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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00053
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: July 6, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00053
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text








Obesity
Assures Health
Problems

Editorial, Page 4


L2LE:.\RY OF FLORIDA IIISTORY
'4 4 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAIE,!VITLL, FL. 32611

How To Treat
Heat Related
Conditions

Story, Page 7


All-Stars
Lose in
Tournament

Story, Page 10


1st UMC
Misson On
Duty in Pensacola

Story, Photo, Page 14
I1


Wednesday Morning


Montic


II


137TH YEAR NO.53.50 CF.NTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY, JULY 06, 2005


Commissioners


Continue Hearing


Budget


Requests


County Still Has No idea

Of Projected Revenues


City, County Identify


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city and the county have sub-
mitted various projects for inclusion
in the 2005 Comprehensive Eco-
nomic Development Strategy being
prepared by the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council (ARPC).
Inclusion in the plan is supposed
to facilitate the receipt of state and
federal grants, according to Clerk of
Courts Dale Boatwright.
"My understanding is that it pro-
vides a boost for getting state and
federal grants approved," Boat-
wright said Friday. "The fact that
we present the projects to the Apa-
lachee Regional Planning Council
and that the city and the county sup-
port each other's endeavors helps.
It's like a point system. There's a
better chance of getting the grants
because we agree on the projects."
The projects the city is requesting
help on:
Evaluation of the city and
county comprehensive plans and
technical assistance in updating
land-use policies to ensure benefi-
cial growth.


Intent Is 1
Facilitate
Receipt 0
Fed Grant

According to -city o
the city and county a
precedented developmi
technical assistance to
development is based
mentally sound prince
does not exceed the f
and service capacity
government, and that
economic growth.
Funding for the c
an impact fee study an
mentation of an impa
nance to ensure that n
ments requiring public
be responsible for fii
fair share of the costs
ties."
Funding to develop
wireless broad band ser
According to city
"ability to provide min
greater bandwidth wit


Funding
pense of wired infrastructure will al-
TO low businesses depending on such
infrastructure to locate in the area
and enhance the economy."
Funding to continue restoration
of the 1851 Jefferson County High
S School building for use as an educa-
5 : tional facility and museum.
According to both city and county
officials, both officials, this project has the poten-
inticipate un- tial to greatly enhance the tourist
ent and need market in the area, create jobs, and
ensure that enhance the economy in the down-
on environ- town district.
ipals; that it Development of other tourism
iscal abilities programs, such as adventure tourism
of the local and other "getaways", archeological
t encourages parks, rural tourism, festivals and
ghost tours.
completion of On the county's side, the requests
nd the imple- include:
act fee ordi- Funding for the planning and
new develop- construction of a countywide sani-
facilities will tary sewer system.
dancing their County officials say the economic
of new facili- impact of this project are obvious,
particularly with regard to develop-
p and expand inent at the 1-10 and SR-59 inter-
rvices. change.
officials, the Equally important, they say, such
imum TI and a project would eliminate the need
thout the ex- (See Projects Page 11)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners on Thurs-
day continued hearing from depart-
ment heads on their budgetary needs
for the coming fiscal year.
Road Department Superintendent
David Harvey possibly shocked
commissioners a little with his re-,
quest for an additional $2 million
for the coming year.
Harvey cited as reasons for the in-
crease antiquated equipment that
needs replacing, a, 40-percent in-
crease in fuel cost, and population
growth, which he said was putting
ever greater demands on his depart-
ment for the maintenance of roads.
Among the equipment that Harvey
identified for replacement: a motor
grader (cost of replacement:
$140,000); a brush cutter (cost of re-
placement: $80,000): and an exca-
vator (cost of replacement,
$300,000).
All told, the equipment Harvey
identified for replacement totaled 13
pieces.


The increase also included a four
percent pay increase for the depart-
ment's 27 employees.
"This budget request of'
$3,981,835.25 is a representation of
the public outcry for improved serv-
ice to this county's roadways and
cemeteries and department offices
and the growth of the industrial
park," Harvey said in his presenta-
tion. "Not to mention this depart-
ment's 24-hour: on-call for road
emergencies and the day-to-day
dedication of its employees."
Commissioners encouraged lar-
vey to revisit his wish list and iden-
tify those pieces of equipment thit
he definitely could not do without.
As an example, they encouraged
him to explore the option of renting
the excavator for a limited time,
rather than purchasing it.
Next in line was, Fire Rescue
Chief Larry Bates.
Bates is requesting $477,550 for
the fire department, up $31,242
from last year's budget of $446,308.
He said the increase was well
within the projected revenues to be
generated by the special fire assess-


ment.
Bates is requesting $574,812 for
the ambulance service, an increase
of $47,338 over last year's budget
of $527,474.
The increase represents a seven
percent pay increase, which Bates
said is needed to bring paramedics'
salaries more in line with the sala-
ries of surrounding counties. The
ambulance service brings in about
$280,000 annually in collections.
Bates is also asking to increase
the budgets for the volunteer fire de-
partments from $5,000 to $7,000.
I He is asking to increase the volun-
teer fire departments' account for
the purchase of equipment .from
$13,000 to $18,000.
Supervisor of Elections Marty
Bishop's budget calls for an in-
creaseof $5,174. Bishop said the in-
crease was largely due to the higher
cost of maintenance on the new
voter machines.
The increase also takes in a three-
percent pay raise for his assistant
and slightly raises the travel
account.
The library budget is up $13,862,
from $174,913 last year to $188,775
for the coming year.
Director Linda Hamadani said ex-
pected higher maintenance costs at
(See Budget Page 10)


EXPECTATIONS
able to reopen


are that the library will be
at the former high school


media center on Water Street by the first
week of August. (News Photo)


-~ .'
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Y. :
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..... .



CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS want assis-
tance with their comprehensive plans so


ii ~


- N


that they can avoid the excesses of un<
trolled growth. (News Photo)


Library Move Proceeding Smoothly


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Things appear to be moving fast
I on the library front.
Director Linda Hamadani told
commissioners Wednesday that the
expected day for the reopening of
the facility is Aug. 1.
The library has been closed since
June 17 in order to allow time for
the staff to make preparations for
the miove.
I lamadani said Thursday that her
staff is now about halfway through
the process of packing books and
other materials for the move. s\hich
will be to the media center building
at the former high school on Mul-
con- berry Street.
She said workmen h:vec now


completed the rewiring of the build-
ing for the library's. computers and
that prison laborers should complete
the painting of both the building's
interior and exterior in the coming
weeks.
Commissioners, meanwhile, are


scheduled to open bids Thursday for
the re-carpeting of the building.
Once the carpeting is replaced, the
staff can begin moving in.
Commissioners also put out for
bids as surplus property the existing
(See Library Page 2)


Fireballs Sail Into Crowd


FRAN HUNT
Staff \Vriter

A large crowd attended ihe .July 4
fireworks. Monday night, expecting
the usual spectacular show\, until
partially through the display, t\wo
irehballs went astray, and shot into
the crowd, causing some to hil the
g around, and others to rtnil.


C'o-Coordillator, Don Anderson
said Tuesday that a mIlll'iinclioln
caused t\o of the tiiehalls to shoot
into tile crowd rather tli.ln the sky.
PivroSorks emplohces quickly \
seramibiled to rcnied\ lcthe problem
Thlie slio\\ \\as ilomenlairily de-
laiyd unlil Sheriff l )a\ id llohhs
and his deputies, and lirc IRCscLti
personnel checked tlhose iIIl tIe
(See Fireballs Page 5)


Budget Discussions


SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS, right, talks with
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin during a recent
meeting. The sheriff is asking for an in-


I


crease in his budget to hire additional
deputies and correctional officers. (News
Photo)


Projects For


7


CO











Time Capsule Discovery


Dates Lamont Church


.1~


CONSTRUCTION of the new Lamont Baptist
Church is rapidly moving along, following
the pouring of the foundation. During the


construction process a time capsule was
found documenting the history of the
church. (News Photo)


Four Administrators Resign


From District School System


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The County School District faces-
a number of critical administrative
openings because of resignations
from key personnel.
Among the resignations are Billy
Epting, Director of Support and
Technical Services.
Kathy Joyner, former principal at
Jefferson Elementary School, has
been named to fill this position.
Epting said that he was assuming
an administrative position at Leon
County High School.
He lives in Tallahassee and has
children in the Leon County School
System.
Cindy Shrestha, executive director
of school improvement, has re-
signed to accept a position as read-


Opera House,

Annual Meeting

Planned

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Monticello Opera House will
hold its annual Member's Meeting,
:30 p.m., Friday, July 8.
Cocktail Hour begins at 6:30 p.m.,
tnd dinner is served at 7 p.m.
The cost is $20 per person, and
reservationss are necessary. Call the
Opera House at 997-4242.
A brief business meeting follows
Mhe dinner.
Entertainment will feature Lisa
Reasoner singing Broadway Favor-
ites, accompanied by Dr. Rebecca
Burkart at the piano.
The meeting is open to members,
future members, and all who enjoy
te Opera House.


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ing coach in Wakulla County.
Linda I iewt, executive director
of operations and human resources,
has resigned to accept a position at
DOE.
Michael Bryan, principal of Jeffer-
son County High School, has ac-
cepted a position as assistant
principal at a Leon County School.
He lives in Tallahassee, and his
children attend school there.
Commenting upon the resigna-
tions, Superintendent Phil Barker
said: "I really hate to lose these peo-
ple. They are dedicated, qualified
people and have proven their worth
to the district."
When asked what he thought
might account for the resignations,


Barker said: "I'm sure the fact that
other counties pay more competitive
salaries, and we are in a tight budget
crunch, was a major factor, along.
with the commuting issue."
An Emergency Board Meeting
was called for Tuesday, July 6.
Barker said, to address the District's
Organizational Chart and related
personnel issues.
Salaries advertised for the admin-
istrative salaries are some $15,000
to $17,000 greater than previously.
"We need to fill these positions
with the best people we can get,"
Barker said, "and to do this we have
to increase administrative' salaries."
With school set to begin in about
five weeks, the time line is par-
ticuarly tight, he stated.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

While removing the debris of the
Lamont Baptist Church that was to-
tally destroyed by flames April 27,
2004, workers heard tales of a
"Time Capsule" being located on
the site, and began sifting through
the debris.
Contractor Bob Perry said they
searched and searched but could
not locate any such item. "Then
about three weeks after the debris
had been removed, a little girl
found a bottle with a piece of paper
in it on the site, and it was the time
capsule."
He said they worked carefully, not
to damage the paper while remov-
ing it. It was then learned that the
church was much older than origi-
nally thought.
The document discovered in the
time capsule had an Atlantic Coast-
line Railroad Company letterhead
and is dated July 23, 1934.
. Construction began on the build'-
ing tlhai burned last year, on July
19, 193-2.
'nc document states that the
church was founded about the year
1870, as far as they were able to as-
certain because records were not
available. Further:


"The following information has
been secured and that it may be
preserved and a copy of this is be-
ing given to our church clerk for
his records,. also a copy is being
placed in the northeast comer of
the new building.
"The first church was built some
two hundred yards south of the pre-
sent location and was known as Ol-
ive Branch Church. The building
was of hewn logs and built by
members of the church at that time,
having certain days set aside for. the
building and the raising of the
church.
"The building committee was
composed of the following, W. W.
Daw, Albert Reams, Bill Oash, and
John Lynn.
"The building was used until
about 1890, when the church was
moved to the present site and a new
frame building erected, with the
following committee in charge of
the building, Prof. Capps, W. W.
Daw, and Albert Reams.
"The name of Olive Branch was
kept until the area became known
as Lamont and the church name
was changed to agi.- with said
name, and is still known as such.
"The building, committee for the
new building was R. L. Hudson,
W. K. Jenkins, C. J. Reams, R. B.
Timmons, and Dr. W. H. Walker.


The Jefferson County School Board

Announces the regular school board meeting to which the
public is invited. The meeting will be held at the Desmond
M. Bishop Administration Building on Monday,
July 11, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.
Agendas may be picked up at the district office at
1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL
Monday through Thursday between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
A copy of the school board packet will be available
for review at the district office.


_a .. -.- .. ..


The Monticello Cemetery Authority

will meet Thursday, July 14, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street to discuss
proposed rules and rate fees for
Oakfield Cemetery

Two or more Council Members may be present
at this meeting. For more information, contact
Emily Anderson, City Clerk, at
City Hall at 342-0153.
-_ a -- -. ... ...m.a......_ .:... "....


"Building erected by subscrip-
tions of members and others work
to be done by donation paid for by
funds derived from subscriptions.
Lumber was purchased from J. R.
Hughes Lumber Company of Mon-
ticello.
"The pastor at the time of this
building was T. W. Branch of Ray
City, GA."
The document is signed by W.K,
Jenkins.
Upon the completion of construc-
tion of the new building, currently
underway, document will be en-
cased in glass and placed in the en-
try way of the new building along
with the Bible, pulpit, and the cross
survived the fire last year.
"This document is a piece of his-
tory," Perry said.

Library
(Continued From Page 1)
library building on Cherry Street.
It's commissioners' hope that the
sale of the building will generate
enough money to compensate the
county for much of the cost of the
move and renovation work at the
media center.

fAlways Informative...
MONTICELLO NEWS)























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money for, U.S. Savings Bonds
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Ask your employer or banker about
saving with U.S. Savings Bonds.
Or for a recorded message of
current rate information, call
1-800-487-2663


If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The

Monticello News

You Can't Be Without It
#'.


CITY OF MONTICELLO
NOTICE OF PROPOSED BUDGET AMENDMENT
FISCAL YEAR 2004-2005


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Far F, a-


* Your Choice of Doctors and Hospitals.
* 24-hour, worldwide coverage*
* (Coverage on or oflT the job**
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* Portable: keep coven ra>' I ';w
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Plan. MW/COMBI0108 exp. 8/05


11.11

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The City Council of the City of Monticello will consider Resolution 2005-08
proposing an amendment to the 2004/2005 fiscal year budget. The proposed change is to
correct the carried forward balance as of September 30, 2004 and the ending balance for
September 30, 2005 and to include new required asset accounting required by
Government Auditing Standards Board Statement 34.

The changes will be discussed at the Council's next regularly scheduled meeting to be
held on Tuesday, July 12,.2005 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall, 245 S Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida.


Adopted


GENERAL FUND CARRIED FORWARD BALANCE
WATER/SEWER FUND CARRIED FORWARD BALANCE
GRAND TOTAL CARRIED FORWARD B BALANCE

COMBINED ANTICIPATED WATER/SEWER FUND
AND GENERAL FUND REVENUES
COMBINED ANTICIPATED WATER/S'EWER FUND
AND GENERAL FUND EXPENSES
GENERAL FUND ENDING BALANCE
WYATER/SEWER FUND ENDING BALANCE
COMBINED ENDING BALANCE


$ 226,037 00
S 157,968 00
$ 384,005 00

$ 2,976,054 80
S 2,976,054 80
$ 226,037 00
$ 157,968 00
$ 384,005 00


Pro posed
Amended
S 160s,3 12 001
S 3,628,475 OU*
S794.787 U00.


-',,')-,0,0 4 58)

$ .,I- (10I2))
3.0',475*400(
S,7u,),7 8 7 00


*Includes fixed and liquid assets










Shelter Needs Subject Of

Humane Society Discussion


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The focus of the recent meeting
of the Humane Society was on the
needs of the animal shelter.
Because of the rapid growth of the
animal population at the shelter, and
the demand for more attention paid
to the housing and operation of the
shelter, Kennel Operations Director
Tina Ames announced that someone
was needed to fill her position as the
Adoption Chairperson, so she can
devote more time to Shelter Kennel
Operations.
President Caroline Carswell ad-
vised that Deb Armentin, a grant
writer, had agreed to work with
Martha Jean Martin on researching
grants that might be available to the
shelter for needed upgrades and ad-
ditions.
The suggestion was made that
those present, create lists of what


they knew the shelter needed, and
submit those lists in two weeks for
review.
Some of those needs include:
medications, vet care, indoor, out-
door, and enclosed kennels, repairs
to roofing, outdoor fencing, con-
crete pads for outdoor runs, auto-
matic open and close security gates,
funds to go toward the new facility,
and repairs to the old facility, such
as sealing the concrete floors.
Also, expansion of the indoor dog
runs, an outdoor exercise pool, land-
scape maintenance, cat and dog
transport cages and pads, finishing
the puppy palace and finishing the
cat room, to name just a few.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
interjected, that they needed to ob-
tain quotes for welding services.
"The cat cages need new pans (slid-
ing bottom panel), the old one are
about shot and they have to be cus-
tom made to fit the cages," said
Bautista.


Progress Energy Offers

Tips To Save Electricity


With increasing heat related en-
ergy demands, Progress Energy of-
fers tips to save electricity and
money this season.
Among the tips are:
*Set your thermostat on the high-
.est comfortable setting. Each de-
gree above 78 will save seven to 10
percent on cooling costs.
*Change air conditioning filters
monthly. Dirty filters can increase
operating costs by 20 percent.
: *Use ceiling and portable fans to
keep air moving. Fans only use
about as much energy as a light
bulb. .


*Close blinds, drapes, and shades
during the hottest part of the day, to
keep the sun's rays from heating the
house. _
*Because humid air holds more
heat, take lukewarm showers and
baths and use ,the bathroom exhaust
fan to reduce humidity in the home.
*When possible, use the micro-
wave or counter top appliances for
cooking instead of the oven or
stove.
*Longer term, plant shade trees on
the sunny side of the house to pro-
-vide natural shade.


Membership chairperson Martha
Canady advised that during the Wa-
termelon Festival, at the adoption
booth, three new members were ob-
tained.
She described all of the work that
could be done by members and vol-
unteers and the significance of that
work toward the homeless animals.
Before the conclusion of the meet-
ing, a resident of the county, signed
on as another new member, vowing
not to be an idle one.
Tammy Peck addressed the group
about a fundraiser effort conducted
through Tupperware.
She provided everyone present
with an information packet and in-
formative materials. "By selling
Tupperware, 40 percent of what is
sold, will go to the Humane
Society," said Peck. "You could
probably raise a couple thousand
dollars easy."
After discussing the prospect,
members agreed to sell the Tupper-
ware to raise funds for needs at the
shelter.
The items will be sold until the
end of Aug., at which time, the or-
ders would be placed and buyers re-
ceiving their items approximately
two weeks afterward. Those wish-
ing to place orders can either contact
a Board member or call Peck at 997-
6455.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005 PAGE 3

'Sammy' Feline Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Humane Society has named
"Sammy" the adoptable feline Pet
of the week.
Sammy is a domestic short hair
tabby male, with white paws and
black nose.
He is approximately 8-10 weeks
old, neutered and all vaccinations
are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista


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describes him as extremely playful.
"He's rough when he plays, so I
don't recommend him to be around
small children," she added.
To adopt Sammy or any of the
other many pets at the shelter call
342-0244.


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will meet at
9:00 a.m. July 13,
2005, at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street.


SAMMY


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THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL
SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
THIS IS AN EXPULSION HEARING OF A STUDENT
AND PURSUANT TO F.S. 1006.07(1)(A), SS. 120.569
AND 120.57(2), IS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC

DATE: July 11, 2005
PLACE: Desmonds M. Bishop Admin. Building
TIME: 5:00 p.m.

RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. EXPULSION HEARING STUDENT 2005-2006 (13)


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-52971-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
I $Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State '$52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Obesity Assures


Health Problems


--






-l t

ACCEPTING a plaque awarded to Florida
Power employees for work done on the
March of Dimes Mother's March, in Feb.,


1989, is Division Manager Grant Houston.
L-R: Alexa Meridith, Tim Peary, Houston,
Connie Clarke. (News File Photo)


- Opinion & Comment


ifY MIKE MAGEE, M.D.

.Obesity is an urgent epidemic with
catastrophic implications but, so far,
tlie public discussion hasn't focused
on the right answers to the problem.
Why aren't more people trying to
fid ways to understand and prevent
obesity, rather than just adapting to
it?
For example, in 2003, there were
more than 103,000 gastric bypass
surgeries for morbid obesity in the
United States. And, all across Amer-
ioa, things are getting bigger to ac-
commodate bigger Americans.
Take, for instance, the Puget
Sound ferry seats, which were re-
cently widened from 18 inches to 20
inches. Or the Colorado ambulances
that are now equipped with a hy-
.draulic winch capable of lifting a
1 :000-pound human.
-; And, lastly, Indiana has a new
super-sized casket that's 38 inches
wide, rather than the standard 24
iliches.
, Since these measures aren't solv-
ing the problem, how should we be
tlfinking about obesity?
*;First, we must take into considera-
tion that the science of obesity is
c mplex and still in its infancy.
5The hormone leptin, which is pro-
diced by fat cells and provides the
chemical message to the brain that
helps control excessive caloric in-
take, was only discovered in 1994 at
Rockefeller University.


BY CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
Clerk of the Court

. Q: So many times, tragic automo-
bile accidents are caused by impa-
tient drivers running red lights. It
seems like to me that if Florida had
stiffer penalties, it would cut down
bn red light runners.
A: You are quite right about the
danger people who run red lights
present. As a matter of fact, legisla-
tion passed druing this year's ses-
sion, HB 497, makes the following
'changes:
Increases the civil penalty for a
driver failing to obey a red light
traffic signal from $60 to $125*,
and assesses 4 points against a
driver failing to obey a traffic con-
trol signal device.


It's becoming more obvious that
fat is not a byproduct of individual
greed and guilt but rather an active
organ in its own right, worthy of a
significant scientific effort to un-
cover its complex chemical and bio-
logical mysteries.
Being obese doesn't mean you're
a bad person, but it virtually guaran-
tees bad health, and that can't be ig-
nored.
Obese individuals have a higher-
than-normal rate of hypertension,
type 2 diabetes, high lipids, cardio-
vascular disease, gallbladder
disease, osteoarthritis, strokes, respi-
ratory disease, and some types of
cancers.
Obesity isn't a condition we
should accept and adapt to. Before
we continue on this path, investing
in the problem rather than the solu-
tion, it's time to identify a different
approach.
How can scientists help the lipid
cell adjust to population-wide over-
nourishment?
How can we promote decreased
quantity and increased quality in the
American diet?
How do we get Americans out-
doors again?
Why are children, women, and mi-
norities targets for obesity?
And, is investment in gastric by-
pass surgery, wider ferry seats, am-
bulance winches, and bigger caskets
really the way to go? I know the an-
swer it's a resounding "no"..
(NAPS)


Requires an operator to com-
plete a driver improvement course
for a second violation occurring
within 12 months of the first viola-
tion, and
Distributes money collected
from the increased civil penalty to
trauma centers based on trauma
caseload and severity of trauma pa-
tients.
Remember, a "traffic control de-
vice" can include more than just a
red light.
*This is the amount of the base
fine. This amount does not include
court costs which may vary slightly
from county to county.
If you have any questions or com-
ments about this column please for-
ward them to: Carl D. Boatwright,
Clerk of the Court, County Court-
house, Room 10, Monticello, FL
32344.


More Stuff Is American Way


The woman was fairly gushing
ab ,ut the deal she found at a garage
sale and I just looked blank.
"Look," she said, "I got all of this
for 50 cents'." So I looked. I saw a
beat up frying pan with a bent han-
dle, two pot lids, what looked like a
broken potato masher, and an assort-
ment of knives and forks.
Frankly, I think the person who
got the 50 cents got the better end of
the deal.
You see, I don't know what one
does with a frying pan with a bent
handle or a broken potato masher. If
there's a market for stuff like this I
don't know about it.
But, you must understand, I've
never been to a garage sale so I
don't know about these things.
I have friends who love garage
sales. They go out early Saturday
morning looking for treasures.
Maybe they find treasure from
time to time but the lady whose en-
thusiasm for her 50-cent deal which
prompted this column did not, at


Publisher's

Notebook |


Is. "


A


Ron Cichfon


least in my opinion.
The reason I don't go to garage
sales is I'm not a collector of stuff.
What's more, I hate clutter.
My late father was famous for sav-
ing stuff. Old phone books, last
month's newspapers, screws, wash-
ers, nuts, whatever.
Taking a page from him, I used to
save screws, nuts and washers. I had
a big can full of these things.
I discovered whenever I needed a
screw or washer or nut, I had every


kind but the kind I needed.
So, I threw all that stuff away and
when I need a screw or washer, I go
to the hardware store and buy it.
This makes perfect sense to me. And
the good part is I have less clutter.
People tell me saving stuff is the
American way. We are a society that
prides itself on accumulating stuff.
We file it, hoard it, hang it up, put
it in drawers and closets, and put our
new stuff on top of the old stuff.
If we get too carried away and


space is at a premium, we can al-
ways rent space at one of the mini-
storage warehouses.
By the way, have you noticed how
the mini-storage facilities have pro-
liferated in our town? That's a trib-
ute to our saving stuff.
In recent years I've been making a
concentrated effort to keep stuff to a
minimum.
I fail when it comes to birthday
cards and sentimental stuff. Fact is, I
have a drawer full of birthday cards
and Father's Day cards.
Previously I saved ties even when
they went out of style. One day I
was looking at my tie rack and de-
cided if I haven't worn a tie in the
last year, then I simply didn't need
it. Out went several ties.
Come to think of it, I should have
saved those ties and sold them to the
garage sale lady.
If she was juiced up about a bat-
tered frying pan, just think how ex-
cited she would be about a dozen or
more out-of-style neckties!


Study Targets Manatee Eyes


BY SARAH CAREY
University of Florida

For Florida manatees, the eyes
may have it, say University of Flor-
ida researchers studying whether the
mammals' unusually thick tear film
helps protect against disease and
could be used to gauge the endan-
gered sea cows' ability to fight
stress from cold water temperatures.
Manatees depend on both natural
and artificial warm water refuges
like those found near coal-burning
power plants to survive cold
winters. As older coal-burning
power plants are phased out in the
next 10 to 20 years, researchers fear
chronic exposure to cooler waters
could weaken the large herbivores'
immune system, and they could
sicken or even die.
By sampling manatees' tear film
in addition to performing other stan-
dard tests, scientists think they
might be able to more efficiently
evaluate manatees' immune system
function and better determine strate-
gies for rescue, treatment and reha-
bilitation.
The current tear analysis project,
believed to be the first of its kind,
builds on work UF veterinary scien-


tists published recently in the jour-
nal Veterinary Ophthalmology that
described the abundance of blood
vessels found in manatee corneas.
Blood vessels could have a tendency
to move into the cornea to supply
oxygen because the tear film creates
a barrier so thick that oxygen pre-
sent in air can't penetrate it, said
Don Samuelson, Ph.D., professor of
ophthalmology in the Marine Mam-
mal Medicine program at UF's Col-
lege of Veterinary Medicine.
Manatees are believed to have the
thickest tear film of any sea mam-
mnal, and possibly of any animal,
Samuelson said. In general, mam-
mals produce tears to protect against
infection, because the eye itself does
not have immune system compo-
nents.
"Through this protection against
the potential for infection, the mana-
tee is able to enter murky waters just
rich with potential pathogens," Sam-
uelson said. "For that reason, we
think this very thick tear film, un-
doubtedly rich with anti microbial
components, serves to protect in ar-
eas that could otherwise be devastat-
ing."
Researchers speculate that tears,
which can be collected without re-
moving manatees from the water us-


ing a small, soft cotton swab, may
one day be used along with or in-
stead of blood tests to assess health
status and to gauge whether the
mammals were recently exposed to
health threats such as red tide. On-
going UF studies are exploring the
relationship between the tear film
and blood vessel formation.
"One of the findings of our earlier
work was that there is absolutely no
pathology involved in the formation
of these manatee blood vessels,
which in other species occur pre-
dominantly because of trauma or
disease," Samuelson said. "So the
question is, why do these mammals
have such thick tears that corneal
blood vessels form naturally, even
in the fetus?"
Samuelson collaborated with
Roger Reep, Ph.D., a UF professor
of neurology, and Jenny Harper,
Ph.D., a recent doctoral graduate
who is now an assistant professor at
Coastal Georgia Community Col-
lege. Together they examined 26
eyes from 22 individual manatees
and constructed 3-D images of the
corneas.
"We've completed the evaluation
and mapped the blood vessels, so we
know where within the cornea they
are located and how many there


are," Samuelson said. "Our next
goal is to start examining the tears
and evaluate them with regard to the
whole animal's health status."
He added that the recent study
clearly documented the fact that
these blood vessels are present,, do
not appear to interfere with manatee
vision and appear to be part of
manatee anatomy beginning in the
embryo.
"With that in mind, we are exam-
ining the tears to see what they ex-
actly consist of, particularly with
regard to the anti-infectious compo-
nent," Samuelson said. "This may
eventually be an opportunity to ex-
amine an individual manatee's state
of health with regard to their im-
mune system by analyzing their
tears."

Tear analysis is being.used in hu-
man ophthalmology and is in its
early stages in veterinary medicine,
he said.
Kendal Harr, D.V.M., assistant di-
rector of UF's Marine Mammal
Medicine program, is collaborating
with Samuelson on a large federal
Fish and Wildlife Service research
initiative to assess the immune func-
tion of manatees at Homosassa
Springs State Park.


Do You Know Terms Of Your Prescription Plan?


If you have a prescription drug
plan, you're not alone. About 75
percent of all Americans already
have some type of prescription drug
plan.
When the Medicare drug plan be-
gins in 2006, millions more will re-
ceive a drug plan for the first time.
To help boost your knowledge of
these plans, the Academy of Man-
aged Care Pharmacy offers this
quick quiz. See how many answers
you know:


Q: What is a covered drug?
A: If a drug is "covered," that
means the plan will pay a part of the
cost.
Q: What's a copayment?
A: A copayment, or copay, is the
amount of the drug cost that you pay
for. A copay for a brand name drug
may be $15, $25 or more. A copay
for a generic drug may be as little as
$5.
Q: What's coinsurance?
A: Coinsurance works like a co-


payment, but it's a percent of the
drug cost instead of a set price. So if
a drug costs $100 and you have 30
percent coinsurance, you pay $30
and your plan pays $70.
Q: What's a drug formulary?
A: The list of drugs covered by
your drug plan is called a formulary
(FOR-mew-lerr-ee). It's developed
by medical and pharmacy experts.
Ask your drug plan for a copy of its
formulary or the plan's Web site ad-
dress, and give that information to


your doctor. If the drugs you take
are not included in the formulary,
ask your doctor or pharmacist about
other choices.
Q: What's a tier?
A: "PBM" is a "Pharmacy Benefit
Manager." A "PDP" is a "Prescrip-
tion Drug Plan." These companies
manage drug plans for the employer
or government agency that pays for
your plan. PBMs and PDPs provide
many services, evaluating drugs,
monitoring care and keeping ex-


penses down to ensure drug costs
stay affordable.
Q: What's a prior authorization
(PA)'?
A: Some prescription drugs are
dangerous if taken by children, older
people or pregnant women. Others
require careful monitoring, are very
expensive or may have been pre-
scribed for a purpose different than
the purpose for which it has been
approved. In any of theses cases,
you' plan might require a PA to


cover it.
Q: What's an exception?
A: If a drug your doctor prescribes
is not in your plan's formulary, you
or your doctor can ask for an excep-
tion, explaining that the drug is
medically necessary for you.
Q: What's an appeal'?
A: If your request for an exception
or a PA is turned down, you have
the right to appeal. An appeal is a
formal process to determine whether
(See Drug Plan Page 5)


From Our Photo File


Red Light Observance


Fines Get Increased


























This "Eye" Catching sign, along SR 59 lets seems to be s
passers by know the blueberries are ready Photo)
to be picked. The popularity of U-Pick farms


Exchange Students

Seek Host Families


Host families are sought for for-
-eign high school students, scheduled
to arrive soon for academic semester
and year program homestays.
Pacific Intercultural Exchange
(PIE) Executive Director, John Doty
states the students are between the
ages of 15 and 18 years of age, are
English speaking, have their own
spending money, carry accident and
health insurance, and are eager to
share their cultural experiences with


Drug Plan
(Continued From Page 4)
or not the drug will be covered. If
your plan won't cover the cost, that
doesn't mean you can't get the drug
it only means your plan won't pay
for it.
If you know the answers to these
question s, you are well on your way
to choosing and managing a drug
plan wisely. If not, clip this column
and keep it for handy reference
(NAPS).


r "


American families.
PIE has programs to match almost
every family's needs, ranging in
length from a semester to a full aca-
demic year, where students attend
the local high schools.
PIE area representatives match
students with host families by find-
ing common interests and lifestyles
through an informal in-home meet-
ing.
Prospective host families are able
to review student applications and
select the perfect match. As there
are no "typical" host families, PIE
can fit a student into just about any
situation, whether it is a single par-
ent, a childless couple, a retired
couple, or a large family.
Families who host for PIE are also
eligible to claim a $50 per month
charitable contribution deduction on
their itemized, tax returns for each
month they host a sponsored
student.
For upcoming programs, PIE has
students from Germany, the Former
Soviet Union, Venezuela,


spreading in the county. (News


Argentina, Brazil, Macedonia, Hun-
gary, Korea, Mexico, Australia,
Yugoslavia, and China.
Doty encourages families to con-
tact the program immediately, as it
will allow the proper time for stu-
dents and hosts to get to know one
another, before actually meeting for
the first time.
Local families interested in learn-
ing more about student exchange, or
arranging to meet with a community
representative, may call PIE toll free
at 1-800-631-1818.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005 PAGE 5
Fireballs Sail
(Continued From Page 1)
crowd for injuries.
Fire Rescue officials reported
Tuesday morning, that there were
no injuries.
Anderson reported that one fe-
male spectator escaped injury,
when the fireball hit the back of her
'' chair, missing her completely.
Though a good portion of the
S crowd left the area after the inci-
dent, the malfunction was corrected
and the show went on to comple-
tion.
This is the first time anyone
could recall a malfunction of this
kind occurring at the annual Fire-
works Celebration.

The Easy Way
H*:To Sell


MELIIN PAYNE shows off his 12 foot tomato plant grown at
Reeve's Landing. He displays a tomato that the plant pro-
duced. (News Photo)


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005


Lifestyle


Toni Lynn Naylor Will

Marry Daniel Shumaker


:Toni Lynn Naylor and Daniel
Price Shumaker announce their
forthcoming marriage, Sunday, July
31, 2005 in Mill Valley, CA.
Naylor is the daughter of Ann and
Bill.Naylor of Monticello.
$Shumaker is the son of Sonja
Chiristopher and David Shumaker,
and" the maternal grandson of Helen
Christopher.
Naylor is a 1995 graduate of Au-
cilla Christian Academy. She gradu-
ated in 1999 from the Valdosta State
University with a Bachelor of Fine
Arts in Communication with empha-
sis on Public Relations.
She is currently working on a
Master of Divinity Degree at




Homes Of
Roger G. Atchison
After a life richly lived, Roger
George Atchison died in the loving
arms of his daughters on June 17.
Roger was born September 1.
1934 in Caledonia, NY. He grew up
on a farm and was particularly close
to his uncle, F. Edward Stone. After
an early life filled with hijinks that
are remembered in stories today,
Roger joined the Navy in 1954.
A career Navy officer, "Atch" par-
-ticularly enjoyed the time he spent
with his buddies in Japan, serving
on the Coral Sea, his work as a me-
teorologist, and his assignment to
the Hurricane Hunters. Treasured
friends from the military include
Sally Balkema, Richard Owens, and
Jim Romano to name a few.
"Roge" met the love of his life,
Nancy Wawro, in 1958 and married
her four months later. They were
blessed with two daughters, Elaine
Marie and Erin Elisabeth. Nancy
died too early in 1978, leaving her
family a legacy of love. '- *
"Mr. A" retired after 27 years in.
the Navy in Jacksonville, FL. He
spent the years since bird-watching,
woodworking, trail-building, travel-
ing with his dogs, and staying in
touch with friends and family. He
moved to Monticello, FL in 1997
and made many. new friends.
The joy of Roger's life was being
a grandfather. "Pappa Scruffy Face"
to Sarah Elisabeth,, age 3 and Helen
Nicole, 3 months.
Roger is survived by his
daughters; sons-in-law Brad Gause
and William J. Bouthillier; grand-
daughter; brother, Peter Atchison;
sister, Judy Wright; Uncle Eddie
and Aunt Armada Stone: cousin
Richard Stone; godson John Thabes;
and many other relatives and
friends. In lieu of flowers or
services, please raise a glass to Dad,
tell a good story or two, and send
donations to The Listening Place, a
magical spot for people of all ages
to watch birds and wildlife to: Bird-
song Nature Center, 2106 Meridian
Road, Thomasville, GA, 31792.
William Thomas Grant, III
Mr. William Thomas Grant, III
(W.T.) age 71 departed this life on
Sunday. June 26, 2005 at Capital
Regional Medical Center in Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Funeral services were held 11:00
A.M. Saturday, July 2, 2005 at New
Bethel A.M.E. Church in


Golden Gate Baptist Theological
Seminary in Mill Valley.
She is currently employed by Ed-
ward's Hair Salon in Mill Valley.
Shumaker is a 1987 graduate of
Ygnacio Valley High School. He
graduated in 1995 from Cal Poly
Technical State University with a
Degree in Computer Science with
an Art Minor.
He received his Master of Divinity
Degree from Golden Gate Baptist
Theological Seminary in 2005.
He is presently the Associate Pas-
tor of Rollingwood Baptist Church,
and works at the Academy of Art
University and Golden Gate taptist
Theological Seminary.



Mourning
Monticello, Florida. Family received
friends Friday, July 1, 2005 at
Cooks & Cooper Funeral Home
from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.
William Thomas (W.T.) Grant, III
was born on October 16, 1933 in
New Orleans, Louisiana, the third
child and one of twin sons of the
late Warren Grant Sr. And Thelma
R. Grant.
William Thomas as he was affec-
tionately called, was a native of
New Orleans, Louisiana and resided
in Mobile, Alabama, Madison, Flor-
ida, Atlanta, Georgia and
Monticello, Florida. He was. bap-
tized at birth and accepted Christ at
the early age of seven at State Street
A.M.E. Church in Mobile, Alabama.
He served as a Steward at Mt. Zion
# 1 A.M.E. Church of Madison,
Florida and as a Deacon at Shiloh
A.M.E. Church of Madison, Florida
until he moved to Atlanta, Georgia.
William Thomas received his
early education. in New Orleans of
Louisiana and Mobile, Alabama and
his B.S. In Music Education from
Alabama State University of Mont-
gomery, Alabama with further stud-
ies toward his Master's degree at
Florida A & M University and Be-
thune Cookman College of Daytona
Beach, Florida.
William Thomas was an avid
lover of music and enjoyed being an
entrepreneur: From 1954 to 1965 he
was the band director of Carter Par-
ramore of Quincy, Florida, Madison
Training School of Madison, Flor-
ida Suwannee Training School of
Live Oak, Florida, and Starke Train-
ing School of Starke, Florida. From
1966 to 1979 he owned and oper-
ated William Thomas Grant Ten-
neco and Amoco Service Station of
Madison, Florida. From 1979 to
1983 he was a math teacher at Madi-
son County High School of
Madison, Florida. From 1983 to
1992 he owned and operated Wil-
liam Thomas Grant and Son Amoco
of Madison, Florida. From 1992 to
1998 he was the founder of Grant's
Service Center, Wrecker Service,
and Bill Grant Enterprises of Monti-
cello, Florida. From 2002 to June
26; 2005 he was semi-retired.
William Thomas never met a
stranger. He loved people, and
would carry on a conversation with
anyone. He married Esther Tolliver
on December 23, 1962 after a brief

(See Homes of Mourning Page 7)


Quilters To Donate

Proceeds From

Raffle To Sr. Center


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Members of the Crazy Quilters are.
two thirds of the way towards the
completion of their North Carolina
Lily Quilt.
Members have decided that the
funds from the sale of raffle tickets
on this white king sized quilt with
it's large red lilies and green stems
and leaves will be donated to the
Senior Citizen Center.
The Center is active in the com-
munity, working with the disabled
and less fortunate, and offers a num-
ber of programs aimed towards the
seniors of the county.
Raffle tickets for this elegant quilt
have been printed and are for sale
now from any members of the quil-
ters. Cost is $1 each or, 6 for $5.
The winning ticket will be drawn
in December at the Christmas in
Monticello tree lighting event.


The monies from the last quilt raf-
fle was donated to the County Hu-
mane Society.
The Quilters have more recently
been meeting at the home of Bar-
bara Sheats on Tuesdays and Thurs-
day, as the Public Library is closed
while it prepares for the move to its
new quarters at the former JCHS
Media Center on Water Street.
Sheats can be contacted at 997-
8732 for quilting times and for the
purchase of tickets.
During their quilting sessions, the
Quilters have been discussing ideas
for their next quilt project. No deci-
sions have been made as yet.
The Quilters have recently been
seen quilting at functions such as
the Watermelon Festival, the Rotary
Barbecue, and the Woman's Club
Luncheon and Fashion Show.
They are open to invitations to
community events, for the opportu-
nity to stitch and sell raffle tickets.


TONI NAYLOR AND DANIEL SHUMAKER


HUMANE SOCIETY Representative George Carswell ac-
cepts a check from the Crazy Quilters, from the proceeds
of their quilt raffle. L-R: Barbara Sheats, Carswell, Pat
Monge, Rose Klemp and Jeanne Brenner. (News Photo)

VBS Scheduled At Bethel AME


Vacation Bible School at Bethel
A.M.E Church on East York Street,
takes place 6:30 to 8 p.m., Monday,
July 11 through Friday, July 15.
Classes include Bible teaching,
and other activities for adults and


BOLAND'S COUNTRY STORE, in Wacissa, has this conver-
sation piece standing on the fringe of its parking lot. A
closer look shows that there is no water connected to the
shower. (News Photo)

P 7


LIMITED TIME.
OFFER


C COMPLETE


S115.00


Km


-qEE PEDALEP
FOR DFETAILQ


GAS SERVICE
INCLUDES:
Normal Installation
6 Months Free Tank Rental)
50 Gallons of Gas


LI LJ

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION : "
of the Big Bend '
Serving Persons with Epilepsy
Comnnluinity EIdu cation
Diagnosis and Teat ent
Case Managenmcil
Support Groups


1108-B East Park Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777

FIXR1PDA D UAT T OF Of

HE ALTH
LTHI


children.
Refreshments will be served each
evening, after classes.
The community 'is welcome to
share in this week of learning and
fun.


Health



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First!



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UBIQUITOUS Red Hats, enjoyed the Festival L-R: Mary Connell, Rowena Daniel and
RED HAT LADIES enjoy the Watermelon Courthouse. L-R: Dottie Jenkins, Dorris Up- Luncheon and Fashion Show, and met mem- Thelma Birdwell. (News Photos)
Festival Parade from the south steps of the tain, and Maggie Shofner. bers of other area chapters at the event.


Tips To Prepare For, Treat


Heat Related Conditions


As summer officially began, June
21, the County Emergency Opera-
tions Center offers tips to help resi-
dents prepare for a heat wave.
A Heat Wave is defined as a pro-
longed period of excessive heat and
humidity.
When this occurs:
*Slow down. Avoid strenuous ac-
tivity, or if you must undertake this
activity, do so in the coolest part of
the day, between 4 and 7 a.m.

*Stay indoors as much as possible.
If air conditioning is not available,
stay on the lowest floor, out of the
sunshine.
Try to go to a public building with
air conditioning each day for several
hours.
Remember fans do'not cool the
air, but help sweat evaporate which
cools the body.
*Wear lightweight, light colored
clothing. Light colors reflect away
some of the sun's energy.


*Drink plenty of water regularly
and often. The body needs water to
keep cool.
*Drink plenty of fluids, even if
not thirsty.
*Water is the safest liquid to
drink. Avoid drinks with alcohol or
caffeine, which make the effect of
heat on the body worse. This is es-
pecially true of beer which dehy-
drates the body.
*Eat small meals more often.
Avoid foods that are high in
protein,. which increase metabolic
heat.
*Avoid using salt tablets unless
directed to do so by a physician.
Signals of heat emergencies in-
clude:
*Heat exhaustion: cool, moist,
pale, or flushed skin; heavy sweat-
ing; headache, nausea or vomiting;
dizziness; and exhaustion. Body
temperature will be near normal.
*Heat stroke: hot, red skin;


changes in consciousness; rapid,
weak pulse; rapid, shallow
breathing.
Boyd temperature can be very
high, up to 105 degrees. If victim is
sweating from heavy work, skin
may be wet; otherwise it will feel
dry.
Treatment of heat emergencies
includes:
Heat Cramps: Get the person to a
cooler place, and have him/her rest
in a comfortable position.
Lightly stretch the affected muscle
and replenish fluids. Give a half
glass of cool water every 15
minutes. Do riot give liquids with al-
cohol or caffeine in them, as they
can make conditions worse.
Heat Exhaustion: Move person to
.a cooler place and remove or loosen
tight clothing and apply cool, wet
cloths, such as towels or sheets.
. If the person is conscious, give
cool water to drink. Make sure per-
son drinks slowly. Give a half glass
of water every 15 minutes and on al-
cohol or caffeine.


Opening

the door ,

to hope K,

Call our
lifeline.
It's toll-free.


1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


Now It Comes With A
List Of Ingredients.
( ) Call your water
S supplier for a short
.1 S new report about
your tap water.
For more information, call
1 P"'"' FP ^'T'FP .r it


J EPA


w
to hope
Call our lifeline,
It's toll-free. I, '
THE VOICE OF HOPE 1
1-800-572-1717 satrophy


-ftA
Muscular Dystropliy
Association


Let the victim rest in a comfort-
able position and watch for changes
in his/her condition.
Heat Stroke: This is a life threat-
ening situation. Call 911. Move the
person to a cooler place and quickly
cool the body.
Immerse the victim in a cool bath
or wrap wet sheets around the body
and fan it. Watch for breathing
problems.
Keep the person lying down and
continue to cool the body any way
possible.
If the victim refuses water, or is
vomiting, or there are changes in the
level of consciousness, do not give
anything to drink.


Red Hats Plan Shopping

Trip To Thomasville


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Red Hat Ladies of America
are planning a day trip and travel to
Thomasville, GA., Saturday, July 9,.

They will meet at the Dunn's tur-
niture Plaza at 1 1 a.m. and carpool
to the Toscoga Market Place on
South Broad Street.
There they will lunch and hold a
brief meeting on current and past
events. Then, the plan is to shop till


Graham/Scurry Reunion Set


Family members of the
Graham/Scurry family are being
sought now for a Family Reunion
"Homecoming to the North." to be
held in Tallahassee, Thursday, Sept.
I through Sunday, Sept. 4.
Members of the family are asked
to contact Lillian L. Brown at 544-
0887, or at 113 Rehwinkel Road,
Crawfordville, FL., 32327.


New Arrivals
ShI'mar and Shamyra I arris were
3or'. June 15, 2005 at Tallahassee
Vlemorial Hlospital.
Parents are Melissa and Phillip
Harris.
Shamar weighed 3 lbs, 8 oz and
was 17 inches long.
Shamyra weighed 3 lbs and 2.9
oz, and was 16.5 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Robin
and Warren Avrett and James Bow-
man.


Paternal grandparents are Bernice
and Nathaniel Harris.



Now

Enrolling!

SUMMER BATON

TWIRLING CAMPS
Ags4a ndu
-1.11


This will be the third reunion of
the combined branches of the
Graham/Scurry family.
Relatives of Roscna Scurry; Mat-
tie Graham-Thomas; Simon Ran-
dolph; or Tommy Graham, are
asked to contact Brown as.above.


giv, 1TheGirl
I hal row.'

Creat ~igLa SAVINGS
New Century .tD'll
Savings .JBONDS

For complete information
about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at
www.savingsbonds.gov.
A public service of this newspaper


they drop.
Recent area events brought them
together as they watched the Water-
melon Festival Parade together from
the south steps of the courthouse.
They also enjoyed the company
of other Red Hat ladies at the Mon-,
ticello Woman's Club Fashion Show,
and Luncheon. Ladies from Perry,,
Madison, and Tallahassee came into
town to dine and to shop the local
establishments.
I Some 50 plus Red lat Ladies
were in attendance on this Thursday
afternoon.








CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA 'PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix_

S385-06047
LOCA FF


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
S dba
raC, v mT a FuNv al-,HU-o-nw
S620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
Monticello, FL. 32344

850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return oi, most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page bi
courtship, they were essed '.nh
two children.
He leaves to cherish his memories
a loving and devoted wife of forty-
two years, Esther Grant; one son
William Thomas (Kimberly) Grant,
IV; one daughter Adrienne (Leon)
Grant Smith; one brother Dr. War-
ren (Theresa) Grant Jr. (L.J.) Of
Monticello, Florida; two brother-in-
laws: Fi.uk Tolliver of
Montgomery, Alabama, and Booker
T. (Deloris) Taylor Sr. Mobile, Ala-
bama; one sister-in-law Bernice
Skelton of Monticello, Florida; two
goddaughters and a host of nieces,
nephew, cousins, other relatives and
sorrowing friends.


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN


877-4550


Monticello 'Border /
2 Border / 1-10
MAHAN


lwww we p r event.






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005



~ S ,Senior
,, J ,! J^ Southeast Regional S
I Cancer Center
Is Celebrating Your SOlutiOns.....

M Freedom of Choice!

iHeritage Manor Apartments -
1800 E. Texas Hill Road Monticello, Florida
J A unique community designed for ?
R Elderly and Disabled.
SPlease contact Jerry (850) 997-4727 for further
Information or stop by our leasing office
I,, '0#Mon.- Fri.
V ''i between 9 a.m. and Noon. E _DE


SNorth Florida & South Georgia's
Medical Equipment Experts

We now accept Capital Health Plan.
Southeast Cancer Center is proud to bring World Class
Cancer Care including TomoTherapy@ Treatment to all
people of North Florida and Sout'Bh Georgia.
Please call 850-878-2273
to set up your .;z. o"ltr.& ioday. .
Southeast Regional Cincet erner ;s part cf -he HCA family of health





l "B 0W.. TS 7But if health concerns are slowing you down, we can help!
cr Home oxygen refill systems Respiratory medications
Hand-held nebulizers Low-cost inhalers
S 1BtTfh Da c PA Power chairs & scooters Walkers & wheelchairs
SHERRY LD W ALKER, A Diabetic supplies Therapeutic footwear
L 9 All Injury & Death Claims Lift chairs Hospital beds


Car, Truck & Motorcycle Accidents
Defective Products
E Slip & Fall
IUNegligence In Nursing Homes
I Or Hospitals


3 86o-5656 Total Homecare Solutions
Toll Free 1-800-458-5514 Fax 850-386-5136 301 NE Marion Street Madison, FL
FLO J 1637 Metropolitan Blvd. Suite B Tallahassee, FL. 32308
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisement. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information &mo
about our qualifications and experience.
Medicare Medicaid Private Insurance


MEDICARE PATIENTS |
:K_ B There's a lot in the news today about possible changes in our healthcare system.
E .. If you're 65 and older Medicare already works.
Medicare is a system that:
1. Lets you choose your own doctor.
2. Provides healthcare at minimal nost to you.
If you are a Medicare patient who has met your deductible for 2005, you could save a considerable amount of
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_ If you have a cataract or a vision problem, use your Medicare Benefit now. The system that works for you today might
___ not be here tomorrow.
- -;" Contact Dr. Thomas Lawrence today and we will be happy to answer your questions or assist you in scheduling your P
surgery before the year runs out and you are faced with the expense of a new deductible.

K Thomas L. Lawrence MD, PA ,
S3401 Capital Medical Blvd Tallahassee, Florida
(850) 942-3937 (EYES)

&FLO atjij~j~iaia|^lai^a~i~ia~|jBja


850973412





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005 PAGE 9-:.



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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005



All-Stars Lose To Perry,


Madison In Tournament


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello All-Stars base-
ball team lost both of their games
in the double-elimination district
tournament, recently.
Perry, which finished second in
the state last year, blanked the lo-
cal team 20-0.
Zack Michael began the pitching
effort against Perry, working for
two innings.
Three additional pitchers were
brought in during the game to see if


they could help the effort.
There were only three Monticello
hits in the game, all singles. They
were made by Elliott Capers, Trent
Roberts and Tyler Jackson.
Monticello lost the second game
to Madison, 8-5.
Marcus Roberts pitched the open-
ing two and a half innings, and Mi-
chael came in to wrap up the final
three and a half innings.
Capers was hit by pitch twice,
sending him to first base.
Jackson had two walks, his first
time at bat but made it safely to
first, because of an error on the part


of the first baseman.
He scored a run that time, for a
total of two runs.
Trent Roberts made it to first
safely during his first time at bat,
due to an error on the part of the
second baseman. He scored a run
during that time around the bases.
Roberts hit a single, which re-
sulted in his second run of the day.
He also had the team's play of the
game, when he ripped out a two-
run home run during his final stand
at the plate.
Michael hit one single and one
fly-out to deep center field. Mar-
cus Roberts made it safely to first
base following an error made by
the right-fielder. He also hit a sin-
gle which resulted in him scoring a
run.







LAND OF THE DEAD
(R)
Fri.. Thurs. 12:45 5:20 -
9:00
'NO PASSES

WAR OF THE
WORLDS(PG13)
Fri. Thurs 1:30 4:15 -
7:20 10:00
NO PASSES

MR. & MRS. SMITH
(PG13)
Fri.- Thurs. 1:15 4:20 -
7:10 9:55

REBOUND (PG)
12:15 2:25 -4:55 7:05 -
9:20
NO PASSES

BATMAN BEGINS
(PG13)
Fri.. Thurs 1:00 4:00 -
7:00 10:00

HERBIE:FULLY
LOADED (G)
Fri. Thurs. 11:45- 2:10 -
4:35 7:15 9:35
NO PASSES

BEWITCHED (PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 12:30 2:50 -
5:10 7:30
NO PASSES


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Five play dates remain in the-
Church League softball season,
wvith action continuing this week.
Calvary Baptist faces off against
Christ Episcopal team one; and
Casa Bianca Baptist squares off
against Elizabeth AME, with both
games at 7 p.m., Thursday.
Christ Episcopal team two goes
up against Elizabeth Baptist at 8:30
p.m. that day.
Action continues July 7, with
Christ Episcopal team one versus
Christ Episcopal team two; and
Casa Bianca Baptist faces off
against Calvary Baptist, at 7 p.m.
At 8:30 p.m., Elizabeth Baptist
will play Elizabeth AME.


Budget
(Gontipued From.Page 1) ....
the new library building accounts in
part for the increase. She said the in-
drease also allows the library staff to
return to a five-day week.
SHamadani had to cut back the
hours of library employees last year
because of budgetary constraints.
sThe Solid Waste Department's
Budget shows an increase of
$166,439, from $1,395,851 the pre-
Vious year to the $1,562,290 for the
coming year.
The increase includes the pur-
chase of a new garbage truck and a
three-percent pay increase for em-
ployees.
'Director Beth Thorne told com-
missioners that the increase falls
well within the projected revenues
to be raised by the special landfill
assessment.
- The Recreation Park's budget ac-
tually shows a decrease from the
previous year, a reflection of the
losing of a grant.
* The request is for $192,212,
4own from $227,170 last year.
SDirector Kevin Aman is asking
fbr money for a part-time assistant
nad a three-percent salary increase
tor himself.
Still to be heard by commissioners
are Property Appraiser David Ward,
lax Collector Lois Hunter, and
dlerk of Court Dale Boatwright.


American Heart
Associations,
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke


Reduce your risk factors


July 14, Calvary Baptist goes up
against Christ Episcopal team two;
and Elizabeth AME will play
Christ Episcopal team one, at 7
p.m.

At 8:30 p.m., Elizabeth Baptist
plays against Casa Bianca Baptist.
Scheduled for July 21, Elizabeth
Baptist goes against Christ Episco-
pal team one; and Calvary Baptist
plays against Casa Bianca Baptist,
at 7 p.m.

Christ Episcopal team two will
face Elizabeth AME, at 8:30 p.m.
In, the final games of the season,
June 28, Casa Bianca Baptist faces
Christ Episcopal team one, and
Christ Episcopal team two goes
against Elizabeth Baptist, at 7 p.m..
Elizabeth AME squares off against
Calvary Baptist, at 8:30 p.m.


SEE THEf fUTURE
Sf







With your help, "my kids"
can look forward to
a future without
neuromuscular diseases.
Please volunteer
today.


Muscular
Dystrophy Association
o 1-800-572-1717
o www.mdausa.org









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Clark Christy, led the batting av-
erages against Madison, going-
three for three with three singles.
He went three for four during the
entire tournament, giving him the
top of the Monticello list for bat-
ting, and Smiley went two for
three, hitting two singles.
Coach Paul Michael said the team
worked hard on its batting tech-
niques, beginning three weeks be-
fore the tournament, and it paid off.
Against Madison, they out batted
them eight to seven.
He said the technique the boys
practiced was illustrated on a DVD
called "Major League Batting" by
Tom Emansky, a major league
scout and hitting instructor for
many years.
"I would encourage any young


players who would like to continue
to develop their batting skills, to.-
get on the Internet
(baseballwall.com) and order the
DVD," said Michael. "It helped
our game."
He added that he may schedule
additional games for the team, if
so, that information will be forth-


coming.
Playing for the All-Stars are:
Trent Roberts, Capers, Alphonso
Footman, Jared Jackson, Zack Mi-
chael, Marcus Roberts, Shelton Al-
len, Clark Christy, Tyler Jackson,
Cody Kelly, Smiley, Devin Reams.
Coaches are Paul Michael, Leroy
Mobley and Harold Malloy.


Monticello Christian Academy
Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


Church League Play

Wraps Up July 28


Sports


The Jefferson County Recycling Program. accepts
:b a the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans -- Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
i etc.
SAluminum cans -soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
S laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

; All glass bottles, jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)
'

SResidents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

A *Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center) m

Batteries

S "*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
' machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

6 *Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
i clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

SHousehold Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, pahit thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
^ clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
0 accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
c collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
I for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
. http://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
Operation for each individual site. For further information please call the -

, Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.



...R Visit thle www.Eart,9 iorg Recycling Information web page C
-r*Cn r con a ( wooo io o nio st.. of n Lu ombYer, s hnglessink fos








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005 PAGE 11


Daisy Crumitie

Returns To Gym

To Train For Boxing


LITTLE LEAGUE Athletes of the Year recog- gram include, from left: Zack Michael, Trent
nized at the Recreation Park Awards Pro- Roberts, and Brittany Hopson.


COACH PITCH Athletes of the Year receiv- from left: Jana Barber and Capas Kinsey.
ing awards at the awards program include, (News Photos)


Fencers Coed Team

Inches By Cubs 16-15


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Waukeenah Fence and Deck
coed softball. team officially
wrapped up the second half of the
season at a 3-2 record, 5-5 unoffi-
cially,'due to games forfeited and
played after the fact, following a
close 16-15 win over the Tallahas-
see Cubs last week.
Team coach Nick Flynt said that
the Cubs are the number one team
in'the league.
"It was a tough game," he said.
"It was neck and neck all the way.
First, they would score, then we
would score. It stayed pretty tight."
The Cubs led the score 14-15
when time ran out, the fencers at


bat during the bottom of the inning,
therefore, giving them another im-
mediate chance at bat.
Lucy Buzbee hit a fly-out; and
Nick Flynt hlit a single up the mid-
dle.
Alison Flynt lined out to third
and Blake (last name unknown) hit
a single, sending Nick Flynt to sec-
ond base.

Michelle Bronson also hit a sin-
gle, loading the bases and the fenc-
ers had two outs.

Steve Lohbeck came to the plate
and ripped out a double to left
field, sending Nick Flynt and Blake
around the plate for the score and
the win.


A drunk driver ruined something
precious. Amber Apodaca.
Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.








FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As renovations continue and the-
number of young boxers continues
to grow at the new Cherry Street
Gym location, a local female favor-
ite, Daisy "The Black Widow"
Crumity, has returned to action.
Trainer Troy Carter said she had
been coming to the gym daily to
train for the past couple of weeks.
When the gym was located on
North Railroad Street, Crumity was
the first female boxer to begin
working out at the gym and began
boxing early in 2003.
Crumity built up her reputation
and became known as "The Black
Widow", a name she earned, be-
cause of her hard work, training
and dedication, said Carter.
"Every time she got in the ring,
she "killed" her man," said Carter.
"Just like a Black Widow.spider."
In her first year of boxing, she
had 10 bouts, all of which were
fought against male opponents, and
'she won'nine of those bouts. The
one loss was to an opponent older


Projects
(Continued From Page 1)
for septic tanks in many areas of the
county, reducing the threat of aqui-
fer contamination.
Funding to continue to upgrade
the industrial park, specifically in
the areas of lighting, paving and
sewer and water extensions.
Funding for the establishment of
an Emergency Operations and Fire
Rescue facility.
"As Jefferson County grows, so
does the need to enhance its emer-
gency preparedness and response
capabilities," county officials say.
"The board considers this an eco-
nomic development issue, inasmuch
as quality of life is a key ingredient
in the economic status, of the com-
munity and its residents."


and bigger than she was.
In what was to be her second year
of boxing, the gym was closed for
several months.
In that first year, she said she felt
really proud of herself, "Especially
when I beat the boys."


Iy


Carter added that not only did
Crumity beat the boys she went up
against, she dominated and went
right through them.
'She doesn't back down and
works really hard at her training,"
he said.
"People might say that girls don't
do that (boxing), but I don't care
what people say," said Crumity.
"My insides tell me that I can do
anything that a boy can do."
Crumity stated that she wants to
" be a world champion some day.


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SWELL SERVICE
.. Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced -
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


LUMART AVIATION
Airplane rides, Sightseeing, Aerial photography
Come fly with us!

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2150 Ellon Rd
Perry, FL 32347
Phone (850)584-8867
Lumar s Slolpor 3
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E mail LSTi6rtcom net Classic Cessna 170-B


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www.Ti m Pca rv.co m


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


4-L
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Mowing,
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Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Register's

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315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


BETTER BODIES
I AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BOD'R fPAlN 1


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1 997-4160 )
ANDV & TINA AMES, OWNERS


-- itw -1~v


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT


0 # 850-997-5808


850-545-9964 4 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


p


I O~i- iiiieI Curts U-Ua's c tiaraL.MMIc.


11 %0"______________IaW___ -= -I -. .___


F


Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not vahid with any other offer.


LI "' :i-L. ".5" Wellness/Industry ,.,,
85-97-79


CO"~ll lllY :t'()INSt 'IAN( 'I
C) ~.illstate I us Urance ( uutp.aN~

-'I -;M ll l%\0 dI)ll~l ljni \ 1111l'IC ( C


N ormnia iL. I-fo(It
\C Io t lUltfSI\ c .\ 13C )!


878-80'77


GiveThe

That GroS
Giving Savings Bonds now can make.a
difference for the fliture--to help) with
expenses like college tuition. They're
available through most l)iankks, your work, or
autolliali'cally through the new Savings Bonds
EasvSaver Plan at www.easysaver.gov.
Call 1-800) -41 S BOI) for recorded rate
inlIormation, or write to:
Savings Bonds Pockel ('ide,
Parkerswtnng, In '26106-1328.


Creating a ~~L'AVLlVG(.l
For complete information about New Cen.,tury,\.~ ijfBNt
U.S. Savings Bonds, visit our Web SavingsJ. .
site at www.savingsbonds.gov.
1 I A public service of this newspaper


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005


\


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e ASE Certified Store Personnel

e Battery Testing & Installation
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997-5387


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1300 North Jefferson St., Monticello
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AR CARE



Begins Here


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We Offer Pick uP Mano ,. | of qul ot' oilchssis
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S s rakes *Exhaust* General Maintenance $5 95
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To Place Your Ad




997-3568




CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail


Payment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 Lines, One Edition $4.00 Each Additional Line $1.00
3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
30 Characters Per Line
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
S Wednesday Noon for Friday


DATES TO BE PUBLISHED


CLASSIFICATION

WRITE YOUtR AD HERE









Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


IEGAI2 NOTICE


LEGALS,- ..


T e J.enerson Lounty Boaro 01 County
Commissioners will hold a budget
workshop at 1:30 p.m., on Thursday, July
7, 2005, at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, Monticello,
Florida, to discuss the proposed FY
2005-2006 Budget.
7/6,c


ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITION
VACANCIES: School Board of
Jefferson County, Florida 1490 West
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344, Phone: 850-342-0100, Fax:
850-342-0108. Positions Available:
*Executive Director of Operation and
Human Resources *Executive
Director of School Improvement
*Principal Jefferson Elementary
School *Principal Jefferson County
High School. The following
information is for all positions listed
above: Salary: $65,212 Beginning
Date: July 18, 2005 Deadline for
Application: July 11, 2005 Contact:
Hal Wilson. Equal Employment
Opportunity School Board Rule
2.124
7/6, 8, c
Three dressers, must have experience
and three references. 997-5748.
7/6, 8, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5P.'0 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5,18.ttai,c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Pers'-:. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/j, s/d, tfn
Truck Driver Wanted: Class B
Contact Judson Freeman @ 997-2519.
Local deliveries.
s/d, 6/13 tfn

LEGAL$, ,:', :, "


NOTICE OF PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE
LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA AMENDING
ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR JURISDICTION; ADOPTING AN
AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP
TO INCLUDE A FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR A CERTAIN
RECENTLY ANNEXED PARCEL CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 12.84
ACRES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2005-06. The future land use map proposed designation is RLD -
Residential Low Density for a parcel located on Rocky Branch Road near the intersection
of Morns Road and identified on the map below. A public hearing on the ordinance will
be conducted by the Local Planning Agency on July 19, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, FL 32344. Interested persons may appear
at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. The entire text of
the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
(Dr'JUH1 BASt) /2* P
'*. '-r: ______ t oO' t 'A-.at


CASH NOW Asseen
3onT.V.
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on
I ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


iwTi 7iymIIUULuI.I UI-iA4UUU or. 9 Ui Uoo
shape & runs Asking $3900
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
Mr. Stump Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6;2, s'd, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
Isith no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of,
Christ and you'can'be a member of it&r
\\e are ready to help if you.are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn

FOR RENT
3bdrm, I '1 b officec, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
6 22, tfn, c
RV or Mobile Home Lots For Rent.
Call Liz @ 997-1638.
6/24, 29, 7/1, 3, 1, 10, 15, 17, c
Shop / Warehouse Space. Four large
roll-up doors. 1200 sq ft with
standard utilities included. Easy
access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
August 1st. Call 997-4150.
6/15, 17, tfn. c


1 bed, 1 bath with pasture in country,
$V0.00 a month 997-6653.
)/6, 3, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, oc

FOR SALE '.
Air conditioner: Sunchaser XL Series,
duo-therm, roof top for trailer or van,
11,000 BTU's, $150. Call 997-8591.
7/1, 0, 3, 13, pd
4 P225/60-R-16 Mich. tires $40
997-0135.
tin
Louis., Mills has silve- lueen sweet
corn for sale. 997-2'0(

REAL ESTATE .
Beautiful & Private. 2 miles from
Monticello 3 br, 2 '/2 bath home on
171/2 acres w/pond, dock, barn, dove
field, garden, and pasture in a
manicured, country setting. Pine
floors throughout with large brick
fireplace. Shown by appt. Only.
$439,000. Send email to
House@PWHhomes.com to receive
additional info or call (850) 997-6344
to set appt.
6/22, 24, 29, 7/1 6 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, pd


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jtfferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997..551d vwwxbkk~cai


* GREENVILLE- affordable starter
home in town, 1.75 acre lot. $42,500
* Quiet Residential Area: remodeled
home, vinyl and brick with fenced
backyard, Nobles Subdivision
$101,900
* Spacious Brick Home- split plan,
large tiled shower, family room with
fireplace, on 2 acre lot. S155,000
* COOPER'S POND- spacious home
huge master suite, 4BR/3BA, privacy
fenced backyard with pool. $174,900

Many Others Available


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com 1

Beautiful Home on the Top of a
Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath I
yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 I
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, 1
detached garage, barn nice field all very i
convenient to Tallahassee for only I
$1,200,000 ]

Choice Building Lots in Town on ]
Morris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000 j

Under Contract -Look- Un-
usual Opportunity!!! On Waukee-
nah Highway easy access to Tallahassee
high, dry, fenced and ready to build on, 1
great for

Like New Home built in 2002, 3 bed-
rooms 2 baths, 1964 sq. ft., ceramic tile
and hardwood floors, cathedral ceiling,
fireplace and a screened porch on one
acre not far from town $169,500 don't
miss it!

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with
big doublewide w/ fireplace, stables,
round pen in remote, big oaks, pond, lo-
cated north of Greenville a real opportu-
nity for the horse owner only $295,000 1

Under Contract-Terrific New i
Listing!! 3 bedroom 2 bath double wide _
with new gal alum roof and vinyl siding 3
sheds, fish pond on 2.4 acres and only
$86,500

Don't Miss this One -South 1
Main Ave west of Monticello off US 90
on paved county road five wooded acres
with well and septic tank $85,000

Biq doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500

Prime Commercial Property us
19 South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Builders Mart

Home Site close to town on West
Grooverville Road with'paved road front-
age $14,500 1


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at j
www.TimPeary.com
W behave qualified buyers looking for
acreage between Monticello and Lloyd
can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Simply the Best

Buyers looking for Homes and Land
.=-;6r======


Housing Vouchers


WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMODELED HOMES
2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy Officers on site

575-6571


Mill, -111 M. I


ki







PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 06, 2005


~v


m IA


WORKING ON this wheel chair ramp for an Aucilla Shores
resident are L-R: Anna Finlayson, Katherine Hogg, and
Caroline Mueller.


TRYING OUT the completed wheelchair ramp are Kather-
ine Hogg and Eric Mueller, as resident Vann looks on from
the porch.


1st UMC Mission Team Helps


Storm Victims in Pensacola


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

An 18 member mission team
from First United Methodist
Church recently traveled to Pensa-
cola to assist residents who are still
recovering from last year's hurri-
cane hits.
Youth Director and Mission
Team Leader Sally Cole said plan-
niing actually began several months
ago with a prayer, and fundraising.
On June 19, tlhe team then trav-
eled to Pensacola and worked for


three days.
Projects entailed repairing a roof,
and replacing the ceiling that had
been damaged bya tree that fell on
a house, and the subsequent water
damage; painting a wheelchair
ramp that had been damaged by the
storms; moving water damaged fur-
niture; cutting trees and removing
storm debris; and doing yard work.
After the team returned to Monti-
cello late Wednesday night, they
got up Thursday morning and went
to work around the county.
Part of the team helped a family
in town with yard work, while oth-
ers on the team built a wheelchair


ramp for an Aucilla Shores
resident.
Cole said most of the team did
not have any construction experi-
ence, but the ramp was a good-
looking, well built ramp that met
code and ADA standards.
Cole related that team members
said it was a great trip and very
successful.
"The team was not able to com-
plete all the projects we originally
expected to work on in Pensacola,
but the projects we ended up doing.
served as a very effective witness,"
said Cole.


"Not only were the residents Very
appreciative of the physical help,
but at least two said they felt that
we were sent by God," she added.
"One even went on to say that
she had been feeling that God does-
n't care, but now, she knew He
did," said Cole.

Team members included Cole,
adults Tony Hogg, Mac Finlayson,
Pam Mueller, and Mona Lewis.

College students included Katie
Hatcher and Ben Hodges, and
youth included Amy Blanton, Re-
bekah Dibble, Anna Finlayson,
Will Hartsfield, Kiersten Hayes,
Katherine Hogg, Kaitlin Jackson,
Abby Lewis, Caroline Mueller, and
Daniel and J. T. Ward.


Posing in front to this wheelchair ramp the group helped
build are: L-R: Tony Hogg, Caroline Mueller, Brad Mueller,
Eric Mueller, Mac Finlayson, Ben Hodges and resident
Vann of Aucilla Shores.


WORKING on removing yard debris at this Pensacola home
are L-R: Will Hartsfield,'J.T. Ward, Sally Cole, Kiersten
Hayes, Daniel Ward, and Ben Hodges.


PAINTING this
field.


fence during the mission work is Will Hart-


REPAIRING the roof on this stucture in Pensacola are L-R:
Daniel Ward, Tony Hogg, and Ben Hodges.


DOING SOME LANDSCAPING while on the mission trip to
Pensacola are L-R: Caroline Mueller, Anna Finlayson, Kait-
line Jackson, and Katherine Hogg.


CONSTRUCTION
AHEAD


With your help,
MDA is building a
tomorrow without
neuromuscular diseases.
1-800-572-1717

Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org




.Emi








During October, remind
the women you care about to
get checked for breast cancer.
Call to learn more.


V


Hope. Progress. Answers.
800-ACS-2345
cancer.org


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