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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00047
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 15, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00047
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



LID2ARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UniVERSITY OF FLORIDA




Legion Names
Four To
Boys' State

Story, Page 6


Early Childhood
Development
Eyed

Editorial, Page 4


Wednesday Morning





Montic


- -T A 1-3 XnT"* A V rr9I.rO.M


137TH YEAR NO.4/,DU5,P CENTS_________


Recreation Park
Spring Sports
Award Ceremony

Story, Photos, Page 9


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


City Resident
Threatens Suit
Over Sewer Gas

Story, Page 12


ews
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


Alana Chambers



Crowned Melon



Festival Queen


JESSYLN JOYNER, outgoing Watermelon
Festival Queen, crowns Alana Chambers
2005 Queen. Chambers will represent the


County events such as Tallahassee bpring-
time and the Perry Forest Festival. (News
Photo)


School Grades Rise At


HMS, JCHS, Fall At JES


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


The School District learned last.
week the Jefferson Elementary
School dropped from a C to an F on
the Annual School Report Card.
Howard Middle School rose to a C
from a D, the grade it held for 2003
and 2004.
Jefferson County High School
-rose to a D from the F it earned last
-year.
While all of the school principals
are attending a mandatory state con-
ference for administrators in Or-
Slando, Superintendent, Phil Barker
-'stated Monday:
"We are terribly disappointed at
the drop in grade from C to F at
-JES.
"Likewise we are delighted at the
rise to a C at HMS, after two years
of D grades. We all congratulate
Principal Juliet Jackson for her hard
work and dedication.
"We are pleased that JCHS is now
off the F list, though we realize a
grade of D must be improved."
Barker said that tutoring for stu-
dents earning Level I (lowest level)
in Reading is ongoing this summer
through state funding.
The state did not fund the same
program in math, but the district
-found funding to tutor level I stu-
dents in Math, also during the sum-
mer.


-JES--F

HMS--C

JCHS--D


"What really hurt us," Barker said,
"is that funding cuts forced us to
eliminate Reading Resource Teach-
ers which we used in previous
years."
Barker also said that every effort
will be made to find a way to pull
level I and level 2 students from
regular classes for additional reme-
diation, when school resumes, in an
effort to improve the scores.
He also explained that even
though percentages cited below in-
dicate improvement in many areas,
the question is, how much improve-
ment was made?
"A student two or more years be-
hind, may improve a year, but this
improvement is not enough, and
hurts the overall grade," he said.
School Grades are based on how
well students have mastered the
Sunshine State Standards (skills
Florida teachers determined children
must learn at each grade level.)
These are measured by the FCAT.


Schools earn points based on:.
how well students are doing; how
much progress they are making
(learning gains); and how much pro-
gress struggling readers are making
(since reading is essential to success
in all subject areas.)
DOE reports that:
At Jefferson Elementary School,
the F grade is calculated by adding
points from each of the performance
areas listed below.
In Reading:
*53 percent of students read at or
above grade .level.
*52 percent of students made a
year's worth of progress in reading.
*42 percent of struggling students
made a year's worth of progress in
reading.
These statistics indicate that stu-
dents with disabilities at JES need
improvement in reading.
In math:
*35 percent of students are at or
above grade level in math.
*40 percent of students are mak-
ing a year's worth of progress in
math.
These statistics indicate that stu-
dents with disabilities, African
American, and Economically Disad-
vantaged students at JES need im-
provement in math.
In writing:
*44 percent of students are meet-
ing state standards in writing.
(See District School Page 2)


.. -. -
..



NAVY BAND COLOR GUARD, along with the Band performed a concert after the Parade.
Marine Marching Band provided music for (News Photo)
the 2004 Melon Festival Parade. The Marine


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Alana Chambers was crowned
2005 Watermelon Festival Queen,
Saturday, by outgoing Queen
Jesslyn Joyner.
In addition, she was named Miss
Photogenic, a new award this year,
and received the award for the Best
Evening Gown.
Charlsie Boyatt was named first
runner-up, and received the Best
Talent Award.
Lindsey Scott was chosen second
runner-up.
Chevarra Ulee was named Miss
Congeniality .
Despite the earlier downpour, a
large audience filled JCHS audito-
rium, and the spirit of anticipation
was high.
As the young ladies scurried
around backstage preparing for
their opening number, Elvis made a
brief appearance and walked
through the auditorium.
At the stroke of 7 p.m., the lights
dimmed and Co-chairs Roslyn Bass
and Ginni Joiner, introduced the
MC's for the evening, Channel 6
Meteorologist Rob Nucatola, ac-
companied by his wife, Ann.
The electricity crackled as the dy-
namic pair took the stage.
. As the curtain opened for the
opening number, the music "I'm
Every Woman" by Whitney Hous-
ton began to play on cue. Each
young lady wore black slacks, with
tops in vibrant colors ranging from
blue to green, pink, yellow and red.
Joyner, 2004 Watermelon Queen,
sang "Legacy", thrilling the crowd
as contestants prepared for the tal-
ent competition.
First in the talent competition was
Carmen Skipworth, reciting the
poem "I Can Achieve" by Tiffany
Ransom.
She began by performing a short
skit portraying her being turned
down in a job interview, then re-
cited the poem, dramatizing the
emotion.
She wore a pink, black and
white floral print top with blue
jeans.
The second contestant was Kim-
berly Prime, singing the country
song, "Born To Fly" by Sara
Evans. She wore a pink tank top
with brown hip-hugging cords.
Alana Chambers sang the country
song, "I'm Going To Get You
Good" by Shania Twain.
She openeddressed in a flow-
ered robe, acting as if she had just
received a phone call from her boy-
friend canceling their date, only to
find out he was planning to go out
with someone else.
She slipped behind a dressing
screen, dropped the robe, and came
out wearing a white sequined top
and sequined jeans, with the audi-
ence clapping to the beat of the mu-
sic.
Lindsey Scott sang the song "My
Strongest Suit." Two technical
sound errors resulted in false starts
for her talent, but that didn't appear
to phase her concentration.


his


quick humor and wit, "Let's just
jump in the way-back machine and
go back 45 seconds and pretend
-this never happened and start all
over. The audience chuckled and
Scott began her number flawlessly.
She was dressed in a blue bath
robe and as she began to sing, she


dropped the robe to reveal a hot.
pink, sequined floor length gown,
with a side split.
Casey Handley danced to the
song, "Rhythm Of The Night", cho--
reographed by Ashley Fulford. She:
performed the disco dance routine.
wearing a bright red sequined top-
and black slacks.
Tierra Thompson recited the:
poem, "Woman Anomaly, Phe-
nomenal Woman" by Mia Angelo.'
She wore a sheer black overlay:
(See Queen Crowned Page 2)
OIN=' MIS


2005 FESTIVAL ROYALTY includes Queen Alana
Chambers. L-R: Lindsey Scott, 2hd runner-up, Chambers,
Charlsie Boyatt, 1st runner-up. (News Photo)


SKEET JOYNER escorts his daughter Jesslyn, 2004 Water-
melon Festival Queen, on the final walk of her reign at the
Queen's Pageant Saturday night. (News Photo)


Boyatt 1st Runner-Up

SScott 2nd Runner-Up
Nucatola intervened with h


NO












(Queen Crowned


5-
' F


-:t;'. '

8 ,- -
r., -"
(.*1i.


MARSHA PLAINES, right, serves
Boyatt at the Festival Kickoff Dinner.


Nigel
At left,


Skeet Joyner collects tickets and helps
serve food. (News Photo)


District School Grades


(Continued From Page 1)
JES has not yet met the criteria of
the Federal No Child Left Behind
Act, because it needs improve-
ment in one or more areas.
Howard Middle School's grade of
C is calculated by the points for
each of the following areas.
In reading:
*40 percent of students read above
'grade level.
*60 percent of students made a
year's worth of progress in reading.
*70 percent of struggling students
made a year's worth of progress in
reading.


These statistics indicate the Stu-
dents with Disabilities, While, Afri-
can American, and Economically
Disadvantaged Students at HMS
need improvement in Math.
In writing:
*74 percent of students are meet-
ing state standards in writing.
These statistics show that all sub-
groups met the criteria.
Nevertheless, Howard Middle
School has not met federal adequate
yearly progress because it needs im-
provement in one or more areas.
At Jefferson County High School
the Grade of D is calculated by add-
ing points from each of the perform-
ance areas below:


These statistics show that Stu- In Reading:
dents with Disabilities, African .2 percent of students read at or
American and Economically Disad- above grade level.
vantaged students at HMS need im- *42 percent of students made a
p pvement in reading. year's progress in reading.
fn math: *47 percent of struggling students
*34 percent of students are at or made' a year's worth of progress in
alove grade level. reading.
*65 percent of students made a_ These calculations indicate that
y4ar's worth of progress in math. Students with Disabilities, White,
F n ing*

Boyd Secures Funding

For Green Institute
Congressman Allen Boyd helped tions bill," Boyd said.
secure $400,000 in funding for the "Horticulture is a multibillion dol-
Green Industries Institute for profes- lar industry, and Green Institute will
stonal Development at FAMU, lo- give people the skills they need to
cated in Monticello. secure Jobs in this vital industry


'The Green Institute is dedicated to
horticulture education and research
in Florida.
Boyd secured an increase in fund-
ing this year to allow the institute to
continue its mission of providing
quality education programs and
services for professional develop-
ment in the horticultural industry.
"I'm so pleased I was able to se-
cure this funding in the appropria-


, Izn --os i


FAMU and North Florida Com-
munity College entered into the
_unique partnership to develop Green
Institute.
Providing hands-on classroom ex-
perience for the horticulture
industry, the Green Institute also.
conducts research used to study
weed control, detection of patho-
gens in irrigation systems, nutrient
water management, an the econom-
ics of nursery management aspects.


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55th Watermelon Festival
370 South Jefferson Street* Monticello, Florida 32344 850-342-3474


African American and Economi-
cally Disadvantaged students at
JCHS need improvement in
Reading.
In Math:
*40 percent of students are at or
above grade level in math.
*71 percent of students made a
year's progress in math.
These figures indicate that Stu-
dents -with Disabilities, African
American, and Economically Disad-
vantaged students at JCHS need im-
provement in Math.
In Writing:
"*4 percent of-students are mieet-'
ing state standards' in writing.
This figure indicates that all sub-
groups met specified criteria.
JCHS has not met federally ade-
quate yearly progress because it
needs improvement in one or more
areas.
a The above material are hiMghlights
of the DOE-report.
Readers can access the entire re-
port online: '
HTTP://web.fldoe.org. Click on
"School Report Cards," "Jefferson,"
and each of the three schools in the
district.


(Continued From Page 1)
over her sea foam green, top and
black slacks.
Amber Lee sang the song "God's
Will". She sat on a park bench,
with a candle burning nearby in a
small shrub, wearing a black spa-
ghetti strap dress.
Charlsie Boyatt sang the country
song, "Suds In The Bucket" by
Sara Evans. She wore a white
pixie-cut hem top and jeans cut off
at the calf.
Chevarra Ulee recited the poem,
"The Creation" by James Johnson,
wearing a white choir robe.
Following the talent portion of
the night, the young ladies hur-
riedly slipped into their evening
gowns, performing last minute
touchups to their makeup and hair.
As the contestants prepared, the
Watermelon Princess and her court,
along with the Little King and
Queen, were introduced to the
audience.
Skipworth wore a gown of cream
and ivory with an embroidered, se-
quined bodice, and a flower in her
hair.
Prime's gown was a purple halter
style, complete with glitter and se-
quined bodice.
Chambers wore a white silk
sleeveless gown with empire waist
and train.
Scott wore a cream spaghetti-
strap gown, embroidered with gold
sequins shaped as flowers.
Handley wore a pink spaghetti-
strap floor length gown, embroi-
dered with sequins.
Thompson wore a tangerine fad-
ing ,to pink gown with, matching
shawl.
Lee wore a lilac open back gown,
embroidered with silver beading
and sequins.
Boyatt wore a turquoise green, A-
line strapless gown with gold
beaded bodice top.
Ulee wore a. pink strapless empire
waist gown, embroidered with
crystal beads and sequins.
The Nucatolas added suspense to
naming the winners at the conclu-


sion of the pageant.
Ann handed Rob the envelopes
for each winner after he stated,
"The envelope please."
When naming the Queen, Rob
continually paused as audience
members, all on the edge of their
seats, yelled out the numbers of
their favorite competitors.
"You want me to tell you the
winner or you just want to guess?'
her quipped.
As he read the name of
Chambers, applause erupted from
the crowd. "
Serving as auditors for the event
were Angie Williams and John
Hopkins. Coordinators chose not
to name the judges.


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U.S. General Services Administration


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The Water Committee of the
Monticello City Council will meet on
June 21, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. to discuss
proposed water system improvement
projects. The meeting will take place

at City Hall,.

245 S. Mulberry Street,

Monticello.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005 PAGE 3'


Queen Contestants In Gowns


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SKIPWORTH THOMPSON


FSA Seeks Committee

Member Nominations


Farm Service Agency Executive
Director Mark Demott reports that
the USDA will soon begin accepting
nominations forms for eligible can-
didates to serve on local Farm Serv-
ice Agency (FSA) County
Committees.
The nomination period is June 15
through August 1.
"I encourage local producers to
-become a member of their local
FSA County Committee and make a
difference," said Demott.
"FSA County Committees have an
important role in the decision mak-
ing process for commodity prices
loans and payments, conservation
and disaster programs and other im-
portant agricultural issues in their
farriing community."
Those participating or cooperating
in a local FSA program, and of legal
voting age, may be a candidate. In-
dividual may nominate others or
themselves.
All nomination forms must be re-
ceived in the County FSA Office or
postmarked by August 1. Voting
takes place between Nov. 4 and
Dec. 5.


To hold office as an FSA County
Committee Member, a person must
meet these basic requirements:
*Participate or cooperate in a pro-
gram administered by FSA.
*Be eligible to vote ,in a county
committee election.
*Reside in the area where the per-
son is a candidate.
In addition, a person must not
have been:
*Revoved or disqualified from the
office of FSA County Committee
member, alternate, or employee.
*Removed for cause from any
public office or have been convicted
of fraud, larceny, embezzlement or
any other felony.
Dishonorably discharged from
any branch of the armed services.
Contact the local FSA at 1244
North Jefferson, for additional infor-
mation.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

SMEMBa~,, RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Early Childhood


Development Eyed


From Our Photo File


Winners of stuffed animals in the Pizza Hut
"Color the Placemat" Contest In Jan, 1988
were: L-R: Nicholas Spallino, Amy Hyne-


man, J.R. Hightower, and Misty Lamb. Avery
Martin was not pictured..(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


During their child's early years,
most parents are keenly aware of
changes in physical development,
such as height and weight. But there
are also important milestones chil-
dren should reach in terms of how
they play, learn, speak, and act.
Smiling for the first time, making
eye contact, and pointing are a few
of these developmental milestones.
Parents need to know about devel-
opmental milestones they are an
important way to track a child's
overall development.
Also, the earlier a child with a de-
velopmental delay receives help, the
better chance the child has to
achieve his or her full potential.
The Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC), in collabora-
tion with a coalition of national part-
ners, recently launched a public
awareness campaign, "Learn the
Signs Act Earl%."
The campaign is designed to'du-t
cate parents about childhood devel-
opment, including early warning
signs of autism and other develop-
mental disorders and promote early
action among parents and, health
care professionals.
"By recognizing the signs of de-
velopmental disorders early, parents
can seek effective treatments that
can improve their child's future,"
said CDC Director Dr. Julie L. Ger-
berding.
As of now, about half of children.
with developmental disorders are


not diagnosed until school age.
Many signs of delay can be easy to
see. For example, a two-year-old
should be able-to:
Point to an object when asked.
i* Use two- to four-word sentences.
Follow simple instructions.
Every child is different and devel-
ops at his or her own pace, but most
children reach major milestones
within a certain range of time.
Parents, should learn the mile-
stones, but recognize that their child
might develop some skills earlier
and some later than other children of
the same age.
If parents suspect a delay, the first
step is to consult the child's doctor
or health care professional. Some-
times a parent's concern might be
resolved by the passage of time, but
in many cases taking a "wait-and-
see" approach could delay opportu-
nities to take helpful action.
If after talking %ith a health care
professional, parents still have con-
cerns, they can seek a second opin-
ion. They could ask a pediatrician
specializing in child development or
another qualified professional. Par-
ents may also contact an early inter-
vention agency or public school.
Parents and health care profession-
als can receive free materials avail-
able in English and Spanish, as well
as other resources and referral infor-
mation by calling 1-800-CDC-INFO
or visiting www.cdc.gov/ActEarly
(NAPS).


Reader Compliments


Writer On News, Article


Dear Editor:
Please convey our compliments
and appreciation to Debbie Snapp,
your Staff Writer, for ner v.u 1inerful
article about Devin Windham's bone
marrow transplant.
Not only did she tell your readers
about our fundraising project of col-
lecting old cell, phones, but more
importantly, she did an excellent job
enlightening your readers about a
devastating illness called Fanconi
Anemia.
She also provided your readers
with information. about the Chil-
dren's Organ Transplant
Association, a nonprofit organiza-


tion which provides much needed fi-
nancial and educational assistance to
families whose children need organ
transplants.
As of this date, Devin has received
his bone marrow transplant and is
struggling through the after-effects
of transplant toward his recovery.
He will be in the hospital in Min-
neapolis for approximately four
more months.
Please keep Devin and his family
in your prayers.
Thanks again to Debbie Snapp for
her excellent article.
With grateful hearts,
Vi Payton


Runaway Bride Had To Pay


The runaway bride of Duluth,
Georgia is an interesting case. '
Jennifer Wilbanks fled town four
days before her wedding. \\ound up
in Albuquerque, New Mexico,. and
called police back home to say she
had been kidnapped.
Law Enforcement authorities had
spent days searching for her when
she turned up missing.
The latest turn of events in the
case has Jennifer paying the city of
Duluth some $13,000 of the $50,000
or so spent on the search.
Seems to me the real story about
Jennifer's escapade and lies to law
enforcement has to do with respon-
sibility.
Some bleeding hearts have' been
all o'. ei TV pitying the poor girl ank
dismissing the notion that she
should pay city and county govern-
merits for money spent on, the
search.
Alright, she was upset, I'll give
her that; But to lie to law enforce-
ment officials, cost her city and


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cichon


county a pile of money for police
overtime is beyond the pale.
Excusing this kind of beha'.ior is
ridiculous.'
As i. as lci c:--.-c apa .de V.a.. ,,. er,'
I bleheved she should face'the bar of
justice.
If she needs professional help,
then \that's what she should seek.
But taxpayers don't need to pay for
her antics.
For me, I'm sick to death of'ex-


cuses about everything.
I'm tired of the "victim"
mentality.
If you couldn't get along \\ith
''ui mother, too bad. That doesn't
justify criminal activity.
Good gosh,what happened to the
days when we were taught to be on
time for appointments, respect the
property of others, admit it when we
made a mistake, and give our best to
our team, family or job?


Time was kids didn't rule the
house. Three year-olds weren't in
charge. And, parents made the rules.,
Last weekend, while out of town, I
enjoyed an evening cigar by the ho-
tel pool.
I watched a mother summon her
children from the pool. She called
them 12 times before they decided
to. get out of the water.
She turned to me and rather sheep-
ishly said, "Oh, they'll come out af-
ter a fashion."
That's some idea of parental
authority!
The bride from Duluth acted irre-
sponsibly. There's no denying tha~.
She faced the bar of justice and hat'
to pay for some costs she caused the
cit, to incur. Good!
I' like ,o think there is a lesson io
all of this, but I fear it is obscure
by the bleeding hearts.
By the way, her. intended still
plans to marry Jennifer.
Kinda makes you wonder, doesn't
it?


Wildflower Seed Demand Exists


Researchers with the University of
Florida's Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences, or UF/IFAS have
found an alternative source of in-
come to help replace the revenue to-
bacco farmers are losing.
Although there is probably no sin-
gle replacement crop for tobacco,
native wildflower seed is one alter-
native crop that could play a mean-
ingful role in alleviating some of the
revenue losses in the tobacco-based
economy of 20 northern Florida
counties, including Jefferson.
While Florida wildflower see pro-'
duction and marketing is in its in-
fancy, there is a growing market.
There is a strong demand for native
wildflower seed derived from natu-
rally occurring Florida populations -
but Florida's fledgling native wild-
flbwer seed, industry cannot meet
current and projected demand.
,So instead of purchasing seed
from within the state, agencies such
as The Florida Department of Trans-'


portation (FDOT) are forced to buy
. seed from major seed producing
states such as Texas.
"We try to look for the Florida
ecotype or the Florida grown seed,
because we're getting research back
from the universities that say" it has a
better re-seeding value here in Flor-
ida because it's our soil types," said
Tim Allen, Maintenance Rating
Program/Roadside manager for
FDOT. "Whatever I can't get of the
Florida grown, then I look towards
the other suppliers from outside the
state.
"The Florida co-op has only been
around for a couple of years now, so
I think we've only bought Florida
grown seed for about three years
now." .
FDOT is currently the largest
buyer of wildflower seed in' Florida.
Other large land management agen-
cies, such as Water Management
Districts, along with private compa-
nies that must reclaim large areas of


land also have expressed strong in-
terest in purchasing Florida ecotypes
of native wildflower seed.
Goldenmane Tickseed was the
most frequently grown wildflower
crop in 2002, and the most profit-
able species. However, since this
species is the one in greatest supply
- and supply is expected to increase
- a slight drop in price could occur
within the next few years if efforts
are not made to facilitate an increase
in demand.
Florida ecotype wildflower seed
has potential as a high-value crop.
Depending on species, Florida
growers are currently receiving $35
-100 per pound, with typical yields
of 20 60 pounds per acre.
It should be noted that although
wildflower seed production can help
replace lost tobacco revenue, it will
require an investment of time and
money. "Even though seed price is
high, it's not a 'get rich quick' busi-
ness," said UF/IFAS wildflower re-


searcher, Dr. Jeff Norcini, who is
based at the North Florida Research
and Education Center in Quincy
(NFREC-Quincy). "New growers
should start small and then expand;
be prepared to. invest dollars and
sweat equity."
According to the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer
Services' (FDACS) publication,
"Native Wildflower Seed Produc-
tion in Florida," wildflowers for
seed production can be grown in
field or landscape fabric production
systems. Details about these two
types of seed production, including
costs, are disciussed in this publica-
tion, to which a direct link can be
found online on the NFREC-
Quincy's web site.
Growers interested in starting a
wildflower seed operation can pur-
chase seed from the Wildflower
Seed and Plant Growers
Association, Inc., a co-operative of
Florida growers.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 14, 1995
Ruth Elizabeth Boyd was crowned
queen Saturday night in the 45th
Annual Watermelon Festival Queen
Contest.
About 25 persons attended the li-
brary's dedication ceremony in
honor of the late Senator F. Wilson
Carraway Sr. on Thursday
afternoon. -
TWENTY YEARS
June 12, 1985
American Legion Post #49 is pre-
paring a site for a public park on
South Water Street.
Work will begin soon on a new
nursing home south of Monticello.
The failure of any representative
of the Jefferson County Commission
to appear at a legislative committee
hearing cost the county considera-


tion of repayment of $25,368 in le-
gal costs in the county redistricting.
lawsuit.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 12, 1975
The pageant shows all signs of be-
ing the best ever. One of the reasons
is the location, being the new air-
conditioned JCHS Auditorium. The
last six of the queen hopefuls are
Phyliss Lewis, Amy Martin, Darlene
Morgan, Jane Pafford, Carol Toole
and Susan Windsor.
Monticello golfers walked away
with top honors in. the annual Cario
Country Club H-Ball Tournament
Shuman came in as top winners in
the 2nd flight, with Wally tied for
individual low gross for the entire
tournament. In the first flight, Butch
Plaines and Tom Shuman were
(See Our Files Page 5)



Personal Finances Need Plan


While most Americans agree that a
fil.ancial plan is important, only
about half of Americans have started
such a plan, according to a recent
survey.
"Getting personal finances in
shape can seem overwhelming,"
says Mitch Swanda, a financial
planner with USAA Financial Plan-
ning Services. "With help, it can ac-
tually be very simple."
To get help with your finances on
the right path, Swanda offers an-
swers to common questions:
Should I pay off debt first, or save
money for emergencies? Every fi-
nancial situation is different, but
when prioritizing your budge, con-
sider paying off consumer debt, like
credit cards, first. When you do
-build an emergency fund, save at


least three months of living ex-
penses.
How can I get rid of debt? Getting
rid of debt takes discipline. Follow
these simple steps:
Stop spending. Put credit cards
away. Destroy them if necessary.
Create a budget. Know where
money is going, and determine what
nonessentials, such as entertainment
costs, you can cut.
Have a payment plan. Generally,
it is best to pay off debt with the
highest interest rate first to avoid ex-
tra interest charges. Then focus on
eliminating bills with the next high-
est interest rate.
How much should I save for re-
tirement? Most retirees need 70 to
80 percent of pre-retirement income
to maintain their standard of living.


To get you started:
Put retirement savings before
college savings. Keep in mind that
your children might be eligible for
financial aid to help pay for college.
Start saving now. Set a goal to
save at least 10 percent of your total
income. The more time you have to
invest, the more compounding inter-
est will help your investment grow.
Take advantage of free money.
Find out if your employer offers a
401(k) that matches contributions.
Contribute to this program up to the
maximum match before considering
other investment vehicles, such as a
traditional or Roth IRA.
What should I do about saving for
my kids' college? If your retirement
plan is in good shape, you can begin
saving for college.


With tuition and fees at private
universities averaging around
$80,000 over four years, start saving
for college as early as possible.
If you save $250 a month when
your child is born, potentially in 529
plan or a Coverdell Education Sav-
ings Account, you should be able to
cover most college costs.
Do I need life insurance? If some-
one depends on your income, life in-
surance is a must.
Most people need about seven to
10 times their annual income to pro-
vide a financial cushion for loved
ones, though you should complete a
life insurance needs analysis with
the help of a professional. Consider
shopping for a policy now since
most people qualify for better rates
at a younger age (NAPS).


i-- -

























WORKING in the kitchen preparing salad for Drawdy and Judge Bobby Plaines. The
the Kickoff Dinner were Mary Francis event drew a good turnout.


CHOOSING a dessert from
manned by Dianne Westbrook,
iL;


the table
after enjoy-


ing the Festival Kickoff Dinner are Charlsie
Boyatt, and Goeff Monge. "'


AMONG THOSE enjoying the Kickoff Dinner Ruby Whitson. The Band 19 South enter-
were, from left, MaryAnn Van Kleunen and tained during the dinner.


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ENTERTAINING at the Festival Kickoff Diner
was the 19 South Band. From Left, Charles


Our Files
(Continued From Page 4)
runners-up in with second place. W I
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 11,1965
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Kiser were hosts t
Saturday night, at dessert bridge at
their home on Ll.oyd Road.
SGlenda Cone celebrated her eighth ti
birthday with a party at the home of
her parents Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Cone
on Alabama St., in Noble's subdivi- MI
sion.
Bret Oglesby son of Mr. and Mrs V
Lester Oglesby, celebrate his fifth v
birthday last Thursday morning with
a party at Mrs. Ferguson's Nursery
School. it
FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 10, 1955
L.C. Griffin Jr., Ike Anderson,
Roy Finch, Wesley Gramling, Au-
brey Williams, R.B. Ball, and C.E.
Quick were installed as the new Li-
ons Club officers.
Delma Ward, Tommy Lamar, Ned
Yaglie, Jack Stokley Jr., Mac Joiner,
'Felix Johnston Jr. and Claude 307
Groom Jr., won trips to 4-H Short
Course in Gainesville for their
county 4-H projects.


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"PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005


Lifestyle


.American Legion Names Four


*Boys State Representatives


Last year he was vice president of
IDEBBIE SNAPP the Fellowship of Christian
%Staff Writer Athletes, and, has participated in
fundraisers with his local youth
American Legion Post 49 has groups.
.chosen its Boys State Representa- Daniel Morris, Jr. is the son of
ttives. Sharon and Dan Morris, and is Cap-
The four boys chosen for the hon- tain of the football team. He is also
"or include: Christopher Shane Ar- a member of the National Honor So-
-rington, son of Stasey Whichel and city and the Mu Alpha Theta Math
*Ron Whichel. Honor Society.
* He is a youth leader in his church, He is employed at the Winn Dixie
Vand along with others from the Store as Assistant Customer Service
church, reads books to the young Floor Supervisor.
students at Florida High School. In 2002, he represented Jefferson
He enjoys playing football and has County at Walt Disney World as a
been on the varsity team for over a Disney Dreamer and Doer.
,year now. He has participated in Praise Mu-
Jonathan Counts is the son of Pa- sic at his church and has provided
,tricia and Gil Counts. He was a pa- volunteer lawn care service for the
trol leader in the Boy Scouts, editor County Historical Society.
0of the school newspaper, and presi-
jdent of the Drama Club. The Boys State Program is a com-
4 He has participated in such activi- prehensive one-week leadership
-ties as community food drives with course in state and local government
;the Boy Scouts, putting up fencing development to offer youth a better
around the Letchworth Indian perspective of the practical opera-
tMounds, and rebuilding old grave tion of government and to show that
sites at some of the local area ceme- the individual is responsible for the
Tteries. character and success of
; Alexander Lingle is the son of government.
#Debra Lingle ahd Mark Lingle. He Delegates who are selected to at-
plays the drums for the Church of tend this program will "learn by do-'
the Nazarene. ing" as they progress through the
He also plays on the baseball team various phases of government.
4at Jefferson County High School, This is a leadership action pro-
eand was Captain of the school's soc- gram, where qualified male high
*cer team. school juniors take part in a practi-


;Elizabeth Baptist VBS

To Feature Road Trip


fRAN HUNT
taffl' Writer
"'0
.4 Elizabeth Baptist will host its an-
qual Vacation Bible School; 6 to 9
,p.m., June 20-24.
This years theme is: Life Ways,
Ramblin' Road Trip; Which way do
,you go?
The Ramblin' Road Trip is an ex-
-hilarating excursion that will take
youngsterss across this vast nation.
As youth travel through exciting
I ible stories, they will discover the
ay God wants us to live through
the choices we make each day, and
"rbach the final destination, a rela-
*tionship with Jesus.
, "We want your children to come
-ahd join us for the fun and excite-


"Foundation

VMini Grants

DEBBIE SNAPP
'9taff Writer

The Jefferson County Educational
pFoundation funded a $900 mini-
&ant written by the First Grade
.Team at Jefferson Elementary
school to enhance their needs in
Science.
' Each teacher received five sets of
warning stations which provided
students with hands-on experiments
to help teach the targeted standards
in the areas of: physical properties
qf objects, structures of plants and
animals, weather changes, primary
opd secondary colors, and healthy
food choices.
' Readers and nonreaders were
given step-by-step instruction cards,

.Local Students
tarn Degrees
At LaGrange
'.Two local students graduated from
.L~aGrange College at its 174th Com-
siencement.
,jSarah Elizabeth Creel received her
dJA Degree in Biochemistry, gradu-
ting cum laude.
* Hillary Paige Palmer received her
fA Degree in Psychology.
, A four year liberal arts and sci-
,ences college affiliated with the
JUnited Methodist Church, LaGrange

college is ranked in the top 10, and
as a "best value" among 106 South-
Orn comprehensive colleges by the
U.S. News & World ReDort.


ment," said Vacation Bible School
Director Tricia Joiner. "We'll cruise
into Bible stories, play games and
have cool, road trip snacks.
"We'll create special crafts, learn
great songs, and much more," she
added. "Along the way, we will
make stops at the music tune-up sta-
tion, Recreation Park, Ramblin'
Diner, Missions Drive in and crafts
Souvenir Shop.
The Bible School is free of charge
and dinner will be provided Monday
through Thursday evening.
Friday, a snack time will be hosted
following the 7 p.m. parent's night
presentation with students demon-
strafing what they learned during the
week.
For further information contact
Joiner at 997-0974.


Provides

At JES
which were illustrated, so that indi-
vidual students can conduct experi-
ments at their own pace using the
tools provided.
Each kit also included an assess-
ment card so that students arid
teachers can track their progress.
"Our team felt these learning sta-
tions gave the students a better un-
derstanding of the science concepts
being covered because the students
were actively engaged and enjoyed
the hands-on experiences," com-
ments Instructor Nancy Whitty.
The First Grade Team thanks the
Jefferson County Educational Foun-
dation for making the mini-grants
available and for their desire to
work with the schools in Jefferson
County to enrich the Science and
Math programs.


cal government course.
It is designed to develop a work-
ing knowledge of the structure of
government and to impress upon
each delegate that our government is
what we make it.
They will have the opportunity to
learn the political process. Each
level of government will be run by
those delegates who are elected to
serve. Instruction will be presented-
on the law and court system, legisla-
tive procedure and Florida political
history.
The American Legion has estab-
lished certain qualifications for pro-
spective Boys State citizens. They
are:
Only males who have successfully
completed their junior year of high
school and have at least one semes-
ter of high school remaining; above
average scholastic standing, 3.2
GPA unweighed or above; an inter-
est in the governmental process;
outstanding qualities of leadership,
character, scholarship, loyalty, and
services to their school and commu-
nity; the prospective delegate and
their parents must be residents of the
state of Florida; and any boy who
has previously attended Boys State
is not eligible to attend a second ses-
sion.
Selected applicants are awarded
an all expense paid trip to Tallahas-
see, participate in events in the State
Capitol, and have an opportunity to
earn three hours of college credit.


'1
I,


MYRTICE AND MARVIN JONES


Couple In Their 90's

Enjoy Birthday Event


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local residents, Myrtice and
Marvin Jones, were honored at a
birthday celebration held at Fred's
Market in Lakeland, June 4.
The gathering included many fam-
ily members and friends.
A buffet dinner was served, along
with cake and ice cream.
Born in Pollard, AL, in 1913,
Marvin is celebrating his 92nd
birthday.


BACKSTAGE action at the Queen Pageant is
almost as hectic as that on stage. Here


Sherise Lee to
ber Lee. (News


Born in Barnesville, GA. in 1915,
Myrtice is celebrating her 90th
birthday.
This couple moved to Monticello
some 10 years ago to be near their
daughter and son-in-law, Pat and
Lee Corbin.
Corbin thanks all who helped
make the occasion memorable for
the couple.
She adds that because of this birth-
day celebrating, Myrtice was able to
spend some quality time visiting
with a childhood friend who will be
soon relocating to California.


.- .;.i

i- .,


JES Students

Earn Awards
Through a clerical error at JES,
the name of first grader Thaddeus
Francis, who received a Reading
Achievement Award, with an "A"
average in reading, was omitted
from a recent article in the Monti-
cello News.
Carlie Barber, also a student in Ni-
cole Roddenberry's First Grade
Class is an "A" Honor Roll Student.
She received the Top Math Aver-
age Award, Best Creative Writing
Award, Top Reading Award, and
the Citizenship Award.



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005 PAGE 7













ty


























TING his daughter, Alana Chambers, on her first
s 2005 Watermelon Festival Queen, is Chuck Cham-
1




Badcock& more
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Monticello, Fla

997-8533


EYE SAVERS
Robert R. A.ssanles, (.1).
Family Eye Care at Affordable Prices
* Comprehensive Eye EAaminations
* Contact Lenses
* Treatment of Eye Injuries & Eye Disease
* Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid, V.S.P., ECPA, PPC, HMO, HPSE

997-4772
1315 S. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL.
Open Mon. & Wed.


FLORIDA FARM BUREAU INSURANCE COMPANIES SOUTHERN FARM
BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES


PHONE: 997-2213
FAX: 997-4805


FREDDY PITTS
AGENT
105 E. ANDERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL 32344


SAmeri Gas
Reliable, Safe & Responsible


Monticello (850)997-3331
Madison (850)973-2218
Thomasville (229)228-5252


f I


A.Z. Jf-a/'fjunerafl-irector, Inc.


TWi'wnv Fuuerarl HUomev
620 York Street, Monticello, Fl. 32345
997-5553


DAY'S INN
OF MONTICELLO

US 19 & 1-10 Ex 225
997-5988


Have a safe and happy Memorial Da


t


-I


a


9


F


E:.W EAr'


ay!


------- ---------------- --------------------


To Royal


ALANA CHAMBERS is the 2005 Watermelon second runner-up, Chambers, Charlsie
Festival Queen. From left, Lindsey Scott, Boyatt, first runner-up.


.1 1


.4







PAGE 8. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005


7 - --* - -


A Salute


To


CROWNED 2005 Watermelon Festival Princess was Ram-
sey Revell. From left, Tori Thor, second runner-up, Kaitlin
Jackson, first runner-up, and Revell.


Royalty


LISA REMALARD, of TV Channel 27, served as Mistress of
Ceremonies f6r the Little King and Queen Contest.
Crowned Little Queen was Carly Joiner. Little King was
Donnie Kinsey.


1 Branch Street
L FUNERAL HOME

997-2024
750 Branch St. ~ Monticello, FL


Tallahassee Title Group, LLC
Jamie Temples
Managing Member / Closing Agent


1407 Piedmont Dr. East
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
* Phone: 850-580-2222
Fax: 850-580-2229


202A Avenue A NW
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
Phone: 850-697-3988
Fax: 850-697-3983


11" Specializing In
n Ornamental Aluminum Fencing
Chain Link Custom Wood *
Custom-Deck Custom Gates
Licensed C Operators PVC Fence
Insured
Free 942-1003
Estimates Member of
Tallahassee
3MCD btfencing@comcast.net Commerce


Mirror Image Antiques
MIRROR 303 First Street NW
Havana, FL 32333
850.539.7422
www.HavanaFlorida.com
Email: Anteekr@aol.com
Enjoy special storewide discounts on antiques, collectibles, gourmet foods, golf
. iandibaseball items,,and:MUCH MORE through,the end of May! Come by.
with this ad by May 31, 2005 and say Happy Birthday to Rick and Sandi and
get a free Cadbury candy bar straight from England! Yummy!
Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5 Sun 12:30-5


) ~


WE HOPE EVERYONE ENJOYS THE FESTIVAL!

FLORIDA AUTO TAG AGENCY
1155 W. WASHINGTON ST.
997-8799


Huddle House
US 19
P Always Open! -
Always Fresh!


Monvcell Fuorist & Gts, I9 nc
230 N. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344
850~997-4342 800-513-6860
Fax 850-997-1404
www.myfsn. com/montice foflorist
ru6453@aoClcom


Congratulations


Lois Hunter
&
Staff


Congratulations

Robert R. Plaines

County Judge


/


11 7,11V


551


sJ


STRONG &' JONES
Funeral Home, Inc.
1 West Carolina St. ~ Tallahassee, FL 32301
Gracious Dignified Service
224-2139 Day or Night
Darrell L. Lawrence Linn Ann Griffin J. Griffin
Licensed Funeral Directors


Congratulations

Howard Middle School

Students and Staff


SALUTE To ROYALTY


[BURGER
\KING


1290 S. JEFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL
342-1050


SKTBOR CM
Jun 61h- AuusI 011
Mese ParkISkatboard Par


Register's
Mini-Storage
315 'Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South
997-2535


Congratulations Watermelon Royalty!
State Farm Insurance
Tommy Surles
fIa ~238 W. Washington Street
Monticello, Fl
'" '"'- 997-8282


Hidden Fence Systems
0* QFM DDW i Sy.M-Wig tfor yw pl4
Ow *bef ow P*b w 4 *emo
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DogWatch of Northern Ff. Inc.
* ~~8 __ .-4010Ql


24 HOUR ROAD SERVICE
New. Used & Retreaded
Truck Tires
Minor Truck & Trailer Repair
National Account Dealers For....
2f0IDGEMTHE0 =1
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Capitol City Travel Genter


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Seniors and
disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms, HUD voucners
accepted. Call 850-973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Madison, Fl.
Equal Housing Opportunity


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: f t 2. 1
- --- -- or ----qp W-- w4p w w 40-014














Sports


Recreation Park Spring


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005 PAGE 9 ,
.


Sports Awards


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The annual Recreation Park
Spring Sports Awards Ceremony
was held recently.
Among those recognized were:
Rotary Club, T-ball champions;
Kiwanis Club; coach pitch; Joy-
ner's Travel Center, softball; and
Monticello Milling, little league
champions.
Receiving Athlete of the Year
awards were Brooklyn McGlamory
and Jake Edwards in T-ball; Capas
Kinsey and Jana Barber, coach
pitch; Skyler Hanna, softball; and
Brittany Hopson, Trent Roberts and
Zack Michael in Little League.
Named Coaches of the Year
awards were Kevin Home, Bubba
Walker and Nicole Home in T-ball;
Don Lunn, Les Burke and Walton
Boatwright, coach pitch; Mac Fin-
layson and Hank Evans, softball;
and Paul Michael, Keith Rodden-
berry and Robbie Roberts, Little
League.
Team awards were issed to all 15
participating teams, for most valu--


able player, most im
sportsmanship.
,On the Chicken I
Christopher Miller and
were named MVP; Ka
ington, most improved
Sanderson, sportsmansh
Capital City Bank, Bt
loff, MVP; Joe Hanno
proved; and Sa
sportsmanship.
C & F Fencing, Hun
MVP, Brady Adams,
proved; and Ty Chan
manship.
Jefferson Farmers M
Jackson, MVP; D. J.
improved; and Trevoi
sportsmanship.
Bishop Farms, Jak
MVP; Austin Wilford
proved; and Jenni Jack
manship.
Hiram Masonic Lo
Scarborough, MVP; I
most improved; and Hu
sportsmanship.
Williams Timber, C
MVP; Ladarian Smiley
proved; and Brian Tha
manship.


Ceremony
proved and Jackson's Drug Store, Skylar
Hana, MVP; Emily Howell, most
Delite team, improved; and Tori Self, sports-
Jade Greene manship.
ishayla Bar- Jefferson Builders Mart, Carlie
1; and Bryce Barber, MVP; Ruben Aleman,
hip. most improved; and Will French,
randon Rud- sportsmanship.
n, most im- State Farm Insurance, Capas Kin-
ara Hall, sey and Tanner Aman, MVP; Win-
ston Lee, most improved; and
ter Handley, Ashley Schofill, sportsmanship.
, most im- Farmers and Merchants Bank,
cey, sports- Trent Roberts, MVP; De\ in
Reams, most improved; and Elliott
market, Jared Capers, sportsmanship.
Allen, moarest Rotary, Alex Campbell, MVP;
Allen, most Thadeus Francis, most improved;
and Thomas Swickley, sportsman-
:e Edwards, ship.
ms i- Kiwanis, Matthew Hutchinson,
, most im-
son, sports- MVP; Avery Jones, most
improved; and C. J. Burke, sports-
dge, Colby manship. I,%
dakota Ely, Joyner's Travel Center, Sarah
anter Home,/ Sorensen, MVP; Ashley Hall and
Laneshia Massey, most improved;
Cody Kelly, and Keli Dollar, sportsmanship,
y, most im- Monticello Milling, Marcus Rob-
erts and Zack Michael, MVP; Clark
SChristie, most improved; and Brad-
ley Holm, sportsmanship.


RECEIVING AWARDS are the C&F Fencing
Coach Pitch Team. L-R: Brady Adams, most


i.


9.
-S

>.

improved, Hunter Handley, MVP; and Ty }
Chancey, sportsmanship. :


Fencer, Deckers Split


Two in Softball Action


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In recent coed softball action,
Waukeenah Fence and. deck split
their two latest games, winning
over Florida Tee's, 17-11 and fal-
ling to American Home Patient, 11-
15.
Coach Nick Flynt said that in the
first game, the Fencers continued
their hot hitting of late, not so
much in batting average, but in
clutch situations.
"The entire game was hard-
fought and close, with scoring in
every inning by both teams, save
the top of the sixth (Florida Tee's
half)," said Flynt.
"The season went about the same
way in the fall of '04, with the team,
losing the first couple of games,
then setting on a hot streak later in
the season."
Matthew' Addison went to bat
four times, hit three doubles and a
home run, scored three runs and
had two RBI.
Casey Chance went to bat four
times, hit two singles, a double and
a home run, scored three runs, and
had three RBI.
Nick Flynt went to bat four times,
hit one home run, two singles,
scored two runs and had four RBI.


Lady Diamonds
Beat Perry 8-4

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello Lady Diamonds
clobbered Perry Sunday in softball
action 8-4.
Tasha Samuel went two for two
and smacked out a home run; Kidra
Thompson, Letitia Fead and Kista
Hill all went two for two.
Alanna Anderson and Keandra
Seabrooks both went one for two;
and Tonya Young, Lisa Fead, Fe-
lice McDaniel, Tasha Smiley,
Chandra Tucker and Cynthia Steen
all went one for one.
The Lady Diamonds now stand at
a 6-3 season.
They will face off against Talla-
hassee, 4 p.m., Sunday, there.


Steve Lohbeck went to bat five
times, hit four doubles, scored two
runs and one RBI.
Andy Telefsen went to bat five
times, hit one double and three sin-
gles, scored two runs and three
.RBI.
Melanie Bronson went to bat five
times, hit three singles and scored
one run. and Michelle Bronson
went to bat four times, hit two sin-
gles, scored-two r..uns and one.RBI.
Darica Hewett went to bat five
times, hit two singles, and scored
one run.
Allison Flynt went to bat four
times and hit one single, and Katie
Turner went to bat four times, had
one single, scored one run, and had
one RBI.
Commenting ,about the game
against American Home Patient,
Nick Flynt said, "Even though we
had sort of a makeshift lineup, we
hit pretty well. Defense and errors
killed us.
"Any time we scored a few runs,
the very next inning we would al-
low them to come back and keep it
close," he added.
"Our next games is not for about
two weeks, so hopefully we can set
everyone together and get back to
good defense and get on track
again."


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LEARNING
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Chance went to bat four times, hit
two singles and had one RBI.
Lucy Buzbee went to bat four
times, hit two doubles and two sin-
gles, scored two runs and had two
RBI.
Nick Flynt went to bat four times,
had two doubles, one single, scored
three runs and three RBI.
Tellefsen went to bat three times,
hit three singles, and had one RBI
and scored one run.
Carrissa Burgett went to bar
three times, hit'one single, scored
one run and had one RBI.
Kevin McClellan went to bat
three times, hit three singles, scored
two runs and had one RBI and Erin
Boyd went to bat three times, hit
one single and scored one run.
Kyle Shaw went to bat three
times, hit two singles and scored.
one run.


Michelle Bronson
three times, hit three
had two RBI; and A
went to bat four times,
gles and had one RBI.
To date, the Fencers
batting average. The
hits out of 242 times a
88 runs, 74 RBI, 39
triples, and nine home r


CHICKEN DELITE Coach Pitch Team re-
ceived awards at the annual sports banquet.
L-R: Bryce Sanderson, sportsmanship; Jade


Greene, MVP; C
Kashayla Barrin
Photos) ..


e3 w




:hristopher Miller, MVP; and
igton, most improved. (News ;


12 Named To

All-Stars Team ni

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer .

Twelve young athletes were.r
named to the Jefferson All-Stars.
baseball team last week.
These include: Trent Roberts, El-
liott Capers, Alphonso Footman, :
Jared Jackson, Zack Michael and'
Marcus Roberts.
Also, Shelton Allen, Clark Chris;
tie, Tyler Jackson, Cody Kelly, La-
darian Smiley and Devin Reams.,
Coaching the team are Paul Mi.A '
chael, Leroy Mobley and Harold
Malloy.




fSTAOFADrA L-

otiisca ii'ttit Done,,,,

Nll ecomeseeMc....

CAUSE I'MTHEONE!!!

DVRO LDEIT
ar Supercenter i

1-57854

1 -5487 6


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Demons downed
the Drifton Wildcats Sunday in


double-header softball action for
went to bat 19-10 and 7-2.
singles, and In .the first game, Warren Allen
Alison Flynt went four for four and ripped the
hit two sin- skin off the ball for a grand-slam
home run.
have a .638 Kevin Jones, James Wesley, Vin-
y have 155 cent gentle and Nod Thompson all
t bat, scored went three for four; Gentle and
doubles, six Wesley each smacked out home
runs. runs.


DREAMS COME TRUE











Ci

W With "Damn Yankees" I finally
made it big on Broadway.
,u "My kids" have big dreams, too.
< Help us cure neuromuscular diseases.
Q Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org
(L*


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


Johnny Rivers and Eldon Jen-
nings both went two for three; Joe
Andrews and Nick Russell both
went two for four; Wilbo Ellis, Jr.,
went one for four; Monterious Riv-
ers went one for three and James.
Edward went one for two.
In the second game, Kevin Jones,
Warren Allen, Johnny Rivers and
Nick Russell all went two for three;
Nod Thompson went two for two,
and Joe Andrews and Darren,
Young both went one for two.
The Demons now stand at a 10-3
season.
They will square off against Tal-
lahassee, 4 p.m., Sunday, there.


OrI







THADDEUS K. cHE:
BRUCE us.d c=
(850)32

(850)32


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening




1630E. JACKSON ST.
CLocated behind Langdale Auto Mall)4


4(N





4P, iV
O.L4,


Demons Defeat Wildcats

In Double Header Action


News Without Fear or Favor

Monticello News








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005
Honorees Named To

HMS Wall Of Fame


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
During the Howard Middle
School 2005 graduation ceremony,
a Wall of Fame was established at
the school.
The wall is designed to recognize
alumni of Howard Academy High
School and Howard Middle School,
who have gone on to achieve excel-
lence in their lives and careers.
HMS Media Specialist Mae Eva
Wilson, presented the 10 honorees.


How TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS
FREE OF DRUGS.



Rule

#10.


Don't

Preach.

One of the greatest
deterrents to drug use
is simply talking with
your kids. But don't
preach or you'll lose
them. If a conversation
lasts more than five
minutes, you're
preaching. Better to
have lots of five-
minute conversations.
'Kids have short atten-
tion spans and shorter
memories. To learn
more about how to
talk with your kids
about drugs, call for a
free parent's handbook. .

1.800-624-0100
PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE FLORIDA.. AMERICA
c/o Bush & Associates, Inc.
1001 Alternate AIA Jupiter, FL 33477


The 2005 honorees and their ca-
reers include: Dr. Joseph L. Web-
ster, medicine; Dr. Angela Massey,
health services/pharmacy; Captain
Chad Roe, military leadership;
George Pitman, Sr., education; and
Glyndell Presley, communications.
Also, Martha Hall, education;
Lois Howell-Hunter, government;
Joni Wilson, corporate financial
services; Captain Katina Manning-
Maddox, aviation, US Army; and
Flossie Byrd, higher education.
The Wall of Fame is the brain-
child of HMS Principal Juliette
Fisher-Jackson.


877-4550


CONSTRUCTION
AHEADy^

With your help,
MDA is building a
tomorrow without
neuromuscular diseases.
1-800-572-1717

Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org


CASH NOW As seen^.
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, onT.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS
(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


2 Border 1-10
MAHAN


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Toll Free 1-8
1637 Metropolitai
The hiring of a lawyer is an
advertisement. Before y(
about


SD. WALKER, PA
All Injury & Death Claims
Car, Truck & Motorcycle Accidents
Defective Products
Slip & Fall
Negligence In Nursing Homes
Or Hospitals

86-5656
300-458-5514 Fax 850-386-5136
n Blvd. Suite B Tallahassee, FL. 32308
important decision that should not be based solely upon
ou decide, ask us to send you free written information
our qualifications and experience. -


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My hearing is restored, and
my confidence is as well."
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Never in our 65-year history has a product received such
overwhelmingly positive reviews as the EDGE'. Come in
for a free digital demonstration during our Get Your
Edge Back Event and hear the difference for yourself.
And, we're so confident you'll like it, for
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The EDGE hearing system is designed for your active
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having evaluation and proper it.,D 2005 Beltone Eletronic
A 2633 Hwy 77 Suite A
Panama City, FL 32405
850-763-0801
Hours M F 8:30 4:30
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2510 Miccosukee Rd., Ste 110
-*1 Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-222-1231
.. Hours M- F 9:00-5:00
-,i"1, i-, . ,, T


. U USINES S a-6 s



.DIRECTORY cee


U U


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
.'-.- Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs




Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All! .
"Call Andy"


997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


Northside Mower and
Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT Licensed & Insured John A. Kuhn
CAC 058274 Owner
J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
850-997-5808 A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911 (850) 997-4577

155 JOHN COLLINS RD. 30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South
997-2535


Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC..

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


BETITERBODIE5

AUTOMOBILE PAINT & BODY REPAIR
DENTS, COLLISION LSTRA'I'ION: W DOL) IT ALL'.

997-4160
ANDY & TINA AMES, OWfNERS
90o1 NOUl't iJAl T i.iK HILLE UA LD..OI 1. t'lOKIDA
FREE ESTIMATES & FREE PARTS LOCATION SERVICE!


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

""J Allstate Insurance Company Z
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130 ."
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

Norman L. Barfoot 878-8077 =
Exclusive Agent OPEN Monday-Fnrday 8:30-5 30
Barefoot Insurance Group Email-NORMANIlARFOOTwa ,'llstate con


WE DELIVER. CALL F OR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN


MIL


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CO.)141









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-64; JOHN A. SOPRANO
AND AUDREY M. SOPRANO, TRUS-
TEES OF THE JOHN A. SOPRANO
REVOCABLE TRUST AGREEMENT
DATED OCTOBER 13, 1999; JOHN A.
SOPRANO AND AUDREY M.
SOPRANO, TRUSTEES OF THE
AUDREY M. SOPRANO REVOCABLE
TRUST AGREEMENT DATED OCTO-
BER 13, 1999; JOHN SOPRANO; AND
AUDREY SOPRANO; Plaintiffs vs.
STEVE ELDRED AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF
SALE; Notice is hereby given that, pursu-
ant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson County, Florida
I will sell the property situate in Jefferson
County, Florida, described as: Lot No 3,
Greenwood Estates, A Private Land-
owner's Association Subdivision, in Jeffer-
son County, Florida described as follows:
Begin at the Southwest corner of the
Northwest Quarter of the Northwest
Quarter of Section 16, Township 1 North,
range 6 East, Jefferson County, Florida
and run N. 0 degrees 09 minutes E. 430.0
feet along the West boundary of Section 16
to a point, thence S. 79 degrees 22 minutes
E. 1366.09 feet to a point in the Center of a
60- foot wide road, thence S. 3 degrees 16
minutes W, 154.53 feet along the center of
said road to the Southeast Corner of the
Northwest Quarter of the Northwest
Quarter of Section 16m thence S. 89
degrees 06 minutes 18 seconds W. 1335.30
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, Being
part of the Northwest Quarter all in sec-
tion 16, Township 1 North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson County Florida. Reserving the
Easterly 30 feet for roadway easement
Mobile Home Identification Number
7119203, 1971 HOLI Title Number
4532220 at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at the front door of the Jef-
ferson County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida at 11:00 a.m., on June 23, 2005.
Dale Bontwright Clerk of Circuit Court.
6/8, 6/15, c

HELP WANTED
The City of Monticello is accepting
applications for the position of Patrol
Officer. This position requires a
minimum of a high school diploma
and Florida Police Standards. The
successful candidate mustlive within
25 miles of Monticello Police Station.
Applicant must complete a
Department field training program
within the first month. The position
requires a background check. Salary
and benefit information is available
upon request. Submit application and
resume to Monticello Police Dept. 195
S. Mulberry St. Monticello, FL 32344
by June 20, 2005 EOE/Drug-Free


Over 55 and

Unemployed?

Interested in working in the
healthcare field?
If you qualify, Experience Works
has paid CNA training and job
opportunity funded by grants
from SBA.

Call Georgia at

850-973-9922

A national nonprofit
organization. EEO/AA
"These U.S. Small Business Administra-
tion (SBA) Grant Awards. #SBAHQ-02-1-
0034 and #SBAHQ-03-1-0058, care funded
by the SBA. SBA funding is not opinions
or services. All SBA funded programs are
extended to the public on a non discrimi-
natory basis."


HELP WNTED


Workplace.
6/15, c


NOTICE OF JOB OPENING:
Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners, is seeking applicants
for Staff Assistant in the department
of Emergency Management. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Room 10, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida.
Salary range is $18,470.00-$27,705.60
Minimum qualifications are:
Knowledge: of business English,
spelling and punctuation. Knowledge
of mathematics. Ability to gain
knowledge of the unit's policies,
procedures, and practices. Ability to
establish and maintain effective
working relationships with employees
and the public. Ability to access, input
and retrieve information from a
computer. Ability to communicate
using writing, speaking, hearing and
visual skills. Ability to type at the rate
of 35 correct words per minute. Skill
in the use of dictation or of
transcription from a dicta phone (if
required). Availability to travel to
attend training classes and meetings.
Education and experience needed:
High school graduation or possession
of an acceptable equivalency diploma.
(Two (2) years work experience
. involving staff assistant duties
including the operation of a personal
computer, keyboard, or similar data
entry equipment. (A comparable
amount of training, education or
experience may be substituted for the
above minimum qualifications).
Applications will be accepted until
Tuesday, June 28, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
at the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employee. -Drug Free Workplace.
Drug testing is a required part of
preemployment physical. Applicants
with a disability should.contact the
above office for accommodation.
6/15, 17, 22, c


DRILLERS HELPER Great pay and
benefits Must be ableto travel. Clean
Fl drivers license, CDL a plus. Drug
Free, EOE, 800-487-9665.
6/15, 17,22,24, 29, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Monticello Christian Academy: Now
Interviewing for Elementary and
Middle School Teachers. Call Pastor
Mike 997-3906; 294-1006
5/27, tfn, c
Great earnings potential! Only $10.00
startup Fee!! Make all-your dreams
come true. $250.00 Fast Start Bonus.
Call B.J. at 850-584-6289.
5/27, 6/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3s/d, tfn
Truck Driver Wanted: Class B
Contact Judson Freeman @ 997-2519.
Local deliveries.
s/d 6/3, tfn
A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking a Secretary #2173.
High school diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/office clerical experience.
Typing score of at least 35 CWPM.
Starting salary: $6.43. Shift: 8AM -
5PM / Monday through Friday. For
more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
(850)523-3217 or 1(800)226-2931.
Human Resources 2634-J Capital
Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL Pre-Hire
Drug Screen & FDLE background
check. An Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer. Drug-Free Workplace.
6/15, c

SERVICES- .. ,.
Equine Sports Massage Therapy for.
the high performance horse and rider.
Contact Angela Boland at 591-1728 to
schedule a home, barn, or show call.
6/15, 17, pd
D&S REPAIRS 997-4015, 4189.
Small engines, tractors, outboards,
ATV's, etc.
6/15, 17, 22, 24, 29, pd
Ours is a church where diversity is
celebrated and thinking is
encouraged. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N. of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 am. 997-4116.
6/15, c
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19 tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,


SERVICES -

933-3458.
4/28 tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established
His Church called the Church of
Christ and you can be a member of it.
We are ready to help if you are ready
to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn

REAL ESTATE
3 Bedroom, 2 bath & much more.
Renovated and ready! 251-0760 or,
wv-7i'.blueradish.biz.
6/15. nc

WANTED
Looking to lease acreage with 2
houses, horse barn and fenced
pastures. 850-443-6075 or
850-212-2685. "
6/10, 15, 17, 22, pd


AUTOMOTIVE
1951 Plymouth Cranbook. 4 dr good
shape & runs Asking $3900
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c
95 Ford Aerostar mini Van. Runs,
good, cold ac Ft & Bk $900 firm.
342-1486, 509-1942
6/8, 10, 15, pd

FOR RENT
3 bd/2 bth mobile home. Screened in
front porch on Rabon Rd. $490.00.
997-5607.
6/10, 15, pd
Shop / Warehouse Space. Four lirge
roll-up doors. 1200 sq. Ft. With
standard utilities included. Easy
access to US 19 with good visibility
and generous parking. Available
August 1st. Call 997-4150.
6/15, 17, tfn, c
FOR SALE
King size bedroom suite & bedding I
included $500. Beautiful 5 pc. Wicker
set w/custom seats & pillows $800.
Large metal desk $50. Desk chairs
$50. Rocker and rocking foot stool
$60. Table & chairs $75. Stereo
cabinet $20. 997-2512.
6/15, 17, pd
2-3 RIB Front Tires for 8' Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50. 4 P225/6 or 16
MICH. tires $40 997-0135.
tfn
Self perpelled lawn mower $125; 120v
Window A/C unit, Large $125; Kids
Electric Air Hockey game $15; Kids
yellow care bear shelf $10 and misc.
toys call 342-1486, 509-1942.
6/8, 10, 15, pd
14 H.P. Twin OHV. Electric start,
Briggs, w/tank and portable rack.
Generator died, engine is perfect, only
50 hours. Engine list $994, yours for
$350. "97-0676.
6/10,15, pd
*


-' Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMODELED HOMES

2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 -4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy Officers on site

575-6571







Will Sell in 5 Acre Tracts


Sales Manager is B tMark Rogers
For'Terms & Listing Contact
1* 9 Iim www.rogersrealty.com or
STN License#2216. \ A 7
tPO Box729, Mt.Airy. NC Call 336-789-2926


You're APPROVED-Guaranteed!
* No Credit Check
* Bad Credit W
* Bankruptcy OK
8AM-10PM EST. M-F
1-800-678-8366
*Checking Account Required
rfi 3~* .4 il gTu


1-4 INTERCHANGE PROPERTY
.15 Toral Acres Dcvclopminci Tract offered in Par'cls
- Excellent Visibility! 1171 ac uplands, 2361 ac wetltands
- Frontages 3,300' on 1-4 1,05Crt on the i-4 intercharnge & :1.168't n CR 5:57


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St
Downtown Monticello
997-5516 www.cbkk.com


* New Listing- Lloyd Acres, 3BR/2BA,
office, apart., 2.44 fenced acres.
$165,000
* Nobles Subdivision- Roomy, remodeled
3BR/2BA, nice master suite. $101,900
* Huge Home- private setting, 10+ acres,
4BR/3.5BA, barn, guest house, Ig. storage
bldg, $429,000
a Reduced- beautiful modular, 9' ceilings,
maple cabinets, built 2003 on 1/2 acre.
$123,000
Many Other Properties
Available


.b.. Di...


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com
Great Cash Flow for the Investor
Apartment House currently 5 could be
7 unit apartment building great potential
as a bed and breakfast with suites
$240,000
Beautiful Home on a Sweet Mountian
Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted
pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field all very conven-
ient to Tallahassee for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000
The Price is Riqht! 2acres high and dry
in Aucilla Forest and Meadows $7,500
Look- Unusual Opportunitv!!! On
Waukeenah Highway easy access to Tal-
lahassee high, dry, fenced and ready to
build on, great for horses or cattle $8,500.
per acre
Price Reduced Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$169,500 don't miss it!
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location north of Greenville
only $295,000
Terrific New Listinq!! 3 bedroom 2 bath
double wide with new gal alum roof and
vinyl siding 3 sheds, fish pond, fenced on
2.4 acres really nice and only $86,500
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road Under Contract 4 bed-
room 2 bath home with garage, out build-
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres in the
Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
South Main Ave west of Monticello off
US 90 on paved county road five wooded
acres with well and septic tank $85,000
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Great Buy big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property SOLD On US 90 in
town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Builders 6+ ac sewer and water
$240,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com

We have qualified buyers looking
for acreage between Monticello and
Lloyd can you help?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Buyers looking for Homes and Land
1.us -lrs ns --i*-ir on- '-'-I '- "r '- .fI 'Br 'r- '- i '-" *r**


M"


i


==E









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 15, 2005

City Resident Threatens Suit


Over Sewer Gas In Her Home


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A city resident who claims that
noxious sewer gases in her house
are compromising her health and her
quality of life is threatening to take
legal action against the city, if offi-
cials don't do something about the
problem.
Dorothy St.Pierre told that council
last Tuesday that the problem of
sewer gas in and around her home
on 230 N. Hickory Street has ex-
Jsted for about 20 years. But during
the last four or five years, the prob-
lem has become intolerable, she
said.
r The reason, she said, is that her
health has declined, "possibly due to
this extended exposure to sewer
,gas.
... "During this period of time, I
have begged the city for help to
eliminate this hazard," St.Pierre
said. "Apparently, most of my cries
for help fell on deaf ears. I have
been stonewalled, sandbagged and
ignored. Now, after getting more as-
sertive, I have been told 'The city.
has done all it knows to do'."
St.Pierre called the implications of
the city's position "mind-boggling",
conjuring "impressions that range
from indifference to incompetence,
and many possibilities in between."
She said she had gone so far as to
hire a Tallahassee firm to correct
plumbing problems in her house that
might be contributing to the odor.
And after almost a year and $2,000,
the firm had advised her that the
plumbing on her property met all
codes, St.Pierre said:
.Given that she had now upgraded
her plumbing system and the sewer
gas persisted, she had to assume that
the problem.was the city's responsi-
bility, St.Pierre said.
SThe action she requested of the
council:
That it resolve the existing im-
passe between her and the city.
That it provide a written state-
-mient attesting to the problem being
the city's responsibility and commit-
ting to correcting it.
That it commit in writing to the
date that the corrective action would
begin and when it would be com-
pleted, underscoring that a comple-
tion date later than the fall of 2005
would not be acceptable);
That it provide a transcript of the
question-and-answer session follow-
ing her presentation to the council.
"In closing, I would be less than
honest if I did not advise you of the
way I feel about my dealings with
the city over these past four or five
years," St.Pierre said. "As an elderly
widow, living alone, and on a lim-
ited income, I feel the lack of action
in correcting my problems and. the
nonacceptance by the city of its re-
sponsibilities has been deliberate.
"At this late stage of my life, the
two things I value most are my
health and my home. Unfortunately
for me, both of the things I value
most have been put in jeopardy by
the arbitrary and capricious posi-
tions taken by the city. To have my
calls for help ignored and to be
stonewalled in my good faith effort
to save my home and my life is, in
my opinion, the most insidious and
repugnant form of deliberate and
gender discrimination I can think
of."


Problem

Existed

More Than

20 Years;

worse NOW



St.Pierre made the veiled threat
that although she represented herself
at present, "some type organization"
might become involved in the future
if the stalemate between her and the
city continued."

Her brother-in-law, Randy Pier-
son, was more blunt. He called the
issue a wake-up call for the city, cit-
ing civil and criminal implications
of the issue.

"If you force a little mouse into a
comer, it's going to fight back,"
Pierson said. "That's the position
you're forced her into. You have the
authority to break the impasse."

Pierson shared with the council a
15-page report put out. by the federal
government on sewer gas. Among
other things, the study reportedly
identifies the gas as a hazardous
compound that can have adverse
health effects, ranging from nausea
to death.

"You better get off this methane
mentality," Pierson told the council
at a later point in the discussion.
"You better get off this mentality of
smoke tests. You need to get an ex-
pert with expertise involved in this.
You need to get someone who has
the equipment to test for the 18 in-
.gredients in the gas."
"If you don't want to do it, then
take that position and force this


City officials appeared at a loss
how to address the problem. City
Superintendent Don Anderson char-
acterized as unfair and inaccurate
St.Pierre's representation of the
city's response thus far.
Himself, city crews, the building
inspector and others had repeatedly
gone to St.Pierre's house and been
unable to detect the problem, Ander-
son said. In fact, the times he had
been at the house, he had not
smelled the odor, he said.

The only thing that he could con-
clude, Anderson said, was that the
problem was internal to St.Pierre's
house. Specifically, he thought the
problem might be with the different
traps in the drains in the house.
"The city's sewer main is going to
have gas," Anderson said. "If the
traps are not working properly in the
house, the gas will get in. Every-
body I've talked to has the same im-
pression. If the traps were installed
properly, gas will not get in the
house."

Absent documentation from the
Tallahassee plumbing firm that
St.Pierre hired or other experts at-
. testing to the city being the cause of
the problem, City Attorney Bruce
Leinback advised that the city take
no action. Otherwise; the solution
likely would prove expensive, as,
well as set a precedent, Leinback
said.
Indeed, given that the city had de-
termined that the problem was not
of its own causing, by state law it
rested with the property owner to
correct the problem, Leinback said.


Ultimately, Councilmen Luther
Pickles, a neighbor of St.Pierre's,
agreed to work with her. Pickles
promised to get with St.Pierre in the
coming days and see if together they
could get to the bottom of the prob-
lem. Whatever the solution, he was
sure the city would work with her,
Pickles said.
The discussion concluded on that
positive note, at least for the time
being.


SELLING TICKETS at the Opera House for Kim Prime, and Lindsey Scott. (News
the Annual Kickoff Dinner were Queen Con- Photo)
testants L-R: Amber Lee, Casey Handley,


DISTRIBUTING programs and selling door
prize tickets at the Festival Kickoff Diner
were L-R: Chevarra Ulee, Alan Chambers,


Carmen Skipworth and Tierra Thompson.
(News Photo)


- 3 Sources of Retirement Income -
Trends in Aging Social


:1 st OthThis is a free seminar
dune a. o SEATING IS LIMITED
6 7:30 Presentation ~ L ~~,~ 1 ....(5)523

11 iJ. F IPA4E HuioueCqudiF ,akw yv.)6 n i '.jCpj 1 881f~,v &7 r".urbi.
fil iikied'sbtn~aiy of Corwin 14CCeth Flri'a Financal.l 1 a 101 ao r. ffu,iile C Sub'Si~iry dl PAS "i CaI&A PAS Cuardan andtIneW


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