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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00049
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 22, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00049
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text









Make Amusement

Park Dream

Safe

Editorial, Page 4
Now


* LI2ARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
i404 LIBRARY WEST
U;;IV-ERSITY CF FLORIDA
GAiN '17TI' FL, 32611



Luncheon,

Fashion Show

Sellout

Story, Photos, Page 6


Partial List Of

Melon Run

Winners

Story, Photos, Page 9


Rotary Barbecue

Serves

500 Patrons

Story, Photos, Page 12


Wednesday Morning


'Montic


137TH YEAR NO.49, 50 CENTS


Ilo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2005,


Festival Draws Large Crowd


New Rules

To Impact

On Growth

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Planning Official Bob Arredondo
recently made commissioners aware
of new legislation that puts addi-
tional planning requirements on lo-
cal governments.
Arredondo said he and Commis-
sioner Gene Hall had learned of the
coming changes at a Department of
Community Affairs (DCA) work-
shop they attended in May on
growth management..
Among the summary of changes
that Arredondo provided for com-
missioners edification:
Beginning Dec. 1, 2007, the
capital improvement element (CIE)
of the comprehensive plan will re-
quire"mannual updating.- Failure' to
meet this requirement %%ill present
local governments from making
amendments to the Future Land Use
Map (FLUM).
By Dec. I, 2008, all counties
and municipalities ( ith the excep-
tion of a few that will be allowed
waivers) must have a public schools
element in place.
Local governments that fail to
adopt the public schools element
will be prohibited from adopting
comprehensive plan amendments
that increase residential density, up-
date interlocal agreements, or
amend the plan to implement school
concurrency.
The legislation provides sanctions
for school boards that fail to adopt
the interlocal agreement or imple-
ment provisions relating to school
concurrency.
Under the concurrency element,
school capacity must be in place or
under actual construction within
three years after final subdivision or
approval of site plans.
Initially, school capacity must be
available on a district-wide basis.
Within five years of adoption of
school concurrency, however, it
must be available on a less than
district-wide basis.
Additionally, adequate water
supplies must be available at the
time of the development, or no later
than issuance of a certificate of
occupancy.
Park space must be available at
the time of development, or no later
than commencement of
construction.
Finally, transportation facilities
must be in place or under actual
construction within three years of is-
suance of a building permit that re-
sults in traffic generation.
In the area of regulatory incen-
tives, the legislation exempts from
state and regional agency review
those map amendments that are
within the urban service boundary,
provided local governments have
adopted a community vision and ur-
ban service boundary. The excep-
tion to the exemption are areas of
critical state concern or coastal high
hazard areas.
The provision likewise exempts
from state and regional agency re-
view those map amendments of cit-
ies with a designated urban infill
and redevelopment area. The excep-
tion to the exemption is again areas
of critical state concern or coastal
(See New Rules Page 10)


Earlier Rain, Breeze

Brought Cooler Air


FESTIVAL ROYALTY wave to the crowd dur-
ing the Parade: Royalty includes: Alana
Chambers, queen; Charlsie Boyatt, 1st
runner-up; Lindsey Scott, 2nd runner-up;


Ramsey Revell, princess; Kaitlin Jackson,
1st runner-up; Tori Thor, 2nd runner-up;
Carley Joiner, little queen; Donnie Kinsey,
little king.


'15 -


STEVE ANDRIS, Parade Grand Marshal,
points to a friend in the crowd as he rides in


the 55th Watermelon Festival Parade Satur-
day morning.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 55th Watermelon Festival
drew the largest crowd in recent
memory, as throngs filled the city,
enjoying the variety of events on-
going.
A festive mood permeated the at-
mosphere, and a slight breeze
helped make the heat less intense
than in other years.
CO-chair Mary Frances Drawdy
said that in addition to a larger
crowd this year, "they also stayed
later too."
"Last year we saw a wonderful
crowd and this year was better.
The little bit of rain we had was
just enough to cool it off, so it was-
n't too hot or miserable."
Crowds lined the streets, ready-
ing for the parade, which began as
scheduled at the stroke of 10 a.m..
Sirens blared from the many law
enforcement vehicles, fire trucks
from departments all over the
county, and ambulances.
Leading the parade was Parade
Grand Marshall Steve Andris fol-
lowed by the Marine Corps March-
ing Band, which thrilled spectators
with its strong beat and cadence.
Applause erupted on all sides
when the band passed marching
and playing.
There were many floats in the pa-
rade, and the Watermelon Queen
and her court, with the Watermelon
Princess and her court drew much
applause.
Each of the young ladies dawned
were beautifully gowned and wore
their brightest smiles for the
crowds.
Each of the floats played music
of the 50's, to the delight of all.
As the many participants traveled


through the streets, children were
delighted with the number of treats
thrown into the crowd, including
candy, beaded necklaces, small
Frisbees and foam footballs.
The Health Department handed
out health related items as tooth-
brushes, pedometers and the like.
At the conclusion of the parade,
spectators walked the streets, mov-
ing through the assorted attractions,
the vendors 'booths, and the Car
Show at FMB.
Music from the 50's was played
at the show, and one couple, Curt
Masak and Ruth Didief, thrilled
those at the car show when they be-
gan performing dances of the times
complete with all the right moves
in the FMB parking lot.
One could barely maneuver
through the streets where the ven-
dors were set up, so thick were the
crowds: -
Vendors booths were packed
tightly along the side streets, fea-
turing items from mass produced
toys to handmade arts and crafts,
from iguanas to turtles and from
jewelry to collectibles.
The food court was just as busy,
offering everything from the tradi-
tional watermelon slices to alligator
kabobs, from barbecue ribs to corn
on the cob, from elephant ears to
ice cream and from popcorn to
pizza.
Spectators gathered observing the
many platform events, and children
enjoyed activities such as face
painting, games and traditional fa-
vorites such as the Bubble Bounce.
As the morning slid into after-
noon, festivities continued, with the
crowds seemingly as dense as they
were earlier in the day.
Attendees seemed reluctant to
call it a day.


Courthouse Will


Enhance Security


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


LINE DANCING to
Festival Sock Hop


the 1950's music at the
Friday night in the JCHS


COOKING CORN Friday afternoon for the
Rotary Barbecue are from left, Ron Cichon,
and Bobby Plaines. Rotarians are said to


Cafeteria, are front to back: Jackie Clem-
mons, Sukie Chambers, and Earl Cochran.


have the best barbecue in town. (N
tos)


Look for changes in the court-
house, in the form of added security
measures.
At the request of Second Circuit
Court Chief Judge Charles Francis,
commissioners have agreed to ex-
pend $16,000 to erect a wall in the
corridor where the metal detector
presently sits.
The wall will have a door that the
judges will be able to open and
close via remote control from their
chambers. Persons wishing to access
the courtroom or the judges' cham-
- bers will have to telephone the par-
ticular judge's office to be allowed
in.


At the same time, the west door of
-'" the courthouse will be permanently
locked, and everyone entering the
courthouse will be screened for
weapons.
.. The changes, in effect, will bar the
public from accessing the western
section of the courthouse at will. It
ews Pho- will also provide a secured corridor
for correctional officers bringing jail
inmates into the courtroom.
The alternative, according to corn-


missioners, would be to hire a full-
time deputy -- something they say
the county can't afford.
"We felt this was the cheaper way
to go," Commission Chairman Skeet
Joyner said in explanation of the
board's decision.
Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
pointed out Monday that $14,000 of
the $16,000 would be a one-time ex-
penditure, with $2,000 a recurring
expenditure. Compare that with the
recurring cost of maintaining a full-
time deputy, he said.
He said the changes have been a
long time in coming. In fact, ever
since Francis took over as chief jus-
tice, the latter has been pushing for
more security, Boatwright said.
He allowed that the recent court-
house shootings in Georgia and
Texas had played a part in the con-
siderations. But the latter incidents
had in no way prompted the consid-
erations, he said.
"We have been discussing this is-
sue for over two years now," Boat-
wright said. "The lack of security
has been a long-standing problem,
especially in small towns with old
courthouses. With four entrances,
it's impossible to monitor the people
coming in."


ir, eF_ L


-------------------




























MARINE MARCHING BAND performed a urday, during the platform events. They re- LOIS HUNTER, tax collector, waves to her cycle in the Festival Parade. Riding with
mini' concert, after the Festival Parade, Sat- ceived thunderous applause from the crowd friends,,as she drives her three wheel motor her are grandchildren.


E ...' m 'a i- ' . 3
DRIVING A JOHN DEERE tractor in the festi- man Allen Boyd, who goes along for the ride
val parade is Cissy Boyd, wife of Congress- The Boyds are an active farm family here.


Howard Academy Graduates

Celebrate 50th Reunion


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Approximate 40 graduates of the-
Howard Academy class of 1955,
attended their 50th class reunion
recently to celebrate the 'gold,
anniversary and the old academy
campus, now the Boys and Girls
Club.
The motto of the graduates was
proudly displayed on the program:
"Good, better, best! Never let it
rest. Until your good is better and
your better best."
The celebration was enjoyed by
graduates from* Monticello, other
points in Florida, Georgia, New
York and Chicago.
Coordinator Johnnie Mae
Seabrooks-Abrams, said the three


days of celebration was a very
memorable occasion with much
reminiscing, reflecting and
catching up on years past with their
- lives events over the last 50 years.
The banquet was held at Diane's
Place and the featured speaker was
1955 class Valedictorian Lorraine
Seabrooks-Vaught of Miami.
"The presence of two of our
teachers, Hazel Fitz of Tallahassee
and Emma Stokes of Monticello,
along with a delicious meal
prepared by Diane and staff, was
out of sight," said
Seabrooks-Abrams.
Attendees enjoyed a meal of
good old fashioned soul food with
everything from collard greens to
fresh green beans, baked and fried
chicken, salad, macaroni and


May Rainfall Below

Average For Month


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Rainfall for the County in May
was at 2.60 inches, above last year's
2.24 inches, but yet below the
County average of 3.94 inches in
May.
In the Suwannee River Water
Management District (SRWMD),
the average district wide rainfall was
4.20 inches, up from the highest av-
erage in the district for May, in all
years.
Highest District wide rainfall for
all years was at 3.25 inches.
The cumulative rainfall for the
past 12 months is at 66.74 inches,
compared to the long term average
annual District rainfall of 55.2
inches.
The District rainfall surplus for the
past year is 11.5 inches.
At the Aucilla River in Lamont,


rainfall in May was at 49.92 inches,
slightly higher than the average May
rainfall of 49.18 inches, and above
the rainfall of 46.34 in May of 2004.
Counties within the SRWMD in-
clude: Alachua, Baker, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamil-
ton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor and
Union.

Rape Reported
The Sheriffs Department con-
firmed Tuesday that an alleged rape
occurred in the county over the
weekend.
Major Bill Bullock said no arrest
had been made as of early Tuesday.
He said the incident was under in-
vestigation and more information
would be forthcoming as soon as the
department knew more.


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cheese, and mashed potatoes.
Seabrooks-Abrams said that Di-
ane created a beautiful work of art
as dessert, a tree constructed of three


FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK float complete with juke box, Elvis,
depicts the step back in time to the 1950's, to the music. (News Photos)


pineapples with a wide variety of
fresh fruits decorating it.
"It was all so wonderful," said
Seabrooks-Abrams.
The reunion was spearheaded by
Seabrooks-Abrams, Maythe
McLeod, Ella Mae Rivers, Everle-
,ana Moore-White, Etta Mae Hall-
Gallon, Ethel Ford-Coates, Leroy
Glenn and Flories B. Thomas.


Movie





Sports


Monticello Christian Academy

Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


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NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005 PAGE 3


Jefferson County Freecycle Group
announces its new online group,
with the goal of recycling items so
they stay out of the landfill.
Moderator and Resident Paul
Davis encourages anyone living in
the county or surrounding areas to
join the online group.
Davis explains that no one makes
any money on this venture, as all
items must be given away, and can-
not be sold or traded.
All are encouraged to freecycle
their unwanted items, rather than
tossing them away.
All participants, including Davis,
are volunteers.
Davis notes that Freecycle is not a
receiving warehouse. There is no
physical location where people can
leave unwanted items.
Anyone who is interested in the
program subscribes to the online



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Each subscriber receives all mes-
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There are two types of posts:
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*Wanted Posts: request items
sought in the hope that another
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Arrangements are made directly
between the two parties about
pickup and delivery and the like.
It is recommended that charities
be given first priority.


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PERFORMING a dance routine to the 1950's Friday, are these contestants from the Prin-
piece "Daddy Took Her T-Bird Away," at the cess Pageant. (News Photos)
Festival Sock Hop, in the JCHS Cafeteria,


Festival So

Considered


DJ JOE LAND, with shades, and hot pink shirt, provided
the music for the Sock Hop, assisted by Krista McManus,
with pony tail, glasses fashionable in the '50's, poodle
skirt and ankle socks.


Commodity Distribution

Explanation Scheduled


To explain changes in the surplus
commodities distribution program,
Interim Grants Director Larry
Halsey has scheduled two sessions
at the Extension Office, one at 4
p.m., and another at 6 p.m., Thurs-
day, June 23.
At the sessions, Angela Sowards,
Denise Griewisch, and Andy Win-
dosor of Second Harvest will ex-
plain how their agency works in the
Big Bend Region, and answer ques-
tions.
Halsey explained that while in the
past, the County Grants Office dis-
tributed USDA surplus commodities
to some 350 to 400 households
monthly or every other month, last
year the Florida Department of Ag-
riculture changed the program.
Second Harvest of Big Bend has
been assigned emergency food dis-
tribution, which includes USDA-


commodities, and food from private
sources, such as farmers and
grocers.
"We don't want anyone to lose ac-
cess to food assistance, and we hope
the program expands to include
more people.
"We hope to find 8-10 groups that
will take on smaller programs close
to home for people in need," Halsey
stated.
Churches and non-profit commu-
nity groups are encouraged to set up
food pantries.
Groups that already distribute Sec-
ond Harvest foods are encouraged to
expand their programs.
Most Second Harvest programs
draw on volunteers, Halsey ex-
plained.
Halsey encourages anyone who
cannot attend the sessions, to call
him if they have questions, at 342-
0187.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

With slicked back hair, glasses,
dressed in 50's garb, DJ Joe Land,
assisted by Krista McManus and
Betsy Gray, in pony tails and poodle
skirts, had the JCHS Cafeteria rock-
ing and rolling Friday evening, with
the 1950's Sock Hop, a new event
added this year.
Music of the era kept dancers on
their feet throughout the evening,
enjoying the nostalgic "blast from
the past."
Decorations of yesteryear, and
DJ Land seated behind the wheel of
a bright red 1957 Chevy, providing
the music, drew a sizable turnout for
the event.
Attendees ranged in age from
six months to 90 years young,


However, Elvis did have a busy
ck H o p week attending most of the Water-
melon Festival events and a Cham-
ber of Commerce meeting.
I B ig H it The event was sponsored by Al-
len & Mooney Investment Advisors,
dressed in outfits from poodle skirts LLC and Farmers & Merchants
and bobbie socks, to blue jeans and. Bank.


high rise pants.
Festival Chair Gray announced the
Baby Contest winners, and pre-,
sented them awards.
She also introduced the Festival
Royalty in attendance, and the Little
King and Queen performed a dance
routine to the classic "Surfin'
USA."
Dressed in matching green and
white costumes, the Princess Con-
testants performed a dance routine
to another pop hit of the 50's.
Contests were held though out the
evening with prizes awarded to the
winners.
The hula hoop contests drew the
greatest number of contestants.
To the disappointment of all, El-
vis did not make a showing. The
audience looked for him all evening.


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41 VVV46

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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

MEMBERRON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Make Amusement


Park Dream Safe


If your children are daydreaming
of turns, spins, laughs and fun at the
nearest amusement and water park,
they're not alone.
Kids of all ages love to seek out
the nearest roller coaster or wave
pool and spend hours exploring the
thrills and excitement these parks
have to offer.
According to the International As-
sociation of Amusement Parks and
Attractions (IAAPA), this year will
excite fun seekers with the opening
of new attractions. These include:
Anchor Bay Lake Compunce
(Bristol, Connecticut), the nation's
oldest amusement park, is adding a
relaxing and cooling retreat with its
new 800-foot-long lazy river.
Disco H20 This retro-raft ride
will have visitors thinking they took
a trip back in time at Wet 'n Wild
(Orlando, Florida).
Fear Factor Live A spin-off
show of NBC's wildly popular tele-
vision, reality show, this exhibit lets
visitors test their strength and cour-
age at Universal Studios (Orlando,
Florida and Universal City, Califor-
nia).
Hades The world's longest un-
derground roller coaster drops into
darkness and bursts out on the other
side of Mount Olympus Water &
Theme Park (Wisconsin Dells, Wis-
consin).
Kingda Ka Six Flags Great Ad-
venture (Jackson, New-Jersey) tops
all other parks with the installation
of the tallest and fastest roller
coaster in the world, which goes
from 0 to 128 mph in 3.5 seconds
and 456 feet in the air.
SheiKra The first dive coaster
in North America features an under-
ground tunnel and water-feature fi-
nale at Busch Gardens (Tampa Bay,
Florida).
Soarin' Epcot Center, Walt
Disney World (Orlando, Florida).
Riders glide over a picturesque
movie sequence of breathtaking vis-
tas of Yosemite and redwood
forests.


To ease your planning time,
IAAPA has named
www.ticketforfun.com the official
resource for amusement parks world
wide. At www.ticketforfun.com,
visitors have access to a comprehen-
sive directory of amusement parks
and attractions from around the
world.
Dress comfortably but avoid
open-toed shoes and dangling cloth-
ing or jewelry. Protect yourself with
sunscreen and a hat, even on cloudy
days.
Upon arriving at the park, desig-
nate a place to meet immediately if
anyone is separated from your party.
Also implement the buddy system
so no one in your party is left alone.
Observe all posted rules and fol-
low the verbal instructions given by
ride operators.
Obey listed age, height, weight
and health restrictions.
Keep hands, arms, legs, and feet
inside the ride at all times and re-
main in the ride until it comes to a
complete stop and you are instructed
to exit the ride.
Always use the safety equipment
provided and do not attempt to wrig-
gle free of these restraints.
For water parks, dress appropri-
ately, including water shoes, a hat
and loose shirt for when you've had
enough sun.
Apply waterproof sunscreen be-
fore leaving home (reapply through-
out the day) and drink plenty of
fluids.
Make sure non-swimmers and
weak swimmers have a life vest.
Bring your own if you are unsure of
availability and fit.
Children in diapers should be
dressed in swim diapers to minimize
leakage.
Read the sign at every water
park ride and obey its rules and ex-
perience level guidelines.
Designate a meeting place in the
instance someone is separated from
your party and use the buddy system
(NAPS).


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 21, 1995
The 1995 Watermelon Jr. Miss
crown belongs to Mary Kate Swann,
10-year-old daughter of Susan Wa-
ters and Earl Swan.
One county man is in jail and an-
other was treated at the hospital for
gun shot wounds, the result of a Sat-
urday night dance hall misunder-
standing.
A $60,000 state grant has been
awarded to the Juvenile Justice On
Track Program at Jefferson County
High School, Merry Ann Frisby,
chairperson of the Juvenile Justice
Council, said last week.
TWENTY YEARS
June 19, 1985
Jeanna Folsom will reign over the
festivities this week and represent
the county for 1985 as the 35th Jef-
ferson County Watermelon Queen
of Jefferson County at the Tuesday
night pageant. Miss Baker also won
the evening gown award.
The new Little King and Queen
for the 1985 Watermelon Festival
are Kyle Salas and Ginni Joyner.
They were chosen during an elabo-
rate contest at the JCHS Auditorium.


THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 19, 1975
Following a three-week delay,
greyhound racing at Monticello's
Jefferson County Kennel Club
opens its season, had made new de-
mands and refused to run their grey-
hounds in preliminary schooling
races.
Calvin Reams III received the de-
gree of Doctor of Medicine from the
University of Miami School of
Medicine in Miami on June 1.
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 18, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. R.H. Hopson an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Sarah Jane to Harold
Deene Pittman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Pittman of Thomasville.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 17,1955
Vep Hudson, Herbert Thigpen
and Russell Sheffield left for Day-
tona to attend the state FFA conven-
tion, Georgie Wright, Russell
Herbert and Earl Merritt were to re-
ceive State Farm Degree during the
week.
Two buildings were reduced to
ashes in a huge fire at Lamont.


From Our Photo File


PRACTICING for their recital in Jan, 1989,
are these students at Jamie's Dance Works.
L-R: Cassie Crocker, Stephanie- Smith,


Shannon MacDonald, Josie Stokley, Adri-
enne Holland, and Elizabeth Beggs. (News
File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Bathroom Scale Saga Is Over


Our bathroom scale has become.
unkind to me. Maybe you never had
that problem, but it's a bummer!
Starve, exercise, sweat and what
do you get? A scale that says you
gained two pounds!
This is unconstitutional, I explain!
My wife chuckles.
Of course, when the scale turns on
her I say nothing. It is not a good
idea for a husband to comment on
his wife's weight gain. It is a very
good idea, however to comment on
a wife's weight loss.
This is the Cichon axiom and you,
read it here.
When Pat is two pounds over her
desired weight, she declares she is
huge and must go into diet mode'
immediately.
As indicated above, I say nothing.
I do talk to the scale, though.
When it turns on me I object. I ques-
tion its accuracy. I complain about
its inconsistency.
For example, the other morning I
weighed before my shower and was
quite pleased with the verdict.
- After the shower, I stepped on the


Publisher's

Notebook


....... "

,~ -


Ron Cc/i on


scale in my birthday suit, expecting
another dose of feel good, when it
determined I had gained two pounds
in the shower.
As I ranted about the scale, Pat
suggested I shower with my mouth
closed because I'm taking on too
much water.
This saga has been going on for
some time and things have gone
from bad to worse.
Not too many months ago the
scale was pretty accurate because it
jibed with the scale in my doctor's
office. And, you know, the scale in


the doctor's office is always (?) ac-
curate.
Lately the readings have been very
inconsistent and, I believe, inaccu-
rate.
In self defense, you have to be-
lieve the scale is inaccurate when it
gives readings that don't please you.
What else can you do? The scale
and I squared off Wednesday for our
morning ritual.
An amazing thing happened. Ac-
cording to the scale, I lost 107

pounds. Hot dog, now we're getting
someplace! .


I quickly reasoned I have been
losing weight right along and the
scale is now atoning for its sins.
So, I stepped back on the scale,
chortling a bit I admit, and guess
what, I weigh 88 pounds.
Let's see what it says after the
shower, I thought. Shower over, I'm
back on the scale and I still weigh
88 pounds. I guess I didn't take on
too much water!
I was on a temporary high. It was
kind of like the time in Miami when
I deposited $200 in my checking ac-
count and the teller gave me a re-
ceipt for $100,000.
I knew I didn't have $100,000 in
my checking account, but I got a
temporary high with that deposit slip
tucked in my pocket.
I said nothing to Pat about the
scale malfunctioning expecting her
to get some kind of high out of her
reading.
Things didn't work out that way.
She weighed and said, "Scale's
broke."
I said I feel a column coming on.
She said, "Good, I'll send it to my
sister 'cause she gave me that scale.


Letters...



Resident Gives Her View


On Humane Society Events


Dear Editor:
Your readers must be enjoying the
recent letters in this paper for their
entertainment value.
One of the last articles read like
something out of "National Geor-
graphic," with words like "cannibal-
izing," "malicious attacks,"
"sabotage," and "sour grapes."
I won't deny that I have had is-
sues with the Jefferson County Hu-
mane Society, Inc. (JCHSI) Board
since the meeting of April 2004..
The meeting was held to discuss
initial negotiations of intent to
merge with Extended Circle Ani-
mal Haven (ECAH.)
Previous meetings held for mem-
bers to suggest alternatives to the
merger, which could save JCHSI,
proved unsuccessful.
Our Board of Directors had al-
ready offered to step down if the
community would not approve the
merger.
The demonstrative group of citi-
zens had no reason to become "con-
tentious" and "oust" our Board
members and the representatives
from ECAH.
I did not approach the new Board
until September when I read Wendy
Moss' letter of resignation.
Among the reasons she stated for
resigning was "the failure of several
Board members to honor their
pledge to function as a professional
business, operate with good man-
agement policies, and serve with
honesty and integrity."
She did not mention "frustration."
I attended three meetings and had


serious concerns about the Board's
operating procedures.
Ms. Moss' leadership had brought
JCHSI the best organizational struc-
ture it had ever enjoyed, but it was
obvious that if some of those she
left behind continued to operate in
this fashion, they would place the
501 (c) 3 status of JCHSI at risk.
The tax benefits of good faith do-
nors who graciously give to JCHS
would also be placed at risk.
In October, I provided helpful in
formation, requested records any


general member is entitled to review
by State Statute, asked for clarifica-
tion of Board decisions, and sug-
gested alternatives.
In late November, when they re-
fused to respond, Ms. Moss and I
combined our efforts and set a date
of Dec. 8 to meet with a Board
member to review the records at the
shelter.
On the evening of Dec. 7, while
attending a City Council meeting on
animal control, someone from the
Humane Society had delivered a let-


ter of expulsion to my home and left
a letter denying membership rights
at Ms. Moss' residence.
The JCHSI Board may claim they
follow Roberts Rules of Order and
Florida State Statutes, but some peo-
ple understand them as well as a for-
eign film without subtitles.
The letter of expulsion the Board
sent me is full of misinterpretations.
As stated, they charged me with
the "illegal, secret taping" of an
"open public meeting."

(See Resident's View Page 10)


Citizen Determined To Get


Help With Sewer Gas Issue


Dear Editor:
My thanks to Senior Staff Writer,
Lazaro Aleman, for the competent
coverage he gave my presentation
on Sewer Gas to the Monticello City
Council during its June 7th meeting.
Sewer Gas problems have been
with us for a long time. Air Quality
and Environmental Technology
which can detect and analyze the
contents of Sewer Gas are relatively
new and expensive.
Consequently, Jefferson County
and the City of Monticello still use
the old fashioned system: "Take a
deep breath. If you smell it, you
may have it. If you can't smell it,
you ain't (sic) got it."
The City of Monticello and I are at
a stalemate over who has the prime
responsibility to detect the source of


Sewer Gas and correct the problem,
the City, or the property owner.
In my complaint to the City, its
position is clear: "They have done
all they know to do."
Does this dogmatic approach by
the City automatically shift the re-
sponsibility to the property owner? I
think not!
To assist the City in locating and
correcting sewer problems, which I
consider to be widespread in the
City, I contacted the US Environ-
mental Protection Agency and asked
for its help.
They have assigned a representa-
tive to address this problem.
I have written a request to the US
Agency for Toxic Substances and
Disease Registry and asked them to
use their technology and expertise to


conduct a study in my
neighborhood, such as the one they
conducted in Scottsdale, AZ.
I have talked with the county
Health Department and suggested
they obtain a Sewer Gas analyzing
device for the County.
li: the future, I may ask for help
from the US Center for Disease
Control.
By nature I am not a crusader. I
wonder why I conduct research and
am contacting organizations which
can help the citizens of Jefferson
County cope with this serious health
hazard.
Isn't government suppose to per-
form this type of work for its citi-
zens?
Dorothy St. Pierre
Monticello








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Festival Luncheon, Fashion

Show Event Sold Out


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Woman's Club
presented its annual Luncheon and
Fashion Show, noon Thursday, at
the Opera House.
Ladies' fashions were presented by
Barbara Hughes of Milady's Shop.
Heather Collins was the emcee for
the event, introducing local models,
dressed in the latest in summer fash-
ions and evening wear.
Models included: Christi
Beshears, Mary Frances Drawdy,
Mary Ellen Given, Eleanor Hawk-
ins, Kay Martin, Monica Roberts,
and Katrina Walton.
Garments were accessorize with
matching hats, handbags and totes,
jewelry, and foot wear. Some outfits
included a matching sweater, jacket,
or poncho.
The event was a sell out, with 145
numbered tickets selling at $12
each, sold before the event, by
members of. the Club, Milady's
Shop, and at the Monticello/Jeffer-
son Chamber of Commerce.


The luncheon meal was prepared
and served by members of the club.
Club member Jan Wadsworth
baked 29 loaves of zucchini bread,
always a hit at the luncheon.
The bread complemented a heap-
ing serving of large chunked
-chicken salad and sides of fresh
fruits, including a variety of melons,
and a homemade cranberry con-
gealed salad was also served with
the meal.
Helping with the food prepara-
tions, under the leadership of Club
President Amanda Ouzts were:
Emily Taylor, Louise Chitwood,
Linda Beard, Betty Bard, Wad-
sworth, Edith Adams and her sister.
Dessert was a variety of home-
- made cakes and baked goods pre-
pared by members.
Helping to serve the meal were
youth from the Monticello First
Baptist Church.

These included:.Rebekah Aman,
Mallory Crum, Stephany Fountain,
Ivy Galloway, Rachel Harris, and
Katherine Hope.
The young ladies also helped with
the handing out the 20 plus door


prizes to winning ticket holders.
Donating prizes were: Jan Wad-
sworth; Farmers & Merchants Bank;
Tommy Surles, State Farm Insur-
ance; Jefferson Builders Mart &
Hardware; Monticello Florist &
Gifts; Great Adventure Outfitters.
Marty Bishop donated fresh can-
taloupe for the fruit salad.
This year's Watermelon Queen Al-
ana Chambers and her Court, Charl-
sie Boyatt and Lindsey Scott, were
in attendance along with the 2005
Festival Princess Ramsey Revell.
Some 51 Red Hat ladies were in
attendance and wearing their acces-
sorize red hats and purple outfits.
Two of those 51 ladies wore their
hats of pink and outfits of lavender,
as women too young to be Red
Hats, and one was celebrating her
birthday so, she was garbed in red
and wearing a hat of purple, attire
for one's birth month of the Red Hat
-Ladies.
The Red Hat members came from
groups from the surrounding areas
of Tallahassee, Perry, Madison.
They were eager to shop at Mi-
lady's immediately following the
-- luncheon, and Hughes accommopa-
nied them to the shop.


HAWKINS DRAWDY


.4


BESEARS GIVEN


WALTON


'Red Vs. Wolf' Well


Attended
The Opera House Stage Com-
pany's Children's Play, "Red vs the.-
Wolf," was performed Saturday dur-
ing the Watermelon Festival.
The play re-tells the story of Lit-
tle Red Riding Hood, but from the
wolf s point of view.
The wolf is upset because he is
known as a bad guy, but he is really
kind, sensitive, thoughtful, and cul-
tured.
After refreshing the audience's
memory regarding the traditional
rendition of Red Riding Hood, the
wolf tells it like it really happened.
He shows the true Red, and re-
veals his plan with Grandma to
teach Red a badly needed lesson.
He hopes that the audience would
see his side of the story, and realize
there are two sides to every story,_


Saturday
and learn a lesson in humility and
understanding.
The cast included Samantha Ham-
ilton, as Red Riding Hood and the
Stage Manager; Micah Nisbickel, as
Wolf; Thea Delaney, as Grandma;
Samantha Jones, as Red's Mother;
Adriane Hamilton, as the Deer;
Amanda Price, as the Rabbit; Ran-
dee Lee Bilyou; as the Skunk; Corey
Jones, as the Butterfly; and Bimie
Godbolt, as the Woodcutter.
The set was designed by Bimie
Godbolt, with Costumes by Cindy
Jones, and Lighting by J. Jones.
The two showings were well at-
tended by both children and adults.
The play was produced by the
Monticello Opera House and Di-
rected by Linda Hamedani, director
of the Jefferson County Public Li-
- brary.


.1'


* t,.*..


SIMS


E (ON


MALLORY CRUM helped to serve at the
Woman's Club Luncheon and Fashion Show.


Here she offers dessert to Norma Wilson.
To the right is Gloria Brown. (News Photo)


New Arrival
Steven and Shireen Sims of
9' Gainesville, FL, announce the birth
of their first child, Zahra.
She was born 11:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, June 7, 2005, at Shands
Hospital in Gainesville.
Zahra weighed seven pounds and
one ounce.
Grandparents are Behrouz and
Claudia Madani, of Dade City, and
Mike and Charlotte Sims, of Monti-
cello.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005 PAGE 9


Babe Ruth League Ends


Season With 2-8 Record


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Babe Ruth League Baseball
Team wound up its season with a
2-8 record after losing four of their
last five games against Perry.
The first game was a squeaker,
resulting in an 8-9 loss.
Randy Curtis pitched the game,
striking out four and walking three,
hitting one single and one double.
Malcolm Norton hit one single,
one double and one triple;Curtis
Hightower had two singles; and
Michael Cox hit one single.
The boys were hammered in the
second game for a 1-12 loss.
Curtis pitched the first two in-
nings, striking out three and giving._


up no walks. Michael Cox wrapped
up the pitching effort with four
strikeouts and two walks.
Malcolm Norton was hit by pitch;
Curtis and Jimmy Tillman each hit
a single.
The third game was what coach
Bobby Cox referred to a "A great
one". The Monticello team won 8-
5.
Michael Cox pitched, striking out
18, and giving up no earned runs.
Cox said 18 was a Babe Ruth
League record, at least in this area.
"The most you can get is 21," he
explained.
Malcolm Norton was hit by pitch;
Curtis hit two singles and a double;
Luke (last name unknown) hit one
single; and Michael Cox hit two
singles.'


The fourth game resulted in the
Monticello team losing 9-1.
Michael Cox pitched, .striking out
six batters and hit a double at the
plate.
In the fifth game, the boys suf-
fered a 9-11 loss after fighting back
from a 2-8 deficit in the third in-
ning.
They came back in the fourth in-
ning of the five inning game to
score seven more runs.
Curtis pitched the game, striking
out six and at the plate, and hitting
a single.
Michael Cox had two singles;
Luke hit a single and a double; and
Telvin Norton was hit by pitch.
The Babe Ruth League will com-
pete Friday at 7 p.m. in the District
Tournament in Waukulla.


ROSALEE MYERS, 94, ran the Melon Race, cle to the event. Reportedly, she hopped on
after driving her three wheel BMW motorcy- her cycle and drove home after the event.


Partial Listing Of


Melon Run Winners


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

' Though all of the winners in the
Kiwanis 5-K Melon Run have not
yet been tallied, Spokesman Larry
Halsey released the named of the
biggest winners of the race.
For the first time ever, a woman
took the first place crown,. Sarah
Docter-Williams, with a time of
18:'07, the first place male finisher
was Jack McDermott with 18:31.
Halsey said 134 runners crossed
the finish line.
"We get between 120-140 every
year," he added. "We had a higher
number of locals from here and
Tallahassee running this year."
,;In the Masters_(40 and. o_ er) rhe
fastest male 'was Jay Herring of
Jacksonville with 20:28 and the


Cal Ripken

Tournament

Set At Park

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Recreation Park will host the
Cal Ripken 12 year old District
Tournament, Thursday through Sat-
urday.
Opening the Tournament, Jeffer-
son will play Perry, 5:30: p.m.,
Thursday
At 7:30 p.m., Wakulla will face
Madison.
Action continues Friday, with
games set for 3, 5, and 7 p.m..
The Championship Game is set for
10 a.m., Saturday, with the "if nec-
essary" game set for noon.

Lady Diamonds

8-3 Season

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Lady Diamonds.
softball team climbed to an 8-3 sea-
son after defeating Tallahassee,
9-7, Sunday.
Playing without four of their
starters, the Lady Diamonds
jumped to a 3-0 lead, but Tallahas-
see fought back to tie the score at
3-3.
Keandra Seabrooks, Kidra
Thompson, Nikki Cooks and Sha-
nise Brooks all went four for four;
Tasha Samuel, Tonya Young,
Cynthia Steen, Felice McDaniel,
and Alanna Anderson each went
three for four; and Diane Robertson
went two for four.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said
Thompson pitched a good game
and the game MVP was Keandra
Seabrooks.



S x *


fastest female in the Masters was
Nancy Palmer of Oveto, with
23:57.
The fastest local male was Star-
buck Rissman with 21:09 and the
fastest female was Olivia Sorensen
with 23:10.
In the 10-14 category, Tristan
Sorensen took first place with
23:36 and Hannah Sorensen took
third place in the same category.
Joe Land finished third in the 60-
64 category, male, and Carolyn
Wright took firstplace in the same
category, female.
A very special runner in the
Melon Run was 93 year-old
Rosalee Myers, who ran the race
after arriving on a 3-wheel BMW
motorcycle with sidecar.
The final results should be ready
for publication later this week.


SA,' bCi'E'-WILLIAMS won the melon run with' a time
of 18.07, the first time the event was ever won by a
woman.


'Deep Dish' Named

Canine Pet Of Week


J l I











STARBUCK RISSMAN. was the fasted local male i.n the
Melo Run with a time of 21.09. (News'
STARBUCK RISSMAN was the fasted local male in the -
Melon Run with a time of 21.09. (News Pftofos) -' "


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005
New Rules Impact Growth


(Continued Form Page 1)
high hazard areas.
More pertinent to this county.
small-scale amendments are in-
creased from 10 acres to 20 acres in
Rural Areas of Critical Economic
Concern, provided the change fur-
thers certain economic objectives
and meets other requirements.
Non-small-scale amendments in
these areas may also be approved
without regard to statutory limits on
frequency of adoption of compre-
hensive plan amendments, provided
the change furthers economic devel-
opment objectives.
The legislation creates a 15-
member standing body that is
charged with developing a 25 and
50-year state vision. Beginning Jan.
16, 2007, this commission must be-
gin making annual reports to the
Governor and Legislature.
The legislation also creates a 15-
member task force charged with re-
viewing and recommending the use
of impact fees as a method of fi-
nancing local infrastructure.
It also provides for recurring and
nonrecurring funding in the amount


Resident's
View
(Continued From Page 4)
l They have failed to state which
law I have broken, but no lawyer
nor law enforcement official I have
spoken to, knows of one either.
Robert's Rules suggest expulsion
only as a last resort, in a case of se-
rious infraction by a member out-
side of a meeting.
The JCHSI Board's actions were
extreme and inappropriate.
SMr. Sutphin can speak for himself
regarding procedures of the County
Commission meetings. The Board
votes unanimously to remove a
commissioner from the JCHSI
Board with support from community
representatives.
Mr. Sutphin was implicated in a
unanimous decision made at a spe-
cial JCHSI Board meeting on May
16.
He was asked if he was notified of
the, special meeting in accordance
with State Statute 617.0822; if he at-
tended the meeting; and if he par-
ticipated in the supposedly
unanimous vote which cited no ab-
sentees nor abstentions.
He answered that he was out of
town on the 16th; he was not noti-
fied; and he did not vote.
The record now shows the Board
of the JCHSI was in violation of the
State Statutes, not to mention the
disregard shown to Mr. Sutphin.
Sincerely,
Betsy J. Pertierra


of $1.5 billion for certain public in-
frastructure.
The recurring funding includes
$541. million for transportation,
$105 million for public education
capital outlay, and $3.25 million for
local government technical assis-
tance.
The nonrecurring funding in-
cludes $575 million for transporta-
tion, $100 million for water
protection and- sustainability, and
$71.6 million for public education
capital outlay,


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005 PAGE 11


lenkins US Attorney

:or Virgin Islands
Jenkins served as an Assistant State
RAN HUNT Prosecutor for the Fourth Judicial
:aff Writer Circuit in Jacksonville, from July
1984 to Jan. 1990.
Monticello resident Anthony J. During his tenure as an Assistant
enkins was sworn in as United State Attorney, he served as the
states Attorney for the District of Deputy Director of the Juvenile and
ie Virgin Islands, June 10. Special Assault Division before be-
He was nominated by President ing promoted to Chief prosecutor
Reorge W. Bush, and confirmed by of the State Attorney's Office, Clay
ae United States Senate. County Division.
"I would like to thank President Jenkins obtained his undergradu-
keorge W. Bush for nominating ate degree from Troy State Univer-
ne, and I thank the senate for con- sity where he graduated Summa
irming me," said Jenkins. Cum Laude with a bachelor of sci-
"I am looking forward to continu- ence degree, and received his jurist
ng to do good work fighting crime doctors' degree from Mercer Uni-
xnd enforcing federal laws on be- versity School of Law.
lalf of the United States and the He is a member, in good
People of the Virgin islands." standing, of the Florida Bar and is
Jenkins had been serving as the the recipient of numerous awards
Acting United States Attorney and commendations including the
since Aug. 20, 2004, upon the res- Director's Award and Special
nation of the former US Attorney Achievement Awards for his work
David M. Nissman. as a federal prosecutor.
He has been a federal prosecutor Prior to his legal career, Jenkins
For more than 15 years. Of those served in the United States Army
15 years, 10 of them were spent in where he received the prestigious
the Northern District of Florida, "Army Commendation Medal".


Tallahassee area, where he primar-
ily prosecuted drug offenses before
relocating to the Virgin islands in
Sept. 2000 as an Assistant US At-
torney on St. Thomas.
Before becoming Acting US At-
torney, Jenkins served as the first
Assistant US Attorney from March
to Aug., 2004. Prior to that, he
served from Sept. 2002 as the
criminal Chief of the US Attorney's
Office where he was responsible
for supervising the day-to-day op-
eration of the District's criminal Di-
vision.
He also served as the managing
Assisting US Attorney in the St.
Thomas' Division prior to being ap-
pointed as the criminal chief and
from Jan. 2001 to April 2002, he
served as the lead OCDETF attor-
ney in the Virgin Islands.
Prior to his federal service,


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yo
PIE
de

1.
















3.










4.





5







6













If

7



8





9





Th
bu

Yo

Ja
Je


Infant
1 4 years old
5 9 years old
10 12 years old
13 15 years old
16 19 years old


u 20 30 years old
o 30 40 years old
a 40 50 years old
i 50 60 years old
a 60 years or older


-- ---------------------------------


If a YMCA Branch is opened in Jefferson County, I would be willing to join as:


Family
Married Couple
Single Parent
Single Adult


a Senior (over age 60)
o Senior Couple
a Teen
a I am not interested in joining.


I am interested in the following YMCA programs (please check all that apply):


Health and Fitness
Sports
Youth In
Government
Aquatics
Leaders Club


a Adventure Guides
o Resident Camps
i Day Camps

o Senior Programs


a Other


The best time of day for me to exercise is:


Early morning (6 A.M.)
Mid Morning (9 A.M.)
Noon


o Afternoon (4:30 P.M.)
a Evening (5:30 P.M.)


. I would use the following services if offered (please check all that apply):


Personal Training
Nutritional Counseling
Massage Therapy


a Towel Service
a Fitness Evaluations
a Workshops on health topics


O Other

. I would enjoy taking the following group exercise classes (please check all that apply):


Step
Kickboxing
Pilates


u Yoga


Parent/Child Yoga

Body Sculpting
Abs and Back
Class


Group Cycling
Circuit Training
Boot Camp


o Resist-a-Ball Class

o Stroller Exercise

o Tai Chi
o Organized Walking
Groups


o Prenatal Exercise
a Mom and Tot Exercise
a Youth Group Exercise
Classes
o Trekking (Group
Treadmill Classes)
a Belly
Dancing/Polynesian
Dance/Salsa


swimming lessons would be of interest to you, please answer the following questions.

. Which type of swim lesson would interest you?


Parent/Child
Preschool


L Youth
ai Adult


. Which class schedule would you prefer?


4 week class that
2 week class that
8 week class that


meets two times per week
meets four times per week
meets one time per week


. What time of day would you prefer to attend swim lessons?


u Morning
Comments:


a Afternoon


a Evening


ank you for taking the time to fill out this survey. We are looking forward to the opportunity to
ild healthy spirit, mind and body in our community.

Durs in spirit, mind and body,

mie Rogers, Chair
fferson County YMCA Steering Committee

op Sites: Jefferson County Health Department, City Hall, Jackson Drug Store, The
warning Center, Union Hill AME Church


Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs
that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.


Dar Jefferson County residents,

better meet the needs of the residents of Jefferson County, we are exploring
ening a branch of the Leon County YMCA in our wonderful county. In order to
sure our residents receive quality services offered by the YMCA, we will need
ur input by completing this survey.
ease answer the following questions and return this survey to one of the
signaled sites listed below. Your prompt response is appreciated.

Please check the appropriate box that best represents the ages of the people living in your
house (please check all that apply).


Xr.

















X.X.






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005
Rotary Barbecue

Serves 500 Patrons


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
While the tally is not yet
complete, for the Rotary Barbecue,
treasurer Fred Golden estimated
that 425 to nearly 500 meals were
served, compared to the 700 served
last year.
James Muchovej said that elec-
tion years tend to show more sales
for the Rotary and that sales fluctu-
ate from year to year.
"We expect it to be even bigger
next year," he added.
This was the first year for an out-
side pickup and Golden said that


worked very well. "We wanted to
try to shorten the lines inside," he
added. Approximately 100 meals
were picked up outside.
"Everyone I talked to says Rotary
makes the best barbecue," said
Golden.
After expenses, approximately
$2,000-$2,500 was raised.
Approximately 20 members
worked very hard to make the bar-
becue a success.
Twenty-five percent of the pro-
ceeds will be donated to the Cham-
ber of Commerce and the
remainder of the proceeds will go
toward local projects.


3 AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIALS &TRIBUTES


SERVED a Barbecue Meal by Rotary Serving the line are:' L-R: Liz Beaty, Mike
Line are at left, Donald Carter, of Albany, Humphrey, Mary Frances Drawdy, and Ron
GA and Mildred Davis, of Pelham, GA. On Cichon.


TIM PEARY and his horse drawn
around town, and in parades.


carriage are often seen


BILL DOUGLAS, left, and Fred Golden, with
help from John Muchovej served up the to
go orders for the Rotary Barbecue. It was


the first time the barbecue tried the curb-
side service, which was a hit. (News Photos)


Homeless individuals. Families. Communities.
Volunteers of America helps hundreds of thousands of
individuals and families find a place to call home every
year. With programs that range from emergency shelter to
medical and mental health services and job training. For
over 100 years, we've helped build better communities
by teaching skills and restoring self-sufficiency and hope.
Find out how you can help. Call 1.800.899.0089
or visit www.voa.org.
There are no limits to caring.

' Volunteers
ofAmerica*


KAITLIN JACKSON, second runner-up in the Princess Con-
test took part in the Hula Hoop Contest at the Sock Hop.


FRITH ABSTRACT

& TITLE CO.
Owners & Mortgage Title
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850-584-2672


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 22, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


,CLASSIFED Ab)VEr
3 Lines, Two edition,-Wtesdgh
Each Additionod t~..
IADEfLINS';'.!-M-onday Now)~f
:"'edne'sdiy Noon'fr
Call Ojmr'Ciassi le d., bj~,t
9 35, 6.


STAR WARS 3 (PG13)
Weds. Thurs. 12:45 3:55
S-7:05- 10:15


LONGEST YARD
(PG13)
Weds. Thurs 11:30 2:00 -
4:45 7:30 10:00


MADAGASCAR (PG)
Weds. Thurs 12:30 2:35 -
5:05 7:20 9:25


MR. & MRS. SMITH (PG13)
1:15 -4:20- 7:10-9:55
NO PASSES


ADVENTURES OF SHARK
BOY & LAVA GIRL (PG)
Weds. Thurs. 12:15 2:25
-4:40 6:50 9:00
NO PASSES


BATMAN BEGINS (PG13)
Weds. Thurs 1:00 4:00 -
7:00 10:00
NO PASSES


HERBIE:FULLY LOADED
(G)
11:45 2:10- 4:35 7:15 -
9:35
NO PASSES


HELP YOUR DOCTOR


HELP YOU
IN THREE EASY STEPS.
When you have a chronic illness,
there are steps you can take to
support your health care team, and
help them do their very best for you.
Ask questions.
There's no faster way to
understand your symptoms, your
treatment, your dos and don't.
Remember, your doctor, nurses, and
therapists all work for you. They're
there to listen and answer your
questions.
Educate yourself.
Read up on your illness and your
medicines. Yourilibrary and the
Internet are great sources. Smart
patients stop acting like patients-
and become partners in their health
care treatment.
Network with others.
Whatever your illness, there are
others out there, just like you. In
fact, it's assured there's a national
agency to help people with your
condition. Groups like the National
Osteoporosis Foundation and the
American Cancer Society can put
you in touch with people who
know what you're going through.
Ask your providers who to call.

It's your health.
You call the shots.



NATIONAL HEALTH COUNCIL
For assistance or more information, visit
www.NationalHealthCouncil.org or write the
National Health Council at 1730 "M" Street NW,
Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036-4505
This message made possible by an educational grant
from the Pfizer Health Literacy Initiative.


f~v 1 --ga


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North Flor-
ida Community College will hold its regu-
lar monthly meeting Tuesday, June 28th
2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 1000
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of
the agenda may be obtained by writing:
disability related accommodations, contact
the NFCC Office of College Advancement,
850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal opportu-
nity employer.
6/22, c
The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners is accepting bids for 988
sq. yards of commercial carpeting includ-
ing installation, 26 oz. or higher, stain-
resistant with at least 10 year warranty,
and" 400 yards of cove base installed. All
bids are due 5:00 p.m., July 6th, 2005.
6/22, c

In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction July 16, 2005 @ 10:00am
1979 Ford Vin# F35SRDE8042; 1992
Ford Vin 1IFTDF15Y5NNA19352 To
be sold as is for Towing & Storage
charges. Conditions & Terms at Auc-
tion. Dave's Towing 7261 East
Washington St. Monticello, Fl 32344 /
(850)342-1480
6/22, c




HealthCare. Healthcare is about
people. That's no different here. But
what is different about Prison Health
Services is the environment in which
you'll extend quality care. It is safer
and more rewarding, giving you the
opportunity to experience medical
care at a whole different level. Join
our team at the Taylor Correctional
Institution in one of these immediate
openings: RN-FT, days; LPN-FT,
nights; Pharmacy Technician-PRN.
We offer competitive compensation
and benefits. Contact Dave Hall at:
850-838-4000, ext 069 or forward
resume via fax: 850-838-4081.
EEO/AA www.prisonhealth.com.
6/22, c


Drivers: Run mega OR short haul.
Home nightly &/OR once during the
week & weekends! Lease/purchase
available. Own your own truck! No
Money/Credit? No problem! CDL-A
w/2yrs TT exp. Shelton Trucking
800-877-3201.
6/22, pd
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING:
Assistant Professor of Education:
Saint Leo University, a leader in
teacher training enrolling more than
400 major in Florida is seeking
candidates for a full-time, 10-month,
nontenure track faculty position to
teach and advise students in the
Elementary Education program in
Lake City and Madison. The
Assistant Professor of Education
requires a doctorate degree from a
regionally accredited institution with
credentials to teach Elementary
Education courses (methods or ESOL
preferred) and previous teaching
experience in Florida public schools
and universities preferred. Review of
resumes begins for immediate
placement. To apply, submit letter
documenting successful teaching
experience, current vita/resume to
include contact information for 3
professional references, and official
transcripts. Saint Leo University
Human Resource MC2327, PO Box
6665 Saint Leo, Florida 33574
resume@saintleo.edu Visit
www.saintleo.edu/jobs for detail and
job postings including adjunct
instructors being recruited for the
new academic year. EOE/Catholics,
women and minorities are encouraged
to apply.
6/22, 24, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Monticello Christian Academy: Now
Interviewing for Elementary and
Middle School Teachers. Call Pastor
Mike 997-3906; 294-1006
5/27, tfn, c
immediate opening for elderly care.
850-570-8746 ask for Janet.
6/17, 22, 24, 29, c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3s/d, tfn
Truck Driver Wanted: Class B
Contact Judson Freeman @ 997-2519.
Local deliveries.
s/d 6/3, tfn

Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners is seeking applicants
for Staff Assistant in the department
of Emergency Management. Job


description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Room 10, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida.
Salary range is $18,470.00-$27,705.60
Minimum qualifications are:
Knowledge of business English,
spelling and punctuation. Knowledge
of *mathematics. Ability to gain
knowledge of the unit's policies,
procedures, and practices. Ability to
establish and maintain effective
working relationships with employees
and the public. Ability to access, input
and retrieve information from a
computer. Ability to communicate
using writing, speaking, hearing and
visual skills. Ability to type at the rate
of 35 correct words per minute. Skill
in the use of dictation or of
transcription from a dicta phone (if
required). Availability to travel to
attend training classes and meetings.
Education and experience needed:
High school graduation or possession
of an acceptable equivalency diploma.
(Two (2) years work experience
involving staff assistant duties
including the operation of a personal
computer, keyboard, or similar data
entry equipment. (A comparable
amount of training, education or
experience may be substituted for the
above minimum qualifications).
Applications will be accepted until
Tuesday, June 28, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
at the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employee. Drug Free Workplace.
Drug testing is a required part of
preemployment physical. Applicants
with a disability should contact the
above office for accommodation.
6/15,17, 22, c
DRILLERS HELPER Great pay and
benefits. Must be able to travel. Clean
FI drivers license, CDL a plus. Drug
Free, EOE, 800-487-9665.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, c


*Fulltime RN Faculty Positions (2) for
new RN Program. 10 mo. /yr/
contracts. Requires master's in
nursing -current.-Fla. RN license at
least 3 .1 -. ar full-time clinical
experience as RN. Experience as a
nursing educator and clinical
experience in medical-surgical,
intensive care, obstetrical and
pediatric nursing preferred. Generous
benefits. Part-time Laboratory
Skills Instructor. 9 mo./yr. position,
20-25 hours per wk. Requires
bachelor's in nursing; current Fla.
RN license, at least 3 years full-time
clinical experience as RN. Experience
in nursing education preferred. Some
benefits. *Teaching may be nights,
weekends at NFCC or satellite
locations. Positions require
participation in college and
department activities. *Applications
to HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. Only
complete application packet
considered which include cover letter;
resume, NFCC application;
transcripts (unofficial OK); copy of
Fla. nursing license. Application
available at www.nfcc.edu
850-973-1662. Deadline 7/1/05. EOE
6/22, 29, c


AUTOMOTIVE
1951 Plymouth Cranbook. 4 dr good
shape & runs Asking $3900
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c


Universal Gym, Weider Pro 9
different exercises. 7 mos. old pd. 500.
Asking $300 call Greg/Tammie @
997-6455
6/22, 24, pd
INTEK 6.5 HP Generator;
4500 /3250 watts. Used-once. New
$650; now just $550 997-8604
6/22, 29, pd
REAL. ESTATE
Extra money in your pocket! Log on
to www.cejfinance.com to find out
how you can lower your payments
every month, hassle free!!
6/22, 24, 29, 7/1, pd
Beautiful & Private. 2 miles from
Monticello 3 br, 2 V bath home on
171/2 acres w/pond, dock, barn, dove
field, garden, and pasture in a
manicured, country setting. Pine
floors throughout with large brick
fireplace. Shown by appt. Only.
$439,000. Send email to
House@PWHhomes.com to receive
additional info or call (850) 997-6344
to set appt.
6/22, 24, 29, 7/1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, pd

SERVICES
D&S REPAIRS 997-4015, 4189.
Small engines, tractors, outboards,
ATV's, etc.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
Ours is a church where diversity is
celebrated and thinking is
encouraged. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N. of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 am. 997-4116.
6/15, c
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19 tfn


FREE Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
Free 2 year old tan lab (male) 8 year piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
old black lab mix (spayed). Moving 933-3458.
997-8604 or 519-0277. 4/28 tfn
6/22, 29, pd _II___________


[ RGE


1 1 F U I ,M i ,N-.. -I- -- -. -


Housing Vouchers

WE'ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMODELED HOMES
2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy Officers on site

575-6571


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215N. Jefferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-S516 ww.cbkLkcom


* GREENVILLE- affordable starter
home in town, 1.75 acre lot. 42,500
* Quiet Residential Area: remodeled
home, vinyl and brick with fenced
backyard, Nobles Subdivision
$101,900
* ECONFINA RIVER- two lodges
near the river landing, will sell to-
gether or separately.
* COOPER'S POND- spacious home
huge master suite, 4BR/3BA, privacy
fenced backyard with pool. $174,900

Many Others Available


3bdrm, 1 V2 b w/office, garage, nice
hours, in town. Fenced back yard
w/nice size shed. $700 per month.
933-8167.
6/22, tfn, c
House in country for rent. 3 BDRM, 1
/2 b w/extra room. 997-3365.
6/22, tfn, c
Shop / Warehouse Space. Four large
roll-up doors. 1200 sq ft with
standard utilities included. Easy
access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
August 1st. Call 997-4150.
6/15.17, tfn, c



14 H.P. Twin OHV. Electric start,
Briggs, w/tank and portable rack.
Generator died, engine is perfect, only
50 hours. Engine list $994, yours for
$350. 997-0676.
6/22, 24, pd
Sofa/matching chair (green, navy,
burgundy plaid) good condition; 2
end tables $150. Linda Wheeler
997-4441.
6/22, 24, pd
120v window A/C unit, large $100.
Kids electric air hockey game $10.
Kids yellow care bear shelf $5. and
misc. toys. Call 342-1486, 509-1942.
6/22, 24, pd
2-3 RIB Front Tires for 8N Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50. 4
P225/60-R-16 Mich. tires $40
997-0135.
tfn
1 Craftmatic Bed (twin) Fully adj.
w/wireless remote, vibrates and
massages used 2mos. $595. 1-23" color
TV good condition $20. 1. Sony Dual
Cassette component player and
recorder. New mint cond. $50.
997-4879, 997-0404.
6/22, 24, pd


Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted
pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field all very conven-
ient to Tallahassee for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000 -,..
Under Contract-The Price is RiQht!
2acres high and dry in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows $7,500
Under Contract -Look- Unusual
Opportunity!!! On Waukeenah Highway
easy access to Tallahassee high, dry,
fenced and ready to build on, great for
horses or cattle $8,500 per acre
Price Reduced Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$169,500 don't miss it!
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location north of Greenville
only $295,000
Under Contract-Terrific New Listinq!!


3 bedroom 2 bath double wide with new
gal alum roof and vinyl siding 3 sheds,
fish pond on 2.4 acres and only $86,500
Under Contract-Saddle Up Six very
nice acres mostly fenced pasture nice
location near Lamont $40,000
Under Contract-Fulford Road 4 bed-
room 2 bath home with garage, out build-
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres in the
Country $76,500
Don't Miss this One -South Main Ave


west of Monticello off US 90 on paved
county road five wooded acres with well
and septic tank $85,000
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Great Buy big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property SOLD On US 90 in
town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com

We have qualified buyers looking
for acreage between Monticello and
Lloyd can you help?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Buyers looking for Homes and Land


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com,

Under Contract-Great Cash Flow for


the Investor Apartment House cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment build-
ing great potential as a bed and break-
fast with suites $240,000
Beautiful Home on a Sweet Mountian


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE.22, 2005


HO


SVILLE T


15757 US Hwy 19N Thomasville, GA f-888-CO


0tOY 5Oame9i 2006
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA CE 2<01HONIDA ODESSEY


2003 CHRYSLER SEBRING


V6,Auto, All Power, CD, Convertible


V8, Auto, All Power, CD


T SILVERADO 2005 PONTIAC GRAND AM 2003 FORD F-150 CREW CAB 2001 GMC DENALI



Owner, A/C, Leather Auto, All Power, CD, A/C, Certified V8, All Power, CD, A/C '8., Auto. .411 Power, CD, 3rd Row, Rear 4ir, Leather
Dealer kill subsidize payment for a limited time WAC. Example: 02 Honda Civic -12 payments at$99/mo. and then 60 remaining payments at $240/mo. @ 6.9%APR. II.4C
WALON XLS 2002 HONDA CIVIC 2002 JEEP WRANGLER 2004 FORD EXPEDITION

. _. 5 ;


V6, Auto, All Power, Sunroof, CD, A/C -.
Leather. Alloy Wheels 5 spd, All Power, CD, A/C6, uto, A
2002 HONDA ACCORD 20: 4 PONTIAC GRAND AM 2004 MAZDA B4000 CAB PLUS



S6. Auto. All Power. Sunroof CD
Leather, Loaded,. 4loy iWheels 1'6, Auto. All Pow er, CD, A/C, Alloy Wheels V6, 4x4, Auto, A4 Power, CD, A/C
2001 TOYOTA TACOMA BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT, DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY, REPOSSESSION
Loan Officers on site thru Monday

CREDIT APPLICATIONi
a Just bring completed application TO THE SALES EVENT, plus driver's license and paystubs..
4x4. Auto,All Power, CD,A/C,Certified- $0 Down Your Job Is Your, Down Payment! :
2002 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB :First Name Date of Birth
:Last Name Telephone ,
A'O .. Add ress Place of Employment
u :Social Security Number Monthly Income


V8, Auto. .ll Power.
2002 FORI
o Erll


3rd Row. Rear 4ir


S8,.4uSo.. AllPower, Sunroof. CD,A./C
Leather, Rear Air, 3rd Row Seat
2003 TOYOTA TACOMA CREW CAB


V6, Auto, All Power, CD, A/C, Certified
2000 TOYOTA COROLLA


4x4. Auto. All Power, CD. A/C *.......E..........Ea........................... Auto, CD, Certified
' ._ Dealer will bsjdie payment fora limited time 11t C. Example: 102 Honda Civic -12 payments at ,S9 mo. and then 60 remaining payments at $241.,mo. 6.9 A.4PR. At.LC
2004 TOYOTA MATRIX 2004 TOYOTA SIENNA 2003 HONDA ACCORD 2003 TOYOTA ECHO



V6, Auto, All rower, Sunroof CD, A/C
4x4, 5 Spd. All Power. CD, Certified V6. Aulo. .11 Power, CD, I Owner. A/C. Certified Alloy Wheels, Leather Auto, All Power, CD, Certified
2003 TOYOTA MR2 SPYDER 2004 TOYOTA SOLARA 2005 NISSAN ALTIMA 2002 FORD F-250 DIESEL



CD..A. .' C rrified. Convertible
Se'e r>n.c,,icci;o, I 6. Auto. All Power. ClDC, C, Certified, Convertible Auto, All Power; CD, 1 Owner, A/C V8, Auto, All Power, CD, A/C


2002 EXIJSLS430


Luxury Pkg.. Auto. Sunroof. 1 Owner
.-/C. Certified
2001 ACURA 3.2


2004 TOYOTA CAMRY 2001 CHEVROLET S-10


Auto. ll Power. CD, I Owner. A.'C. Certified
2001 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER


2003 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO


V6, Auto, Sunroof, CD, A/C l a
Leather, Alloy Wheels V6, All Power, CD, 1 Owner, A/C, Certified V6, All Power, CD, A/C, Leather, Alloy Wheels V6, Auto, A/C, Rear Air, 3rd Row Seat
Dealer dill lubsidiz payment fora limited time 1.4C. Example: 2 Honda Cinic -12 paviniiS I at 9 V o. in. thin, 611 rimainrng palmentlt at .2- 41f, mUo. .I 4\PR I11.

THOMASVILLE TOYOTA

1577 US' I ..1
TTioieaswvileGA 1-866.3210LOAN o


V6, Auto, All Power, CD, A/C V6, Auto, All Power, CD
2005 JEEP LIBERTY 2002 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
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