
will celebrate July Birthdays with
cake, ice cream, and fruit punch.
Residents celebrating birthdays
this month include: Carrie Hendry,
on the 2nd; Julia Neeley and Eunice
Wilcox on the I Ith; and Aileen
Mcfate, on the 15th.
Resident Eunice Wilcox's daugh-
ter Nellie Strickland, brought in a
special birthday cake for her mother
to enjoy and share with her fellow
residents and the staff at the Center.
"I would especially like to thank
the Ladies VFW Auxiliary for the
gifts they brought out for the resi-
dents, in care of S.iirley
Washington," Edwards said.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Triple L Club will meet on
Tuesday, July 26 at the First Baptist
Church of Monticello fellowship
hall for a Patriotic Celebration pro-
gram.
The program is still incomplete,,
but promises to be inspiring.
Hostesses are: Emily Taylor, Phyl-
lis Weldon, Dottie Bishop,Thelma
Letchworth, and President Mary
Helen Andrews.
A "Meeting of Music" had been
planned with Destin DuBose, minis-
ter of music, but he will be out of
town with the youth of the church at
Quest Youth Camp 2005 in Chatta-
nooga, TN. _.._


Local GOP

TO Hold

Barn Dance

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Republican Party of Jefferson
County presents a Barbecue Dinner
and Barn Dance 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Sat-
urday, July 23 at Willow Pond.
The theme of the event is "Cele-
brating Agriculture," with special
guest of honor Commissioner of
Agriculture Charles Bronson.
The Encore Band will provide the
music.
The cost is $15 per person, with a
beer and wine cash bar available.
Tickets are available by mail at
www.jeffersongop.com, or by call-
ing 228-4400.
Mastercard; Visa, and Disco'. er
Cards are accepted.,


At the June meeting, programs
and activities were planned for the
upcoming Triple L year.
Past programs and activities have
included: the Pine Cone Kitchen
Band from the Southern Pine Nurs-
ing Home in Thomasville, GA.; an
educational and historical tour of
Jefferson County, as ,told by local
resident Dee Counts; Gospel music
programs from area churches; a
slide presentation from Maclay Gar-
dens by State Park Ranger Ken
Lewis; Holiday Feasts with the
sounds of the season; programs on
health related topics; and defensive
driving classes.
There were also day ,trips to Wa-
kulla Springs and Hiawassee, GA.;
and to restaurants in Tallahassee and
Steinhatchee; and a cookout at the
meeting location.
"Senior adults are welcomed and
encouraged to attend," says An-
drews. "This is a great opportunity
for newcomers to meet and socialize
with others and have a wonderful
time," she adds.
The Triple L Club meets 10:30
a.m. on the 4th Tuesday of every
month at the First Baptist Church
Fellowship Hall.


Skate Night

Set July 29
Community Skate Night will be
held from 7 9 p.m. Friday, July 29
at the Monticello Church of the
Nazarene Family Life Center lo-
cated on Highway 19 north.
All are encouraged to bring skates
or roller blades to enjoy skating, or
to come and watch the skaters and
share fellowship.
The event is open to all ages at no
charge!
S'Rfreshnfients'wilf.be available:';


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Red Hat Ladies


Motor To T'ville


RED HAT LADIES propose a toast at their Black, Thelma Birdwell, Lee Condon, Mar-
recent outing at Toscoga Market Place in gie Cole.
Thomasville. L-R: Colleen Weber, Fran


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Red Hats of America traveled
to Thomasville, Saturday, to dine
and shop at Toscoga Market Place.
The ladies met at the Dunn's Fur-
niture Plaza and carpooled to their
destination and enjoyed socializing
as they rode.
Upon arrival, they lunched on
Chicken Almondene. The meal was
described as excellent, pleasantly
served, with mouth watering des-
serts available.
Lois Piper coordinated the trip.
She made phone calls to the mem-
bers and made sure that vehicles-
were fully occupied, and arranged


Workday At Animal

Shelter Successful

VIDA ,VT TT rr. done."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Humane Society shelter
work day conducted Saturday was
a huge success, with 10-15 volun-
teers showing up to help through-
out the course of the day, and the
completion of much needed work.
Caroline and George Carswell
also provided their hardworking
work crew.
"It was very hot and miserable,
and there was a lot to be done,"
said spokesperson Martha Canady.
"We were able to get so much work-


Work conducted by volunteers
included the removal of a large
downed tree limb that fell on the
cal room roof, causing damage and
repairing that damage.
All of the kennels were moved,
bleached and cleaned, all of the dog
runs were mowed and trimmed,
and debris recently deposited on
the property when Dennis passed
through, was removed.
"We want to thank the volunteers,"
said Canady. "The shelter looks so
good as a result of their hard and
dedicated work."


Homes Of Mourning


W,-


*a .0 .11.


z-f.


PLAYING at Our Blessings Learning Center a are Timothy
Jackson, left, and Njyjae Freeman. (News Photo)


for some of the ladies to be picked
up and brought to Dunn's Furniture
Plaza, from which the group de-
parted.
The 18 ladies had no agenda
scheduled, other than to lunch and
shop. They chose The Market Place,
a three story building full of an-
tiques, with the dining room is in the
center on the first floor.
Diners are able to "eye shop"
surrounding items, as they enjoy
their meal.
The Aug. 13 meeting of the Red
Hat Ladies will take place at the
Pizza Hut.
It will be hosted by Pat
Muchowski and Jacque Langford.
No program has been scheduled
as yet, but members will be notified
before the meeting.

Circle Gives

City Check For

Cemetery Well

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Founders Garden Circle member
and past president Cindy Lee, pre-
sented a $702.76 check to Mayor
Julie Conley at the Tuesday, July 12
City Council meeting.
The $702.76 was the remainder of
funds raised by the Circle, for the
Oakfield Cemetery Well project.
The money is to be earmarked for
continuing beautification at the
cemetery.
"This was my last official duty as
President of the Founder's Garden
Circle," Lee said.
The Founder's Garden Circle will
continue to meet on the second
Tuesday of each month with the
next meeting set for Sept. 8.


BATMAN BEGINS
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 4:00 9:20


HERBIE:FULLY
LOADED (G)
Fri. -Thurs. 2:25 4:50 -
7:15 9:35


FANTASTIC FOUR
(PG13)
Fri.- Thurs. 1:15 4:30 -
7:05 9:40
NO PASSES


CHARLIE
&CHOCOLATE
FACTORY (PG)
Fri.-Thurs. 1:00 4:05 -
7:10 9:45
NO PASSES


WEDDING
CRASHERS (R)
Fri. Thurs. 1:20 4:20 -
7:25 10:05
NO PASSES

BEWITCHED (PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 1:40 7:00

WAR OF THE
WORLDS (PG13)
1:30- 4:15 7:20 10:00


(Continued From Page 6)
FL.; Brother Frank Rothman of
.Los Angeles, CA.; Sister-in-law -
Merle Honroth, of Phoenix, AZ.;
and Brother-in-law Dawson Nor'-
man, of Tarpon Springs, FL:
Mrytle Harlow Mercer
Myrtle Harlow Mercer age 100,
died Sunday, July 17, 2005 in Talla-
hassee.
A native of Clay County, Georgia,
she had lived in Tallahassee since
1946. She taught in the Florida
School system for many years. She
was an active member of Trinity
United Methodist Church, the
TMRMC Auxiliary, Retired Educa-
tors Association, ADK Honorary
Teachers Society and the UDC Win-
nie Davis Chapter.
She is survived by: Sister-in-law,
Thelma Harlow of Groves, Texas,
devoted great niece, Lisa Davis and
husband Danny of Crawfordville,
niece Carol Keller and husband
Franklin of Crawfordville, nephew
Tom Braswell and wife Helen of
Monticello and several other nieces
and nephews.
There will be a graveside service
held at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, July
20, 2005 at Roseland Cemetery in
Monticello. Interment will also be
held at Roseland Cemetery. Visita-
tion (viewing) will be 6:00 8:00
p.m. Tuesday, July 19, 2005 at
Beggs Funeral Home, Apalachee
Chapel in Tallahassee.
Contributions may be made to
Trinity United Methodist Church,
PO Box 1086, Tallahassee, FL
32302 or The Southeastern Scholar-
ship Foundation, 322 Stadium
Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32304.


Harriet Rebecca Walker
Lewis
Harriet Rebecca Walker Lewis,
age 86, a retired LPN who worked
atTMH ,for 30'years passed away
Monday July 18, 2005 in
Monticello.
Her funeral services will be Thurs-
day, July 21, 2005 at Beggs Chapel
Monticello at 2:00 p.m.. Interment
will follow at Beth Page Cemetery.
Family will receive friends at Beggs
Funeral Home Monticello Chapel
Wednesday, July 20, 2005 from
6:00 to 8:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers
donations can be made to Big Bend
Hospice 1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32308 .
A native of Jefferson County,
Mrs. Lewis has lived in the Monti-
cello area most all her life was a for-
mer resident of Thomasville and
Quitman, GA. She was a member of
Elizabeth Baptist Church.
Mrs. Lewis is survived by her hus-
band W.T. Lewis, Monticello, one
son David Ellis Honea and wife
Jane of MacClenny, FL one daugh-
ter Nancy Stover and her husband
Tommy of Monticello. She also
leaves behind 2 brothers Gadsden
Alexander Linton and wife Paula of
Goose Creek, SC, John Sidney Lin-
ton and wife Nancy of Hudson NY,
and one sister Mary Butler and hus-
band Raymond of Tallahassee, six
grandchildren David Eric Honea,
Kelley Ann Honea, Daniel Hushel
Honea and wife April, Matthew Jo-
seph Honea, Tammy Elaine Diam-
bra and husband Jason, Jennifer Kay
Stover, 5 great grandchildren, Jeoy
Honea, Mackenizie Rose Honea,
Victoria Diambra, Daniel Diambra,
and Delilah Diambra.


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.AGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20,
, -..%. : 1 I *I I n
.. "i


2005

Free, Reduced Price Meals


Student Eligibility Policy,


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


r.


The Jefferson County School
Board announces its policy for Free
and Reduced Price Meals for stu-
dents under the National School
Lunch and Breakfast Programs.
Household size and income crite-
ria will be used to determine eligi-
* ability.
Application forms are being sent
to all homes with a letter to parents
or guardians.
To apply for Free or Reduced Price
Meals, households must fill out the
application and return it to the
,r. -,


school.
The information provided on the
application will be used for the pur-
pose of determining eligibility, and
may be verified at any time during
the school year, by school or other
program officials.
Applications may be submitted at
any time during the school year.
Household that receive Food
Stamps or TANF (Temporary Aid
To Needy Families) are required to
list on the application only .the
child's name, Food Stamp/TANF
case number, and signature of an
adult household member.
Foster children may receive bene-
fits based upon the child's personal


Canine Snake Bite


Vaccine Available


MONTEZ WILLIAMS takes part in the Physical Fitness Pro-
gram at the JES Boys and Girls Club.


MIYKALA DEAN works with paints at the St. Phillips Boys
mad Girls Club. Pink is her favorite color, she said.


,-










Uk
,,1 ..



-' 2 ---* + .*

ERICA HUGHES enjoys a picnic lunch at St. Phillip's Boys
and Girls Club, during a recent activity. (News Photos)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As the temperatures continue to
rise, Rattlesnakes are becoming
even more active in the commu-
nity and locally owned animals are
more at risk to suffer a Rattlesnake
bite.
Rattlesnake vaccine remains
available in the county for canines.
Dr. Reginald Jordan of Animal
Medical Clinic, states that this is of
particular interest in the county be-
cause in his 28 years as a veterinar-
ian here, he has seen many animals,
including dogs, cats, horses and
cows, that have suffered rattlesnake
bites.
He explained that the vaccine is
used as a preventative and lessens
the severity of snakebites. "Some
vaccinated dogs may not even
show symptoms after receiving a
bite," said Jordan.
All dogs, whether vaccinated or


not, should be taken to a veterinar-
ian for evaluation and care as soon
as possible following a snakebite.
Even bites from non-venomous
snakes can lead to serious infec-
tions and antibiotic treatment may
be needed.
A veterinarian can determine if
the dog is sufficiently protected for
the specific type of snake involved
and the amount of venom injected,
or whether additional medical treat-
ment would be helpful.
Jordan explained that the dog is
vaccinated the first year twice, one
dose being received one month af-
ter the first. After the first year,
large dogs are vaccinated with a'
booster once a year in the Spring,
and the recommendation for
smaller dogs is twice a year every
year.
The rattlesnake vaccine is avail-
able at Animal Medical Clinic.
Veterinary Associates report that
they have none in-house, but do
have access upon request. Call
997- 3750 for further details. a


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income alone.
All other households must supply
the following information, listed on
the application:
*Total monthly household income
by amount received and type of in-
come (wages, child support, and the
like) received by each household
member.
*Names of all household members..
*Signature of an adult household
member certifying' the information
is correct,
*Social Security number of the
adult signing the application, or the
word "none," if he/she does not
have a number.
If a household member becomes
unemployed or if the household size
changes, the school should be con-
tacted.
Such changes .may make the. stu-
dent eligible for reduced price or
free meals, if income drops.
The School Food Service Supervi-
sor will review applications and de-


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You can Bet your britches It's gonna be a Night to remember, so Get yourself to the Monticello Opera House for an evening of





NUN BINGO!


with the Little Sisters of Drifton, (formerly Hoboken)

FRIDAY, JULY 22 7:00 P.M.


BINGO!


FOOD!


RAFFLE!


DRINKS!


50-50 DRAWING!


$5.00 Admission includes 2 BINGO! cards. Additional cards $1.00 each
*****PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE OPERA HOUSE ROOF FUND******


Call 997-4242 to reserve your seat. Everyone who calls ahead will be entered in a special
"Early Bird" Prize Drawing.


termine eligibility.
If a parent or guardian is dissatis-
fied with the ruling of the official,
he/she may discuss the decision
with the determining official on an
informal basis.
If a parent wishes to make a for-
mal appeal, a request may be, made
orally or in writing to: Superinten-
dent Phil Barker, 1490 West Wash-
ington Street, 342-0100.
Unless indicated otherwise on the
application, information on the ap-
plication may be used by the school
system to determine eligibility for
other educational programs.
The total income before taxes, so-
cial security, health benefits, union
dues, and other deductions, must be
reported.
A sample of income eligibility
guide lines for free meals follows:
For a household of four, $2515,
annually; six, $33631:, eight,
$$42,107.
Sample income eligibility for re-
duced price meals:
Household of four, $$35,798; six,
$47,860; eight, $59,922.
A copy of the policy can be re-
viewed by contacting Joann Clark,
930 Mamie Scott Drive, 997-0145.









Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005 PAGE 11


WELCOME TO TRY CLUB'S
JEFFERSON COUNTRY CLUB'S ON

~~DDBY

SPONSORED BY .D
--". ,- _. .. .' '. .





WINNERS in the Country Club's Watermelon Jackson, Tex Hamilton, Amy and Duke Har- WINNING consolation in the 6.0 division of scored by FMB at the Country Club, are: Ste-
Tennis Tournament 7.0 Division L-R: Cathy prison, .the Watermelon Tennis Tournament spon- phen Demott, left, and Cathy Jackson.


Festival Tennis


Tourney Winners


IN THE 6.0 DIVISION, winners of the Water-
melon Tennis Tournament are:' from left,


-Pk


',.,' -* ';
-. '.. ". ,% ..-? ,. -



"I. '

p. .- -


.. .. ll- d -
George Miller, Pam Kelly, Trisha Wirick,
and Doug Wainright. .




' -


WELCOME TO
JEFFERSON COUNTRY


SPONSORED BY


CONSOLATION winners in the 7.0 division Club are Lisa Jackson, left, and
of the Tennis Tournament at the Country Mueller.


Festival Melon Tourney

Set Saturday At Park .


Brad


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Winners of the 10th annual Wa-
termelon Festival Mixed Doubles
Tennis Tournament have been an-
nounced.
The tournament consisted of the
6.0 division and the 7.0 division,
with participants choosing their re-
spective levels of play.
The 6.0 mixed doubles tennis
tournament was won by the team of
George Miller and Pam Kelly.
They defeated Doug Wainright
and Trisha Wirick in the third set
for the victory in the finals.
The Lucky Losers Flight was
won by the team of Cathy Jackson
and Stephen Demott.
The 7.0 mixed doubles tennis
tournament was won by the team of
Duke and Amy Harrison, which de-
feated the team of Tex Hamilton
and Cathy Jackson in the finals.
The Lucky Losers Flight, was

Lady Diamonds To
Play Tallahassee

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After being rained out. with the
game scheduled against Mayo re-
cently, the Lady Diamonds softball
team is scheduled to play Tallahas-
see, 4:30 p.m., Sunday, here.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said he
expected a good game.
Subscribe Today!
Monticello News
In State: $45.00 (yr.)
Out of State: $52.00 (yr.) [


won by the team, of Brad Mueller
and Lisa Jackson.
Spokesman Doug Wainright
said this year's tournament was a
huge success, with 24 players par-
ticipating in the event.
Attending players came from
both Monticello and Tallahassee.
"The competition levels were ex-
tremely close," said Wainright.
"More than half of the games
played resulted in going to tie
breakers matches.
He said the players had a great
time, and that the weather was
very nice and everything ran very
smoothly.
"We are hoping to expand the
levels of play next year to also in-
clude an 8.0 team," said Wainright.
"We would like to thank all of the
people who put so much hard work
into the tournament to make it a re-
ality."
These include Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank, Simpson's Nursery,
Maloy's Nursery and Troy J.


For more information on how you
as an employer can help,
contact your state committee
at our web site: www.esgr.org.

T EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF
THE GUARD AND RESERVE.


CASH NOW As see
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


Recreation Director Kevin Aman
reports that the 29th Annual Water-
melon Festival men's softball tour-
nament will be conducted at the
park, beginning at 8 a.m., Saturday.
The tournament had to be re-
scheduled due to the threat of se-
vere weather posed by Tropical
Storm Arlene.
The 12 men's teams competing in
the tournament were determined
several weeks ago.
Last years event saw some 200-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Recent church league softball ac-
tion resulted in two of three games
won by forfeit.
Casa Bianca Baptist won over
Elizabeth Baptist by forfeit for
lack of players.
Elizabeth AME was victorious
over Christ Episcopal team number
one; and Calvary Baptist had to


300 spectators and lasted into the
wee hours of the morning, with
many participants camping in tents
while awaiting their turns on the
field.
Aman said he expected about the
same number of spectators this
year.
The previous tournament saw a
grueling battle ongoing for many
hours, with 125 players receiving
watermelons for each home run hit.
Team Footlong of Tallahassee
won the 2004 tournament.


forfeit to Christ Episcopal team
number two, because of a schedul-
ing conflict involving a Bible Study
the same night.
Elizabeth Baptist will face Christ
Episcopal team number one 7 p.m,
Thursday; and Calvary Baptist
will take on Casa Bianca Baptist,
also at 7 p.m..
Christ Episcopal team number
two is scheduled to play against
Elizabeth AME, 8:30 p.m., Thurs-
day.


ANNOUNCES


TUMBLING CLASSES


Coming September 2005
For Children Ages

3-10


Call 997-4253

for more information

Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Instructor


WELCOME TO
JEFFERSON COUNTRY CLUB'S

AE .:DI ..N, .
"T'5 tj'N^^^ .v


.7,


In Case Of Emergency,


Dial 911


:n
V.


Church Softball League
Action Continues Thursday


-.-I w-l-
Imam






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005

HOW TO Reduce The Risk

Of Attack By Sharks


In the wake of recent shark at-
tacKs on Panhandle beaches, Exten-
sion Office Director Larry Halsey
shares this information from the
University of Florida Museum of
Natural History with residents:
Shark attacks are rare, but they
are most likely occur near shore,
typically inshore of a sandbar or be-
tween sandbars, where they can be-
come trapped by low tide, and near
steep drop offs, where sharks' prey
congregate.
Types of unprovoked shark at-
tacks include:
*Hit and Run, by far the most
common, usually in shallow waters
or surf zone. These often occur
when the sharks mistakes the human
for prey. Injuries are usually small
lacerations, often on the leg, below
the knee, and seldom life threaten-
ing.
*Bump and Bite, less common,
usually in deeper waters involving
swimmers or divers. The shark cir-
cles and often bumps prior to the at-
tack, with injuries usually severe
and often fatal.
*Sneak, less common, usually in
deeper waters involving swimmers
or divers. The shark attacks without
warning and injuries are severe and
often fatal.


The relative risk of a shark attack
is very small. Chances of interaction
with a shark can be reduced by
heeding this advice:
*Always stay in groups, as sharks
are more likely to attack a solitary
individual.
*Do not wander too far from
shore, as this isolates one and places
him/her far away from assistance.
*Avoid being in the water during
darkness or .twilight hours when
sharks are most active and have a
sensory advantage.
*Do not enter the water if bleed-
ing from an open wound, or if men-
struating. A shark will smell the
blood.
*Don't wear shinny jewelry which
will reflect the light and can be mis-
taken by the shark for fish scales.
*Avoid waters with known efflu-
ents or sewage or sewage, and those
being used by sport or commercial


fishermen, especially if there are
signs of bait fishes or feeding activ-
ity. Diving seabirds are a good indi-
cation of such action.
*Sightings of porpoises do not in-
dicate the absence of sharks, as they
both eat the same food items.
*Use extra caution when waters
are murky, and avoid uneven tan-
ning and bright colored clothing, as
sharks see contrasts very well.
"Refrain from excess splashing
and do not allow pets in the water
because of their erratic movements.
*Exercise caution when occupying
the area between sandbars or near
steep drop offs, as these are favorite
hangouts for sharks.
*Do not enter the water if sharks
are known to be.present and evacu-
ate the water if sharks are seen
while there. Above all, do not- har-
ass a shark if you do see one.


American Heart
Association.MV
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke

Reduce your risk factors


Z A


I,

~
ES
'a-


survive!
Keep litter out of our
waterways.' Recycle
plastics and fishing line.
Boat safely. x
myfwc.org/psm




It keeps

more than

memories

alive.




American Heart
Associations 9
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke



AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIALS & TRIBUTES

1-800-AHA-USAl


This space provided as a public service.
1.)1994, American Heart Association


Questions,

Anyone?

Have questions about federal government pro-
grams, benefits, and services? Get the answers
you can trust from the Federal Consumer
Information Center. We'll answer your ques-
tions directly or get you to the person who can.

Now the only question left is how to reach us.
Simple. Just call toll-free:

1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Eastern Time
Or visit www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call

A public service of this publication and the U.S. General Services Administration's
Federal Consumer Information Center


air purifier
It's simple Look for the
ENERGY STAR' io reduce
your home energy use


To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


MAN GREHUSAE AS U AR

,e o


Is Your Smoke Detector Working?
More Americans have smoke detectors than ever before. But nearly half don't work.
Without a working smoke detector as an
A early warning device, fire can spread
unnoticed through the household, blocking
escape routes and filling rooms with deadly
smoke.
Make sure you're protected. Start a
lifesaving habit this October 30. When you
change your clock from daylight-saving
time, change the batteries in your smoke
detectors.
A message from your fire department.
@1994 Energizer brand Batteries
International Association of Fire Chiefs


BUSINESS C93

List V"' to


DIRECTORY ___
Y I


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs
101 E Shlb, t. gais *'5097-10
CalonBr: te atr lmbrf..


LUMART AVIATION
Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
Come fly with us!


'LUTHER S. TURNER
:2150 EllIon Rd
:Perry. FL 32347
'Phone (850)584-8867
.Lumart's Stolport
:N 30-07-51 W 083-32-58
'E-mail LST@gtcom net


Classic Cessna 170-B


STAR TEAM .
(MONTICELLO / TALLAHASSEE)
SHAUNDRA M. BUGGS c. us'



HOME: 850-997-2404
LADY BUGO LIFESTYLES CELL: 850-264-5112
Website: www.ladybuggllfestyles.biz Email: Ildybuggls@aol.com


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


U I I


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT 'liJl i|l 1 JiJ


850-997-5808

850-545-9964 850-251-291:

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


I


PART-TIME SUPPLEMENT OR
FULL-TIME INCOME POTENTIAL.
NYSE Listed Company
Training Provided
Be Your Own Boss


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


1 'B Wellness Industry ij g
.
237329 850-997-2798B
Ask for*John Thomas


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


BETTER BODIES
S AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY' REPAIR I


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ROM DENTS & COLLISIONS TO RESTORATIONj
LOCATED JUST 14 MILES SOUTH OF MONTICELLO AT:
966K BARBER HILL RD. LAMONT, Fl.
I 997-4160 I
ANDY & TLNA AMES, OWNERS


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE


Norman L. Barf
Exclusive Agent
arfoot Insurance Gro


Allstate Insurance Company
3551 Blan Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Pubhlix Shopping (Cntr

oot 878-8077
ON'IN NhMuiida I i\ d S 3 5 i
)up nmail: NlOR)IMANI l lRM)) iircihalllcl-m


CHEERS


L I IYA I I A I All


El Curtis morgan-s u3arage, inc.


CO. Ao












To Place Your Ad





997-3568


MO




CLASSIFIED


Your Communityo Shopping Center


NTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005 PAGE 13

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday..,$7.00
Each Additional Line....$l,00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


AECGALS
N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEF-
ERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA PRO-
SATE DIVISION File Number: 05-66-PR
N RE: ESTATE OF ROGER G. ATCHI-
ON Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMIN-
STRATION: The administration of the
state of ROGER G. ATCHISON,
deceased, File Number 05-66-PR is pend-
ng in the Circuit -Court for Jefferson
county, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Jefferson County
courthouse, Monticello, Florida. The
*ame and address of the personal repre-
entative and of the personal representa-
ive's attorney are set forth below. ALL
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
[IED THAT: All persons on whom this
notice is served who have objections that
*hallenge the validity of the will. the ouali-
ications of the personal representative,
,enue, or jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with this
ourt WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY'
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All credi-
tors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice
is served within three months after the
date of the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other
creditors of the decedent and persons hav-
ing claims or demands against the estate of
the decedent must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this
Notice is July 13, 2005. Attorney For Per-
sonal Representative: T. Buckingham
Bird., P.O. Box 247, Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3S03 FL Bar ID # 0006176
7/13, 7/20, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL JUVE-
NILE DIVISION CASE NO.: 04-18-DPA




GiveT he Gift

That Grows


creating a SAVINGS
Savings .BONDS

For complete information
about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at
www.savingsbonds.gov. .
A public service of this newspaper


Steve Belmonte, Childreach sponsor,
CEO and President of Ramada hotels.
on a visit to hurricane-ravaged San Juan
in the Dominican Republic.


"Just look at

these kids.

How can you

not help?"


"In the poorest villages throughout
the world, families live in
conditions that are difficult to
imagine. And it's always the kids
who suffer most.
Childreach (formerly Foster Parents
Plan) is an amazing child sponsor-
ship organization that helps needy
children overseas to overcome the
most punishing poverty and not only
survive, but grow and thrive.
Childreach sponsors have helped
bring about miraculous changes.
Clean water, life-saving medicines,
hospitals, schools, and self-help
programs have improved the lives
of not only the children, but their
families and entire communities.
To find out more about
Childreach, call 1-800-556-7918.
Because if you really want to
help, Childreach really helps."


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE INTEREST OF: J.J. 02/06/2004
MINOR CHILD; NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jessie Joiner and Unknown Father
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills
Road, Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above
styled court for the termination of paren-
tal rights and the permanent commitment
of J.J. a male child born on 02/06/2004 in
Leon County, Florida to the State of Flor-
ida, Department of Children and Families,
Adoption and Related Services a licensed
child placing agency for subsequent adop-
tion and you are hereby to be and appear
in the above court at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, County Courthouse, Room 10
Monticello, Florida 32344 on Monday
August 22nd at 4:00 p.m. for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should
not be granted. You must appear on the
date and time specified. FAILURE TO
PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVI-
SORY HEARING CONSTITUTES YOUR
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD.
IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETI-
TION. WITNESS my hand and official
seal as the Judge of said court this 8th day
ofJr.e, 7-905./s/
7/1:, 7/20, 7/27, 8/3,c c

NOTICE
There will be an organizational meeting of
the Value Adjustment Board on Thursday,
July 21, 2005, at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, Monticello, Flor-
ida beginning at 4:00p.m. Carl D. Boat-
vright, Clerk.
7/20, c

HELP WANTED
The Healthy Start Coalition of
Jefferson, Madison and Taylor
Counties is seeking a Projects
Coordinator. Position requires
knowledge of local community health
services and agencies, ability to
communicate clearly and concisely
through oral and written
communication, ability to establish
and maintain effective working
relationships with Coalition
membership, staff, all pr.4ders a nd
the general public, ability 'to design,
prepare and deliver health education
presentations, and the ability to work
independently in local office or in the
field. Requires reliable
transportation, valid driver's license,
good driving record and automobile
insurance. The ideal candidate will
have Bachelor's degree in social work,
social sciences, education, health, or
social services related field of studies
and a strong working knowledge of
all Microsoft Office functions.
Knowledge of community relations,
public health issues, maternal and
child health, social work, or
marketing experience preferred.
Experience in the community's social
services preferred; must reside in
Jefferson, Madison or Taylor
Counties. Base Salary $27,000.00.
Submit Resume to: Healthy Start, PO
Box 568, Greenville, FL 32331 by July
30, 2005.
7/8, 13, 15, 20, 22, c
Come join uur growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Ca!! Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
7/13, 15, 20, 22, pd
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18 tfn, i
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. I117 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, s/d. tfn


HELP WANTED.
Parking Lot & Asphalt Maint. Co.
Now taking applications. Salary
D.O.E. 545-1776.
7/15, tfn, c
Registration and Records Specialist
(part-time 25 hours per week). Duties
include: Assisting with the day to day
record keeping in the department of
Enrollment Services. Complete job
description on web site.
Qualifications: Must be High School
Graduate, AA/AS degree preferred.
Proficient in Microsoft software.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. A complete packet includes:
resume and application (available at
www.nfcc.edu). Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet
must 'h received by 07/29/2005. EOE.
7/15, 20, ,2, 27, c


GARAGE SALE
Moving Sale. 1070 So. Water St.
Entertainment center, picnic table, lift
chair, freezer full of fo 1. Call
997-2438. 7/20, '/22,
pd

SERVICES
We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context. Christ

Episcopal Church, three blocks N of
the courthouse. Sunday service at
1 C.u AM. 997-4116.
7/20, tfii
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill-
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn


Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol eonjsist of 3 key ingredients
incorporatlIl into rice: bran bOil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to .limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, *fn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if-you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466


AUTOMOTIVE
1992 Mazda Pickup. (Red). Extended
cab w'bed liner. 997-3645. $1,800.
7/15, 20, pd
1999 Jeep Wrangler Sport. 6 cyl., a/c,
P.S., P.B., cruise, 5 spd., tilt, sound
bar, soft top, highway mileage only.
Very clea, $8000.00. 997-2725.
7/13, 15, 20. 22, 27, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c


FOR RENT
4 bedroom 2 bath house for rent in
Waukcriah. 251-7708. $700 month.
7/15, 20, pd
3bdrin, 1 'A b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-81'.,.
7/13, tn, c
House in country for rent. 3 BDRM, I
'/i b w/extra room. 997-3365.
6/22, tfn, c
I bed, 1 bath with pasture in country,
$500.00 a month 997-6653.
7/6, 8, 13, 15. 20, 22, 27, 29, oc
Shop / Warehouse Space. Four large
roll-up doors. 1200 sq ft with
standard utilities included. Easy
access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
August Is: ftal 997-4150.
6/15, 17, fn, c

FOR SALE
Bed liner in good condition for 2004
Toyota Tacoma & locking tool box
for tr, .!,. Call 997-2433.
7/15 20, rd
4 P225/60-R-16 Mich. tires $40
997-0135.

REAL ESTATE


$112,700 charming, cozy 4bd/2ba
hm, approx. 2,530 sq-ft. Fire place,
front porch, white picket fence, large
workshop, and big back yard.
Convenient location town of
Monticello. $94,900 quiet country
living, 2bd/2ba, approx. 1,152 sq-ft.,
walk-in closets, 2 screened porches,
fenced backyard. Stfve C. Walker
Realty, LLC Licensed Real 'Estate
Broker. Call Lori Blush Realtor
Associate 850-933-9115 or
850-997-46 1.
7/13, 15, 20, f2,-c
Beautiful & Private. 2 miles from
Monticello 3 br, 2 '/ bath home on
171/2 acres w/pond, dock, barn, dove
field, garden, and pasture in a
manicured, country setting. Pine
floors throughout with large brick
fireplace. Shown by appt. Only.
$439,000. Send email to
llouse@PWHhomes.com to receive
additional info or call (850) 997-6344
to set appt.
6/22, 24, 29, 7/1, 6, 8, 13, 15 2C, 22, pd

Have you Been Turned
Down? Let us Help.
Bad Credit Welcome.
Mortgages, car Loans or
Business, Thousands of
Dollars available.
Fast Results.
Call toll free
1-866-828-6941


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


* Spacious home in the country $215,000
*Duplex lot in town $15,000
* Roomy in town hoi 5,000
* Leon Co. ho $s $380,000
West. J5S ac $243,900
Frame of town $74,900
S6+ acre hvice Hwy. $49,000
.6 acres Lloyd Road $60,000

GET RESULTS
Let Us List Your Property!

215 N. Jefferson St
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 ww.cbkk.com


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Beautiful Home on the Top of a
High Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath
yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 1
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, 1
detached garage, barn nice field all very 1
convenient to Tallahassee for only '
$1,200,000-


Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on 1
Morris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000 1


Under Contract--Look-- Un- .
usual Opportunitv!!! On Waukee-
nah Highway easy access to Tallahassee
high, dry, fenced and ready to build on,
great for


Price Slashed!! Like New Home
built in 2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths, 1964
sq. ft., ceramic tile and hardwood floors,
cathedral ceiling, fireplace and a
screened porch on one acre not far from I
town $ I tyu,bUU Now $135,000


Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with
big doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, I
round pen in remote, big oaks, pond, lo-
cated north of Greenville a real opportu-
nity for the horse owner only $295,000 ]


Under Contract-Terrific New I
Listing!! 3 bedroom 2 bath double wide
with new gal alum roof and vinyl siding 3
sheds, fish pond on 2.4 acres and only
$86,500


Don't Miss this One Big 1999 3 bed-
room 2 bath double wide with a bathroom
that won't quit on a high hill with a view in 1
Aucilla Forest and Meadows only $56,500

Big doublewide with additions 12 L
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500


Prime Commercial Property US
19 South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson -
Builders Mart $650,000


Home Site close to town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front- -
age $14,500


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
We have qualified buyers looking for I
acreage between Monticello and Lloyd ,
can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate .
Simply the Best



Buyers looking for Homes and Land
.. --,l ,IJ-e l -]l | *Ir | rI-.f-II=I J-II-.B- lB==IJlg =B =I r I -I=


Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


See Us Today!


I


or-WE


-==Mmm=EEI





PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 20, 2005

EMPLOYEE PRICING IS A GOOD IDEA.
BUT WITH VEHICLES LIKE
TALLAHASSEE DODGE CHRYSLER JEEP'S
& BEASTY ... IT'S PURE GENIUS.


EMPLOEE PICIN


EVERYONE IN THE MONTICELLO AREA GETS OUR EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT


up
iTO


p


CASH
ALLOWANCE


New Jeep Grand Cherokee
Limited, HEMI V8. Lcadc3d. i5.1073
MSRP.
Employee Price
Rebates


Sale Price


$38,935
$34,387
-.2,O0


132,387


New Dodge 3500 Quad Cab
4*4, Weisa, Loaded, 05D383
MSRPW
al Emptoyee Price
Rebates


Sale Price


'43,860
$37,4%
1,500
s35,996


New Chrysler Town &
Limited, #5C1C'


Country


MSRP
Employee Price
Rebates


Sale Price


"38,185
'33,827
-2,)000


`31)827


New Chrysler Pacifica
.5C325


MSRP
Employee Price
Rebates


Sale Price


;26,090
'23,380
-12,000
521,380


-iivmi


NO FEAR USED CARS AT

3-DAY BLOWOUT PRICES!


'94 FORD -150 PICKUP :c:., Sp A9................................... 5,9 9 6
'97 MWD MIATA CONVERTIBLE :........... ............ 9,A9 9 5
'02 DODGE RAM 1500 PICKUP rCCA. ,-L s ., ..... 1.3,995
'00 HONDA CRV 2 L, A- : ............................... ...... ...................... 4, 04994
'02 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LIMITED 1,- ,. La.l-h i 15,995
'02 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED .....1.........6,994
'01 FORD WINSTAR UMITE L .................16,995
't3 DODGE DURANGOSffTl iL SJ...... ..............................................16995
'02 FORD F-150 LT SUPERCAB ,_ .-.. .? ., 41 1. 1,995
'02 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT .. ........................................16,995
'03 NISSAN KTERRA XE .:.. 4U .4.4, L,AC..................... .. ......................... '3O18,995
'05 DODGE STRATUS k s..................... ...................... ,99
'01 1DGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB .-:, .. .. 18,998
'03 CHEVROLET SILIIERADOEXTCAB .... ... 19,991
'03 DODGE DAKOTA QUA CA SL ............................. 19,995
'04 JEEP W RANGLER SPORT 2251 ,,,, .............................. 21,993
'83 H ONDA PILOT :- .. ................................11 .. .................... '26 ,988
'03 NISSAN MURANO 0-.2355, SufroecL r. ra 2RV i. .'27,999


'00 PLYMOUTH NEON 4:yi. T. 5., .............. .................... ,9 9 5
'95 JEEP WRANGLER _35 c,_. 5 spd4..4 ......................... 8,9 9 5
'03 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC *,z3s, 3_.. ti.;, l t '20,995
'04 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX UL..-,it% ....i S ........ 18,995
105 DODGE MAGNUM SXT. .:,5cs ... ..', .................22,995
'05 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 'uuL2 swd rermcAi 1N,A ,.C .'10,995
'0 2 IN C O N LS e a .................................................................... 18 ,9 9 5
'05 TOYOTA SCION I X e .,uo.......... ...................15,995
'04 MITSUBISHI GALANT IS AC .................. ........... 18995
'01 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB o n m. SLT ....................... 17,995
'03 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD CAB ,cL S', L rsu. .19,995
'05 HONDA ELEMENT El .................... ...... 21995
'02 FORD F-150 SUPERCA u L, ........................ ........16,995
'02 fORD ESCA PE lLT e,u"i e Al ................................................... ......... $16,99 5
'02 IEEP GRAND CHEROKEE UIMITED 5 ff 5,5A. S SLtnr, Lea he A, 9 es.. '19,995
'04 0ODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CABu ,- ,a .. .. AC 23,995
'02 FOR [EXPEDITION su. -,i a c :S ... ....................................... 1,995
'04 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR :.-.:,: -.a.tory -. 19,995


ONLY INA
19C 8fiR RVS Btl S

DOOi 5E *IIIIII


........