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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00051
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 29, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00051
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text










Merchant Marine
Plays
Supporting Role

Editorial, Page 4


LIDRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611


Refuge House
Helps
Battered Women

Story, Page 6


4-Hers
Attend
Camp Jubilee

Story, Photos, Page 11


Tommy Brown, Jr.
Wins
Golf Tournament

Story Photos Page 14


Wednesday Morning
J


137TH YEAR NO.51, 50 CENTS


Montic


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2005


County


Adopts Impact Fees


Expectation is To Begin

Collecting Fees Aug. 1


Lik


PROMPTED by the growing tempo of devel- of recapturing some of. the government
opment, county officials decided to take ac- costs associated with serving the new
tion and put into place impact fees as a way growth. (News Photo)


Fire Rescue Seeks Grant


To Augment Department


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The County Commission has
granted Fire Rescue permission to
pursue a federal grant that would
make it possible for the department
to hire two additional Emergency
Medical (EM) personnel.
- As Fire Rescue Chief Larry Bates
explained it to commissioners, the
federal government would cover an
ever-diminishing portion of the
salaries of the two individuals over a
four-year period. On the fifth year,


Bates said, the county would then be
responsible for the entire salaries of
the two individuals.
Each salary would begin at
$48,000 and grow to $52,000 by
year five.
The first year, the federal grant
would cover $36,000 of each salary
and the county would be responsible
for the other $12,000.
The second year, the federal grant
would cover $32,000 and the
county, $17,000.
Third year, the federal grant
would cover $20,000 and the
county, $30,000. Fourth year, the


FIRE RESCUE Chief Larry Bates is hoping to get a federal
grant that will allow him to hire two additional Emergency
Medical personnel. (News Photo)


grant would cover $12,000 and the
county, $39,000.
On the fifth year, the county
would pick up the entire $52,00C
salary.
The grant requires that the county
keep the personnel on the payroll
for five years minimum.
"The way the county is growing,
we're going to need additional EM
people, especially on the west side
of the county," Commission
Chairman Skeet Joyner said in
support of the measure, expressing
the general view of the board.
Bates said it's been his longtime
goal to augment the department
from the present four employees per
shift to five employees per shift.
He said the department presently
consists of 16 full-time employees
and three part-timers who fill in dur-
ing vacations. But two of his full-
timers employees will soon be leav-
ing soon for jobs in Tallahassee, he
said.

MPD Substation
Will Be No More

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Come Thursday, the police substa-
tion in Roostertown will cease to be.
By unanimous vote, the City
Council decided two weeks ago that
it would not renew the annual lease
on the building, which comes due
June 30.
"It's a political decision," Police
Chief David Frisby told the council
right before the decision.
Frisby said the substation had
served its purpose, evident by the
drastic reduction in crime in the
area. But for the last few years, the
substation had been no more than "a
scarecrow", he said.
"We don't have the officers to
staff it," Frisby said.
It cost the city $300 monthly for
the building, including rent, phone
and electricity.
When Frisby first established the
(See Substation Page 3)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
The county now has an impact fee
ordinance.
The County Commission adopted
the measure by unanimous vote on
June 16, following a brief public
hearing.
As approved, the impact fee is
$96.32 per house for fire service and
$123.72 per house for ambulance
service, for a total of $220.04.
These, at least, are the impact fees
for residential units. The impact fees
for commercial, industrial and insti-
tutional structures are figured on a
per footage basis.
The expectation is that the county
will be able to begin collecting the
impact fees as early as Aug. 1. That
gives county officials about 45 days
to put in place the procedures for the
collection of the fees.
By law, the monies collected
must be kept in separate accounts
and can only be used for capital ex-
penditures, as dictated by future
growth.
The fees apply only to new con-
struction. They are due at the time
the building permit is pulled.
The only possible concern ex-
pressed at the June 16 hearing came
from a developer, who cautioned the


commission about a case in Lee
County having to do with a School
Board-imposed impact fee.
The case supposedly established
that "a local government cannot im-
pose an impact fee if it impairs
someone's existing contract rights."


Total Fee

Per New

House Will

Be $220.04 .

For Fire &

Ambulance

"If I bring a client in and they
qualify for the loan and then the im-
pact fee disallows them from getting
the loan, you can't apply the impact
fee," the gentleman gave as an ex-
ample.
The attorney associated with the
Government Services Corporation --
the consultant firm that prepared the
study and impact fee ordinance for
the county -- disputed the gentle-
man's assertion.


PLANNERS serve at the pleasure of county
commissioners and often catch the flack on
controversial zoning and planning issues.


In fact, Lee County had won the
suit, said the attorney, who suppos-
-edly represented that county in the
suit. Anyway, the local impact fee
exempted any contract existing prior
to Aug. 1, she said.
But if there were any problems in
future, she would advise the county
on a case-per-case basis, she said.
The only other possible concern
expressed came from Commissioner
Gene Hall, who questioned the low
amount of the fees.
"I got calls from citizens who feel
that these rates are low," Hall said.
Not to worry, the consultants as-
sured commissioners. The present
numbers were based on the existing
situation, they said. But as that
situation changed with development,
those numbers could be adjusted up-
wards:
"We recommend you examine
these fees every three years," said
consultant Melissa Proctor.
The total cost of the project to the
county was $15,000. That's $10,000
for the study justifying the imposi-
tion of the fees and another $5,000
for the actual implementation of the
fees. The county first decided to
pursue impact fees last November.
Impact fees, by definition, are
one-time charges levied against new
construction -- both residential and
commercial -- to help pay for the
cost of the increased government
services demanded by growth.
According to the experts, every
(See Impact Page 2)


Here Commissioner Skeet Joyner, center,
talks with Attorney Scott Shirley, left, and
Planner Bill Tellefsen. (News Photo)


Planners Lack Of Quorums

Hindering County Business


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
The inability of the Planning
Commission to hold scheduled

News Office To
Close For Holiday
The Monticello News Office will
close Monday for the July 4th H oli-
day.
The office will reopen S a.m.,
Tuesday, July 5.
D.. ,i ,i..I fur news and ad copy tor-
the Wednesday, July 6 paper, is
noon Friday, July I1.


meetings because of the lack of quo-
rums became a topic of discussion at
a recent County Commission meet-
ing.
Carla Wheeler raised the issue.
Wheeler told commissioners that
one of her projects, scheduled for
review by the Planning
Commission, had to be rescheduled
because the planners had failed to
get a quorum.
Given that the group met only
once a month, it meant that her pro-
ject would be delayed another 30
days, Wheeler said.
"This county stops dead for 30
days if there is no quorum,"
Wheeler said. "It's unproductive."


Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ncr acknowledged that the lack of
quorums at Planning Commission
meetings was a problem.
"It's extremely embarrassing," lie
said.
At the same time, he recognized
that it was a tough job, Joyner said.
He also recognized that it was diffi-
cult to get individuals to serve,
given the positions were voluntary.
In fact, he planned to have the
board address the issue at the com-
ing budget workshops, Joyner said.
If hlie was suggesting monetary
compensation for those serving on
the planning board, she knew of at
(See Planners Page 8)

































BILL HOPKINS, president of the Brother- rector of the Opera House, towards the cost
hood of Christ Episcopal Church, presents a of the new roof.
$500 donation to Jan Rickey, executive di-


Adoptions Down In May


At Humane Society Shelter


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Adoptions were down in May at
the Humane Society Shelter be-
cause of the Parvo outbreak and
quarantine, and the number of
euthanized animals, consequently
wis up.
The shelter was under quarantine
from May 20 through June 11.


A total of 24 animals had to be
put down. They included 10 ca-
nines for Parvo, one with heart
worms and one due to heart worm
- treatment.
Also, one for biting a human, and
three because of lack of room at the
shelter, for a total of 16 canines
Six felines were euthanized due
- top being feral and one for illness.
The total number of animals
- coming into the shelter during the


non quarantine period included 38
felines and 18 canines, totaling 56
animals.
Five canines and five felines
were adopted into new homes.
Kennel Operations Tina Ames
advised that as of June 20, there
were 15 canines and 26 felines
housed at the shelter.
She added that 12 new Shor-Line
cages had been ordered to help
combat the problem of any future
outbreaks of Parvo at the shelter.
Six of the cages measure 48 x 30
and six measure 36 x 30.
"They are a better quality and
more easily cleanable than the old
dog cages," said Ames. "The old
cages will now be used for cats and
kittens, enabling us to house more
animals, both cats and dogs."
The new cages will arrive soon.
Ames also advised that the figures
for the Watermelon Festival booth
would be reported during next
month's meeting, and the last she
heard the number was five adop-
tions.
"Many thanks go to Connie, Jon,
Mary Helen, Martha, Robert and
Caroline for running the booth,"
said Ames. "And thanks to Mat-
thew for helping me set up and
break down the booth."



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The Opera House Stage Company
will;. hold open auditions for its
2005-06 Season, 5 p.m., Sunday,
July 10, and 7 p.m., Monday, at the
Opera House.
'Upcoming productions include
Agatha Christie's "Witness For The
Prosecution'" ,a courtroom thriller,
to be staged in September.
Other upcoming shows include: a
radio version of the Christmas clas-
sic "Miracle on 34th Street," in De-
cemfber; the sentimental classic "On
Golden Pond," in March, and the
murder mystery dinner theatre pro-
duction: "Cafe Noir," in May.


In some cases, parts have already
been cast, but good parts remain
available in each of these
production, relates Stage Company
Chair Lisa Reasoner.
For those wary of trying to learn
many lines, "Witness For The
Prosecution" offers a number of in-
teresting parts with few or no lines
to learn.
"We are always looking for new
people, either as actors or back stage
crew. Experience is not necessary as
we train," Reasoner said.
For additional information, con-
tact the Opera House at 997-4242.


Impact Fees


(Continued From Page 1)
new residence imposes actual and
potential demands on county serv-
ices, as well as adding to traffic con-
gestion and increasing the wear and
tear on roads.
Impact fees are a compensatory
tool that allows governments to re-
coup a certain portion of the costs
they incur to provide the additional
services required by an increasing
population.
Impact fees, moreover, are con-

an------
aItok a


sidered politically palatable, as they
principally affect people who are
not yet part of the community and
so can't take out their outrage on
current office holders.
It is not correct, however, to say
that impact fees never affect current
residents. In fact, residents who
build new houses or expand their
existing dwellings will be subject to
the charges.



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Opera House Gets


$500 Donation

The Brotherhood of Christ Episco- ers, such as the annual gourmet din
pal Church has made the first dona- ner, and then spend the money or
tion to the Opera House "Raise the good works within Jeffersor
Roof' Fund. County.
Brotherhood President Bill Hop-
kins presented Executive Director
Jan Rickey, on June 21, with a $500
check to help pay for the new roof. NO
Board Chair Jack Williams relates
that the old roof leaked so badly that M onticello City H
trash cans and barrels had to be used
to catch the water. M onday, July 4th.
"The new galvanized metal roof
has solved that problem, but now we 4th Holiday, the J
have to pay for it, about $50,000," o
Williams said. Of the M ontic
"We are looking for 100 people or w l
organizations to donate $500 each, will be held
and we appreciate the Brotherhood at 7:00 a
making the first donation." at 7:00 a
Williams added that donors will 245 S. M u
receive an aerial photo of the Opera
House, and a "deed" indicating the
section of the roof they have pur-
chased.
Hopkins explained the Brother- ": RD
hood's decision to make this dona- E UO D E '
tion: "Everyone benefits from the h i 'L.iX .
Opera House. It is a gathering place B 0RD IRr
for the entire community." i"
The primary purpose of the
Brotherhood is to conduct fundrais- LAWN & LNI)DSCAPINI


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Projects have included sending
disadvantaged kids to camp, buying
Christmas presents for handicapped
group home residents, and providing
scholarships to help high school
graduates further their education.
For information about the Broth-
[--erhood, contact Hopkins at 997-
n 8282.
n For information about the Opera
House, contact Rickey at 997-4242.



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005 PAGE 3

Donations Sought For


Fireworks Celebration


GAIGE WINCHESTER waters the flowers and
plants outside the Snapdragon -Shoppe in


Downtown Monticello. In the heat and dry
weather, she does this often. (News Photo)


A' *-mp


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Coordinators are scrambling to.
get the word out into the commu-
nity so that the approximately
$8,000 needed to conduct the
Fourth of July Fireworks show, at
the Recreation Park, will be raised.
"Money is coming in, but not fast
enough," said City Superintendent
Don Anderson.
'We need community support and
we need them to put the funds in,"
added Wallace "Bubba" Bullock,
who makes the fireworks and coor-
dinates the show.
Bullock said the show is planned
to be comparable to those of years
past. "We may do the Shenandoah
again, along with some of the other
displays, we'll have ground dis-
plays and prerecorded music, cho-
sen for its appeal to various age
groups." He added that the aerial
display will last approximately 30-
35 minutes.
"We will have new material that
we've never had before," said Bul-
lock, "It will be spectacular!"
A cake walk and cake auction
will be conducted and the Babe
Ruth baseball team will be on hand
selling such crowd pleasers as ham-
burgers, hot-dogs, chips, drinks and
roasted peanuts in the shell.
Some 5,000 spectators attended


F Substation
(Continued From Page 1)


GRANTS SERVICE CENTER took its awning
down in the ongoing remodeling process

Festival Elvis Sight

Contest Had No Wi


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Despite the frequent Elvis sight-
ings during the Watermelon Festi-
val, there was no winner in the
contest sponsored by Farmers .and
Merchants Bank.
The contest, ongoing throughout
the festival week, planned to award
a prize to whomever turned in a
listing of the most Elvis sightings,
however, no one turned in a list.
"We had so much fun with the


which will have the center closed for an-
other three weeks. (News Photo)
i* action of the general public was
both hysterical and amusing. It did
add something a little quirky to the
n nier festival activities," Gray remarked.


contest" said Gray. "And the com-
munity response to sighting Elvis
was hysterical. Some people
would just stop and look, some
would stop and stare and some
though we were.-just plain crazy,",
she quipped.
Elvis was seen during the Water-
melon Queen pageant, the Sock
Hop, the Fashion Show and Lunch-
eon, and even sitting on one of the
city sidewalk benches.
Elvis was chosen to represent
the '50's theme of the festival.
"We had a great time, and the re-


-Ed urid
trauei


IF IT WEREN'T
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substation about 10 years ago, rob-
beries, assaults and drive-by shoot-
ing plagued the area. Since, the
situation has dramatically improved,'
with the city registering the lowest
crime rate in the state last year.
In lieu of the substation, the city
may install video cameras in the
area. That, at least, was the sugges-
tion of Councilman Gerrold Austin.
Frisby was amenable to the idea.
He promised to look into the possi-
bility.

2heie 's
No Ptace eike
cLome
and
There's
No Place Like
Your Hometown
Newspaper


Monticello

News
7o7 Keeping
-you na^oemed
AJnOut .
qtowlan Communlity
*I1


last year's show, more are expected
this year.
Bullock begins planning the shows
almost immediately after conducting
the previous year's show. He shops
all year round for materials he can
use and combine with the patriotic
displays.
The event is being coordinated
and funds are being collected for


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-the show by Anderson, Bullock,
Buck Bird and Wayne Malloy.
Checks are to be made payable to
the Chamber and can be dropped
off there also.
Those who are coordinating the
event will also accept checks and
donations toward the show, but
would prefer that funds go to the
Chamber.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


PiD%4EM O#






ISO


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Merchant Marine


Plays Support Role


CHATTING after meeting with residents of
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preservation, in Feb, 1989 were: L-R: Archi-


tect Herschel Sheppard, UF Professor Su-
san Tate and CDC Member Gary Ketchum.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


If you've ever been at sea when
looking for a good definition of
what a merchant mariner does,
here's one that will keep you from
getting too far adrift.
The Merchant Marine is composed
of men and women who crew U.S. -
flag commercial vessels on the deep
seas, inland waterways and Great
Lakes.
Although civilians, they are often
referred to as the nation's "fourth
arm of defense."
Since the founding of the United
States, merchant mariners have
played a vital support role in the na-
tion's conflicts. For instance, some
of the vessels they work on transport
troops and military goods.
One of the more recent missions
of the U.S. Merchant Marine was
Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).
During the initial combat phase of
OIF, more than 5,000 American
mariners sailed aboard hundreds of
U.S.-flag ships in support of our
troops.
They executed what has been de-
scribed by top government and mili-
tary leaders as the most efficient sea
lift operation in history.
In a recent address, U.S. Secretary
of Labor Elaine L. Chaostated,
"American merchant mariners have
a rich history in this nation. They
have served in every American war


since the U.S. was born. With their
tradition of courage, patriotism and
perseverance, merchant mariners
have proven that they stand by this
great nation no matter what the chal-
lenge."
The U.S. Merchant Marine also
plays a crucial role in America's
peacetime economy by crewing the
many vessels involved in interna-
tional trade.
U.S.-flag ships can be seen regu-
larly in the major ports of the world.
Crew members serve on all types of
vessels, including container ships,
tanks, bulkers, passenger vessels,
tugs and much more.
At a time when higher-education
costs continue to rise, there's actu-
ally a vocational training facility
that does not charge entry-level stu-
dents for tuition, room or board.
Plus, it assures a first job for its
graduates.
The Paul Hall Center for Maritime
Training and Education, affiliated
with the Seafarers International Un-
ion, prepares students for successful
careers in the U.S. Merchant
Marine.
The entry-level program includes
a mix of hands-on training and
classroom instruction.
It features state-of-the-art training
tools and also includes a phase spent
-working aboard an actual vessel.


Brad And Angelina? Forget It


The press is fascinated with Brad
Pitt and Angelina Jolie since they
appeared in a movie together. Are
they, or are they not lovers?
I say, who cares? What Holly-
wood stars, rock musicians, or major
league athletes do or don't do does-
n't interest me much.
I wish the press would pay more
attention to the things that really
matter, a spiraling federal deficit, a
war that seems to be going nowhere
except to drain blood and treasure,
and more than 40 million people
without health care coverage.
Oh yes, let me also mention a
shrinking middle class which does
not bode well for the future of this
country.
I shouldn't forget the loss of
manufacturing jobs and the out-
sourcing of jobs once done by
Americans.
And, what about the porous bor-
ders where hundreds of thousands of
illegal immigrants make their way to
America?
In fairness, the Administration has
requested funding for 200 more bor-
der patrol people. That will surely
fix the problem, won't it?


Yeah, this impacts on homeland
security and we're not doing much
about it.
Brad and Angelina? Forget it.
Deep Throat came out and the me-
dia went crazy. Oka', so after 30
years we now know who helped
Woodward and Bernstein with their
Watergate coverage.
Deep Throat is now a doddering
old man of 91 who admits he wants
to make some money from his story.
Apparently there are some grand-
children getting ready for college
and you know what college costs are
today.


By the way, with college costs es-
calating, the Bush Administration's
budget cut funding for community
colleges.
Well, I don't begrudge Deep
Throat making a few bucks. Every-
body else connected with Watergate
made a bundle. Folks came out of
prison after serving time for their
Watergate crimes, wrote books and
got well financially.
Do you remember a few months
ago when the nation was consumed
with the Terri Shiavo case?
This, as if that was the only case
of a person in a vegetative state. I


understand there are some 32,000
people in that condition.
Well, the President got involved,.
the Governor got involved, Senate
Majority Leader Bill Frist, a heart
surgeon, diagnosed the patient from
a video, Congress passed a law to
take the matter away from the state
counts and put it in the federal
courts.
Trouble is, the federal judges,'
most of them Republican
appointees, wouldn't touch the
Shiavo case.
This led to cries from the right at-
tacking the judiciary for' non-
activism. Yup, this is the same.
crowd that normally attacks judges
for "judicial activism."
What a fiasco! The public held its
collective nose through all this and
polls showed most people were dis-
gusted with attempts by government
to intervene. Some columnists won-
dered how the people who claim to
be for limited government and more
personal freedom went astray on the
Shiavo case.
I'd like to see more focus on the
issues that really matter.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 28, 1995
Sweltering heat and a sense of ap-
prehension on the part of the law en-
forcement community of a potential
disturbance did not deter a large at-
tendance at the Watermelon Festival
on Saturday. Nor did it detract from
the festivities.
The county plans to waive some
$900 in permit fees when the Senior
Citizen Center goes to remodel the
Jehovah Witness church building,
which the center recently purchased
for its new home on US 19 north.
TWENTY YEARS
June 26, 1985
The Opera House will definitely
receive $150,000 in restoration
funds. Governor Bob Graham last
week signed the 1985-86 Appropria-
tions Act without vetoing funds for
any district project.
A survey is being launched to de-
termine the names of all persons
who handle hazardous wastes in Jef-
ferson County.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 26, 1975
The judges returned, and the audi-
torium grew silent with expectation.
Miss Congeniality was the title be-
towed upon Glenda Cone. Next
came the talent award, won by Phy-
lis Lewis for a piano composition
written by herself. The swimsuit
award was secured by Katie Harp.
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 25, 1965
Twenty six fine dairy cows valued


at more than $10,000 were killed
last Wednesday afternoon at the Lu-
ther dairy farm by a single bolt of
lightning which struck a tree be-
neath which the cows were clustered
for shelter.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 17, 1955
Leonard Delp was selected by the
Jefferson Soil Conservation District
as representative and Luther Foun-
tain as the outstanding farmer coop-
erator by the district and they were
awarded first place in a national
contest.
Tom Braswell, Lt. Governor of
Division 2 of Kiwanis, planned to
attend the annual Kiwanis conven-
tion in Cleveland, Ohio.
Harrel Hamilton and Martin Clay-
ton were in Tallahassee attending
Boy State.
Dr. and Mrs. N.W. McLeod were
honored on their 50th wedding anni-
versary at their home in Aucilla.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
June 15, 1945
Allmond Boland, of Wacissa re-
ceived the Silver Star Award in
ceremonies at Dale Mabry Field.
A big black bear was killed in Wa-
cissa Islands by Steve Brooks, Ly-
mon Walker, E. Grantham and
Vernon Maloy.
Alwyn Grant, James Odom and
Jimmy Connell were accepted for
service in the Army. Going into the
Navy were Huey Booth and Linton
Daniels.


Writer Rips UN's 'Agenda 21'


BY HENRY LAMB

What could-Marion County, Ind.,
and Lincoln County, N.M., possibly
have in common? In Marion County
nearly a million people are packed
into 403 square miles, with a density
of 2,172 people per square mile.
Lincoln County stretches over 4,831
square miles, and on a good day,
can muster only 19,411 people -
that's four people per square mile.
Nevertheless, both counties as is
the county where you live are tar-
gets for transformation into "sus-
tainable communities," as defined in
the United Nations' "Agenda 21."
Neither Indianapolis Mayor Bart Pe-
terson, nor Lincoln County Planning
Technician Curt Temple will admit.
that their efforts to transform their
communities have anything to do
with "Agenda 21." They probably
don't even know that it does.
"Agenda 21" is a policy document
adopted at the U.N. Conference on
Environment and Development, by


more than 170 nations in 1992. It
was implemented in the United
States by president Clinton's Com-
mission on Sustainable Develop-
ment, created by Executive Order,
with no congressional debate or in-
volvement. The agencies of govern-
ment set out to implement the rec-
ommendations of "Agenda 21" by
rule, and by economic ,"incentives
and disincentives."
This means, simply, that grants are
available to states and communities
that do what the feds want, and pen-
alties and fund withdrawals await
those communities that resist.
Though out the 1990s, communi-
ties everywhere began to create "vi-
sioning councils," with special
grants from the feds. These vision-
ing councils set out to transform lo-
cal communities, and protect them
from environmental and social dis-
aster by adopting "smart growth"
policies directly out of "Agenda
21."
One of the high-priority recom-
mendations of "Agenda 21" and the


President's Commission on Sustain-
able Development is to create a
"new decision process." This means
take the policy-making process out
of the hands of elected officials, and
put it in the hands of professionals.
This is exactly that Mayor Bart
Peterson is trying to do.
Indianapolis-Marion County, Ind.,
already has consolidated govern-
ment of sorts. Four communities,
and the sheriff, and a few other
elected positions remain outside the
mayor's control. The mayor wants
to further consolidate his govern-
ment by eliminating these elected
decision-makers, and appointing
their replacements.
The sales pitch is always the same:
more efficient government, reduce
the cost of duplicated services, and
on, and on.
Lost in the argument is the idea
that government is most responsive
to the people governed when the
decision-makers are accountable to
the people who are governed. Gov-
ernment officials who are appointed


- whether appointed by Bart Peter-
son, or Fitlel Castro are responsive
to the people who sign their pay-
checks, not to the people they gov-
ern.
Another high-priority recommen-
dation of "Agenda 21" is to get peo-
ple to live within "growth bounda-
ries" instead of wherever they want
to live. Despite the fact that Lincoln
County's population has declined
steadily since 1980.
Curt Temple believes 600,000
people will invade his county by
2025, and therefore, the county must
plan now to prevent "urban sprawl."
He, and his planning commission
are deciding where these people
may, and may not live.
Temple says: "There is broad con-
sensus in our society that land use
and development should be con-
trolled." If that consensus exists, it
exists only among planners and bu-
reaucrats. In the West, and else-
where, there is a broad and growing
consensus among Americans that
(See UN's Agenda Page 5)


Caregivers Need Care Too


How much does America care?
According to a recent study con-
ducted by the National Alliance for
Caregiving, in collaboration with the
AARP, and funded by MetLife
Foundation, there are more than
44.4 million people in the United
States 21 percent of the popula-
tion providing unpaid care to an-
other adult.
Most of those receiving care are
aged 50 or older, many of them suf-
fering from Alzheimer's disease and


other dementias, and require an av-
erage of 21 hours of care per week.
With fully 59 percent of these
caregivers working full time, the
strain of being a caregiver results in
less time spent with friends and
other family members, less frequent
social activity, and greater stress.
"The study reveals that those who
carry the heaviest responsibilities
are most vulnerable to risks associ-
ated with poorer health, emotional
stress, and economic hardship," said
Sibyl Jacobson, President of the Met


Life Foundation. "What's more, as
the Baby Boom generation ages
over the next 25 years, the ranks of
those needing care will swell."
Although aging is inevitably a fact
of life, by adopting a lifestyle rooted
in good nutrition, fitness, social in-
volvement, and continued learning,
it is possible to attain a healthy life-
style, and ensure that the only care-
giver you'll need for most of your
adult life is yourself.
It's never too early or late to get
started. Steps that anyone can take


on the road to a healthier lifestyle
include:
Put healthy eating on the menu.
Eating a well-balanced diet, rich in
fruits and vegetables, is wise at any
age. Vegetables have been proven to
help- prevent disease and contribute
to overall wellness.
Give your mind a workout.
Reading, listening to music, doing
crossword puzzles, and talking to
people who challenge you can lead
to greater mental alertness and
(See Caregivers Page 5)


From Our Photo File


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and include phone number of writer'











Letters...


Fundraiser Record


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005 PAGE 5..
!qm J


Set Straight


Ijear Editor:
I'm Larry Shiver, the grandfather
of Hayley Grantham.
-Three months ago, Hayley was di-
agnosed with a rare brain tumor,
called Pontine Glioma, and when we
received the devastating news,
friends of the family knew that the
family would need extra monetary
funds to help while the parents,
Perry and Tracie Grantham are out
of work and traveling to Shands in
Gainesville, then to rehab in Jack-
sonville.


I want to personally thank and
commend Cindy Lambert and Rob-
ert Boutwell, and all our friends that
organized a Car Show Benefit to
help Hayley and her family with the
extra expenses in their crises. This
benefit brought in $15,000. That has
taken away some of the financial
burden.
The community was very gracious
and I want to thank you again for
the prayers and support to my fam-
ily.
Despite the unselfish efforts and


UN'S Agenda 21


(Continued From Page 4)
government should get out of the
way and leave people alone. In
America the land of the free peo-
ple should be able to live wherever
they choose and can afford to live.
For government to tell a person,
"No, you cannot build a home here,"
because a planner drew an "urban
boundary line" on a map, is ridicu-
lous especially in a place like Lin-
coln County, N.M.
The planning craze afflicts virtu-
ally every community. The so-called
problems these plans are supposed
to prevent often become problems
that future generations have to cor-
rect. The first wave of planning the
late 1960s and 1970s produced
high-density housing for low-
income families.
These high-rise, low-cost apart-
ments became slums and gang head-
quarters in Chicago, and other cities,
.which ultimately had to be de-
stroyed.
Planners have no sacred wisdom,
they only have authority, Every time
government attempts to engineer so-


:iety by shaping and molding mar-
icet forces, the result is failure.
Nothing shapes the future as effi-
ciently as a free market.


Caregivers
(Continued From Page 4)
greater independence in later life.
Get moving. By staying fit,
you're better able to perform daily
routines, improve balance, and live
an independent lifestyle.
Learn to cope with stress. Over
time, stress can lead to heart disease,
ulcers, memory loss, and immunity
deficiencies. Lessen your stress
level through laughter, deep breath-
ing, and exercise.
Practice preventative medicine.
Screening and early detection tools
can help health professionals iden-
tify health problems and life-
threatening diseases early on.
Stay socially connected. Older
adults who socialize have less stress
and stronger immune systems.
Prepare for retirement and en-
_joy it! Preparing financially for re-


time Cindy and Robert spent on this
benefit, they have been victims of a
vicious rumor that they retained
some of the funds raised. I am writ-
ing this letter to set the record
straight.
In truth, all the money was re-
ceived and deposited in an account
on behalf of Hayley. I have all the
documents to prove this, and if any-
one needs to review these docu-
ments, I will provide them, if they
call me at 997-5387.
Please stop the rumor! Ask for the
truth, because this couple deserves
better. Nobody needs to be slan-
dered for helping other people.
Again, I would like to thank my
friends and the community for their
loving prayers and support of my
family.
Sincerely,
Larry Shiver


Need Care
rement can be key to pursuing
interests in later life.
Most people underestimate how
much they'll need to maintain their
standard of living in retirement on
average, 70 percent of your pre-
retirement income during peak years
(NAPS).


THE MARINE CORPS MARCHING BAND re-
ceived thunderous applause from crowds
lining the streets during the Watermelon


Festival Parade. The band
short concert at the platform

ing the Parade. (News Photo)


performed a
events follow-


DARYL JOHNSON adopted the third puppy of the morning
from the Humane Society Booth. during the last day of the
Melon Festival. (News Photo)


With your help,
MDA is building
a tomorrow without
neuromuscular diseases.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


NI .,,, -~ -


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005


Lifestyle


N


Refuge House Services


Help Battered Women


DEBBIE.SNAPP
Staff Writer

Refuge House provides a variety
of services to battered women and
their children, as well as victims of
sexual assault.
Local Outreach Coordinator Des-
sie Harvey reports that the Monti-
cello Office can be contacted at
342-3518, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday about services avail-
able.
The mission of the Refuge House
is to provide direct services to bat-
tered women, children and sexual
assault survivors, as well as to work
to eliminate the conditions in society
that allow such violence to continue,
shc said.


Harvey explained that by contact-
ing the Refuge House 24-hour hot-
line at 1-800-500-1119, battered
women are given emergency shelter,
temporary housing, food, and health
care,
Counseling is offered to women to
help rebuild self-esteem, and to help
in their recovery from trauma.
Through carefully designed art
projects, games, and stories, chil-
dren learn to accept, and talk about
what has happened so healing can
begin.
Educational and professional train-
ing is available for any interested
group in the community.
In addition to general presenta-
tions on domestic and sexual vio-
lence, programs are also available
- for professionals, including law en-


forcement, health care, social serv-
ices and human resources personnel.
CEU training's are available.
Also, a wide range of school
based intervention programs are of-
fered .- --
Injunction assistance is available
to explain the injunction process, as-
sist with paperwork, attend court
hearings, provide counseling and
give referrals.
The Refuge House depends upon
the dedication of many volunteers.
These positions include: Outreach
Team; Courthouse Advocates;
Group Facilitators; and Self Esteem
Activity Leaders.
An intensive 30 hour training pro-
gram is provided based upon de-
-mand.


The Healthy Start Coalition Of
Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor
counties has been awarded .a
$100,000 grant from the Ounce of
Prevention Fuld of Florida, Inc.
A reception and a Grant Award
Presentation will be held 10 a.m.
Thursday at the Social Hall of the
Greenville Baptist Church located
next to Farmers & Merchants Bank,
SW Grand Street in Greenville.
The 13 month grant awarded will:
provide Doula services for women
in the three county area.
Doulas are professionals that pro-
vide continuous physical, emotional,
and informational support to the
mothers before, during, and after


childbirth.
This grant will help to fund the
True Blue Doula program for moth-
ers whose pregnancies are consid-
ered high risk.
These services will be offered to
various pools of women with differ-
ing economic and social back-
grounds.
Healthy Start is looking forward
to demonstrating the relative use of
,Doulas in terms of improving birth
outcomes in these rural areas.
Healthy Start invites all to assist
the Coalition in celebrating the op-
portunity to implement innovative
strategies to address maternal and
child health issues for the three


counties.
The Coalition looks forward to
collaborate with the public to posi-
tively affect the birth outcome of the
target population with this grant.
The acceptance of Doulas in ma-
ternity care is growing rapidly with
the recognition of their important
contribution to the improved physi-
cal outcomes and emotional well be-
ing of mothers and infants.
Statistics show that benefits to us-
ing a trained Doula include: shorter
labor, reduced need for pain medica-
tion, 50 percent reduction in C-sect
ions, improved neonatal outcomes,
better mother-infant interaction, and
greater satisfaction with the birth
process.


FMB Festival Breakfast

Serves 200 Patrons


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Watermelon Festival Break-
fast hosted by Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank served some 200
patrons.
Spokesman Joe Anderson said
approximately 50 of those were
given to City workers and the Ma-
rine Corps Marching Band.
"200 is comparable to years
past," said Anderson. "We usually
serve between 200-250 in the two-


hour time period."
Every year FMB hosts the event
as its contribution toward the festi-
val activities.
Preparing the breakfast of scram-
bled eggs, bacon, sausage, grits,
biscuits, orange juice and coffee
were Elbert Humphrey and his
group of volunteers.
Volunteer servers included
Debby Braddy, Lani Howell, Jessie.
Joiner, Kristen Andrews, Patti
Brinkley, Brenda Smith, Bob
McElroy and David Driggers.


Olive Baptist Plans VBS


BAYLOR

Ben Baylor

Honored

At NFCC
Ben Baylor, of Monticello, is
among 18 North Florida Commu-
nity College students named on the
Florida Community College Activi-
ties All-Academic Team.
The recognition credits academic
achievement among students who
participate in college activities and
organizations.
Baylor, a pitcher for the NFCC
Sentinel baseball team, was honored
for maintaining a 3.3 GPA or
higher, while participating in col-
lege athletics.

Without Advertising, I
A Terrible
Thing Happens...


AOTHING


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Vacation Bible School at Olive
Baptist Church will have students
crushing across the country in an ad-
venture filled getaway.
This Life Ways VBS is scheduled
to begin 6 p.m. on Friday, July 29 at
the church 7369 Boston Road.


On the road trip, students will
visit Washington, D.C.; Chicago,
IL; Lebanon, KS; the Yellowstone
National Park; and the Knott's Berry
Farm, as they cruise to their final
destination, a relationship with
Jesus.
Participants will experience Bible
stories, crafts, music for the road
trip, snacks and recreation.


Every night before the
show, I make sure
this guitar is perfectly
tuned. And every day,
I do the same for my
body-with healthy,
vegetarian meals. It's
the easiest way to
stay fit and feel great.
Try a medley of new
dishes like grilled
portabello mush-
rooms over pasta or
veggie spinach
burritos-and lighten
up every bite. Soon,
you'll feel your body
sing, Tonight; male it
vegetarian. Do it fbr
someone you love.


Tonight, make it vegetarian
'For more information, contact: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 404 Washington, DC 20016
(202) 686-2210, ext. 306 www.pcrm.org
PHOTO @DREW CAROLAN, 2000





















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License #99


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If you are uninsured, you may
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Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor p
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We accept Medicare, Medicaid Lin1aBuflei.ARN'
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ie xed4D.O.__ _ _ _


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Grant Award Reception


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29,2005 PAGE 7
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MiO miii0(rl~ltr Tioiie 1 B0 0 $5 extra 4 Wheel $15 extra
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sai: :Rotate & Balance
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V Al O ca Increase iile and provide a
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005


Sports


Ripkin Tourney


Winners

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Annual Cal Ripkin 12-year
old District Tournament resulted in
Wakulla winning the title in the
double-elimination standoffs, at the
Recreation Park over the weekend.
Perry blanked Jefferson 20-0, Wa-
kulla squeaked past Madison 1-0
and Wakulla inched past Perry for
a 5-4 win.
Madison defeated Jefferson, 8-5;
Perry blanked Madison 5-0; Perry
and defeated Wakulla 6-3.
Wakulla came back to edge Perry,
4-3.
Recreation Department Director
Kevin Aman expressedhis thanks_


Told
to those wno neipou and showed
their support during the district
tournament.
These include: Dale and Carol
Ellerbee, Bear Register, Richard
Finlayson, Marty Bishop, Demott
Anderson, Casey Anderson, Dixon
Hughes, Matt Bishop, Betsy Mal-
loy, Mac Finlayson, Tonya
Roberts, Liz Bishop, Michael
Bishop, Corey Bishop and Frank-
lin Hightower.
Also, Jefferson Farmers Market,
Morgan's Garage, Farmers and
Merchants Bank, Supervisor of
Elections Marty Bishop, County
Judge Robert R. Plaines, B & B
Sporting Goods Jefferson County
Sheriffs Department-and Jefferson
County Ambulance Deparitnent.


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Academy will
host its third annual Titus Speed
Camp 6 p.m., Tuesday and Thurs-
day from July 5, through July 28.
Kez McCorvey, former FSU, and
NFL player for the Detroit Lions
and the Carolina Panthers, will
head the camp, as in the past.
The camp will focus on speed em-
phasis, agility, flexibility, measur-
ing times in the 40-yard dash.


NAMED T-Ball Athletes of the Year at the Recreation Park
Awards Ceremony were: Brooklyn McGlamory, and Jake
Edwards. (News Photo)



Lady Diamonds Beat Perry 8-3


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer.
The Monticello Lady Diamonds
softball team climbed to an 8-3 sea-
son after slamming Perry for a 21-9
victory, Sunday.
The Lady Diamonds jumped out
to an 8-2 lead and never looked


back.
Keandra Seabrooks went five for
six. Tasha Samuel, Sharice Brooks,
Cynthia Steen and Felice McDaniql
all went four for five, and Kidra
Thompson went three for six.
Nikki Cooks, Kista Hills, Tonya
Young and Sherica Parrish all went
three for five and Parrish also
-smacked out a home run.


CHEERS


TAKING' NOTES on safe practices during a 4-H Archery
class, are L-R: Matthew Dobson, J.D. Gebhard, and Chip
Gallon.






IRS Forms and All Paperwork Done for You.
Associated Charities represents numerous
non-profits in need of your property.


LET'S HEAR IT
FOR VOLUNTEERS!


Thanks to our volunteers,,
MDA is the first voluntary
health agency to receive
the AMA's Lifetime
Achievement Award.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


, 1630 E. JACKSON ST.,
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)


vertical jumps, proper running
techniques, stretching, strength and
weightlifting, bench press and
many other conditioning skills.
Sponsored by the Titus Speed
Academy, the camp and costs
$150.
It is geared for boys and girls of
all ages and coaches expect the
number of participants to be even
higher this year than last.
For further information contact
Ray Hughes at 997-4525 or Dave
or Tonya Roberts at 997-2365.


Planners Hindering Process
(Continued From Page 1) list of interested individuals who
least three individuals who would could be tapped as potential volun-
quit if compensation was offered, teers.
Wheeler said. Wendy Moss, a planner, suggested
Rather,she suggested, cmmis that simple courtesy, would go a
Rather, sht long ways toward solving the prob-
sioners should appoint a third per- lem. All that was required, she said,
.1 lem. All that was required, she said,
son as an alternate. That way, if a
as fai t Th p, t a was that planners call ahead and let
planner failed to show up, the alter- it be known if they weren't going to
nate could take his or her place. be able to attend a meeting.
Others suggested the imposition of In the end, commissioners took no
penalties, removal from the plan- -action. The issue, however, is bound
ning board, or the compilation of a to come up again.

Monticello Christian Academy
Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
S Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


News Without Fear or Favor

Monticello News


BUSINESS c t

List to5ll


DIRECTORY _______
m m


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


JOHN COLLINS FILL DI


850-997-5808


850-545-9964 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


IEALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


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For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
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Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


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Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device


Tree Removal 0 4 Feed riots


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1/4 Mile off US 19 South

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NYSE Listed Company Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
Training Provided $98.99 plus tax
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Wellness Industry .A..-,


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(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


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I 997-4160 1
ANDY & TLNA AMES. OWNERS

COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE


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3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

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100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work. Frame Straightening


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance


tsitista'ainateasi






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005 PAGE 9
------------------ --------------------------------------


Beautify


Your


Our Quality And Service
Really Measure Up.
y- ]- i


Home


Hurricane Season Is


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005
----------------------------------------- --------------------------llw-- - -- - - -


Beautify
tifi^


Our Quality And Service

Really Measure Up.


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"When your power goes out.
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Don't wait until
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Residential & Small Business
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Business Phone: (850) 422-2232
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Metal Buildings


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Custom trim and roof Accessories are available to
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005 PAGE 11


LEARNING to use a compass at a Conserva- left: Charles Bruner, Josh Rodriquez,
tion Session at 4-H summer camp are, from Stephanie Brignon;, and Alyssa Brignoni.


4-H EXTENSION AGENT Heidi Copeland in- in a Forestry Session at the recent summer
structs a group of 4-Hers from Tallahassee Camp Jubilee.



4-H Members Attend Wildlife,


Outdoor Week At Jubilee


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County and Leon
County 4-H Clubs came together in
early June for their second annual
Wildlife and Outdoor Camp at Jubi-
lee, a 207 acre tract of land that be-
longed to former Florida Governor,
the late Lawton Chiles,- and now'
leased by UF/IFAS.
It is managed by the North Florida
Research and Education Center' In
Quincy.

The 4-H Wildlife and Outdoor
Camp gives participants an oppor-
tunity to learn more about nature
and the outdoors.
"We got professionals and pooled
resources, to teach the youth, how to
appreciate the environment; how to
become environmental stewards;
and how to enjoy outdoor
recreation," said Marcus Boston, the


University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
(UF/IFAS) Leon County Agent.
Other County Agents assisting
with the camp include: John Lilly,
Jefferson County; Will Sheftall,
Leon County Natural Resource Ex-
tension Agent, and Stanton Rosen-
thal, the UF/IFAS Leon County
Forestry Extension Agent.
' Participants '"were, taughtea1aout-
about forestry, conservation, 'wild-
life, aquatics, canoeing, and 4-H
shooting sports.

4-Hers were also treated to lunch
and snacks throughout the week
with Sno Cones and an Award Cere-
mony ending the Camp Week.
On the last day of the camp, there
were air rifle, casting and archery
competitions and an Eco--
Challenge, to test the campers' skills
on the material they learned
throughout the week.
The children are then split up into


teams of three and four and given
written tests on the week's sessions.
Among the skills 4-Hers were
tested on were: Air Rifle, Archery,
Conservation, and Wildlife.
During the week, opportunities
were presented to do some
canoeing, fishing, and aquatic sci-
ence.
Members attending from Jefferson
County inrilud.;i.raTa'Tyra Howard,
Wesley Boland~ Gabe Starling, Mi-
chael Starling, Jr., Sarah Anderson,
Jesse Matthews, David Wirgau, Le-
norris Footman, and Rachael
Dougherty.
Also, J.D. Gebhard, Chip Gallon,
Matthew Dobson, Chelsea Dobson,
Brandon Whitfield, Cody Fogler,
Dylan Johnson, and Alphonso Foot-
man.
Also, Josh Rodriquez, Stephanie
Brignoni, and Alyssa Brignoni.
Team Captains from Jefferson
County were: Angela Scurry, Alex
Farmer, and Alana Chambers.


JOHN LILLY, 4-H Coordinator, explains project instructions IN 4-H Forestry Class, Ya'tyra
to Angela Scurry, team leader. Howard and Sarah Anderson.






The Water We Drink (2004)
*.-.S-S Jefferson Communities Water System, Inc.

We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you
about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a
safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the
quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from two wells. The wells draw from the Floridan
Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection
purposes.

The Department of Environmental Protection is in the process of conducting Source Water Assessments (SWA)
for all public water systems in Florida. These assessments will identify and assess any potential sources of
contamination in the vicinity of your water supply. A SWA report for this system is available or will be by July
1, 2005 at the DEP SWAPP web site: www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Bob Cooper at 997-
0314. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more,
please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Thursday of each month at
7pm at 395 Watermill Road.

Jefferson Communities Water System routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to
Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the
results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2004. Data obtained before January 1,
2004, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and
regulations.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of
certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for
public health.

.In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms
-w)ve 've provided the following definitions:
,Maximum Contamirtant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
:MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
'Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration df a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
requirements that a water system must follow.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) one part by weight ofanalyte to 1 million parts by
weight of tile water sample.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (fig/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by
weight of the water sample.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.
There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to
control microbial contaminants.


TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Parameters
For the following parameters monitored under Stage I D/DBP regulations, the level detected is the annual average of the quarterly averages:
Bromate, Chloramines, Chlorine, Haloacetic Acids, and/or TTHM (MCL 80 ppb). Range of Results is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the
individual sampling sites.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Range MCLG or MCL or
Unit of sampling Violation Deted of RDL MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine (ppm) Jan-Dec N 0.82* 0.45- MRDLG MRDL= 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
04 1.25 = 4
TTHM [Total
trihalomethanes] Jul 04 N 2.8* N/A N/A MCL =80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)
*Jefferson Communities Water System routinely monitors for various contaminants in the water supply to meet all regulatory
requirements. Due to an oversight during a busy part of the year, we failed to sample for Lead & Copper and for one of two samples
for D/DBPs. Because we did not take the required number of samples for Lead & Copper and D/DBPs, the health effects are unknown.
Additionally, we failed to report the chlorine residuals for the month of May. We have reviewed and updated our sampling procedures
to ensure this does not happen again.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs.
springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally
occurring ininerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the
presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come frdm sewage treatment plants,
septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result fJom urban
stormwater runoff industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or banning.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-
products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban
stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production
and mining activities.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.
More information about cbntaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental
Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.
Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have
undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water
from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection
5y Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).

We at Jefferson Communities Water System would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improvee the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are conmmnitted to insuring the quality'
)f your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel jree to call
any of the numbers listed.


2004 TEST RESULTS TABLE
** Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides
and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling
point, depending on the sampling frequency.
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of l CLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination

Radiological Contaminants
Erosion of natural
Alpha emitters (pCi/l) Jul & Dec 04 N 2.2 ND-2.2 0 15 deposits
Rdium 226 oicobi Erosion ot natural
Radium 226 or combined Jul & Dec 04 N 1.2 0.6-1.2 0 5 deposits
radium (pCi/l)
Inorganic Contaminants
i s- h i d iII,


Batu si ppuil


ChrOMIiiii1 P1 ()1))


Nickel (ppb)


Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm)


Selenium (ppb)


0.0069


Apr & Jun 02


Apr & Jun 02



Apr & Jun 02


Apr & Jun 02


Jul 04


Apr & Jun 02


0.006-
0.0069


5.9-7.5


ND-0.405


1.2-2 5


N/A


0.379-0.441


ND-3.9


Disciharge of dri ling
wastes; discharge froin
metal refineries; erosion
o l'atural deposits
Discharge from steel
and pulp mills: erosion
of natural deposits
Erosion of natural
deposits. water additive
which promotes strong
teeth; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Pollution Irom1n mining
anid refining operations.-
Natural occurrence in
soil
Runoff froni lertili/er
use; leaching from
septic tanks, sewage:
erosion of natural
deposits
Discharge lomn
petroleum and imentil
:ceincries erosion oI
ilalIal de.puMI5,

S il wa ,ter nltiiiii n.
leai ngih l tIioi isoil


Sodium (ppm) Apr & Jun02 N 356 3.55-3 50 N/A I10


Volatile Organic Contaminants


Lu uu u JCJnosion ol household plnmbllg sdnleIg CiOMOIIn
Coppct tp water) Jun-Sep N 0.137 0 of 5 1.3 1.3 of natural deposits, leaching Irom ltod
Spp, 99' pi c5iheser ativcs
l .Jd tp sue} Jun-Sep N 3i 0 0 Of 5 (1 l5 CrroOio oit househoIld [liuiltingi systClems. eitioun
Nppb1 99*" o IatiIIIal deposIts


i









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005


Brown Wins 10th Past Champs



Shoot-Out Golf Tournament


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tommy Brown was named the
"Champion of Champions" in the
10th Annual Past Champions
Shoot-Out Golf Tournament, spon-
sored by FMB, at the Country
Club, Friday.
Nine men faced off in the tourna-
ment only open to past champions
of the Watermelon Invitational,
with one player eliminated after
each hole, until only one remained.
In the event a single player could
not be eliminated based on his per-
formance for a specific hole, all
persons tying the highest score for
that hole playoff and the farthest
away from the hole is then elimi-
nated.
The spot for the playoff, which
can be a long putt, a chip from the
fringe or rough, or even a bunker
shot, is determined by the Past
Champions Tournament Officials.
The past champions participating
in the tournament included Butch
Plaines who won in '79 and '80,
Bobby Plaines, '87, '92, '96, '97 and
'99 Rodney Avant, '88, Billy Grant,
'89 and '98 and Marty Dickey, '91.
Also, Mike Grant, 2000, Tommy
Brown, Jr., 2001 and Jerrod Sulli-
van, 2002.
There was $750' awarded in
prizes; and the winner received
$200.
The first shot was delivered by
Butch Plaines, a high, long, right-
to-left arching shot over the trees
on the dogleg left corner.
Billy Grant's second shot came
up some 15 yards short of the green
while Bobby Plaines was almost 30


yards over the green.
Avant's second shot was to the
right of the right bunker, leaving
him with a ticklish flop to the right-
centered pin. Bobby Plaines
played first, making a four.
Avant's flop over the' bunker
placed him in position for a four,
after making a 10 footer for par.
Billy Grant came up short with his
par putt, posting a five. Everyone
else two putted for their pars, and
Grant was eliminated.
At the second hole, nearly every-
one hit crushing drives down the
middle of the fairway, anywhere
from 280-300 yards.
Avant placed his. drive to a suit-
able yardage and was first to play
his second shot, to a tucked pin
protected by a bunker on the right.
He cozied his second shot to within
10 feet for a birdie.
A wayward tee shot from Sulli-
van left him with an undesirable
shot from the right tree-lined
rough. He hit a shot under some
limbs and over the bunker, to land
softly enough to spin back to
within 10 feet of the hole.
All others hit on the green or on
the fringe and had birdie putts.
Avant and Brown made their birdie
putts, automatically advancing
them to the next hole. Bobby
Plaines three-putted from the
fringe. All others made par, elimi-
nating Bobby Plaines.
On the third hole par three, Avant
came up a little short and landed
his tee shot in front of the left bun-
ker.
Marty Dickey landed over the
back right in some long Bermuda
with the pin placed close to his side
of the green and the green running


5s


TOMMY BROWN, JR.
away from him.
Avant played first and placed his
second shot below the hole, some
15 feet away.
Dickey, chopping a shot, over-
shot his mark and trickled over the
green into the fringe. David Jack-
son ran his putt to the back of the
hole from 30 feet and pop corned
out, leaving himself a tap-in for
par.
Dickey came up next and left
himself with a lengthy bogey putt.
Brown overestimated his break and
went past the hole giving himself
an uphill par attempts.
Everyone else made their pars,
except Avant and Brown, who


;A.-


PAST CHAMPIONS of the Golf Shoot-out David Jackson, Butch Plaines, Billy Grant,
Tournament include, front, L-R: Tommy Marty Dickey. Back, Bobby Plaines and
Brown, Jr., Mike Grant,. Jerrod Sullivan, Rodney Avant.


The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up
substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment
plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result
from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas
production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are
by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas
stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas
production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the
amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must
provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts
of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses
a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained byv
calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general
population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy,
persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should
seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on
appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological
contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).


missed their par putts only after
Dickey two-putted for five allow-
ing all others to advance without a
playoff, and Dickey was
eliminated.
On the fourth hole, Brown and
Mike Grant made fives by either
missing the green %with their ap-
proach shot or three-w hacking
from I 5 feet.
Jackson, \ ho needed to be at his
son's Little League Game, putted
his ball into the water and pulled
out of the competition.
On the fifth hole. Butch Plaines
hit a bad bounce into the trees and
conceded the hole.
On the sixth hole, Avant makes a
birdie, Brown and Sullivan make
their pars leading Mike Grant %with


mREBA
---U


a par-saving putt after his shot from
the bunker.
He missed the left-to-right
breaker, posts a five and was elimi-
nated.

On the seventh hole, Avant's tee-
shot got tied up in the trees lining
the left of the fairway, nestling in
dome deep rough. He tried to ad-
vance it up into the fairway, but his
club apparently became entangled.

Brown pulled his tee-shot into the
trees farther up the line and caught
a break with a clean lie, and Sullh-
\an his drink e een %with the left fair-
v. a\ bunker.

Brown punched out with a wood
and placed himself in the left rough
about 100 yardss out. Sulli an hit
the green to the left and A\ant hit
his fourth shot into the bunker,
misses his par and %\as eliminated.
On the final hole. Brown and Sul-


livan hit their tee shots in the left
rough, not more than five yards
apart, Sullivan having the better
shot of the two.

Arching his approach shot over
the outlying limbs of a pecan tree,
Sullivan hit his ball to the back of
the green.

Brown, whose only shot was un-
der some tree limbs, hit a low-
runner to the front of the green..
Both players were on in two and
putting for birdie.

Brown tv.o-putted for par. Sulli-
van faced downhill. speed\ purt.
and hit the ball about six feet past
the hole. leading a comeback pun
uphill.

On his next stroke, he ran the ball
past the hole for a fite, losing the
tournament but w\as named the
runner-up.


The Water We Drink (2004)
Lamont Water System


We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you
about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a
safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the
quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from one well. The well draws from the Floridan
Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection
purposes.

The Department of Environmental Protection is in the process of conducting Source Water Assessments (SWA)
for all public water systems in Florida.. These assessments will identify and assess any potential sources of
contamination in the vicinity of your water supply. A SWA report for this system is available or will be by July
1, 2005 at the DEP SWAPP web site: www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Bob Cooper at (850)
997-0314. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn
more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Thursday of each month
at 7pm, 395 Watermill Road.

Lamont Water System routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and
State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our
monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2004. Data obtained before January 1, 2004, and
presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and
regulations.

In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms
we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs asfeasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
requirements that a water system must follow.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by
weight of the water sample.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by
weight of the water sample.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.
There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to
control microbial contaminants.

2004 TEST RESULTS TABLE


** Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides
and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling
point. depending on the sampling frequency.


Contaminant and Unit of
Measurement


Dates of sampling
(moJyr.)


MCL Violation
Y/N


*r I
Level
Detected


Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Results Contamination


Radiological Contaminants
Dec-03, Mar, Jun,15 Erosion of natural
Alpha emitters (pCi/1) Dec-03,J Jn04 N 1.2 (avg) 0.1-2.9 0 15 deposits
Radium 226 or combined Dec-03, Mar, Jun, N 0.63 (av)- 0.1-1 0 5 Erosion of natural
radium (pCi/I) Jul-04 deposits
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge from steel
Chromium (ppb) May 02 N 7.2 N/A 100 100 and pulp mills; erosion
of natural deposits
Erosion of natural
deposits; water additive
which promotes strong
Fluoride (ppm) May 02 N 0.349 N/A 4 4.0 teeth; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Runoff from fertilizer
use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm) Mar 04 N 0.242 N/A 10 10 septic tanks, sewage;
erosion of natural
deposits
Salt water intrusion,
Sodium (ppm) May 02 N 3.06 N/A N/A 160 leaching from soil

Volatile Organic Contaminants
Ethylbenzene (ppb) Dec-03, Mar, Jun, N 0.45 (avg) ND-0.96 700 700 petroleum reneries
nirah ro I'rrnm


Xylenes (ppm)


TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Parameters
For the following parameters monitored under Stage 1 D/DBP regulations, the level detected is the annual average of the quarterly averages:
Bromate, Chloramines, Chlorine, Haloacetic Acids, and/or TTHM (MCL 80 ppb). Range of Results is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the
individual sampling sites.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Range MCL or L or ikely Source of Contamiatio
Unit of sampling Violation Dee of N L NILikely Source of Containation
Measurement (moiyr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine (ppm) Jan-Dec N 0.61 0.35-1.5 MRDLG NRDL = 4 0 Water additive used to control microbes
rFHM [Tfotal'
trihalonethanes] Jul 04 N 11 N/A NA MCL = 80 Bl-product of drinking waterr ditsmlectio
(ppb)


We at Lamont Water System would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve
the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality
of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please Jeel free to
call any of the numbers listed.


-Lamont Water System routinely monitors for various contaminants in the water supply to meet all regulators.' q men )u, to a,
oi eri h ,/t during a busy part of the year, we failed to sample for Lead & Copper. Because we did not take the riq i red iumohii of
amplee for Lead & Copper, the health effects are unkno ai. We have reviewed and updated our .mnpling procedures to en re tlhi.
does not happen again.


I I I







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RAE i.
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday andFri'dld.i,
Each Additional Line....$1.00 .'
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednes4r'A.
Wednesday Noon for Friday '*, "'
Call Our Classified Department at:
0- v 997-3568


NOTICE: The Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners will review and
make a- decision regarding a proposed
major residential subdivision. The subdivi-
sion is to be located on the south side of
Bassett Dairy Road approximately 2.5
miles south of the intersection with Ash-
ville Highway on approximately 131 acres
and includes about 26 single family lots.
The subject property is located in sections
25 and 26, Township 2 North, Range 5
East. Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County planning
Commission meeting on July 21, 2005 at
6:00 p.m. In the courtroom of the Jeffer-
son County Courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and U.S.
Highway 90. in Monticello, Florida 32344.
The meeting may be continued as neces-
saiy. From the Florida "Government in
the. Sunshine Manual", page 36, para-
graph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political sub-
di.ision thereof shall include in the notice
of -any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency, conspicu-
outly on such notice, the advice that, if a
person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission
wi(h respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings, is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. Interested persons
may contact the Jefferson County Plan-
ning and Building Department at 850-342-
0223 or write the Department at P.O. Box
1069, Monticello, FL 32345 and provide
comments. The development proposal may
be reviewed during business hours at the
Department office located at 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344.
6/29, c
NOTICE: The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold a regular meeting
on July 14, 2005 at 7:00 P.M. The meeting
will be held in the Courtroom of the Jef-
ferson County Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highwav 19 and US
Highway 90 in Monticello, FL. The meet-
ing may be continued as necessary. From
the Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing'is'
required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
6/29. c

SLP WANTED


Drivers: Run mega or short haul.
Home nightly &/or once during the
week & weekends! Lease/purchase
available. Own your own truck! No
money/credit? No problem! CDL-A
w/2yrs TT exp. Shelton Trucking
800-877-3201.
6/29, c




Challenge me.


Full-time instructors for fall term.
North Fla. Community College.
English; math: require master's w/18
hours in field. Developmental English;
developmental math: require
bachelor's. Teach at nearby
correctional facilities. Flexible
hrs/days. Background check required.
Full benefits. Send resume, NFCC
application, transcripts, cover letter
to HR, NFCC, 1000 Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, Fla. 32340. Applications at
www.nfcc.edu or call 850-973-1614.
Deadline 7/1/05. EOE.
6/24, 29, C
Activities Director: Pine Lake
Nursing Home is seeking a motivated
energetic organized Activity Director.
Above all this applicant will be
committed to excellent resident care
and making a genuine contribution to
our resident's quality of life. COTA
credentials or a current certificate or
long term care experience will be
considered very desirable. Interested
persons please contact Catherine
Krentz at 948-4601 or fax resume to
948-1702.
6/29, c
DRILLERS HELPER Great pay and
benefits. Must be able to travel. Clean
FI drivers license, CDL a plus. Drug
Free, EOE, 800-487-9665.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, c
*Fulltime RN Faculty Positions (2) for
new RN Program. 10 mo. /yr/
contracts. Requires master's in
nursing; current Fla. RN license at
least 3 years full-time clinical
experience as RN. Experience as a
nursing educator and clinical
experience in medical-surgical,
intensive care, obstetrical and
pediatric nursing preferred. Generous
benefits. Part-time Laboratory
Skills Instructor. 9 mo./yr. position,
20-25 hours per wk. Requires
bachelor's in nursing; current Fla.
RN license, at least 3 years full-time
clinical experience as RN. Experience
in nursing education preferred. Some
benefits. *Teaching may be nights,
weekends at NFCC or satellite
lqcations.... Positions ,,.,,, require.
participation in college ,and
department activities. '*Applications
to HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. Only
complete application packet
considered which include cover letter;
resume, NFCC application;
transcripts (unofficial OK); copy of
Fla. nursing license. Application
available at www.nfcc.edu
850-973-1662. Deadline 7/1/05. EOE
6/22, 29, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c


Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3, s/d, tfn
Truck Driver Wanted: Class B
Contact Judson Freeman @ 997-2519.
Local deliveries.
s/d, 6/3, tfn

SERVICES


1.800-38.BE.SMART Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
FOR A FREE BOOKLET stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
w.edex.org operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
', Em(r..N Mr. Stump : Stump Grinding.
S / ,, 509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Do you have just enough religion to
- make you miserable? Try a joyful
church. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Summer schedule: Sundays at 10:00
AM. 997-4116.
1 6/29, c


An accident left Kenny Dentori paralyzed
below the -waist. After intense therapy,
Easter Seals turned Kenny's glimmer of
hope into a bright new career. One in five
Americans has a disability, and Easter
Seals is there with expert help, hope and
humanity. To learn more, call Easter
Seals or visit www.easter-seals.org

Creating solutions.
changing lives. .


D&S REPAIRS 997-4015, 4189.
Small engines, tractors, outboards,
ATV's, etc.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the


Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn


Free 2 year old tan lab (male) 8 year
old black lab mix (spayed). Moving
997-8604 or 519-0277.
.6/22, 29, pd
GARAMGE'SLE
Yard Sale Saturday (7/2/05) 770 W.
Washington Street, 8 am. Stove, sink,
cabinets, vanity, doors, lumber, toilet,
baby clothes, crib, books, dishes,
coffee table, etc.
6/29, 7/1, pd
AUTOMOTIVE .
1951 Plymouth Cranbook. 4 dr good
shape & runs Asking $3900
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c
FOR SALE "
Apache Indian Tomahawk Peace Pipe
"1880's" Peace Pipe is 16 %" x 7"
blade is 2 I". Item is from Fort
Huachuca, Arizona appraised @
$1,200 will take best offer. Excellent
condition. 997-4723 after 4 p.m. daily.
1944 Japanese Geisha doll. WWII,
14" height x 5".width below neck -
mounted on black wooden base 6" x
6" excellent condition will take best
offer. 997-4723 after 4 p.m. daily.
6/24, 29, pd
2-3 RIB Front Tires for 8N Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50. 4
P225/60-R-16 Mich. tires $40
997-0135.
tfn
INTEK 6.5 HP Generator;
4500& /3250 watts. Used once. New
.,$650n,owjustS55D,9978604 .
6/22, 29, pd ,,
1 Emerson 12 in. T.V. $25.00 call
997-5200.
6/24, 29. pd


RV or Mobile Home Lots For Rent.
Call Liz @ 997-1638.
6/24, 29, 7/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, c

3bdrm, 1 V2 b w/office, garage, nice
house, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 29, 2005

Foundation Poured, Construction

Begins On Lamont Baptist Church


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After 15 months since the Lamont
Baptist Church was totally de-
stroyed by flames, construction fi-
nally got under way last week with
the pouring of the foundation.
During the 15 month period, the
little congregation faced one setback
after another, fought through miles
of red tape, but never gave up.
"The foundation is set," said
spokesman Gerald Bailey, and we're
going to start putting up the walls
next week," he said Friday after-
noon. "Before long, the walls will
be up and the trusses will go up."
The new church will contain a
6,900 square feet, with the sanctu-
ary seating approximately 125 peo-
ple, a fellowship hall, kitchen and
classrooms.
It will also contain a Baptistery,
which the old church did not have.
"It'll be a beautiful, decorative
block building, the color of lime
rock, with architectural roof, arched
windows, and a wonderful steeple,'"
Bailey said.
He explained that because of the
need for retention ponds in the area,
the building committee decided to
build the pond in front of the struc-
ture, with .appropriate landscape.
The few items surviving the fire,
included the bell, the cross atop the
steeple, the pulpit, and the Bible, all
of which will be included in the new
structure.
Plans were discussed about con-
structing a gazebo in front of the
church and displaying the old bell
there.
In the .vestibule entry way of the
building, the- pulpit and the steeple
cross will be on display.
In a display case, the Bible which
survived the flames will be encased,
open to the page of the final sermon
preached at the old church, along
with copies of all of the related
Monticello News articles about the
fire and reconstruction.
Bailey added that one of the con-


'B^


gregation members had donated al]
of the required appliances for the
kitchen area.
A church had donated its old pews,
which are in almost new condition
and two pianos have been donated,
in addition to the monetary dona-
tions that have poured in from othei
churches and the community.
He added that the main concern
about the construction is the possi-
bility that the project would go over
budget.
Should this happen, members of
other area churches and th6se in the
community would help with the in-
side finishing such as hanging the
drywall and doors. Bailey said.
"A lot of people have donated
money to have the church rebuilt,"
said Bailey. "It's like I said before,
if God wants a church built, the
church will be built."
After the fire, April 27, 2004,
which destroyed the church, Con-
gregation member C. J. Reams, who
helped build the church in 1934,
said, "It's a loss you can't take, but
have to. The fire was the last thing
we would ever think about, we'll
just have to rebuild.
The Lamont United Methodist
Church offered the congregation
the use of its church after their Sun-
day services, which works out well


1 because the UMC service con-
, eludes at 10:30 a.m. and the Baptist
Church services begin at 11 a.m.
Plans were submitted to the Su-
i wannee River Water Management
District for permit approvals," said
* Bailey.
r "Suwannee thought it looked like
a new construction site, and didn't
i know that we are rebuilding a
church.
r "They almost rejected the plans,
they informed us not to do anything
f and not to start bringing in fill dirt
until they inspected the site," he-
added.
"After that, Suwannee gave us the
go-ahead, but they said that they
saw pipe clay (gray clay) in our soil
sample and they didn't like it be-
cause it has a tendency to make
things shift and is not a sturdy
foundation," said Bailey.
The groundbreaking ceremony
for the new building was Aug. 8
and approximately 50 people from
both the congregation and the com-
munity were present during the
ceremony.
He concluded that members
maintained their patience and hung
together. "Now, they can see the,
finished product down the road,"
Bailey said.


WHEN THE PAPER DOESN'T COME


My father says the paper he
reads ain't put right.
He finds a lot of fault, perusin'
it at night.


He says there ain't a single
thing worthwhile to read.
And that it doesn't print the
kind of stuff the people need.


He tosses it aside and says it's
strictly on the bum...
But you ought to hear him hollar
when the paper doesn't come.


He reads about the weddins
and he snorts like all get out.
He says the social doins with
a most derisive shout.


He says they make the paper
for the women folk alone.
He'll read about parties and
fume and fret and groan.


He says of information, it
doesn't have a crumb...
But you ought to hear him hollar
when the paper doesn't come.


He's always first to grab it and
he reads it plumb clean through.
He doesn't miss an item or a
want ad...this is true.


He says they don't know what
we want, the durn newspaper guys,
I'm going to take a day sometime


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Buy, Sell, Rent With A Monticello News Classified


an' go an'


put 'em wise.


Sometimes it seems as though they
must be blind and deaf and dumb...
But you ought to hear him hollar
when the paper doesn't come.

(Author unknown -- Minn. Newspaper Assoc.)


SMonticello


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