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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00048
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 17, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00048
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
i404 LIBRARY WEST
U:iIVER-3ITY OF FLORIDA
,^AIT't'VrLLY, FL. 32611



Program Promotes

Healthy Lifestyle

For Blacks

Story, Page 6


Senator Al Lawson

Addresses

Democratic Group

Story, Page 10


^C [ Friday Morning D





Monticello

137TH YEAR NO.48, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Stiff's

Flower Garden

Work Of Art
Story, Photos, Page 14


ews


FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 2005
I 1


Upscale Subdivision Planned




Adjacent To Holly Hills Are


Some 50 One-Acre Lots

Envisioned in Project


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

It's only in the early talking
stages, but a big, high-scale devel-
opment may be coming to the west-
ern part of the city.
The property under discussion is
the large tract just south of US
Highway 90 and just west of Holly
Hills.
Developer Riley Palmer appar-
ently has been in negotiations with
owner Tim Braswell for the possible
purchase of the property.
Palmer approached the City Coun-
cil last week to get the council mem-
bers' feelings on his plans to
develop the property.
It was his desire, Palmer said, that
the development occur within the
city. He wanted to know if council
members were amenable to the an-
nexation of the parcel, which is
presently in the county.
One of the main attractiveness of
the city, Palmer said, was that it
could provide water and sewer serv-
ice. At the same time, he said, the
development would provide the city
with high property taxes and sewer
and water fees.
As he described phase one of the
proposed subdivision, Palmer said it
would consists of 56 to 60 one-acre
lots. Expected prices of the houses,
he said, would be between $250,000
and $300,000.


"It will be an upscale
subdivision," Palmer said.
Ironically, the county rezoned the
property several years back to four
houses per acre to make it more at-
tractive to development. But Palmer
said he was not interested in devel-
oping at such a high density. Rather,
he was aiming for the kind of con-
sumers that wanted more of a rural
setting, Palmer said. Hence, his
plans for one house per acre.
"People want to live in rural com-
munities," Palmer said. "They want
more space."
He said that he had spoken with
City Superintendent Don Andersodn
about the project and it appeared
that the availability of city sewer
service to the subdivision would
pose no problem.
The one possible obstacle, he said,
was the city's capability to provide
water to the subdivision.
According to Robert George, con-
sultant engineer for the city, it will
cost about $158,000 for the city to
install an 8-inch water line from the
old high school to Holly Hills.
Depending what route the city
chooses to pursue the funding for
the project -- either seeking a Rural
Development grant or an outright
loan -- the process would take be-
tween nine months and two years,
George said.
That's when Palmer proposed a
deal that he said would expedite the
installation of the water line and that


New among Festival Events this
yei,, is the 50's Sock Hop scheduled
7:30 to 10 p.m., Friday at the air
conditioned JCHS Cafeteria on Wa-
ter Street.
The event is sponsored by Allen
and Mooney Investment Advisors,
LLC, and Farmers and Merchants
Bank.


Admission is free and all are en-
couraged to come out to dance to
100 of the greatest hits of the 50's
and early 60's.
It is expected to be a Blast From
the Past, in keeping with the theme
of the Festival.
Joe Land is the DJ for the event.


developers in Tallahassee com-

fi i"That deal calls for Palmer to front
Sthe cost of extending the city's wa-
S" '' terline. The city, meanwhile, would
enter an agreement that would as-
AD sure reimbursement of Palmer's in-
vestment down the line, as the
4 "' development begins to pay for itself
i "in sewer and water fees and property
-3 taxes.
s I ..L .- Too, the city would a, ree to the
annexation as part of tl( deal.
... I .. .ji 9 Council members expressed open-
|. ..' '.. ness to both the proposed annexa-




i -- other matters. It was the expressed
hope of everyone-concerned that the
i up with a recommendation on Pal-
m-er was offering.







MAYOR JULIE CONLEY, left, discusses Holly Hills, south of US 90, with Developer mproposal by th e July council
plans for an upscale subdivision adjacent to Riley Palmer. (News Photo) meeting.



State Recognizes County


Health Department Program


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Health De-
partment was one of four health de-
partments recently identified as a
winner of the Davis Productivity
Award.
The Davis Productivity Award is
described as a major government
improvement initiative chaired by
the lieutenant governor and spon-
sored by Florida Tax Watch, the
Florida Council of 100, and the state
of Florida.
The stated aim of the program is
to recognize state employees whose
work measurably and significantly
increases productivity and promotes
innovation to improve the delivery
of government services, thereby
saving Florida taxpayers and busi-
nesses money.
Since its establishment in 1989,
the program reportedly has recog-


r. :. r,



BARNHILL
nized and rewarded more than 7,000
state employees and work units with


cash, commemorative plaques and
certificates for making measurable
improvements in the way they per-
form and deliver services to Florida
citizens.
The health departments here and
in Madison, Taylor and Wakulla
counties were recognized for im-
proving their Indigent Pharmaceuti-
cal Programs (IPP), which provide
free or extremely discounted pre-
scription drugs to income-eligible
clients.
More specifically, the administra-
tive support personnel for these four
program were recognized. The four
individuals, nominated by Health
Department Director Kim Barnhill,
were Nondis Driggers, of the J.C.
Health Department; Amy Ellison of
the Madison County Health Depart-
ment; Tina Kidd, of the Taylor
County Health Department; and
Linda Sinnot, of the Wakulla
County Health Department.
According to Barnhill's written


nomination, the achievement of the
four employees involved the modifi-
cation and enhancement of the auto-
mated system used to obtain free
prescription medication for 1,304
low-income patients in the four rural
counties, "a threefold increase from
the previous year."
Wrote Barnhill: "The number of
patients served per month increased
over 200 percent, from 173 to 354;
the number of prescriptions ordered
per month increased 220 percent,
from 234 to 521, and the retail value
of prescriptions ordered per month
increased 224 percent, from $52,837
to $118,358.
"In the 12-month period (between
May, 2003, and April, 2004), the
team obtained 4,447 free prescrip-
tions, with a retail .value of
$926,744."
Barnhill calculated a total savings
of $456,664, after deducting an esti-
mated value of performance of
(See Health Dept. Page 3)


Appeals In Fulford Case May Be Coming To End


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The death penalty case of Paul
Howell, convicted of killing Florida
Highway trooper Jimmy Fulford in
1992, continues wending its way
through the legal system.
Howell, however, is reported to be
running out of options, insofar as his
appeal of the death penalty. He has
reportedly exhausted all his rights in
the state courts and his case is now
on a fast track in the federal courts.
"He's hanging by a thread," says
Attorney Baya Harrison, who rep-
resents Howell.
The 11th Circuit Court in Atlanta,
in fact, is scheduled to hear oral ar-
guments in Howell's case on Mon-
day, June 20.
"The 11th Circuit Court is not


PAUL HOWELL, with face covered, is escorted into court
during his trial for the murder of Trooper Jimmy Fulford.
(News Photo)


even addressing the merits of his ap-
peal," says Harrison, who will be ar-
guing Howell's case, along with
Attorney Clyde Taylor. "All the
11th Circuit Court is addressing is
whether the federal court in Talla-
hassee was right in kicking out the
case on a technicality."
That technicality involves the late
filing of Howell's post-conviction
papers by his original lawyer.
"That lawyer made a big mistake,"
Harrison explains. "She did not file
his original post-conviction notice
on time and so the federal district
court here kicked out the case."
Under normal circumstances, ac-
cording to Harrison, Howell's case
would have been litigated in the fed-
eral court' in Tallahassee for years.
But because of the late filing, the
court dismissed the case almost out
of hand.


The clincher, according to Harri-
son, is that the 11th Court is asking
for oral arguments, even though nei-
ther side requested oral arguments.
"And the only question the court
will be hearing is, Was the federal
court right in kicking out the case? "
Harrison says.
"This thing is on a fast track," he
says. "It's going at light speed be-
cause of the missed time situation."
Harrison adds that the determina-
tion of the I Ith Circuit Court will
likely be the last word on the case.
"If the 11th Circuit Court says the
court here is right, it's all over,"
Harrison says.
The next step would be the US
Supreme Court. But the chances of
the high court taking up the case are
expected to be slim to none.
Fulford, a county native, was
killed Feb. 1, 1992, when a bomb-


rigged and gift-wrapped microwave
oven exploded in the trunk of a ve-
hicle that he stopped on the inter-
state for excessive speed.
The bomb, it turned out, was con-
structed by Howell, who intended it
to silence a murder witness in Mari-
anna, FL.
In his appeal of his conviction,
Howell argued that his trial attorney
had failed to provide an adequate
defense because the latter had not
asserted that Fulford had contributed
to his own death by violating FHP
policy when he opened the gift-
wrapped package.
The court rejected the argument, a
decision subsequently upheld by the
Florida Supreme Court in May,
2004.
"It was almost certain that How-
ell's action would result in the death
(See Appeals Page 3)


Watermelon

In National

Promo

Editorial, Page 4


Festival Sock Hop

On Tap Tonight


Nov






PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005


..40





a t -,,-----


MORGAN DREW LINN
0-5 Months


MARTAVIAS LERRAD YOUNG
0-5 Months


r '










DARBY JEAN BECKINGHAM
6-12 Months


LAWSON REID HARVEY
6-12 Months


71
''.;


WILLIAM BURNELL
STEWART, JR.
1 Year Old


JESSEE JAMES TUCKER
Two Years Old


TAYLOR SHIANNE KNECHT
Three Years Old ,


Sponsors Announce

Baby Contest Winners


COURTNEY RENEE SMITH
1 Year Old



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Other Supplies

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Next to Publix

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DIRECTOR: Dr. Ernie Lanford, PGA
Assisted by FSU Professional
Golf Management Students
FOR: Beginner & Intermediate
Boys: & Girls Ages 8-14
PLACE: FSU Don Veller Seminole Golf Course
DATES: Clinic I Tues., June 7 Thurs., June 9
Clinic II Tues., June 14 Thurs., June 16


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Patricia Sorensen and Ana
McGlamory, co-chairs of the Water-
melon Festival Baby Contest, re-
ports that some 70 entries were re-
ceived this year, making the 26th
year of the contest.
Back in 1979 the contest began at
Braswell's Store, where owners
Polly and Forrest Brown arranged
contest photos against the white lat-
ticework in their front store window.
; While Braswell is no longer in
business, citizens can still view the
contest entries in the windows of
Jackson's Drugs and Monticello Flo-
rist and Gifts, surrounded with mats
of watermelon slices and vines.
* Pictures submitted displayed
much creativity, Sorensen said, and
stated that winners have already
been notified by telephone.
; Awards will be presented at the
Sbck Hop, Friday, at the JCHS
Cafeteria on Water Street,.
. Winners, their parents, and age
categories follow:
* In the 0-5 month old category:


Morgan Drew Linn is the daughter
of Michael and Cherri Linn.
Martavias Lerrad Young is the son
of Trinkina Benjamin:
In the 6-12 month old category:
Darby Jean Beckingham is the
daughter of Chris and Corin Beck-
ingham.
Lawson Reid Harvey is the son of
Kent and Leslie Havey.
In the one year old category:
Courtney Renee Smith is the daugh-
ter of Warren (Bug) and Renee
Smith.
William Burnell Stewart, Jr. is the
son of William Burnell Stewart, .
In the two year old category:
Olivia Kay Walton is the daughter
of Katrina and Jay Walton.
Jessee James Tucker is the son of
Danielle and Lather Tucker.
In the three year old category:
Taylor ShiAnne Knecht is the
daughter of Ashley and Erik
Knecht.
Cody Alexander Lamb is the son
of Dawn and Lee Lamb.
In the four year old category:
Emily Ann Brock is the daughter of
Katie and Kirk Brock.
Mark David Prevatt, Jr. is the son
of Rachel and Mark Prevatt.


TIMES:
COST:
REGISTER:


CODY ALEXANDER LAMB
Three Years Old


A


Clinic II Tues., July 12 Thurs., July 14
All clinics, Half day: 9 am 12 noon
$135 for each clinic
For additional information/registration form,
call: 906-9108 or 644-0886
email: elanford@cob.fsu.edu


EMILY ANN BROCK
Four Years Old





THE RARE DOOR

N. CHERRYSTR.

997-3133


DOers Club July Meetings


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The July meetings of the DOers
Club Diabetics Support Group have
been scheduled for noon, July 8 at
the Jefferson County Health De-
partment, and 10:30 a.m., Monday,
July 11, at the Jefferson Senior
Citizens Center.
During the July 8 meeting, par-
ticipants should feel free to bring
a bag lunch with them.
The meetings are free and all ma-
terials will be provided at no cost.
Participants will discuss timely
diabetes information topics.
. They will network with other dia-
betics, share information, learn new
ideas, and receive and/or give sup-


MARK DAVID PREVATT, JR.
Four Years Old


port, and ask questions.
People of all ages are welcome.

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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
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Saturday, June 18th

Waterm elon Festival


We'll be serving

--> Hot Dogs

= Hamburgers

SJohnson's Sausage

SBBQ

= Fresh Fruit Cups & Watermelon


Live Music By 19 South*



father's Day Dinner

Saturday @ 5pm till 9 pm

Steak & Alaskan King Crab

$12.95 Fathers Only
reg. $24.95

CALL IN YOUR RESER VA TION TODAY

\ Father's Day Sunday, June 19th

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In Case Of Emergency
Dial 911


OLIVIA KAY WALTON
Two Years Old


' I mu







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005 PAGE 3
- -- z ... - m.- . 1. U i Ill[ Vnn


LISTENING to the band and watching the Queen Contestants Ria Wheeler and Brook-
dancers perform their steps are Little lyn McGlamory. (News Photo)


Health Dept. Recognized


(Continued From Page 1)
$370,080 for 2002-2003 and adding
the use of a $100,000 grant to help
accomplish the improvements.
With reference to the specific
achievement of the four employees,
Barnhill wrote: "The process and
system used by staff to work with*
local physicians to order the correct
prescription medication for patients
requires extraordinary attention to
detail and accurate production of ap-
plications that must be processed by
local physicians offices and tracked
until medication is received. The
process is repetitive and the work-
load increases exponentially as new
patients are added and existing pa-
tients remain active. This requires
mastery of complex computer appli-
cations."
As for the benefits of the overall
program, Barnhill noted that the
program significantly increased ac-
cess to quality heath-care for low-
income rural residents who other-
wise would not have been able to af-
ford the medication.
At the same time, she noted, phy-
sicians benefited from the program's
stabilization of patients' chronic dis-


Appeals
(Continued From Page 1)
of someone, if not his intended vic-
tim," the Florida Supreme Court
judges wrote in their ruling. "There-
fore, the alleged policy violation by
the trooper in searching the pack-
age's contents would not have ne-
gated any of the elements of
first-degree murder, including that
the death was caused by Howell's
criminal act."
Howell was convicted of the mur-
der of Fulford in late 1994 in Pensa-
cola, FL. He was sentence to the
death penalty in early 1995.
Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer
The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
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Red Cross


eases, so that treatment goals could-
be achieved.
Wrote Barnhill: "Without this as-
sistance, seniors would not be able
to afford medications prescribed by
their physicians, resulting in the
worsening of chronic illnesses such
as high-blood pressure, asthma, em-
physema and diabetes.
What's more, she noted, the pro-
gram enhanced the relationship be-


tween health departments and local
health-care providers.
"Because the program is available
to all health-care providers in the
community, it has served to link the
health departments to their commu-
nity providers and enhanced the re-
lationship between them," Barnhill
said. "The health departments now
serve a role in their communities
that is very much appreciated by the
local health-care providers."


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The District School Board Of Jefferson County
Announces A Workshop To Which The
Public Is Invited

Dated: June 23, 2005
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344

Subject: Organizational Chart Para-Professionals Hours



Watermelon Festival

ROTARY BARBECUE

Monticello Opera House
Friday, June 17
Serving Line Opens 4:30 p.m.


Barbecue Pork
Baked Beans
Cole Slaw
Corn on the Cob
Iced Tea
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Adults $8 Children $4
Special Take Out Serving Line

"Ain't No Better Barbecue Anywhere!"


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida"45.00 per-year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
.. .. , ,- =,--,= = --==,---o.'-;% -. . .. .. ''o;'o'B o._ :;


Watermelons


WESLEY HOWELL, City Fire Chief, argued in
vain, in Jan, 1988, against a motion to abol-
ish the City's paid Fire Department and con-
vert it to a volunteer department.


. Councilmen, L-R: Ernest Larry, Roy Gray,
Mayor Ike Anderson, voted in favor of the
motion. (News Photo)


In National Promo


The Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services has
teamed up with Wal-Mart and the
Produce for Better Health Founda-
tion to encourage children to eat
more fresh fruits and vegetables for
a healthier lifestyle.
Families who visit Wal-Mart's
1,700 Supercenters and Neighbor-
hood Markets on June 25 from 11
a.m. To 5 p.m. Will find produce
sections featuring characters and
themes from the upcoming "Fantas-
tic Four" children's action movie.
The movie, which will be released
on July 8, is based on the classic
comic book strip that focuses on as-
tronauts who have become super he-
roes.
"These popular comic book heroes
will help capture children's attention
about the importance of healthy eat-
ing," Florida Agriculture Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson said. "At-
tracting children to the grocery store
produce section and encouraging
them to sample fresh fruits and
vegetables can help them discover
that healthy eating can be fun, too."
The Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services is
providing free samples of fresh
Florida watermelon, a traditional


summertime favorite, in 107 Flor-
ida Wal-Mart Supercenter produce
sections during the June 25 event.
The "Fresh from Florida" logo
will also be featured on point-of-sale
and display materials promoting wa-
termelon and other Florida-grown
produce.
The Produce for Better Health
Foundation's "5 A Day The Color
Way" encourages young people to
get their five daily servings of fresh.
fruits and vegetables.
During the Wal-Mart event, chil-
dren will receive an activity book
that includes kid friendly recipes.
Parents will receive the "5 A Day
The Color Way" guide, which intro-
duces them to the benefits of choos-
ing a variety of health-promoting
fruits and vegetables from each of
the five color groups, and provides
other helpful information including,
a serving size guide.
"Our goal is to educate families
about the new Dietary Guidelines
for Americans' recommendation to
eat more fruits and vegetables than
any other food group about half
your plate," said Elizabeth Pivoka,
Ph.D., R.D., president of the Pro-
duce for Better Health Foundation.


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Music is a fine art, and as a fine
art it is forever changing and chang-
ing rapidly. That is because music,
like all artistic expression, captures
as much emotion as reason. It seeks
to express thoughts that are as yet
inexpressible in more detailed and
analytic form.
Now I do not mean that music is
not rational. Indeed music is capable
of incredible statements of deeply
thought-out philosophy, both or-
dered and harmonic and dissonant
and noisy.

Music is truly a universal lan-
guage in that it enables us to com-
municate across cultures and across
time.
But music's special gift is that it is
affective. It appeals to our innermost
feelings. Consequently, people's
taste in music is highly personal,
preferential, and idiosyncratic. We
know what we like and like what we
know. We like what we like whether
others like it or not.


In times of rapid cultural change,
some music is always on the frontier
of discussion and development. So
if you like today's music, you may
not like tomorrow's because you
may not share the values, feelings,
and philosophies being expressed.
Music is preference because it is
so personal. In any given family,
spouses and other family members
may have very different musical
tastes. So judging what is "good" or
"bad" in music is forever problem-
atic.
As always, the key to determining
acceptability for the Christian is
whether the music directly violates
Scripture or whether the music falls
within the infinite realm of choice
that God has given us. If it does not
undermine Scripture, then the music
must not be labeled "bad" whether
we like it or not.
Music is a fine art. Like it or not,
music is synonymous with prefer-
ence.
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., book
author and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
pens this column, which appears in
89 newspapers.)


Opinion & Comment.


BY RON CICHON
Publisher


Watermelon Festival in full swing
with lots of activities on tap this
weekend.
A highlight of the annual event is
choosing the Watermelon Queen
and her court to reign over the festi-
val. This year's honors go to Queen
Alana Chambers and her court,,
Lindsey Scott and Charlsie Boyatt. i
FCAT scores for our schools rep-
resent a mixed bag with the Middle
and High Schools improving while
the elementary school dropped from
C to F status.
I haven't had a chance to hear the
19 South Band, but friends tell me
they're good...Bill Beaty soon to be
Rotary president, his second tour of
duty. This may indicate the great
support he has in the club for the
good job he did last go round or an-
other chance to get it right.
SDid the Micheal Jackson verdict


Short Takes & Other Notions


premiums are expected to go up an
average of 9 percent next year.
There's something wrong when a
major corporation CEO is fired and
walks with a $20 to $50 million
package
Polls show some 56 percent of
Americans are questioning why we
went to war with Iraq.
If you don't make choices in life,
life chooses for y.ou, and you inay
not like the choices you'-ve been
given. :'
Didja know lightning often strikes
outside of heavy rain and may occur
as far as 10 miles from the nearest
rainfall? Most people who are killed
by lightning are killed at the peak of
a storm's intensity than during any
other time.
With more and more developers
eyeing Jefferson County, the work
of our Planning Commission, made
up of volunteers, is of critical im-
portance.
City Council has taken a bold step


surprise you? ...Health insurance.,: in becoming a high-speed wireless


internet provider.
Group studying the possibility of
providing a sewer system for the
Lloyd area is made up of folks with
lots of experience dealing with
tough challenges.
I walked into the Chamber meet-
ing Tuesday and Elvis was there. El-
vis is moving around the county
during the festival and if you see
him, make.note':because the person
with the most sightings, will win! a
prize at tonight's sock'hop in the old
JCHS cafeteria.
Don't miss the Rotary Barbecue
tonight Serving line opens at 4:30
p.m. and a special takeout line will
be in place.
The first VCR was made in 1956.
It was the size of a piano...Back in
1838, Los Angeles passed an ordi-
nance requiring men to obtain a per-
mit before serenading a woman.
Frank Blow's dancing is fast be-
coming legendary... Good news from
the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
bacteria on meat and poultry are de-


lining thanks to new food safety.
technologies.
According to Ron Harrison, an en-,
tomologist at Orkin, Inc., ways to;
keep a home roach free include stor-
ing garbage containers in dry areas,
sealing cracks around doors and
windows, and disposing of card-
board boxes and paper bags %hich
provide shelter sites for
cockroaches. There you have it.
Former Commissioner Fred VWil-.
liams got a nice reception at the
Tuesday Chamber meeting since he
and Valinda.have been longtime
supporters of the organization.
Years ago when we were between
chamber managers, Valinda stepped
in and did a wonderful job,

Gals from Dr. Carney's clinic tell
me they are on a roll. George Car-
swell picked up their lunch tab one
day and then John Guerin did the
same thing a few days later. We're
equal opportunity folks they told
me, implying I should get the next
lunch check.


Some Pensions Are At Risk


BY MARK MIX

Last month, a Chicago bankruptcy
judge approved a settlement author-
izing the taxpayer backed Pension
Benefit Guarantee Corporation
(PBGC) to take over $6.6 billion in
United Airlines pension liabilities.
Plenty of people have reason to be
unhappy about the settlement.
According to a press release is-
sued by Big Labor Congressman
George Miller (D-Calif.), the
United-PBGC deal will "result in an
average 25 percent to 50 percent
[pension] cut for most active and re-
tired United employees, from cus-
tomer service representatives to
flight crew members."
Meanwhile, taxpayer advocates
fear that now that United has re-
ceived a judicial green light to dump
its pensions on a federal government
agency, other struggling airlines will
do the same, Money-hemorrhaging
auto and steel companies may then


follow suit. Ultimately, the PBGC
Could go belly-up, resulting in a
massive federal taxpayer-funded
bailout dwarfing the $200 billion
S&L fiasco of the late eighties.
Pilots union officials also claim
they are victims of the United settle-
ment. However, the reality is that
they have made out very well at the
expense of rank-and-file members,
United shareholders, and (poten-
tially) federal taxpayers.
The federal Railway Labor Act
(RLA) empowers pilots and other
airline union bosses to act as the
"exclusive" (monopoly) bargaining
agents of airline employees in con-
tract negotiations over pay, benefits,
and working conditions. And as an
additional privilege, the RLA
authorizes union officials to force
employees, like it or not, to pay
dues or "fees" to their union
monopoly-bargaining agent. Em-
ployees who refuse get fired.
The deal is especially sweet for
the hierarchy of the Airline Pilots


Association (ALPA) and other pilots
unions. Nearly 60 percent of Amer-
ica's pilots, including nearly all pi-
lots for major carriers, are subject to
union monopoly-bargaining control.
And, unlike for most other union of-
ficials, the forced dues and "fees"
that pilots union bosses collect are
typically tallied as a percentage of
pilots' earnings, not as a fixed
amount per member.
Consequently, whenever pilots'
pay goes up ALPA union officials
automatically rake in more forced
dues.
Over the years, officials of the
ALPA's United division have thus
had a powerful incentive in contract
negotiations to encourage the com-
pany to under fund its pension pro-
gram and put the money in pilots'
paychecks instead.
Together with machinists union
officials, that's just what the pilots
union brass did. And to get what
they wanted, they repeatedly threat-
ened illegal strikes and engaged in


illegal work slowdowns, as "Wall
Street Journal" editor Holman
Jenkins recalled in a May 25
column.
As recently as five years ago,
then-ALPA chief Rick Dubinsky
was still bragging about this
strategy, Jenkins added. In 2000,
Mr. Dubinsky famously told United
management, "We don't want to kill
the golden goose. We just want to
choke it by the neck until it gives us
every last egg."
But current ALPA President
Duane Woerth seems to suffer from
amnesia when it comes to the
ALPA's long record of intimidating
the only sporadically profitable
United into signing contracts that
rapidly expanded the union's
forced-dues cas flow, but put em-
ployees' pension funds at risk. The
pension catastrophe is all manage-
ment's fault, Mr. Woerth patheti-
cally insists.
Unfortunately for federal taxpay-

(See Pensions Page 5)


Department Offers Energy Saving Tips


Keeping your cool in the kitchen
could save you some cash. A typical
kitchen ventilation fan can pull out a
houseful of cooled air in one hour.
That can cause energy bills to rise.
Try these energy- and moneysaving
tips from the Department of Energy
(DOE):
Replace incandescent bulbs with
compact fluorescents.
. Use a microwave oven instead
of a conventional oven.
Use a power strip to control your


electricity use. A large number of
electrical products from air condi-
tioners to VCRs can't be switched
off completely without being un-
plugged. These products draw
power 24 hours a day. Plugging
them into a power strip to shut them
off will save you money.
Lower the thermostat on you hot
water heater to 115 degrees and take
showers instead of baths.
Wash only full loads of dishes
and laundry.


The shelter from three trees,
properly planted around a house,
can cut annual heating/cooling costs
up to $250.
Grown on trellises, vines and ivy
can shade windows or the whole
side of a house. Trees or shrubs can
shade air-conditioning units.
Use a programmable thermostat
with the AC to adjust the unit at
night or when no one is home.
Keep lamps and TVs away from


the thermostat. The appliances' heat
could cause the air conditioner to
run longer.
Replace five most frequently
used lights with Energy Star bulbs
and fixtures and save $60 a year.
According to the President's Na-
tional Energy Policy, typical home-
owners can save an estimated 30
percent (about $400) a year on their
'home energy bill by using Energy
Star products.


Install white shades, drapes or
blinds to reflect heat. Close curtains
on southwest-facing windows dur-
ing the day. Sunny windows can
make an air conditioner work three
time harder.

Replacing single- and double-
paned windows with Energy Star
qualified windows can save a sig-
nificant amount of money on your
energy bill over time.


Caulking and weather stripping
will help keep indoor air cool. If you
see holes or separated joints in
ducts, hire a professional to repair
them.
Add insulation around AC ducts
in attics and crawl spaces. Also, be
sure the fireplace damper is securely
closed.

Consider investing in insulation
for the whole house (NAPS).


From Our Photo File


Music Captures Reason

in Personal way







































Dear Editor:
I am writing this letter as an ap-
peal to your readership.
A dear friend and a member of the
Opera House Stage Company has
been struck down with a heart attack
and two strokes.
His mind is still good, but his
body, sadly, is failing him.
The last thing he did at the Opera
House was to emcee the Vaudeville
show we had there in March of this
year.
He would very much like to have
photos of what will surely be his last-


I
~- o


CISCO


V0


appearance.
People in the audience took pic-
tures, but we don't know who these
people were.
If anyone has photos of the March
2005 Vaudeville Show, could you
lend them to us?
We will make copies for our
friend and return the originals to
you.
You can drop them by the Opera
House office, or call Jan Rickey at
997 4242.
Thanks.
Jack Williams
Monticello Opera House


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Humane
Society has named "Cisco" as their
adoptable canine of the week.
, Cisco who was first thought to be
a lost puppy, found approximately
a month, ago, apparently turned out
to be an animal who had been
dumped along side the road.
No one ever came forward to
claim the animal.
He is a tri-colored Beagle mix
with a short and stocky frame, ap-
parently four months old, neutered
and all vaccinations are up to date.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
said when he was found, he was
running up the middle of the road,
seemingly trying to catch up to the
vehicle that had just left him.
The animal was apparently well
taken care of, and wearing a flea
collar.
He is described as being calm,
lovable, obedient, rides well in a
car and is housebroken.
"I can't see someone dumping
such a beautiful, sweet, loving and
highly intelligent animal," said
Bautista. "I just don't understand
it."
Cisco is a great indoor animal
and a good outdoor animal. He gets
along extremely well with children,
adults and other dogs and animals.
To adopt Cisco or any of the
other many pets available call the
shelter at 342-0244.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...



Writer Never Saw

Ghosts At Old Jail


Dear Ron:
I wrote a weekly article "Ddwn In
Aucilla" for several years back
when Bill Counts was editor, but I
have never written a letter to the
editor.
After reading the Ghost Trackers
Tour plans in the June 8 issue, I was
compelled to write this letter.
First of all, let me say I read the
article on you in the Democrat.
Congratulations on your retire-
ment. Slow down and enjoy life.
My father was Sheriff and we
lived in the old jail, which now is
the Supervisor of Elections Office.


We lived there from 1957 until
1967. Never, did we know of, or en-
counter any paranormal activities.
I talked to Lillie Mae (Bell) Kin-
sey at church, Sunday who said I
could quote her.
The Bells lived in the old jail for
several years up until 1957. Her fa-
ther was a deputy sheriff, and they
never knew of any paranormal ac-
tivities.
Both Lillie Mae and I agree we
have nothing but wonderful memo-
ries of our families from the old jail.
Thank You.
Donna Smith
Aucilla


THE HANDLEY FAMILY enjoythe grilled Thursday. From left, Hunter, Mary Pate and
chicken at the Festival Kickoff Dinner, last Randall Handley. (News Photo)


Howard Middle School


Holds Graduation Exercises


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After a hiatus of several years,
Howard Middle School resumed
graduation exercises with the class
of 2005.
The ceremony began with the fac-
ulty marching in, donning aca-
demic robes and hoods in their re-
spective school colors, to the "War
March of the Priests", played by
Caroline Henry, led by faculty
members, Brenda Kelly and Celes-
tine Thomas.
Dr. 0. Sylvia Lamar Florida A
& M University Professor, HMS
alumnus and JCHS graduate, pre-
sided.
School Board member Charles
Boland led the Pledge of Alle-
giance and the invocation was
given by Rev. Helen Johnson-
Robinson, pastor of Bethel AME
Church.
Special music was rendered by
Ireshia Lashay Denson, a graduat-
ing student who made a perfect 6.0
on the writing section of the FCAT.
The graduation speaker, Dr. Jo-
seph Webster, Sr., Owner and CEO
of the Webster Surgical Center in
Tallahassee, introduced by School
Board Chairperson Beverly Sloan.
Margaret Williams provided spe-
cial music.


Tyler Murdock delivered the Sa-
lutatorian Address, and Courtney '
Holmes, delivered the Valedicto-
rian address.
Superintendent of Schools Phil
Barker introduced the graduates
and Sloan and Michelle Jones, co-
ordinator of testing at FAMU, pre-
sented graduation certificates to the
students.
Stefan Cuyler, a deceased class-
mate, was honored with a special
presentation by Arsenio Bright and
with the singing of the class song.
Guidance Counselor Kathy
Walker, conducted the Honors
presentations and Joni Wilson,
HMS alumnus, JCHS graduate and
Disney World financial analyst,
presented an award from Disney
World to Denson for her achieve-
ment on the FCAT writing test.
She received a trip to Disney
World for herself and her entire
family.
Denson was also presented with
a certificate and a cash award by
Scott Sutor of the Monticello .Ki-


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wanis Club.
Following final remarks made by
HMS Principal Juliette Fisher-
Jackson, the faculty and students
exited to the recessional "Pomp and
Circumstance".
Other School Board members
present incldued: Franklin High-
tower, Fred Shofner and Ed Voller-
sten.


Pensions.
(Continued From Page 4)
ers and millions of other unionized
workers, besides United there are
thousands of other American com-
panies whose PBGC-backed pension
plans are now grossly under funded,
often because the companies them-
selves have been rendered uncom-
petitive by Big Labor
featherbedding and wasteful work
rules.
The PBGC estimates that single-
and multi-employer plans combined
now have a total liability of $600
billion. And it's overwhelmingly
unionized workers in industries like
airlines, autos and auto parts, steel,
trucking, construction, and groceries
whose pensions are in jeopardy.
It may already be too late to spare
taxpayers the enormous expense of
bailing out the PBGC as more and
more unionized businesses find they
are unable to meet their pension ob-
ligations. But Congress can still pro-
tect countless employees and
employers from future pension melt-
downs by repealing all federal-
labor-law provisions that authorize
union monopoly bargaining and
forced-dues assessments.
While additional reforms to safe-
guard pensions are undoubtedly -
warranted, labor-law reform alone :
would empower independent-
minded employees to reject deals
forged by union officials, who, ex-
perience shows, often place little-'
value on employees' retirement se-
curity.


Monticello Christian Academy
Degreed, Certified Teachers
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
I Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


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Photos Sought Of

Vaudeville Show MC


Lost Dog Turns Out To

Have Been Discarded


ORK / OR )Of../
IN) A+ CARR/tR.S. I /J.01VIA 1*0 11' =


Er











PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005


Lifestyle


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Boys and
Girls Club Physical Education Pro-
gram (PEP) reports its physical fit-
ness and sports activities which took
place in May.
On May 14, the Boys and Girls
Clubs sponsored a Super Saturday
event at the Teen Center.
This event began with an educa-
tional Science presentation by "Mad
Science of Tallahassee."
Immediately following the presen-
tation sports events took place.
These consisted of team sports
such as softball, basketball, timed
jump rope competitions, and team
relays.
Snacks and prizes were donated
by the Boys and Girls Club staff
members, and Pizza Hut.
The Boys and Girls Club staff
commend Pizza Hut Manager Mark
Enoch and his staff for supporting


Fire Rescue To

Hold wacissa

Gospel Sing
The Wacissa Volunteer Fire Res-
cue will present its first gospel sing
,featuring The Diamonds, The Pip-
,pins, and Glory Bound, 7 p.m. Sat-
Surday, June 25, at Wacissa United
Methodist Church.
In addition, Guiding Lights, aka
SCody Gospel Group, and Charles
$ Boland will perform.
No tickets will be sold before the
event and a $7 donation is suggested
upon arrival at the door.
Concessions will open at 6 p.m.
Suffering hot dogs, chips, sweet
treats, and soft drinks.

Homes Of

Mourning

Mary C. Smith
Ma-y C. Smith, 96 of 9626 S. Salt
R vd, Lamont, FL died June 9, 2005
at Capital Regional Medical Center.
Smith was a native of Lamont and
lived in Jefferson County for 96
years.
She was a house wife. She was a
.member of Mt. Morilla M.B.
Church, and also a member of the
Women Home Mission. She was a
member of Jefferson County Union
No. 1.
She is survived by one sister Leola
Burnett of Petersburg, VA, 2 foster
daughters Lillie (Albert) Simmons
of Lamont, Ruthie (Charles) Moore
of High Springs. A nephew of La-
mont Willie (Betty) Smith, a host of
nieces and grand nephews, cousins
and sorrowing friends. Also neph-
ews Robert Lee Smith of Northport,
and James Clair of P ,cl ester, NY, 1
niece Jessie Mae James of
-Rochester, NY.
Funeral services will be Saturday,
June 18, 2005, 11:00 at Mt. Morilla
M.B.C. in Lamont with Rev. Ken-
neth Jones officiating. Interment
will follow at Mt. Morilla Cemetery.
Pallbearers are friends of the
Family. Honorary pallbearers are
Deacons of Mt. Morilla MB Church.
The family will receive friends Fri-
day, June 17. evening 6:00 to 8:00
p.m. at Branch St. Funeral Home.


the children in the Boys and Girls
Club programs.
On Monday, May 16 the Clubs
participated in the MLK Proclama-
tion Foundation Day Parade.
The walk began at the Capital City
Bank and ended at the MLK memo-
rial building.
The children did a wonderful job
walking with posters that promoted
exercise and healthy eating tips.
The walk is estimated to be over
two miles.
The Clubs also recognized the
PEP Star Students of the Month. All
four Clubs recognized their PEP
Star Student.
The requirements of being nomi-
nated for PEP Star Students include:
compliance with all Club norms;
participating the most in each exer-
cise session; and displaying excep-
tional good behavior and leadership.
Tara Smith and Richard Hawkins
were the PEP Star Students for the
Howard Middle School Club. And,
Ladrica Houston was the PEP Star
Student for the St. Phillip Club.

The community is encouraged to
become involved with the local
Boys and' Girls Clubs and their ac-
tivities.




Summer Art

Classes Set

At Center

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Arts, Inc.
will offer children's Art Classes 9
a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday June 21
through Friday, June 24.
The classes are planned for chil-
dren ingrades 2 5.
Teachers for the classes, will be
artists of the Center.
The classrooms are located at the
Art Center on West Washington
Street, next Building "A."
The four days of classes will in-
clude Drawing, Painting, Jewelry,
and Creating in Clay.
The cost is $25 a day.
Children should bring a sack
lunch with them. Space is limited.
Contact Judy Miller at 997-2646
or the Art Center at 997-3311, for
additional information.

CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Tom Jen-
nings, Sr., would like to acknowl-
edge and thank everyone for the
wonderful outpouring of love, com-
fort, prayers, care and assistance
shown to our family during our time
of loss.
We felt truly blessed to have so
many family and friends come to
our assistance with food, flowers,
cards, and concern.
Special thanks to Ted Turner and
the staff and friends from Avalon
Plantation and the staff of Hospice
House and staff and doctors at Tal-
lahassee Memorial Regional Hospi-
tal.
May God continue to bless each
and everyone of you for your kind-
ness.
Thank You.
Tom Jennings Family


Yeager, Hayley Winchester, and Nicole Hon-
cell. (News Photo)


Boys, Girls Clubs Work

On Physical Education


Aim Of Program Is To Promote


Healthy Lifestyles Among Blacks


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The state recently awarded the
Health Department a $30,000 grant
to address the county's racial dispar-
ity.
As Health Department Director
Kim Barnhill explains it, a large gap
exists in the county between the
white and. black communities in
terms of health issues.
Barnhill points to the latest statis-
tics, which show blacks in the
county scoring consistently and
overwhelmingly higher than whites
in the areas of cancer, heart disease,
diabetes and infant mortality, among
other things.
It's all related to lifestyle, says
Barnhill.
"We need to improve people's di-
ets," she says. "We need to eat more
fruits and exercise more. The high
numbers are a direct result of un-
healthy lifestyles."

IN LOVING MEMORY
James 'Big Guy' Campbell
March 3, 1952 Feb. 6, 2005
One day we were laughing and
talking and the next day I was cry-
ing all alone.
For your name had been called on
the roll, an Angel came and took'
you home.
If I had known it was going to be
the last time, I would have hugged.
you the entire day.
Now all I can do is reminisce on
the good times, or kneel by your
grave and pray.
My nights have been long and rest-
less, but I'm sure you already know.
I guess I'm still waiting for you to
call or come knocking at my door.
I just want to thank you for the
courage, knowledge and wisdom,
that you've instilled in me.
Cutting the grass and changing a
tire were all part of my training, to
make it independently.
Go ahead, Big Guy, and get your:
rest, because your little girl is on the
right track.
I'm running for Jesus and I can't,
stop. There's definitely no turning
back.
Happy Father's Day, Big Guy.
Loving you always,
Nicky


Barnhill has formed a task force to
help her address the problem. She
says the $30,000 grant will be used
to mount an educational campaign
that will target the black community
with print, radio and television ads
promoting a healthy lifestyle.
Following are some of the num-
bers that prompted the' $30,000
grant.











,

IN MEMORY
Grashauna Alexis Crumitie
6/19/96 10/11/04
She was a gift from God, a sweet
angel from above.
Through all your pain, not once
did I hear you complain.
Your struggle wasn't long and you
fought a good fight.
Finally God spoke and said,
Grashauna, close your eyes and
sleep tight.
I can still hear your laughter al-
though it's almost a year after.
Today is your birthday and now
you are nine,
I think of how much time has
passed since you were mine.
I think of you often, every day. I
will love you forever, forever and
all days. Happy Birthday.
Love to you,
Mommy, Godmama,
Marcus Bernard, Kalvontay,
Anthony, Deshawn, Gramma,
Aunts, Uncles


The statistics show that the
county's population, increased by
1,606 between 1990 (population:
11,296) and 2000 (population:
12,902), with the greatest concentra-
tion in the 25 to 64 age group.
Population density per square mile
was 21.6, versus 296.4 per sq. mile
in the state.

Of the total population, whites
comprised 8,383 or 61.6 percent,
blacks comprised 5,117 or 37.6 per-
cent, and others comprised 118 or
0.9 percent, compared with 81.9
percent white, 15.6 percent black
and 2.5 percent others for the state.
(A discrepancy exists here. When
one adds the above numbers, the
population comes out to 13,618,
versus the 12,902 identified earlier.
The report, however, offers no ex-
planation for the difference.)

The percentage of the county
population below the poverty level
was 17.1 in 2000, down from 22.5
percent in 1990. Statewide, the per-
centage of the population below the
poverty level was 12.5 percent. The
report offers no breakdown in terms
of the racial makeup of households
below the poverty level.
Median household income was
$32,998 in 2000, up from $21,782
in 1990, but still below the state-
wide median of $38,819.
Black deaths exceeded white
deaths by 334.7. (1,259.2 versus
924.5 respectively) during the three-
year period of 2001-2003.
The causes of death during this
three-year-period, ranked from
highest to lowest, were heart
disease, cancer, stroke, chronic
lower respiratory disease, diabetes,
motor vehicle crashes,
pneumonia/influenza, AIDS/HIV
and cirrhosis.


Among blacks, the three highest
causes of death, exceeding whites
and other races in each of the cate-
gories, were heart disease, cancer
and diabetes.
The statistics also show more
births to unwed black mothers than
to white mothers; more cases of late
or no prenatal care among black
mothers; and more infant, neonatal,
and post-neonatal mortality. in the
black community.


ROSAS


New Arrival
Omero and Dana Rosas of Wau-
keerah announce the birth of their
daughter, Andraya Cecilia Rosas.
She was born May 26, 2005, at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 5 lbs and 15 oz and
was 18.5 inches long.
Paternal grandparents are Jose and
Maria Rosas of Celaya, Mexico.
Maternal grandparents are Drew
and Kim Norman of Waukeenah.
Paternal Great Grandmother Ninfa
Vieyra, of Celaya Mexico.
Maternal Great Grandparents are
Bill and Virgie Harrod of Wau-
keenah.


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I Church News

Greater Elizabeth MB Church
celebrAtes its 39th annual Home-
coming Service 11 a.m, with guest
speaker Pastor Ronald Rackley and
the Faith and Worship Ministry of
Capitola. Guest Choir is Queen
Chapel PB of Tallahassee. Sunday
School is at.9:45 a.m.

Memorial MB Church celebrates
Real Fathers; Real Men with 11 a.m.
Services Sunday, followed by a
dinner.

New Bethel AME Church will
hold its Father's Day Program 11
a.m. Sunday. Guest Speaker is Min-
ister Timbre Denmark, of Tallahas-
see. Ford Chapter Youth Adult
Choir will provide the music.


I -. .




o .. -.



SELLING FESTIVAL T-shirts and hats at the
Kickoff Dinner are from left, Frances


1~- r I










Red Hat Ladies Discuss

Backgrounds, Experiences


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005 PAGE 7


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Red Hats of America ladies met
Saturday at the home of Lee Condon
for their June gathering during
which members shared information
about their backgrounds.
Sample personal questions were
prepared by hostesses Dottie Jenkins
and Condon, and were distributed
among the group.
Members shared information
about their spouses and children.
They told of moving to Monticello
from other towns and states, and
why they chose Monticello. A few
ladies were actually born and reared
in Monticello.
Women talked about their
careers, and about what they are do-
ing in retirement.
They talked about their favorite
television shows and discussed
hobbies.
In her free time, Nancy Kinnee's
favorite hobby is riding her Harley
Davidson motorcycle.
Mary Nowell mentioned that
when her spouse retired from IBM,
they chose Moncticello as their
home, of all the places they had


New Arrival
Liz and Derek Walker announce
the birth of their children Lily Elise
and Luke Thomas, born April 28,
2005 at Tallahassee Memorial Hos--
pital.
Lily was born at 11:29 a.m. and
weighed 4 pounds and 15 ounces.
and was 18 3/4 inches long.
Luke was born 11:30 a.m.,
weighed 4 pounds and 12 ounces,
and was 18 1/4 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Linda
and Cary Wheeler of Monticello.
Paternal grandparents are Barbara
and Wayne Walker of Waukeenah.
Maternal great grandparents are Jo
and Hank Lee and Annie Ruth
Maynard, and the late James
Wheeler.
Paternal grandparents are the late
Lillie and Quinton Nobles and the
late Myrtice Herndon and the late
Lyman Walker, II.

New Arrival
Breanna Leigh Kaschmitter was
born June 10, 2005 at Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital, to Becca and
Thomas Kaschmitter of Lamont.
She weighed 7 pounds and 4
ounces.
Her maternal grandparents are
Bonnie and Deloyd Loveless of La-
mont. Her paternal grandparents are
Elaine and Jack Kaschmitter of
Monticello.
Her great-grandparents are Sara
and Deloyd Loveless, Sr. of
Lamont, and Clarence Movry of La-
mont and Barbara Movry from Ten-
nessee, and Maggie and George
Kaschmitter of Monticello.
Her great-great grand mother is
Lucille Loveless of Lamont.


lived. IBM means "I've Been
Moved," she quipped.
Mary Connell lives a mile
and a half from where she was born
and raised. Although she hasn't
moved too far from home, she does
a lot of traveling.
Irene Evans was a welder in her
younger days, and claims could
weld with the best of them.
Colleen Weber came to Monti-
cello from Canada by way of Michi-
gan. She says the area looks much
like her Ontario home land.
She enjoys not making a covered
dish for the Red Hat meets and is a
very proud American citizen.
Carmela Naranjo also came to the
area from Cuba by way of New
York.
In all their closing comments,
came the mention of their love for
their Red Hats group and the free-
doms it offers them, and especially
the lack of responsibility. The
members just chill out and have fun.
Two guests present were:
Martha Ward. whose hobby is
her grandchildren. She's been mar-
ried 44 years on July 3. She adds
that her husband didn't want to
marry on July 4 because he didn't
want to give up his independence.
She also loves to can fruits and
vegetables.
Margie Cole: was a Spanish
teacher at the Aucilla Christian
Academy. She is now taking a re-
prieve to care for her mother.
A delightful luncheon of pasta
dishes with bite sized cheesecakes
for dessert was served.


Queen Mum Minnie Stokley re-
minded the ladies that the Red Hats
are expected to make a great show-
ing at the Watermelon Festival
Fashion Show and Luncheon hosted
by the Monticello Woman's Club.
Red Hat ladies from Perry, Talla-
hassee, Madison, and surrounding
areas have been planning to attend.
Tables have been reserved and red
hats are to be worn so as to find
each other in the soldout crowd.
She also made mention that ladies,
again dressed in their decorated red
hats, will meet at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday, June 18 to watch the pa-
rade, on the south steps of the court-
house.
The parade is scheduled to begin
at 10 a.m. at the Capital City Bank'
on South Jefferson Street.
The July meeting of the Red Hats
of America will be at the Toscoga
Market Place on South Broad Street
in Thomasville, GA.
Ladies interested in attending will
meet at 11 a.m. in the Dunn's Furni-
ture plaza and car pool to the loca-
tion together to dine and shop.

Tolbert On
Dean's List
William Tolbert of Monticello has
been named to the Dean's List for
the spring semester at Thomas Uni-
versity, Thomasville, GA.
Full time students who earn a
grade point average of 3.5 to 3.99
are recognized on the Dean's List.


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and Nancy Kinnee. (News Photo)


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Congratulations

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i1c, 0,







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005


I- Barn Dance, Barbecue

Draws Good Crowd


ENCORE BAND entertained for the Willow
Pond Barn Dance. Members include, from
left: Frank Purvis, Dr. Robert (Mike) Purvis,


COUPLES ENJOYED the Barbecue and Barn
Dance held for the first time as a Melon
Festival Event. Clyde Simpson reports the


'. i .. "

Rick Weatherby, Wendell Purvis, and Ronnie
Weeks.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Rusty Rooster Dance Hall at
Willow Pond was rocking and roll-
ing Friday evening to the music of
the Encore Band.
"The barn dance and barbecue were
a new addition to the Watermelon
Festival Events this year, and drew
an enthusiastic crowd, which lin-
gered on after the band finished its
engagement.
Some 102 people enjoyed a buffet
of chicken and ribs, with side dishes
-of baked beans, corn-on-the-cob,
and cole slaw.
The hall was decorated in Rusty
Rooster style, with ornate bandana
center pieces topping the tables.
Elvis made another of his festival
appearances and executed a few
fancy dance steps on the floor.
The Encore Band, and its local tal-
ent kept the crowded dance floor
hopping throughout the evening.
"The place was still alive with
people up to an hour after the band
stopped playing," Clyde Simpson
relates.

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event was a success and plans to make it an
annual event.


"There was a lot of dancing going
on, and everyone seemed to be hav-
ing a great time," he added.
Attendees were treated to horse
drawn carriage rides around the
canopied lanes of Willow Pond.
"This was a successful event and
we will continue to make this an an-
nual barn dance and barbecue,on the
first Friday of the Watermelon Fes-
tival," Simpson pledged.


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Sports


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ONTCLL, (L), EWS FRI, sr 1, 20s r 9


Festival Softball

Tourney Postponed


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Because of the threat of severe
weather posed by Topical Storm
Arlene last weekend, the 29th An-
nual Watermelon Festival Softball
Tournament was rescheduled for
Saturday, July 9.
The tournament will begin at 8
,a.m. in the Recreation Park.
The 12 men's teams competing in
:the double-elimination event were
determined over a month ago.


Last year's event saw some 200-
300 spectators and lasted into the
wee hours of the morning, with
many participants camping in tents
while awaiting their turns on the
,field.
Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman expects a similar number of
spectators again this year.
The previous tournament saw a
grueling battle ongoing for many.
hours, with 125 players receiving
watermelons for each homerun
scored.
Team Footlong of Tallahassee
won the 2004 tournament.


RECEIVING AWARDS at the Recreation Park
Spring Sports Ceremony, was the Bishop
Farms T- Ball team. Jake Edwards, MVP;


s ..,, ,




Jenni Jackson, sportsmanship; Austin Wil-
ford, most improved.


The season kicks off Aug. 26,'
with a yet to be determined oppo-
nent.
Action continues against Hamil-
ton County, Sept. 2, there; Florida
high, Sept., 9, here; Dixie County,
Sept. 16, there, Trenton, Sept. 23,
there; and Hawthorne, Sept. 30,
here.
Bronson is slated for Oct. 7,
there; Branfoi-d, Oct. 14, here; La-
fayette, Oct. 21, here; Hilliard, Oct.
28, there; and the final face off of
the regular 2005 season, Taylor
County, Nov. 4, here.


SFRAN HUNT
'Staff Writer
Though football season doesn't
begin until, August, Jefferson
County High Schopol, former Ath-
' letic Director Jeff Schaum set the
schedule for Fall of 2005 and 2006,
prior to his resignation.
For the 2005 session:
The first practice will be held
Aug. 1 with pre season scrimmages
scheduled for Aug. 18-20.
All game times are at 7:30 p.m ...


JACKSON'S DRUGS softball team players Emily Howell, most improved; Tori Self,
and awards include: Skyler Hanna, MVP; sportsmanship. (News Photos)


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3.5 Tennis Team Game Rained Out


In the June 10 edition of the
News, the men's 3.5 tennis team
was inadvertently referred to as the
7.0 tennis team.
The season for the ,6.0 and 0
teams has drawn to a close.
'However, the men were to face
off for second place in the league
this week, but that game was rained
out.
"We're going to try to make it up
Thursday," said team captain Doug
Wainright. "If we can't make it up,
we'll have to scratch it."
If the game is not made up, the
Monticello men will wrap up the
season at third place of nine teams.
Members of the team include
Wainright, John Moore. Brad
Mueller,, Ted Strauss, Duke Harri-
son, Tyler Arrington, Dann) Jack-



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Church League'
Softball Action
Set To Begin :

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Eight teams have committed Io
play in the church softball league,
and action was set to begin Thurs-
day.
Coordinator Nick Flynt said
though teams signing up for the
season got off to a particularly sloYw
start, a sufficient number signed Op
to form the league.
Flynt had determined a schedule,
but it had to be reworked when
several more teams joined the
league, adding more games to tihe
season.
Teams committing include two
teams from Christ Episcopal, Eliza-
beth Baptist, Elizabeth AME, Be-
thel AME, Casa Bianca -Baptist.
Calvary Baptist and New Jerusale'm
Missionary Baptist.
. The schedule \\ ill be forthcoming
as soon as it is finalized

Fencers Lose
TO Cabo's
By Forfeit
The Waukeenah Fence & Decl
coed softball team were not able to:
play its two most recent scheduled
games.
While the game against Sonny's
BBQ was rained out and has to be
rescheduled, the game scheduled
against Cabo's Islanders v. as lost by
the Fencers, due to forfeit. "
Team Coach Nick.Flint quipped
about the circumstdfiicd in the se2-
ond game.
"We had to forfeit because only
five of our players showed up'jo
play," said Flynt.
"After we forfeited the game,
three more players showed up,
which would have given us enough
people to pla v. ith, but it was too
late then."
The Fencers will square off-
against the Cubs,. June 20, 7:454
p.m. on field two. W


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005

Senator Al Lawson Speaks

TO Democratic Committee


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Senator Al Lawson was the guest
speaker at the Jefferson County
Democratic Executive Committee
meeting, Tuesday evening.
Lawson's roots run deep in North
Florida. He was born in Midway, lo-
cated between Tallahassee and
Quincy and attended Northside High
School in Gadsden County.
He earned his BA. Degree from
FAMU, and a Masters Degree in
Public Administration from FSU.
!Lawson has been a member of the
Flprida Legislature for 23 years.,
As a strong voice for Jefferson
County and the City of Monticello,
in' the last session alone, Lawson
w4s instrumental in the appropria-
tidn of more than half a million dol-
lats for the City's septic tank
abatement project in the Cooper's
Pond subdivision; the same amount
to assist the County. in renovating
the old high school buildings for use
as ]county- offices; and a .quarter of a
million dollars to purchase TMH's


LAWSON
old doctor's office for use by the
Health Department as a dental
clinic.
Commenting about the above
funding, Lawson said: "And do you
know how this came about?
"II never paid special attention to
- Jefferson CounrN but when a local


M


delegation met with me and ex-
plained its needs, I realized that
these are people who are passionate
about what they need, and they let
me know that.
"Now Jefferson County is top pri-.
ority with me," he continued.
Lawson stated that Democrats
have the will to win in North Florida
elections, but need to be recognized
to get the necessary votes.
Electing a Democratic Governor
is a top priority for the party, and
the way to make this happen is with
a grassroots efforts to register voters;
and get that message out there, he.
said.
"Democrats need to find out what
citizens really care about, and work
to address those issues," Lawson,
said. -
"We need to field the best candi-
dates," he stressed.
"Set standards, and quiz candi-
dates accordingly. Often many peo-
ple will run for a position.
"If they are not up to par, let them
kno% that the\ are not good for the
pamr at this time,,.and help get the'
-best qualified candidate out there,"


he said.
He advocated creating a forum
for Democratic candidates for Gov-
ernor, to allow them to state their
positions and be questioned on
them.
These include: Jim Davis, Scott
Maddox, and Rod Smith, to date.
Lawson also reported that Demo-
crats were largely responsible for
the tax free days to purchase Hurri-
cane supplies.
"Democrats are responsible, care
about family values, education and a
strong work ethic," he said.
Water is a critical issue on the ho-
rizon, "because we want to keep our
pristine waters in North Florida,"
Lawson said.
He also noted that the Seat Belt
Law, and the regulation of sexual
predators were simmering issues.
In other business, the committee
voted to donate $100 towards the
annual July 4 Fireworks
Celebration.
Chair Eleanor Hawkins noted that
some 100 letters were sent out to
newly registered voters.
The Book Sale held at.the library,
recently, brought in $750.
Hawkins reported that another
$555 is needed to complete the
$2,000 raised for the first and sec-
ond quarters.
The Florida Democratic Party will
-then match the T.OtOO


The Committee will staff booth Ii Ii
#25 at the Melon Festival this week-
end, and distribute free water and
information about candidates, and
register people to vote.U


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Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
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ready for immediate
delivery
Need a book or
products? call
Cricket Edwards,
Ind. Sales Rep.


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Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile.,e
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


Thurman
Tractor
Service
I Mowing
,BB|Harrowing
Food Plots
Licensed & Insured
James Thurman, LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


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I mm


11









VFW Post 251 Attends

Dedication Of Florida's

WW II Monument
home.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Several members of the Veterans-
of Foreign Wars Post 251 attended
the recent dedication ceremony of
the Florida's World War II Monu-
ment, in Tallahassee.
The monument is the fifth and fi-
nal component of the Florida
World War II Memorial honoring
then 248,000 Floridians who
served in uniform during World
War II and the 330,000 World war
II veterans who now call Florida


The monument's stone is cut
from the same quarry, carved by
the same stonemason and bears the
same oak and wheat wreaths as the
pillars of the national monument.
The central pillar of Florida's
World war II monument is an exact
replica of the Florida pillar at the
National World War II Memorial in
Washington, DC.
Gov. Jeb Bush was the guest
speaker at the dedication, and Flor-
ida Secretary of State Glenda Hood
was among the speakers.
The inscription on the monun-


800-363-4851
www.carshelpingpeople.org
V// Volunteers
S" of America*
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ment reads:
"Florida's World War II Monu-
ment, Florida remembers World
War II, December 7, 1941 to Sep-
tember2, 1945.
"This monument is dedicated to
the 248,000 Floridians who served
in the Armed Forces of the United
States' in World War II, especially
the more than 4,600 Floridians who
gave their lives in the service of the
country.
"The 67 county plaques depict the
sacrifices and contributions of lo-
cal Floridians to the World War II
effort.
"A grateful state and nation re-
member their sacrifices in the name
of freedom.
"World war II had a tremendous -
impact on Florida, from the threat
of German submarines off the coast
to the establishment of more thand-
200 military bases and sites around


the state.
"Floridians served and fought in
military campaigns around the
World including North Africa,
Italy, France, Germany, and
throughout the Atlantic and Pacific
theaters.
"Americans owe an extraordinary
debt to the.World War II veterans
who served the country, and to
those citizens who contributed on
the home front.
"We must remember their in-
domitable spirit, exceptional com-
mitment, and willing sacrifices in
this war which preserved today's
freedoms."
Post 251 veterans attending the
ceremony included John Nelson,
Sr.,. Henry McKinney, Sr., Dennis
Gallon, Henry McKinney, Jr., Le-
roy Reese, Cleveland Frazier, Tho-
mas Sanders, Benjamin Kirksey,
- King James Williams, Rev. Ceola
Woodson arid Raymond Henry.


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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TV. '
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005 PAGE 11




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Fax: (850) 997-7450
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Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Rei


Got an


member to complete the survey

idea? Have a concern?'

"Please Join Me In Helping g
to luild a YMCA in Jefferson County"

Gene Hall
County Commissioner


(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or.
ghallboard@yahoo.com


FREE CRYSTAL LIGHTER W/CT PURCHASE. WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURER'S COUPON. I ______ _


1400 S. Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida 32344
Phone (850) 997-2519 FAX (850) 997-0692


*Tractors *Ditch Witch *Backhoe *Construction
Canisters *Pressure Washers *Power Tool
*Much more

*Browning Carolina
Snake Boots- Work Boots-Casual


- I' S


RWA4W


Pam Bowling
Broker Associate
997-4789
1-888-701-2205
www.pamb@nettally.com


77.e bei b- ha ,fn an t ghb-rh- o



Pat Gaver
Mortgage Loan Originator
(850) 894-1488 (888) 833-7514
Fax: (850) 894-4970
Cell: (850) 509-2768
palrickgaver@peoplesfirst.comn
* Florida Housing Bond Program
* TLC Program
* 100% Lending
* 80/20 Programs


Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service is Our Business
on and off the Road"
Edd Keaton
Travis Keaton
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336
850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


S I- 1


Progress Energy
People Performance Exlcellence .
0s..,, ,c '


800-700-8744


progress-energy.com


Come Fly
With Me
Sunrise or Sunset
584-8867
Aerial Photo's
Rides
Lumart Aviation


DAN BURCH
Pressure Cleaning LLC

Licensed Bonded
Insured
Residential
&
Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
997-4100
www.danburch.us


Border 2 Border


Lawn & Landscaping

Mention This
I Ad & Receive I
A 10% o
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11025 East Mahan
877-4550


GLENN GRIFFIN
L.L.C. Co.
GRADING FOR LANDSCAPING
Driveway Instillation &
Repair Light Clearing For
Construction
30 + years experience

850-997-9947
Call 508-7071


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-5808
850-545-9964
850-251-2911


155 JOHN
CouLINs R).


K Strong ront Quanliy i' out f P.
Your 24 hr Service Hotline:
ENSON'S 562-3132 .
44gNMR CONDITIONINGl --j-,
1. 24 hour Service, 7-days Why wait when you don't have to? Call now, 'B/l J d St, tors
2. Your Brand and Your System repaired right by skilled, neat technicians. s anS bt er
3. Free Energy Survey for new systems can save you big. ""
No obligation!
4. Two-year repair warranty Mosi stop at 30 days! Benson's "
repairs stay repaired!
5. 10-Year warranty on new systems installed to our
exacting standards.
6. Easy 'lnancing to suit you! Just call. "
7. Freely Air Quality Check -Let us check what's
in your air for your health. C Tia
8. Up front pricing No surprises, just honesty- C a "Today
Ja.i cll and we'll iiii pilim the way it should be. ( 0 3t M a5
the curing comfortof Benson's. ( 3/2 E-5826
FI CALL FURG .a F..oer.0.yers.tho.and.hae..ou.


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Tractor Work Bush
Hogging
Road Grading
Driveway Repair
Front End Loader-

850-997-1461
Bill Burger


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005

GULF COAST ,
METAL
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S3' WIDE PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDE 5V
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WE HA VE METAL BUILDINWiS
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available
(.'Ino In, \t r de.r ['ed I ri'nt ltte // 'i ,'.' ,S'e'/ru A 'filt hh'
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.


Race Against Time --
Without a life-saving shock from an '
AED, a device that can help restore the
heart's normal rhythm, cardiac arrest
victims' chances of survival drop 10
percent per minute.

To learn more about AEDs (automated
external defibrillators) and CPR courses
in your community, call 1-877-AHA-4CPR.


IN Lcense/ 2216
P0 8ox 729.Mi Aiy. NC


Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
manatees.
myfwc.org/psm


Sat., July 9, Noon
200 Acres
Will Sell in 5t Acre Tracts


Sales Manager is B. Mark Rogers
For Terms & Listing Contact
www.rogersrealty.com or
Call 336-789-2926


Creating aSAVINGS
New Century
Savings. BONDS
-


LEGAL
Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEARBY GIVEN, that Sheila L.
Erstling Trust the holder of the following
certificates has filed said certificates for a
tax deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the de-
scription of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows: Cer-
tificate No. 629 Year of Issuance 1998 De-
scription or Property Lot 6 of AUCILLA
PLANTATION SUBDIVISION, Unit III, a
subdivision, as per the plat thereof filed at
Plat Book "B", page 65, of the Public Re-
cords of Jefferson County, Florida. Name
in which assessed Donald Crocker. All of
said property being in the County. of Jef-
ferson, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate or certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in
such certificate or certificates will be sold
to the highest bidder at the court house
door on the 30th day of June, 2005, at
11:00 a.m. Dated this 26th day of May,
2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida.
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, c


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Licensed & Insured

Member of Tallahassee
Chamber of Commerce


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CAPITOL CITY BANK, Plaintiff ,vs.
EVA KRMOIAN, RAUL ALFONSO
FLOREZ, and UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
EVA KRMOIAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Jefferson County
Florida: Lot 30, Block D, of Aucilla Shores
Subdivision, a subdivision, a subdivision
as per the plat thereof filed at Plat Book B,
Page 38, of the Public Record of Jefferson
County, has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B.
BOWDEN, the plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is Gardner, Wadsworth, Duggar,
Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood
Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, on or
before June 10th, 2005 (within 30 days of
first publication), and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before
service on the plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
DATED June 2nd, 2005. DALE BOAT-
WRIGHT, Clerk of the Circuit Court.
6/10, 6/17, c
Divorce $275-$350* Covers children, etc.
Only one signature required! *Excludes
govt. Fees! Call weekdays (800)462-2000,-
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce Tech. Estab-
lished 1977
6/17, fcan
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL JUVE-
NILE DIVISION CASE NO.: 04-18-DPA
IN THE INTEREST OF J.J. 02/06/2004
MINOR CHILD NOTICE OF ACTION
TO Jessie Joiner and Unknown Father
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills
Road, Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above
styled court for the termination of paren-
tal rights and the permanent commitment
of J.J., a male child born on 2/06/2004 in
Leon County, Florida to the State of Flor-
ida, Department of Children and Families,
Adoption and Related Services a licensed
child placing agency, for subsequent adop-
tion and you are hereby to be and appear
in the above court at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, County Courthouse, Room
10, Monticello, Fla. 32344 on Tuesday
June 28th at 9:00 a.m. for Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing and to
show cause why said petition should not be
granted. You must appear on the date and
time specified. FAILURE TO PERSON-'.
ALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY.
HEARING CONSTITUTES YOUR CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PA-
RENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF
YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE ,
AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE
CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.,
WITNESS my hand and official seal as the
Magistrate of said court this 24th day of
May, 2005. /s/ this matter was referred to
a Magistrate.
5/27, 6/3, 10, 17, c


Cambridge Manor,


El











CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$Sl.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
i997-3568


M~LPWND


Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners is seeking applicants
for Staff Assistant in the department
of Emergency Management. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Room 10, County
Courthouse, M1ontkcllo. Florida.
Salary range is s8,4S"0.00 27,705.60.
Minimum qualilic:uiitm4 are:
Knowledge of business English,
spelling and punctua.ioi. Knowledge
of mathematics. Ability to gain
knowledge of the unli'% pohcits,
procedures and taiidees. Ability to
establish and maintain cflectii e
working relationships with employees
and the public. Ability to access, input
and retrieve information from a
computer. Ability to communicate
using writing, speaking, hearing and
visual skills. Ability to type at the rate
of 35 correct words per minute. Skill
in the operation of a PC, keyboard
and typewriter. Skill in the use of
dictation or of transcription from a
dicta phone (if required). Availability
to travel to attend training classes and
meetings. Education and experience
needed: High School graduation or
possession of an .acceptable
equivalency diploma. Two (2) years
work experience involving staff
assistant duties including the
operation of a personal computer,
keyboard, or similar data entry
equipment. (A comparable amount of
training, education or experience may
be substituted for the above minimum
qualifications)/ Applications will be
accepted until.Tuesday, June 28, 2005
at 4:00 P.M. At the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employee. Drug Free Workplace.
Drug testing is a required part of
preemployment physical. Applicants
with a disability should contact the
above office for accommodations.
6/15-22, c
Immediate opening for elderly care.
850-570-8746 ask for Janet.
6/17, 22, 24, 29, c
Drillers Helper. Great pay and
benefits. Must be able to travel. Clean
Fl-drivers license, CDL a plus. Drug
Free, EOE, 800-487-9665.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
person to 1317 So. Jefferson ST.
6/10, tfn
Truck Driver Wanted. Class B.
Contact Local Deliveries. Judson
Freeman @ 997-2519.
6/10, tfn

Driver Conventant Transport.
Teams and Solos check our new pay
plan. Owner Operators, Experienced
Drivers, Solos, Teams and Graduate
Students. Call (888) MORE PAY (1
-888 667 -3729).
6/17, fcan
Monticello Christian Academy Now
interviewing for Elementary &
Middle School Teachers. Call Pastor
Mike. 997-3906; 294-1006
tfn, c, s/d 5/27
Busy boarding kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
5/18, tfn


Great earning potential! Only $10.00
start-up fee!! Make all your dreams
come true $250.00 Fast start bonus.
Call B.J. at (850)584-6289.
5/27, 6/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
S/E & 3 STATE RUN: T/T Drivers.
Home Weekends. Mileage Pay,
Benefits, 401K. Trainees Welcome /
Miami area exp. Req. 21 min
age/Class A CDL Cypress Truck
Lines (800)545-1351.
6/17, fcan
Data Entry Work on Your Own.
Flexible Hours! $$$Great Pay$$$
Personal Computer required.
(800)873-0345 ext #300.
6/17, fcan


GARA GE SA LES


Saturday, June 18, 990 East Dogwood
St. 9 until, misc. Items.
6/17, pd

FOUND 1-.
Jack Russell, tri color. Neutered male
found in W.D. parking lot. Call Vet
Associates 997-0229.
6/17, 22,

FREE:
Free 2 year old tan lab (male); 8 year old
black lab mix (spayed). Moving. 997-8604
or 519-0277.
6/17, 22, pd



3br,2 Bath & much more. Reno ated
and ready! 251-0760 or
www.blueradish.biz
6/10,s/d,tfn

WANTED
Looking to lease acreage with 2 houses,
horse barn and fenced pastures.
850-443-6075 or 850-212-2685.
6/10, 15,17, 22, pd


SERVICES

Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is designed to
curb the appetite, burn fat and increase
energy levels resulting in considerable
weight loss over time. Hoodiacol consist of
3 key ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to give it a
palpable taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oiL Hoodia gordonii is a
cactus found in the Kalahari. Desert of,
South Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite but
increases the sense of satiety. This tends to
limit total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger. Significant
weight loss should result from such a drop
in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names,, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
Equine Sports Massage Therapy for
the high performance horse and rider.
Contact Angela Boland at 591-1728 to
schedule a home, barn, or show call.
6/15, 17, pd
D&S REPAIRS- 997-4015, 4189.
Small engines,. tractors, outboards,
ATV's, etc.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd


FOR SALE ,

FORMAL DINING ROOM Brand
new cherry table with 6 chairs and
lighted china cabinet. $3K retail, sell
for $999. 850-425-8374
6/3, tfn

MATTRESS SET New full set with
factory warranty, $99, call
850-222-7783
6/3, tfn

NEW QUEEN mattress and base.
Never used, in unopened plastic.
Must sell $125. 850-545-7112
6/3, tfn


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TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT





Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: July 11
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 ww.cbldccom


" GREENVILLE-- affordiable starter
home in town, 1.75 acre lot. S42,500
* Quiet Residential Area: remodeled
home, vinyl and brick with fenced
backyard, Nobles Subdivision
$101,900
* ECONFINA RIVER- two lodges
near the river landing, will sell to-
gether or separately.
* COOPER'S POND- spacious home
huge master suite, 4BR/3BA, privacy
fenced backyard with pool. $174,900

Many Others Available


FOR SA E '--i --
Old pocket watches Cast iron 2
rifles. 997-6693.
6/17, pd
King size bedroom suite & bedding
included $500. Beautiful 5pc wicker
set w/custom seats & pillows $800.
Large metal desk $50. Desk chair
$50. Rocker and rocking foot stool
$60. Table & chairs $75. Stereo
cabinet $20. 997-2512.
6/15, 17, pd
INTEX 6.5 HP generator; 4500/3250
watts. Used once. New $650; now just
$550. 997-8604.
6/17, 22, pd
1987 Suzuki Samurai JX, 4wd
convertible 190k mi., runs OK, CD
player, fiberglass top, toolbox, new 8"
suspension (Rancho), new 33" mud
tires, new 15x10 steel wheels, LOW
gears, rear Lock-Right locker, other
goodies. Needs some work, but
unbelievable off-road! $1800 obo.
Call 997-4253 between 6 pm-9pm
M-F, 9am-9pm Sat-Sun.
3/25 tfn
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
6/17, fcan
Queen mattress set, double pillow top.
New in plastic with warranty. $150.
850-425-8374
6/3, tfn
6 Pc. Full/queen bedroom set. New
boxes, sacrifice $550. 850-222-7783
6/3 tfn
Cherry Sleigh Bed $250. Brand new,
solid wood. 850-222-9879
6/3 tfn
New leather sofa and love seat. $750,
can deliver. 850-222-2113
6/3 tfn
2-3 RIB Front tires for 8 in Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50.00 4 P225/6 or
16 Mich. Tires $40, 997-0135
tfn
New Bedroom Set: Beautiful cherry
Louis Philippe 8-piece wood King
sleigh bed, dresser, mirror, chest, 2'
night stands. Sug. List $4600, sell
$150. 850-545-71 12.
6/3, tfn
NEW Brand Name King Mattress
Set, $250, in factory plastic.
warranty. 850-425-8374
6/3, tfn


3 bd/2 bath mobile home. Screened in
front porch on Rabon Rd. $490.
997-5607.
6/10, 15, pd
Shop/Warehouse Space. Four large
roll-up doors. 1200 sq ft with
standard utilities included. Easy
.access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
August 1st. Call 997-4150.


1951 Plymouth Cranbrook, 4dr good
shape & runs. Asking $3900.
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9a-4p).
6/8, tfn

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
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All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
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6/17, fcan
#1 cash cow! 90 vending machine
units/You OK locations entire business
$10,670 Hurry! (800)836-3464.
6/17, fcan
Professional Vending Route and
Equipm ent. Brand name products,
all sizes. Financing Available w/
$7,500 down. (877)543-8726
6/17, fcan
$50,000 Free Cash Grants 2005!..
Never Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business, $49 Billion left
unclaimed from 2004. Live
Operators! (800)856-9591 EXT #105
6/17, fcan

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LE.\DER ,
878-3957



Over 55 and
Unemployed?

Interested in working in the
healthcare field?
If you qualify, Experience Works
has paid CNA. training and job
opportunity funded by grants
from SBA.

Call Georgia at

850-973-9922

A national nonprofit
organization. EEO/AA
"These U.S. Small Business Administra-
tion (SBA) Grant Awards. #SBAHQ-02-1-
'0034 and #SBAHQ-03-1-0058, care funded
by the SBA. SBA funding is not opinions
or services. All SBA funded programs are
extended to the public on a non discrimi-
natory basis."


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com 1

Under Contract-Great Cash Flow for
the Investor Apartment House cur-
rently 5 could be 7, unit apartment build- i
ing, great potential as a bed and break-
fast with suites $240,000
Beautiful Home on a Sweet Mountian
Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted
pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field all very conven-
ient to Tallahassee for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to i
-$40 ,000 '
S n aer Contractr-The Price is Riqht!
2acres high and dry in Aucilla Forest and
Meadows $7,500
Under Contract -Look- Unusual ]
Opportunity!!! On Waukeenah Highway
easy access to Tallahassee high, dry,
fenced and ready to build on, great for
horses or cattle $8,500 per acre
Price Reduced Like new home, built in '
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$169,500 don't miss it!
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big I
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location north of Greenville
only $295,000
Under Contract-Terrific New Listinall
3 bedroom 2 bath double wide with new
gal alum roof and vinyl siding 3 sheds,
fish pond on 2.4 acres and only $86,500
Under Contract-Saddle Up Six very
nice acres mostly fenced pasture nice 9
location near Lamont $40,000 I
Under Contract-Fulford Road 4 bed- 1
room 2 bath home with garage, out build-
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres in the
Country $76,500
Don't Miss this One -South Main Ave
west of Monticello off US 90 on paved
county road five wooded acres with well
and septic tank $85,000
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000 '
Great Buy big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property SOLD On US 90 in J
town Retail space, warehouse and resi- g
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340 V.
See all our listings with maps at L
www.TimPeary.com

We have qualified buyers looking 1
for acreage between Monticello and
Lloyd can you help?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Buyers looking for Homes and Land
..,=j-v-i-.eB-'r-B-------<-.-i-f-B-r-Bs--- -- s=--








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 17, 2005

Dawn, Doug Stiff's Flower

Garden True Work Of Art


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Ever since last spring, a growing-
nurimber of people have been coming
to Dawn and Doug Stiffs place off
the Ashville Highway to view their
flower garden during its peak of
glory in April and May.
- It's not just the flowers that make
the Stiffs' garden special, beautiful
and exquisite as are the amaryllises,
itises, lilies, petunias and other mul-
ticolored varieties that fill up the
~ ~ [ @]f'j$* ''' ^if* F"T SlVh.tW


DOUG AND DAWN STIFF stroll
den awash in color.


quarter-or-so-acre area. It's also the
hard work, personal touch and his-
toric elements that are incorporated
into the garden and that give it spe-
cial significance.
"He's a scavenger," Dawn says of
husband Doug.
An independent and well-known
tree cutter in the county (Dawn is a
longtime "deputy clerk with the
Clerk of Courts), Doug is an invet-
erate collector of old things.
Hence, the different materials and
objects that give the garden and the
surrounding structures their special


the brick paths in their gar-


meaning.
Take the iron trellis that forms one
of the entrances to the garden. It
came from the house of Doug's
mother in Miami, circa 1958.
Then there's the thousands of
bricks that make up the various
pathways that traverse and define
the garden.
Doug and Dawn salvaged these
from various historic buildings in
the county, including the old train
depot on Old Monticello Road. The
two then hand scraped and cleaned
the mortar from each brick, before
installing each in concrete that they
hand mixed.
Finally, there's the two structures
-- one a combination
gymnasium/tool shop and the other
a gazebo -- that flank the garden.
The Stiffs constructed these from
trees that Doug cut and had milled
for the purpose.
A connoisseur of fine woods,
Doug will point out the various
woods in the interior walls, includ-
ing red cedar, red cherry, black wal-
nut, heartwood pine and pecan --
each piece laminated to a glossy
shine with a coat of varnish-like
paint.
Then there's the collection of old
hand tools that line the walls and the
collection of soda and other bottles
that Doug has amassed through the
years.
"I used to be a bottle collector for
years and years," he says, showing
off some of his prized possessions.
"I used to scour the woods looking
for things."
Give Doug a chance and he will
tell you the story behind each piece
of wood, object or planting.
But back to the garden. It takes
the Stiffs about six weeks to weed
and get the garden ready for its peak
showing each year, according to
Dawn. All told, the two remove
about two truckloads of weeds, she
says.
And how did she and Doug get
started in the whole gardening
thing?
It started about eight years ago,
Dawn says. She started planting
flowers around a dogwood near the
house and it grew from there.
"I had never planted anything be-
fore that," she says.
Next thing, Doug started bringing
plants and other objects home and
the two kept adding them to the gar-
den, eventually putting in the brick
paths, an irrigation system and the
various decorative elements.
There appears to be no end to the
project either, not so long as Doug
continues collecting found objects
and folks' keep coming out to the
property to admire the Stiffs' grow-
ing handiwork.


THIS TRELLIS marks an entrance to the story from the home of Doug's mother, circa
Stiff Garden. It appears to be made of iron 1958
which may be the one mentioned in the


'. -'


....,o ~ ~ ~ a~q
4

(~.
.1


THOUSANDS of bricks line the paths of the
Stiff's Garden and represent many hours of
aMi.411111"Bamkf..il.i ~'^w'sillil!"WSf-f TSi


THIS fountain in the Garden is surrounded
by grasses and colorful flowers. It takes the
couple about six weeks to weed the garden


collecting them from historic buildings and
cleaning them before using the bricks.

I VII 4 7


and about two truckloads of weeds. (News
Photos)


SKAEBORD AM
We *I El. Agst21
Mese ParkISkteboar Parkk


THIS Arbor frame is one of the many objects the Stiffs
have collected and used in their unique garden. (News
Photos)

r- ------ ------------------ --
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'lW SPECIALS
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Call (850)926-GOLF (4653) for Tee Times No,,t'. t ,1 int


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(850)32 1
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6-02-05


THE EASY WAY TO SELL, PLACE YOUR AD IN
THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THE:
MONTICELLO NEWS CALL


997-3568
.L.., J LI I I .I 4, I4 .f:EI


MOBLEY'S MEAT


We do it right..
Everytime!
STEAKS
CHOPS



McAltin, FL.
(386) 963-52.15


Days Inn

of Monticello


US 19 & I-10 exit 225
US 19 Monticello



997-5988







Best Wishes to the
Watermelon Festival


EYE $avers

Robert R. Assantes, O.D.

Family Eye Care at Affordable Prices

=> Comprehensive Eye Examinations
=> Contact Lenses
Treatment of Eye Injuries & Eye Disease
Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid, V.S.P.,
ECPA, PPC, HMO, HPSE



997-4772


1315 S. Jefferson St. *Monticello, FL
Open Mon. & Wed.


--[[lllliLl.i ILII. Iia.111111JIIIIIIrlI.LL.L.L_[_-L,J.-LJJ--L


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