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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00045
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 8, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00045
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text










Gerry Medical
Wins Festival
Bed Race

Story, Photos, Page 3


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILTTF, FL. 32611



Diane Clark
Appointed

Victim's Advocate

Story, Photo, Page 5


Gallon, Hankins

TO Celebrate
35th Reunion

Story, Page 7


DuBose Focuses
His Ministry
On Young People

Story, Photo, Page 11


Q Wednesday Morning

co m m m


Monti4


cello
Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY,JUNE 8, 2005


RAMSEY REVELL, 2005 Watermelon Prin- Amber Curry. Junior Miss was the previous
cess, gets crowned by outgoing Junior Miss title of the pageant. (News Photo)


Revell Named



MelIon- princess
AJ~dAMP DirU'lfcfs-s


Donnie Kinsey, Carly Joiner

Crowned Little King, Queen


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Ramsey Revell was named 2005
Watermelon Princess in a pageant of
Sthe same name at the Jefferson
County -High School Auditorium on
Saturday night.
Meanwhile, Donnie Kinsey and
Carly Joiner were named 2005 Little
King and Queen in an event that al-
ternated throughout the evening
with the Watermelon Princess Pag-
eant.
The other royalty in Ramsey's
Court of Honor included First
Runner-up Kaitlin Jackson and Sec-
ond Runner-up Tori Thor.
Thor also was named Miss Conge-
niality and received the Best Talent
Award. Revell received the Evening
Gown Award, in addition to being
crowned Watermelon Princess.
Runners-up for the Little King and
Queen Pageant were Quinton Tho-
mas and Jenny Jackson, both first
runners-up; and Tomas Swickley
and Chelsea Scarborough, both sec-
ond runners-up.
Serving as Mistress of Ceremonies
for the evening was Lisa Remelard,
of Channel 27. Remelard addressed
members of the full-house audience
between costume changes and other
preparations, asking trivia questions
related to past Watermelon festivals.
Opening the evening, with its
1950-styled entertainment theme ti-
tled "50s Summer Fun", the Prin-
cess contestants performed a dance
routine prepared by Jamie Cichon-
Rogers. The performance, choreo-
graphed to the tune of "Fun, Fun,
Fun" by the Beach Boys, included
moves from the swim, the hand jive
and the monkey.
The contestants were dressed in
matching outfits that consisted of
green-and-white tank tops and white
shorts. Completing the summer
look, the contestants went bare-
footed.
The Little King and Queen contest-
ants also danced to a song by the
Beach Boys. This time it wa.
"Surfin' USA".
2004 Little King and Queen Jake
Edwards and Mallory Register,


PRINCESS AND COURT -- From left, Second lin Jackson; and Watermelon Princess,
Runner-up Tori Thor; First Runner-up, Kait- Ramsey Revell. (News Photo)


Sponsors Say Kickoff


Dinner Great Success


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 55th Watermelon Festival
Dinner and Program, held at the Op-
era House on Friday night, is re-
ported to have been a real success.
Sponsors report that some 310
dinner tickets were collected during
the affair, and more tickets were ac-
tually sold. The Monticello/Jeffer-
son County Chamber of Commerce
called it a great start in its fundrais-
ing efforts.
Chamber members collaborated in
the preparations for the meal, with
Chamber Director Mary Frances
Drawdy orchestrating the different
activities.
Frank Stone, with Robert's Cater-
ing, spent the better part of the day
grilling the chicken, while the other
members worked over hot stoves in
the kitchen to get the rest of the
meal together.
Chamber members also prepared
the desserts, which were displayed
on a separate table for the patrons to
select.
The meal, like the desserts, were
made to perfection, judging from the
expressions on the faces of the din-
ers.
The serving line went out the door
at times, but no one seemed to mind.
The majority of meals served were
for dine-in. The evening was busy
with friends and neighbors visiting


with one another.
The band, US 19 SOUTH, was set
up at one end of the Opera House
and played throughout the meal and
into the evening. Because of the
threat of rain, they did not play in
the garden area. Nonetheless, the
dance area in front of the band was
full at all times, with both dancers
and listeners enjoying the evening
and the tunes.
The talented members of the band
were Charles Bryan, rhythm guitar;
Bryan Freeland, lead guitar; Brett
Kelly, lead vocals; Heath Bass,
drums; and Jason Freeland, bass
guitar.
Queen Pageant contestants, mean-
while, sold door prize tickets to the
diners as they entered the Opera
House. The ticket sellers were hard
to resist, with their big smiles and
cheerful dispositions.
Another area of the Opera House
was set up to display the door prizes
donated by area businesses. Donors
were Jackson's Drug Store, Southern
Friends, Great Adventure Outfitters,
Monticello Florist & Gifts, Coldwell
Banker Kelly & Kelly Properties,
Snapdragon, Imagine Interiors, Gel-
ling's Florist, Ted's Barber Shop,
Milady's Shop, Jefferson Builders
Mart & Hardware, Buddy's Home
Furnishing, HuckleBerry's
Creations, and Monticello Trading
Company, LLC.
Cindy and Don Lee won the grand
prize, a state-of-the-art 27-inch


Sanyo color television donated by
Buddy's Home Furnishing. The Lees
also won five other prizes during the
evening. Not bad, considering they
purchased six tickets for $5.
Co-Chairs Betsy Gray and Mary
Frances Drawdy started the evening
with the introduction of the 2005
Watermelon Festival booklet cover
winner, Jessica Hagan. For her
beautiful artwork on the booklet
cover, Hagan received a Savings
Bond and a Festival T-shirt. She is a
sixth grader at Aucilla Christian
Academy.
Second and third-place winners
were respectively Kaitlin Jackson
and Cheyenne Adams, also students
at ACA. Both received Festival T-
shirts for their artwork and efforts.
Gray and Drawdy next introduced
the chairs for the Little King and
Queen Pageant and the Princess
Pageant: Lauren Blank, Nicole Hon-
cell, Christy Clark, and Leslie Ra-
bon.
Gray and Drawdy also introduced
the chairs of the Queen Pageant: Ro-
slyn Bass, Ginnie Joyner and Linsey
Taylor. The chair people for the dif-
ferent events in turn introduced their
contestants for this year's pageants,
as well as last year's winners.
Sponsors for the band were Jack-
son's Drug Store, Great Adventure
Outfitters, Monticello Florist &
Gifts, Coldwell Banker Kelly &
Kelly Properties, Edenfield Hard-
ware, State Farm Insurance Tommy
Surles, and Judge Bobby Plaines.


meanwhile, performed a 1950s
dance routine to the song
"Lollipop", which caused the audi-
ence to erupt in applause.
Megan Lee next opened the talent
segment of the pageant for the Wa-
termelon Princess contestants. Lee
performed a dance routine to
"Happy Face" by Destiny's Child.
She wore a gray capris and a tank
top with a ball cap, her moves re-
sembling the athletics of a cheer-
leader.
Jackson performed a dance routine
to "Dude Looks Like a Lady" by
Aerosmith. She wore a royal blue
velvet one-piece outfit with a se-
quined top. Her dance was rhythmic
and creative.
Thor performed a dance routine to


"Do You Love Me" and "Soul
Man". She was dressed with a se-
quined derby and a black dance leo-
tard with a sequined top. Her routine
focused on dance moves of the 50s,
including the Mashed Potato, the
Twist, and the Funky Chicken.
Jessika Prevatt sang, "Who I Am'
by Jessica Andrews. She wore a
lime green sequined dress with 'a
pixie cut, a flared skirt and a halter
strap top.
Lisa Kisamore sang, "When I
Think of Angels" by Tamie O'Neal,
which she dedicated to her late un-
cle. She wore a white slant cut hem
dress with a large charm belt and a
white blouse.
Revell performed a piano solo ti-
tled "Over The Rainbow". She wore
a well-fitted black dress with a
rhinestone necklace.
Little King and Queen contestants
(See Revell Page 3)


GETTING READY to roar off the starting line in the bed
race Thursday night is the Rotary Club team. From left,
Bobby Plaines, Mike Humphrey, and Bill Beaty, resting on
bed. See related story and more photos, page 3. (News
Photo)


137TH YEAR NO.45. 50 CENTS


I


101 LAX A, -, .- I :







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005

Water Melon Princess Contestants

Ready For Evening Gown Competition


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The District School Board of Jefferson County
Announces A Regular School Board Meeting To
Which The Public Is Invited.

Date: June 13, 2005
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building
Call To Order:
Invocation:
Pledge:
Call To Sign Up:
Ratify Minutes: Regular meeting of May 9, 2005 Special
Meeting of May 23, 2005 and Workshop of May 31, 2005
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Join us at the

5 5th Annual

Monticello Watermelon Festival


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r.= .- .. ,.... .. .. -..,-
MEMBERS of the Kiwanis Club prepare to defend their title
as reigning champions. Alas, they lost. From left, Doug
Wainright, Tim Thompson and Jane Vollertsen. (News
Photo)


AND the winning team and new champions of the bed race
is the Gerry Medical team of Stephen Demott, J. T. Brown
and J.A. Davis. (News Photo).


Gerry Medical Center Wins


Melon Festival Bed
station was: "Would it be the Ki-
FRAN HUNT wanians again this year or will
Staff Writer Rotary reclaim the trophy?."
For whatever reason, only three
Gerry Medical Center won the beds were entered in the contest,


fourth annual Watermelon Fetival
Bed Race, Thursday, earning the
coveted "Bragging Rights Traveling
Trophy."
Shortly before the race was sched-
uled to begin, people began to line
the streets, despite the heavy threat
of rain. The major topic of conver-_


compared to seven beds last year,
but that didn't halt the action.
Entrants were: Gerry Medical,
Kiwanis, and Rotary Clubs.
Spokesperson Jan Rickey said all
were good, strong competitors.
Coordinators decided to run all
of the beds at. the same time, and the


Race
teams lined up on the starting line.
Kiwanis bolted out to a hefty lead
with Gerry Medical close behind.
In contrast, Rotary maintained a
slow trot, far behind the other teams.
During the turn, the distance be-
tween Gerry Medical and Kiwanis
closed, with Kiwanis still in the
lead.
Rotary was far in the rear, about
half way to the turn.
Chants and cheering came from
the crowd: "Come on Rotary, step


m4 a

13.4


on the gas! Come on Gerry, floor it!
Come on Kiwanis, put the pedal to
the metal!"
Gerry continued to close the gap
coming up the hill, inching closer,
and soon they was neck and neck,
with Kiwanis, both pushing mightly
to the finish line
Just a few feet from the finish,
Gerry went into overdrive to bolt
forward and cross the line.
Moments later, Rotary crossed the
line, quipping, "Where's the
ribbon?"
On the Gerry medical team were J.
A. Davis, riding, and pushers Ste-
phen Demott and J. T. Brown.
Kiwanians Doug Wainright and
Tim Thompson were pushers and
Jane Vollertsen, rider.'
On the Rotary team, pushing were
Bobby Plaines and Mike Humphry,
land riding was Bill Beaty.
None of the three contestants had
decorated their beds for the race, so
there' was no "Best Dressed Bed"
award this year.
The proceeds of nearly $75, will
be donated to the Humane Society,
charity of Gerry Medical's choice.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005 PAGE 3

Photo's by Suzanne
850-997-4869
,w' %.ww.photographsbysuzanne.com






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J. T. Brown, Stephen Demott and J. A.
Davis. (News Photo)


Revell Named Princess
(Continued From Page 1)
kept audience members erupting in GERRY MEDICAL CENTER
laughter during the question-and- G R M D A CT
answer segment of the pageant. 555 North Jefferson Street Monticello
Simple questions drew out some
of the most creative answers.
"What's your favorite color?"
"Red, because my dad has a red Our Medical Staff includes:
Corvette and he won't let my mom Jacquline A. Davis, M.D.
drive it." Or "Pink, because tough James T. Brown, Jr., M.D.'
guys wear pink." 1
"What's your favorite animal?"
"Billy goat, because my mom 6 Also Available:
wants to have one and my dad won't O Home Health Services
let here." Or "rattlesnake, because Outpatient Rehabilitation Services
when they bite, they strike."
"Who's your favorite person?"
"My mom, because she took me to We are currently welcoming new patients
Nascar to meet my favorite driver."
Little King and Queen contestants
receiving awards included Sara Office Hours:
Joiner, best personality; Ria Mon. Fri: 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Wheeler, best queen hair; Sara Mon. Fri: 8:30 a.m.- 5:00 ..
McElveen, best dancer; and Rafael Sat. 8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon
Rosas, best king eyes.
Also, Brooklyn McGlammory, For an appointment, call 850-997-2511
best queen eyes; Emily Knowles,
best queen smile; J. T. Harp, best
king smile; Donnie Kinsey, best
king formal wear; and Carly Joiner, We accept:
best queen evening wear. Medicare, Medicaid, Vista/HPSE, Blue Cross Blue Shield,
Serving as judges for the pageant r
were Dottie Young, Kimberly West Commercial Insurance, & Private Pay
and Tammy Mott. Serving as the
auditor was Joel Clark. Affiliated with John D. Archbold, Memorial Hospital
Visit our web site at www.archbold.org


NOTICE OF PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE
LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO


AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA AMENDING
ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR JURISDICTION; ADOPTING AN
AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP
TO INCLUDE A FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR A CERTAIN
RECENTLY ANNEXED PARCEL CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 12.84
ACRES; PROVIDINGFOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2005-06. The future land use map proposed designation is RLD-
Residential Low Density for a parcel located on Rocky Branch Road near the intersection
of Morris Road and identified on the map below. A public hearing on the ordinance will
be held on June 14, 2005 at 7:0.0 p.m. at Monticello City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, FL 32344. Interested persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with
respect to the proposed ordinance. The entire text of the ordinance may'he inspected at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.


ii


44**


GERRY MEDICAL won the bed race on
Thursday night. Here winning members
catch their breath after the race. From left,









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
40ID4 Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Establish Healthy


Habits For Kids


From Our Photo File


Il~ ~



I" ~
~d


MEMBERS of the Methodist Men's Housing
Coalition repair a house on Hill Street in the


winter of 1994. From left, Rex Ware, Gary
, Hudson and Buck Bird. (News Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Even when school is out, the op-
portunity to learn is always
available. Especially since your chil-
dren follow your example.
That's why the American Heart
Association recommends that par-
erits take time to establish smart and
healthy lifestyle habits your kids
will have for life.
Nutritionists say it can be easy for
school-aged kids to learn healthy
eating habits.
In fact, studies show that healthy
habits established early in life tend
to; remain with people well into their
adult years. The American Heart
Association offers tips that parents
can use year-round.
First, be active with your family.
Go for walks. Enjoy a bike ride.
Toss a ball during a backyard
picnic. Not only will you share extra
playtime with the kids, but physical.
activity is a fun way to burn extra
calories, stay fit and maintain a
healthy heart!
Second, pack your and your chil-
dren's lunches with nutritious, low-
fat, low-cholesterol foods like:
Low or nonfat dairy products
such as skim milk and low-fat string
cheese;
Sandwiches made with whole-
grain breads and extra-lean meats or
fish;


Low-fat condiments such as
mustard instead of mayonnaise;
Fresh fruits and vegetables such
as apples and oranges, carrots, and
celery;
Baked pretzels, baked tortilla
chips and salsa, and low-fat yogurts
for tasty treats.
Third, look for the American
Heart Association's heart-check
mark while grocery shopping. The
distinctive red heart with a white
check markon food labels from the
association's Good Certification
Program helps you quickly and re-
liably find healthy foods that can be
part of a sensible eating plan.
Food packages bearing the simple
logo have been evaluated to ensure
they meet the American Heart Asso-
ciation's criteria for heart-healthy
levels of saturated fat and choles-
terol for healthy people over the age
2.
For even more convenience, use
the association online Grocery List
Builder to create, print and take
your heart-healthy shopping list
with you to the store. (Your kids
might enjoy building their own spe-
cial list!).
The Web site features a complete
list of certified foods. Log on to
heartcheckmark.org. It's a great way
to shop smart and fast! (NAPS).


'Ditzy Stage' Was Left Behind


She was a fairly bright person, as I
recall, but she had problems with the
little things. Let's call her Sally for
the sake of this column.,
Sally was a reporter working here
a number of years ago. She was well
educated, a good writer, and had the
proverbial nose for news. Pretty
good so far, huh?
One morning Sally came to the of-
fice and announced "you can't get
off I-10 until you come to an exit!"
We all kind of looked at her in
disbelief and nobody said anything.
After all, what could you say?
But, from that day forward Sally
attracted quizzical glances as, she'd
let loose with a no-brainer now and
then.
I recall giving her an assignment!,
in writing carefully giving the first
and last name of the person to be
contacted.
I wrote, "please call John Smith
(not his real name) and ask him
about such and such."
She came to my desk later carry-


Publisher's

Notebook |'
__________,',


.Ron Cc/ihon


ing the phone book and said she
couldn't find John Smith under the
J's. I told her that's because the
man's last name was Smith and that
wouldn't be located under the J's.
Fact is. I felt rather bad saying that
because it made her sound dumb.
She was not deterred and replied,
"My phone book must be organized
differently from yours."
I said nothing as I looked up the
number for her.
Despite her peculiarities, every-


body liked Sally.
A few weeks went by and I
guessed Sally was getting off I-10
okay and finding numbers in the
phone book when she cut loose with
another no-biaincri ,Iai'had the of-
fice roaring _.
She arrived for work one day with
a hubcap in her- hand and asked if
the car would run without it.
We assured her the hubcap had lit-
tle to do with how well her car ran.
Sally seemed relieved.


Several months passed and Sally
got an offer to move down state and "
write for a large publication. We
were pleased for her and wished her
well. "
I saw Sally one more time when .
we ran into each other at a press
convention in Orlando.
She was in the company of media -.
mogul and looked terrific. Her hair
was smartly styled and she was .
wearing a beautiful dress.
I asked how things were going for
her and she said, "never better."
We reminisced about her work at
this newspaper and she told me she
learned a lot here.
I was careful not to mention the
no-brainer episodes but she tackled
them head-on.
'' "Do y6u reWember-whin I could- 7
n't figure out how to get off 1-10,"'
she asked?
I told her I did.
"Well, I'm doing much better 3
now," she said. "I'm through with.
that ditzy stage and moving on."
I told her I was glad for her.


Will National Parks Survive?


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 2, 1995
The County Commission approved
two important measures on Thurs-
day relating to the I-10 sewer/water
expansion project.
Students at Jefferson County High
School earned a combined 3.3 rating
in the Florida Writes assessment of
tenth grade students' writing skills,
tying them with the statewide aver-
age.
Hurricane Allison was down
graded to a tropical storm Monday
afternoon by the National Weather
service, even as the storm made
landfall in the Jefferson-Taylor
County area about 11 a.m.
TWENTY YEARS
June 7, 1985
Restoration efforts for the historic
Monticello' Opera House received
several boosts in the last weeks in-
cluding a $150,000 non matching
line item in the legislative appro-
priations bill.
The Watermelon Festival Little
King and Queen Contest will be
held June 18 at 6 p.m. at the JCHS
Auditorium.
It's watermelon time. Despite cold
spring weather and not enough rain,
melon growers in Jefferson County
are starting to load melons this
week.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 5, 1975
Five more of the sixteen candidates
for this year's Watermelon Pageant
are busy pi -la i ing for the big night.
They are : Sylvia Fountain, spon-
sored by the Monticello Cattlemen's
Association; Julie Gray, Lloyd
Homemaker's Club; Cindy Hamil-
ton, Monticello Woman's Club; Ka-
tie Harp, Jefferson Square; and
Carolyn Hightower, sponsored by


the United Men's Association.
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 4, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Bassett spent
several days last week visiting her,
father, Harry Collins and Mrs. Col-
lins in Umatilla.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Norris and
daughters spent Sunday in Blount-
stown attending the baccalaureate
and graduation of her sister.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 3, 1955
Wilma Reichert received her BS
degree in Home Economics from
Auburn University.
John Hawkins and Jane Williams,
JCHS seniors, were awarded FSU
journalism awards for their excep-
tional work on the school year book.
James Temple was to be in Chip-
ley, GA, to represent the local Red
Cross Chapter at a ten-day National

Aquatic school.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
June 1, 1945
Mary Fountain, Jackie Fountain,
Frances Sauls, Janet Wellner, Col-
leen Bishop, Betty McDaniel,
Gwendolyn Hatchett, Clyde An-
drews and Hilda Hamilton were se-
lected to attend the 4-H short course
in Tallahassee.


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.

500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


BY PEYTON KNIGHT
Columnist

America's park system is in trou-
ble. Our nation's 388 national parks,
historic sites, battlefields,
landmarks, lake shores, recreation
areas, scenic rivers and trails have
an estimated collective maintenance
backlog of between $4.1 and $6.8
billion.
That's almost $18 million per en-
tity. Yet as this crisis continues to
snowball, Congress has not done
enough to strike at the heart of the
problem.
Will our national parks 'survive for
future generations? The answer is
simply "no", unless Congress acts
responsibly and reins in the raven-
ous appetite of the National Park
Service (NPS) and federal land ac-
quisition programs.
The federal government currently
owns almost one-third of America's
total land mass. NPS is assigned to
caring for much of this property. It
clearly can't handle its current re-
sponsibility. How on Earth does it
make sense to give it more?


,In order to solve this crisis, Con-
gress must make a sincere commit-
ment to curb all future NPS pro-
gramming and acquisitions, and
scale back expansion plans already.
in the pipeline that will only add
more fuel to the backlog fire.
You can't simply pledge more
funding at one end, and continue
with out-of-control expansion at the
other end. This only exacerbates the
problem.
In the private sector, businesses
must consider expansion carefully,
lest they find their resources over-
drawn and succumb to implosion
and bankruptcy.
In the world of the federal govern-
minent, agencies such as the National
*Park Service seek an infinite expan-
sion of their nefdom, and all too of-
ten Congress rubber-stamps these
requests with little regard for practi-
calities such as available resources
or funding.

This reckless expansion threatens
the future of our nation's national
park system and undermines the
ability of the agency to meet its


commitments to future generations.
According to the National Parks
Conservation Association, public
safety and public access rank high
among the casualties of our over-*
drawn Park Service.
Yosemite National Park in Cali-
fornia desperately needs everything
from trail and campground mainte-
nance to a new sewer system and
electrical upgrades.
Yellowstone National Park has de-
crepit buildings and over 150 miles
of roads that need repair.
In Mount Rainier National Park in
Washington, travel to back country
cabins is impossible because of ne-
glected bridges and trails.
The foundation of the visitor cen-
ter at the USS Arizona Memorial in
Hawaii is crumbling and literally
sinking into the ground. Ancient
stone structures are collapsing at
Chaco Culture National Historical
Park in New Mexico.
In Gettysburg National Military
Park, many historic structures need
rehabilitation and a failing water
line needs to be repaired.
When public access to parks isn't
taking a back-seat to scarce re-


sources, the Park Service is actually
spending money to shut people out.
; The Park Service's "Yosemite
Valley Plan" would cost close to a
half-billion dollars and would actu-
ally reduce the number of parking
spaces in Yosemite Valley by two-
thirds.

Instead of being able to leisurely
enjoy the sights and wonders of Yo-
semite, this grand plan calls for park
patrons to be herded onto a fleet of
buses and shuffled through the park
on the Park Service's schedule.

Under the plan, hundreds of camp-
sites that were destroyed in a 1997
flood would not be replaced, and
nearly 60 percent of the Park's re- .
maining campsites accessible by car
would be removed.

The National Park Service is
quickly earning the moniker of our
nation's slumlord and Congress' re-
sponse should not be to reward NPS
with more property and more pro-
gramming.
Rather, Congress should seek to
scale back the Park Service's duties
until a manageable level is attained.


Retirees Face Income. Test


Experts say many Americans may
be in for a rude awakening when it
comes time to retire. The problem is
that the majority of Americans do
not have a plan that takes them from
saving for retirement to living in re-
tirement.
According to research done by the
financial services company ING,
two-thirds of Americans do not
know how much income they will
need to live on during retirement,
nor do they have a plan for "paying
themselves" once they stop working.
For example, industry data indi-
cate that baby boomers now have a
50-50 chance of living past age 90


but most do hot have a plan in place
to ensure adequate income for 25 or
more years in retirement.
Plus, many people have yet to ac-
cept the fact that the retirement rules
have changed and retirees alone are
personally responsible for managing
their retirement income.
In addition, the research indicates
that most do not understand the fi-
nancial risks of retirement either,
such as investment risk, inflation
risk and longevity risk.
ING refers to this critical double
threat of retirees not knowing how
much money they will need where it
will come from as "America's In-


come Challenge."
Fortunately, there are a number of
things that retirees and future retir-
ees can do to address the problem.
One is to learn all you can about
retirement planning. For many, that
means sitting down with a qualified
financial advisor to determine how
much money you will need and
what its source will be.
Another step you can take is to in-
vestigate options to ensure you get a
check in the mail every month,
guaranteed for the rest of your life.
t'or some, that may mean consid-
ering an annuity. Annuities can be a
type of personal retirement program


with many of the same benefits of
the company pension plans of the
past.
There are a wide variety of annui-
ties available that offer an array of
benefits including protection of
principal or income, guaranteed
death benefits, tax advantages and a
range of retirement income options
including guaranteed income for
life.
A good retirement income plan
starts with a purposeful conversation
with your financial advisor. This
conversation should cover:

(See Retirees Page 5)


...









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8. 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...



Walker Responds To


Title Business Story


Dear Editor:
'After reading your June 3 article
referring to "the disagreement be-
tween Tax Collector Lois Hunter
a"d her predecessor", I felt com-
pelled to write to clarify my position
on this matter.
'When I decided to open a tag and
title business four years ago, I ap-
proached Tax Collector Lois Hunter
about contracting with her office so
tl at the apportioned agency fees
w.puld go to Jefferson County. She
summarily rejected my business of-
fer.
The Taylor County Tax Office
welcomed my business so I set up
sl op in Perry, since title office had
to, reside in the same county as the
tax collector's office. The long dis-


tance drive has become a bit of a
hardship on me so I requested that
the state allow me to bring my busi-
ness closer to home and process the
work remotely.

My request was approved under
the condition that I get a letter of ap-
proval from Jefferson County Tax
Collector Lois Hunter. I then called
Lois, explained the situation to her,
and requested the required letter.
She stated that she did not make any
decisions without approval of the
county commissioners and if they
approved it, she would also. That is
when I asked to be on the agenda at
the next commissioner's meeting, to
explain my request.
When Lois informed me the week









A A .


DIANE CLARK, here with Sheriff David Hobbs, began her
new duties as Victims Advocate Representative last month.
Clark took the duties over from Sally Cole, who was pro-
moted to investigator. (News Photo)

Diane Clark Appointed

Victim's Advocate Rep


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Sheriff David Hobbs reports the
appointment of Diane Clark as the
Victims Advocate Representative
(VOCA) for the, Jefferson County
Sheriffs Office (JCSO).
Clark, served as a secretary for
the JCSO for two years.
Her duties prior to her appoint-
ment .as VOCA, included the main-
tenance of felony case records and
outstanding felony warrants.
Hobbs said it was Clark who
tracked down and .located the fugi--
tive, Richard Kesler, who had been
sought on child molestation


Retirees
(Continued From Page 4)
Evaluating thd income you'll
need once you stop working.
Projected essential expenses in
retirement, such as housing, food,
transportation and health care.
Discretionary expenses, such as
entertainment, travel, family care,
taxes and charitable contributions.
Income sources from "predict-
able" sources, such as Social Secu-
rity income, and traditional
pensions.
Income from investments and
assets, employer-sponsored retire-
ment plans and other potential in-
come sources.
Once you've reviewed expense in-
come gaps, work with your financial
advisor to explore options for filling
them, including determining the
amount of income needed to cover
monthly expenses throughout retire-
ment, considering such factors as in-
flation and withdrawals (NAPS).


NEED I


HELP? 9
GRAB THE LINE
Call our
lifeline.
It's toll-free.
THE VOICE OF HOPE
1 800-572-1717 Muscar Dystrophy
Association


charges for the past eight years.
As a result of her efforts, Kesler
currently resides at the County Jail
awaiting trial.
Clark began her duties as the
VOCA representative early last
month, replacing former VOCA
representative Sally Cole, who was
transferred to the Criminal Investi-
gations Division, as an investigator.
These changes have been made
as a part of the overall organiza-
tional and policy changes by
Hobbs.
He will be making further organ-
izational changes over the coming
months, as assessments are com-
pleted and needed adjustments be-
come apparent.


40 --. 4:
Veterinary Assoc., Monticello
J.L. Spencer, DVM
1599 N. Jefferson, Monticello, FL 32344
1 mi. N. of the Courthouse
Phones (850) 997-2506 / 997-0229
Fax (850) 997-6470
For after hours emergencies call:
(850) 997-2506
Competent, Compassionate Care for all
Animals Large or Small


following the commissioner's meet-
ing (where they unanimously ap-
proved my request) that she had no
intention of signing the letter unless
I broke my contract with Taylor
County, I dropped the matter. I had
previously explained to both Lois
and the commissioners that my busi-
ness does not compete locally. Most
of my title work is with businesses
out-of-state. I am able to renew tags
and do so for my immediate family
only.
I want to thank my County Com-
missioner Danny Moore and Com-
missioner Junior Tuten for their
support and their forward-thinking
attitude that says we welcome and
need independent businesses in our
county (especially from long time
taxpayers like myself and my
family) and see the potential for fu-
ture economic growth for our
county because of it.

Sincerely,
Frances H. Walker


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Big Bend Ghost Trackers (BBGT)
will conduct a haunted tour, 9 p.m.,
Saturday, June 18.
'Reservations are required to as-
sure a good turnout. To reserve,
fdall 562-2516, in Tallahassee.
Cost of the Tour is $10.
The tour will begin at the Cham-
ber of Commerce, formerly the
Margaret's Catholic Church, where
many reports have bee made that
organ music and singing could be
heard there at night, then te tour
veers to Scottie Ebberbach's house
where the story of recent findings
will be told.
Next on the tour, the John Den-
ham Bed and Breakfast, where
there is reported to be much para-
normal' activity, especially in the
"Blue Room", and the ghost of
John Denham has been seen on oc-
casion, and the A-building at the
Jefferson County High School,
where the lights' have been reported
to be mysteriously burning at night
and the laughter of children at play
have been reported.
Other locations on the tour in-


Power Company Offers

Tips On Saving Energy


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


With -the summer beginning to
heat up, Progress Energy offers en-
ergy efficiency tips for residents.
Even before the critical start of
summer, temperatures have al-
ready hit 90 degrees and above in
central Florida..With the tempera-
,.tures rising and cooling systems
running for longer periods of time,
Progress Energy recommends the
following tips to help save some
electricity and dollars this season:
Set your thermostat on the high-
est comfortable setting. If you're
leaving for the day, turn it up a
couple of degrees. Do not turn
your cooling system off unless.
you'll be gone for an extended pe-
riod of time. Cooling systems
work best when they maintain a
steady temperature, instead of mak-
ing large adjustments.
Consider installing a program-
mable thermostat to adjust the.tem-
perature automatically and maxi-
mize your energy savings.
Change your filters monthly.
Dirty filters can increase operating
costs by 20 percent. Do not block
registers and return vents with fur-
niture or drapes.


Use ceiling and portable fans to
keep air circulating.
Close blinds, drapes and shades
during the hottest part of the day.
-This keeps the sun's rays from
heating your house.
Plant shade trees on the sunny
side of the house or building to
provide natural shading.
Because humid air holds more
heat, take lukewarm showers and
baths and run the bathroom exhaust
fan to reduce humidity in your
home.
Use your microwave or counter
top appliances for cooking instead
of the oven or stove.
Make sure your home is prop-
erly insulated. Progress Energy
recommends R-30 insulation for
the ceilings, R-19 for the floors,
and R-16 for outside walls. In ex-
isting homes, wall installations may
be too expensive to put in, so con-
centrate on attic and floor insula-
tion.
If you have a pool, limit the
time your pool pump runs to six
hours a day during the summer.
For more information on energy
efficiency or to learn about Pro-
gress Energy's wide variety of pro-
grams to help customers maximize
savings on energy bills, visit the
company's customer service page
at www.progress-energy.com.


elude the current home of the Shir-
ley .family, and the Palmer house,
said by BBGT to be the most
haunted house in Monticello.
Also on the tour is the Palmer
Medical Office, also said to have
much paranormal activity, and
where Dr. Palmer created 666
cough syrup; the Hanging Tree,
otherwise known as the "Meeting
Oak;" the Perkins Opera House,
where the ghost of John, Henry
Perkins, who loved the theater, is
said to still reside and a BBGT in-
yestigation gathered proof of that
theory.
The tour also includes the Jeffer-
son County Court House, where af-
ter being vacated after hours,
workers have reported hearing
footsteps and door opening and
closing.
Also, on the tour is Old Bank An-
tiques, the Wirick-Simmons House;
the Scott-Simmons house, where
there is reported to also be inuch
paranormal activity in what used to
be the slave's quarters upstairs, the
former Funkshun Junkshun, where
there have been many reports of
paranormal activity and incidences
have been witnessed by the BBGT;


Race Against Time
Without a life-saving shock from an
AED, a device that can help restore the
heart's normal rhythm, cardiac arrest
victims' chances of survival drop 10
percent per minute.

To learn more about AEDs (automated
external defibrillators) and CPR courses
in your community, call 1 -877-AHA-4CPR.


the former Monticello News build-
ing, where some activity is be-
lieved to occur.
The tour concludes at the old
County Jail, where BBGT believes
paranormal activity takes place.


9M


CALLOH 8VIUT OBfn
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

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CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Remodeling Repairs
Additions
Kitchen & Bath Remodels

Licensed
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hewaller@earthlink.net
562-4542

REMODELIRS
K-g mifi'iBBB


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18 Hole Golf Course
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Take Madison -Quitman Hwy (Hwy 53 N)
to 6 Miles North of the Florida Georgia line
6300 Madison Hwy Quitman, GA 31643
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$20 Cart & Green Fee Driving Range Now Open 8 am 6 pm


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Visit our Showroom to find out
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When was


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When you invest in our community
through United Way, thie returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
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307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, Ft. 32303 (904) 414-0844 I


Ghost Trackers Plan Haunted


Tour During Melon Festival














PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8,2005


Lifestyle


N


Monticello Academy


Taking Applications


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Applications are now being ac-
cepted for student enrollment for the
fall semester at Monticello Christian
Academy.
School Administrator, Pastor
Mike Burke, said classes are being
formed for grades K-5 through 12th
and the deadline for enrollment is
July 29.
"Our objective is to educate the
'total person', mentally, physically,
and spiritually," the Administrator
said. "In this role, we stand as a
partner with parents, helping them
fulfill their responsibility of bring-
ing up children who will be respect-
ful and equipped to serve our
country professionally and spiritu-
ally.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A mandatory camp counselors
training session will take place, 9
a.m. to 3 p.m., Friday, June 24, at
the 4-H Extension Office.
Anyone interested in becoming a
camp counselor should be able and
willing: to demonstrate maturity and
stability; to guide in decision mak-
ing; have the ability to work under
indirect supervision; to attend all ac-
tivities and events; be friendly, but
not partial, to everyone; understand _


Three Churches

To Host Revial


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Three area churches will host a
community revival 7 p.m. daily be-
ginning Sunday and running
through Friday.
The three churches, and their re-
spective pastors, are Bethel A.M.E.
Church, 410 East York Street, Rev.
Helen Johnson Robinson; Memorial
M.B. Church, Rev. J.B. Duval; and
Greater Fellowship M.B. Church,
Rev. Dr. Melvin Roberts.
Guest speaker for the Sunday serv-


camp rules, health, and regulations;
respect the adults and campers; and
be firm without being bossy.
Counselors must also: be tactful in'
what they say; be patient with camp-
ers to maintain a clean camp; and
fulfill duties, assignments, and jobs
delegated by the adults; be aware of
campers' welfare; help them adust to
new surroundings; and be under-
standing to their feelings.
Under no circumstance are males
allowed in females cabins, and fe-
males are not allowed in males cab-
ins. This is an automatic trip home.
The deadline to sign up as camp
counselor is Monday, June 20
ice will, be Rev. Albert Bivens, Jr.,
from Bethel A.M.E. Church in Bel-
leville.
Guest -speaker for the MNonday
service will be Rev. Maurice Evans
from the New Jerusalem M.B.
Church in Havana.
Tuesday's guest speaker will be
Rev. John White II, from New Mt.
Zion A.M.E. Church in Tallahassee.
Wednesday through Friday, Rev.
Henry E. Green Jr., from Mount
Herman A.M.E. Church in Miami
Gardens, will.be the guest speaker.
The song service will be provided
by Bethel A.M.E. Church Commu-
nity Choir.
All churches and the community
are invited to attend and share in
- this great revival service and be
blessed.


CARD OF THANKS
I just want to say many thanks to
one of the best "kept secrets" in Tal-
lahassee, Florida. I had my total
shoulder replaced on May 11 and
what an experience. I spent three
nights and four days in Tallahassee
Medical Center and then went to
TMH Rehab for eight days of ther-
apy. It was a great experience even
under difficult circumstances., My
therapists were very professional
and everyone in TMH Rehab were
very professional and
compassionate. I want to say thank
you for the special blessing of hav-
ing friends as Ron and Pat Cichon,
Calvary Baptist Church, my pastor
and wife, Bro. David and Christi,
and everyone in Monticello who
called or sent cards. Thanks to all of
you for the wonderful food brought,
in! What a blessing to be in Monti-
cello.
Sincerely,
Sylvia and David Amert


Methodist Church Sets

Vacation Bible School


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff %% riter


Burke emphasized the Bible-
centered philosophy of the school,
which establishes a firm foundation
for its academic and character build-
ing goals. i
Academic excellence is promoted

in a disciplined, success-oriented
environment. Studies show that the
academic achievement in Christian
schools far passes the national pub-
lic school average.
Emphasis is placed on mastering
major concepts of all academic sub-
jects as well as the Bible. Students
can progress at rates based upon
their own capabilities.
Biblical integration throughout the
entire curriculum teaches students
"how to. live, not just how to make a
living."
For further information contact
Burke at 997-6048 or 294-1006.


AMBER CURRY, 2004 Jr. Miss, fixes her hair, preparatory
to taking her last walk as reigning queen. (News Photo)


MARSHA PLAINES helps Watermelon Princess contestant
Kaitlin Jackson prepare for the competition. (News Photo)


Summer Learning Camp

Classes Began Monday
Students will participate in various
DEBBIE SNAPP art and outdoor activities as well as
Staff Writer computer learning skills.
Among volunteers at the Camp,
The L Centeare: Byron Barnhart, Gloria Cox-
The Learning Center is opening a Jones, Cornelius Barnhart, and Mary
Summer Learning Camp for the Madison.
youth in and arourid Monticello be- To schedule a child or to volunteer
ginning Monday, June 6. services, contact Barnhart at 251-
The camp days will run from 9 0386 or Jones at 997-4572.
a.m. to Noon, Monday through In other news at The Learning
Thursday, and continue through the Center, the Tuesday night computer
summer as long as there is a need. classes are at capacity.
Special focus will be on the sub- The response to all the classes of-
jects of Reading, Math, and Lan- fered by the Center has been grati-
guage Arts. ying for the Board and volunteers.


The First United Methodist
Church of Monticello will hold its
annual Vacation Bible School 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The theme of this year's Bible
School is "Holk Land Adventure."
During the \\eek, kids will be trav-
eling back in time to the days of Je-
SLIs
Kids % ill experience ancient Jew-
ish crafts in the Jerusalem Market-
place. Crafts will include carpentry,
poetry, a herbs and spices shop,
jeweir, making, and a barnyard of
li\e animals.
i Kids ~ ill also experience a
Jerusalem-st) le playground and a
. synagogue school.




Hightower To

i Marry Peters
I Mr. and Mrs. Donald Hightower,
of Wacissa, are proud to announce
" the upcoming marriage of their
daughter, Donnelle Leanne, to Rich-
. ard Charles Peters, son of Sandra
Johnson, of Wacissa, and Brooks
Peters, of Lamont.
The bride-to-be is a 1999 graduate
. of Christian Heritage Academy. She,
is presently employed at Tallahassee
Ear, Nose, and Throat.
The groom-to-be is a 1990 gradu-
ate of Jefferson County High
School. He is presently employed
with the City of Tallahassee.
The couple plans a 3 p.m. wed-
ding at the Wacissa Pentecostal Ho-
H lines Church in Wacissa on July 2.
A reception will follow in the
church's fellowship hall.
Friends ani avti-Ves are invited
to attend.


Organizers say the Holy Land Ad-
venture will help kids experience.
life the way Jesus lived it.
It will also help kids to understand
the land where Jesus walked and his
love for each of us, the organizers
say.
All kids who are headed into K-4
through 5th grades are invited to at-
tend the Vacation Bible School.
An adult must register each child
individually. To register, call the
church at 997-5545.


Auxiliary Ladies

Honor Veterans

Memorial Day
Eleven members of the VFW Post,
2a 1 Ladies Auxiliary donned new'
uniforms for the Memorial Day'
ceremony at Howard Middle School;
last Monday. i
The uniforms are royal blue, with
white blouses that are accented with
gray-off black hose and black shoes.
District 2 Auxiliary President
Shirley Washington led segments of
the ceremony and at one point.,
placed a blue flower on the Patriotic
Wreath, symbolizing deceased fe,.
male veterans.
On behalf of the Ladies and ihe,
Post, Washington also presented
nursing, home resident Aretha
Glenn, a former Army nurse, ith a
patriotic lap blanket made up of
patchwork gold stars between red
and white stripes on a blue back-,
ground.
Washington then introduced the'
new Auxiliary officers and
members, after which she briefly ad-
dressed the crowd as the newly
elected president of District 2.
Following the ceremony, the la-
dies supplied food and refreshments,
including hot 'dogs, -assorted"' chips,
and cookies.


JANIE HAGINS


CARD OF THANKS
"Protect me Lord and through it
all let me stand unshaken and una-
fraid, trusting in the hollow of your
hand."
We, the family of Janie Hagins,
would like to thank everyone for
their prayers, flowers, food, cards,
and phone calls during the time of
our loss.
May God bless you all.
Thank you again.
Mary Ann Hughes,
Venus Jefferson,
Fred Mosley,
Willie Mae Norton,
Bernice Scurry,
and the family


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005 PAGE 7


~..


Gallon/Hankins Families

Celebrate 35th Reunion


'FRAN HUNT
.Staff Writer

The 35th annual Gallon/Hankins
families reunion will be held 11
a.m. Sunday at the New Bethel
AME Church on the Ashville High-
way.
This year's theme is, "Where
there is unity, there is strength."
Terry Gallon, of Tallahassee, will
preside. The service will begin with
the hymn "Amazing Grace", and
Willie Thomas will offer a prayer.
A selection will be performed by
the Gallon-Hankins Choir.
Scripture will be read by Rev.
Carla Breedlove of Leesburg, GA.
A welcome will be given by Ester
Hill and announcements will be
made by Earl Seabrooks of Albany.
Mayor Julie Conley will offer
greetings; Dr. Julia Bridges Rey-
holds, of Jacksonville, will read a


poem; and Ricky Hill (of Orlando),
Reneeka Rogers (of Tallahassee),
Carl Hankins (of Clewiston), and
Nathaniel Hankins (of St.
Augustine) will take up the
offering.
Barbara Seabrooks will recog-
nize the special guests, who include
Steve Walker, Ron Cichon, John
Nelson, Skeet Joyner, David Ward,
Bobby Plaines, Gerrold Austin, C.
P. Miller, Willie Sloan, Lois H.
Hunter, L. Gary Wright, William
Tillman, Al Hall, Shirley Washing-
ton, Beverly Sloan, Julie Conley
and David Hobbs.
An opportunity will be provided
for presentations. Cornell Proctor,
of Melbourne, will introduce the
guest speaker. Remarks will be
made by Rev. Willie Edd Brown,
pastor of New Bethel AME, and
the grace and benediction will be
given by Rev. George Proctor.


,.L, 4~Ct' -~ -'
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BRIC & BRAC are two lovable kittens pres-
ently available for adoption at the Humane


Pausing TO Refresh


TAKING a break after walking from the Jef-
ferson Elementary School Boys and Girls
Club are, from left, Javonere Carr, Cher-


mane Crumity, Bryan Tharpe and Shanneille
Herring. (News Photo)


Two Kittens
Available
For Adoption

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has named
"Bric" and "Brac" as adoptable fe-
lines for the week.
Both are male, longhair kittens,
approximately six to seven weeks
old. All vaccinations are current
and both have been neutered.
Bric is a. yellow tabby with a
white muzzle and chest, and Brac is
white with cream coloration on the
sides of his face and torso.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
described both as being extremely
playful, loving, cuddly and high
spirited.
To adopt one or both of these lit-
tle felines, call the shelter at 342-
0244.


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STAR WARS 3 (PG13)
Thurs. Thurs. 12:45 3:55
7:00- 10:15


STAR WARS 3 (PG13)
Thurs. Thurs. 11:15 2:20
5:25 8:30


LONGEST YARD
(PG13)
11:30 -2:00-4:45 7:30 -
10:00
NO PASSES


MONSTER IN LAW
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12:50 3:05 5:20 -
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Co-t YOU A f~l:FT I NOVWl


N iI Si mon -r i IA


Our Hometown Staff would

like to thank our customers in

Monticello and the surrounding

areas for another great year!

We appreciate your business!


Join us after the parade at our

Monticello store for a drawing

to win a BRAND NEW

ZENITH D VD/VCR!

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(News Photo)


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.JUNE 8 2005
-,.. :;.y' .
t, L Id iJ.. g: "
= : ,. :, ,, .. : ,. o/
,. : .r
.- ;" .. .i ... . :. ':... d..


OMARI FORTS is topped with whipped The students enjoyed the spectacle and
cream. L-R: Devrick Byrd sprays the cream, kept shouting "More!"
as Amber Norton and Gloria Heath look on.



W!,.







-- i- ------ -.



,n 1 J i m --------i .-- --
PHIL BARKER, superintendent has his white L-R: Rachael Simmms and Earley Brewster.
slacks and green T-shirt spray painted red, (News Photos)
during the JES FCAT Fear Factor Program.
Now It Comes With A
'List Of Ingredients.
.. .. ( ) Call your water

your tap water.
To r o enoorotion, call


1^ .. EPA

















GLORIA HEATH, assistant principal, has hair "colored" via
hair paint, applied by Nathan Shiver, left and Sara Boland.






Teen Center Readies

Program For Summer
FRAN HUNT ALACHUA COUNTY
Staff Writer SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jefferson County Teen Center S I AND SURPU S
is in full gear for the summer.
The staff, which is comprised of
Director Deveda Bellamy and as- S. J 1 2.
up with the Boys and Girls Club. Inspection & Registration 7:30 AM -
'The programs will focus on joint npction &t Re3g As or tin7 AM
ventures to enhance the members Auction a 8 30 AM o n st at
educational, social and physical 2621 SE Hawthorne Rd., Gainesville, FL
"Our goals are make sure that we Motorhame, Airboot, Office Equipment -
tive in whatever they do," Bellamy F mre irmoion, ,rn editions, ple











said. "We welcome input from our www.b. encampen.uctioneers. ii
members, parents and the commu- EN CAIPEN AUCTIONEERS



unity. ro Bolx &4/50 C arner svx l l2oo4 5se 5 5i4 52 Q c p Aun '
s. The program hours will be 2-7 puia ,h a ions hair" oard
p.m. Monday through Friday. the Shiver lf and a CTI
Prm ogra m through Friday.


NEW 2005 JEEP
LIBERTY
WAS $22,945

NOW$ 19,955


NEW 2005 CHRYSLER
T ii ... PT CONVERTIBLE
WAS $21,685

NOW$ 17,6 85

NEW 2005 JEEP
WRANGLER X


.Now$ 9,942

NEW 2005 CHRYSLER
~. _,. ~ 'TOWN & COUNTRY
,A. _-..WAS $21,965

*tNOW $6,4 6
fl o T



'03 FOR OC U S GasSa..................................................... 9 9
'011 EP CHEROKEE SPORT ULL.3 .. .41,
'02 fORO RANGER .,- ... .....'14.995
d1 C1HY LER300 a E w M wi s, S,..r.c :..L226................. .. .........1 95
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'01 TOYOTA RAV4 ..:. 15.995
'm D-I..E STRATUS '. u : ....16.995
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'04 FORD CROWN VICTORIA Loadedlh :-. _.#"J_ 2 .' 18,995
'02 CHEVRO ET CAMARO .. -,,U .: .......... ........ .........5.........
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'04 5Ut YSLER$ EB UIs ::,-,.r,, : UL. .- . : 421,995

V1 GQMC 3500 SLT DUALLY -,.. .. ...D 21,995
'02 HONDA ODYSSEY EX,,i .... 21,995
'05 CHRYSLEf PACIFRCA J ,"......... ..... ... 1,995
'04 IEEP WRANGLER SPORT ,L.. .iL2e. '21,9935
'05 FORD M USTANG r., .. :., '2,tyB .-iL'e 2 .. .............. ...2....,9
'02 AUDI TT s .............................................................. ... .. 5,995
'04 CHEVROLET TAHO.E Lik aRock!, 5 23A.......... .......... ......... 2 ,995
'03 BM W 32'5 ...................2.............. ,995
'03 FR B XPEDlTI'N :.N : .r, L.*,LJC UL .28.995
'5 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING UL'.- .95












Sports


Work Continues On


Cherry Street Gym


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Work continues to progress on
the new Cherry Street Gym, lo-
cated in the old Howard Academy
building.
'Memorial weekend, Boy Scouts
from Troop 8015 worked with
Trainer Troy Carter and others,
scraping old paint from the walls,
painting and performing related
work.
"It's coming along real good,"
said Carter. "You're going to see a
lot happening here, and you're go-
ing to see it soon."
The old building comes a little
more to life each day with clean up,
repairs and a fresh coat of paint.
"I see us having more shows
here, at the old high school gym,
like the one we had before," said
Carter. "We'll be participating in


more tournaments, winning a lot
more trophies and hosting a variety
of fundraisers.
"When we get the place fixed up,
we want to sponsor a dance here,"
said Carter. "We'll be holding car
washes and other events.
"There are some doubters in the
community who don't believe in us
and what we're doing for the kids.
But we're going to show them
that with hard work and dedication,
we may have taken a mind-rattling
jab, but we're coming back for a
hard TKO," said Carter.


"No one can stop dreams, deter-
mination and a community when
they come together for a common
goal."
As he continued scraping old
cracked paint from the. walls, he
vowed, "We are going to have
World Champion from here one
day. Just wait and see."


S/4 ...


I,


POSING for the camera are, from left, Brandon Camp
Marquis Brown, Anthony Williams and Roshun Pa
members of the St. Phillips Boys and Girls Club.


Markyce Larry To


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005 PAGE 9


,Drink More Water


. in Warm Weather


As the temperature begins to rise,
experts note that it is important to
take in sufficient fluids during peri-
ods of exercise or athletic practice.
The most important concern, is to
make sure students stay hydrated,
and drink water any time they want
'a drink.
Although, teams take water
breaks, it falls to the coaches to be
sure that each player drinks some-
thing.
It is particularly easy for football
players to get overheated during
practices and games, because of the
rigors of the sport.
On a national level, statistics
show that heat-related football
deaths have risen steadily.
More deaths on the football field
are now caused by heat, rather than
)bell, by direct contact.
rker, In an effort to keep players safe,
parents and coaches should note


these tips:
*Keep an eye on the thermometer.
*Whenever possible, practice dur-.
ing the cooler parts of the day
*Drink plenty of liquids, e\clud-
ing those with caffeine.
*Plan to have regular v.ater
breaks.
*Practice for shorter periods of
time in hot weather.
*Factor in the humidity n~hen
planning outdoor activities.
*Learn about nutrition and body
requirements.
Consider .drinking Gatorade,
which puts electrolytes back into
the body.
It is important for players to tell,,,
coaches when they are not feeling'
well.
Authorities state that play ers
should not push themselves too
hard in hot weather and it is best to
be safe.


Try Out For Braves


s~-~
Ft~
I


T >





RELAXING after playing hard at St. Phill, sBoy.and Girls
Club are, from left, Brandon Campbell and Marquis Brown.

Melon Festival Softball

Tournament Set At Park


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 29th Annual Watermelon
Festival Softball Tournament will
be held June 11, beginning at 8
a.m. in the Recreation Park.
The 12 men's teams competing in
the double-elimination event were
determined a month ago.
Last years event saw some 200-
300 spectators and lasted into the
wee-hours of the morning, with
many participants camping in tents
while awaiting their turns at the_
field in the competition.

Recreation Director Kevin Aman
expects a similar number of specta-
tors again this year.
The previous tournament saw a
grueling battle ongoing for many


hours, and 125 players received.
watermelons for each of their home
runs.

Team Footlong of Tallahassee
won the 2004 tournament.

Park Set Sports
Awards Program
The County Recreation Depart-
_ment will host the 2005 T-ball,
Coach Pitch, Little League, Softball
Awards Program, at the Jefferson
County High School auditorium,
on Water Street, Tuesday, June 7 at
7 p.m.

Coordinators ask that all players
wear their team shirts and hats, and
that each team and its coaches sit
together.
For further information call 342-
0240.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School'
2005 graduate and athlete, Markyce
Larry, has been invited to try out
for the Atlanta Braves this
weekend.
Larry, known by rivals for his
batting skills, holds a .641 batting
average with two home runs for
this past Tiger baseball season.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower
states, once the fury of his bat at
the plate became known, pitchers
would rather walk him intention-
ally, than risk a po er. h i t.
On the field last season, Larry
played shortstop. His stats were
not available at press time.
Larry said he felt "Major league
surprise" when he received the in-
vitation and believes his quick
thinking on the field is a talent that
benefits the team.
"I'm always thinking and analyz-
ing what is going on around me
and how to better my
performance," he said.
Larry began playing baseball
while in elementary school. He
played in spring sports at the Park,
including T-ball, Coach Pitch and
Little League.
He says he mom is his inspiration
ton to excel -in the sport, or any-
thing else in life.
Larry is the son of Belle Parrish
and Damon Larry.


When asked if he was nervous
about the tryout, he responded,
"Yeah, I'm real nervous, I've al-
ways been a Braves fan and I've
never had people really looking at
me like they will be there, before.
There's so much pressure, I have
butterflies." BRAVES base
Regarding his performance dur- Anderson, An
ing the tryout, he concluded, "I'll Anderson, An
use my head and think, I'll have
fun, do my best and not worry Coach K
about the outcome."
FRAN HUNT
Lady Diamonds Staff writer

Beat Mayo 8-12 Throughout ti
Teen Center Br
The Monticello. Lady Diamonds Cox goes over
fell 8-12 to Mayo last weekend in keep the team fr
softball action. Players on the
Coach Roosevelt Jones said the ber Kirkpatrick,
ladies got off to a slow start and
could not recover. s
Nikki Cooks went four for four;
Tonya Young and Felicia McDan-C A
iel both went three for three; and
Letiti Fead, Keandra Seabrooks, FOR STRL
Kista Hills and Kidra Thompson all ANNUITIES
went three for four.
Cynthia Steen went two for three; (800
Alana Anderson went one for two;
Shericka Parrish went one for J.G. WentW
three; and Sharice Brooks andforSt
Shonda Parker both went one for
one. --...------
The Lady Diamonds now stand at
a 5-3 season.
They will face off against Perry 4
p.m.Sunday here.


STEVE ALLEN, MS, PT




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ball action from the dugout. From left, Casey
drew Murphy and Amber Kirkpatrick.

Keeps Team Fresh
Casey Anderson, Joshua Reams,
Mitchell Eure, Marquice Dobson,
Randy Curtis, Jimmy Tillman,
r' I g Richard Lacy, Malcolm Nortun.
heir baseball games, Michael Cox, Curtis Hht'o. er.
aves Coach Bobby Mason Shiver and Casey '.Velc:r
Jdllcitcia signs to
*esh during pla,
team include Am- Assistant Coaches are Randy CIur-
Andrew Murphy, tis and John Tillman.


As seen

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DAVIS REVELL proudly escorts daughter Princess, on her first walk down the aisle
Ramsey Revell, newly crowned Watermelon on Saturday night. (News Photo)


For more information on how you
as an employer can help,
contact your state committee
at our web site: www.esgr.org.

EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF
THE GUARD AND RESEIURVI.


CARLY JOINER AND DONNIE KING take crowned Little King and Queen on Saturday
their first walk together as the newly night. (News Photo)
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0







The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
Setc.
: Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

SNews papers. Magazines, etc.

't') ail cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, sabippin d6xes,t'etc.


, i C-


JESSIKA PREVATT, one
Princess contestants,


of the Watermelon
touches up her


makeup prior to the evening gown competi-
tion Saturday night. (News Photo)


WEAN, TkST ALOADA-

i Or i ot iers can't gt it Done...

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BECAUSE i'M THE -ONE!!t


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1891-2 Capital Circle NE (850) 402-1192
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--------- --------------- --------------


All glass bottles. jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the 60
, collection sites in the County.

o Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfilii'
5 and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong? F

' so
= Additional items accepted at the collection sites: i
Household garbage e

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center) '

Batteries
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
o= machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)
o .g
+ ~ *Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
: toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

o Used Oil & Oil Filters

H-usehold Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will C
0 accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

S,,Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
C collection site for the.proper disposal of above items.


: The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
C information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
: Don Anderson at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
6 http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.htmi for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184. 0
o
0o vi. 1
S =A.L- Visit the www.Earth9 1 i.org Recycling Information web page ,
on6o -o0o- a o o o o o o o o0o-n -0 T u ao 0o"n0 "C"T B-o-a Bi-o-i-ii'- o oT o- a o6 aa 'Oi o o-n ao,


I


.'I






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005 PAGE 11


C uBose's Minstry


Focuses On Youth


EBBIE SNAPP
taff Writer.

Destin DuBose, Minister of Music
and Education at Monticello First
Baptist Church, came to the church
in Sept., 2003.
The Perry resident received his
Bachelor of Music Degree in 2000
and earned his Master of Divinity
Degree from Samford University in
Birmingham, AL, in 2003.


. -.-.


DuBOSE
During his seven years in Bir-
1ningham he was Interim Pastor at
three different churches.
DuBose accepted Jesus Christ into
his heart when he was just six years


old. He has been involved in church
and church activities ever since and
has enjoyed the teaching of the
Word.
He states: "I'm a Christian because
I believe in Christ and I believe in
the Scriptures. Every Christian
should truthfully ask themselves,
'Why do I believe what I believe?'.
They should take time to reflect on
this and conclude their true belief."
His mother has always been, and
continues to be, a strong, vital influ-
ence in his life.
DeBose's desire is to teach youth
that God is relevant and real. "I
want them to know that it's not
about religion, it's about a relation-
ship with Jesus Christ," he said.
I want them to realize that God
permeates every bit of their life.
And, not just their life on Sundays
and holidays.
"I would like to see the youth
groups at First Baptist grow in num-
ber, as well as spiritually," he said.
He adds that Quest Youth Camp
2005, possibly the biggest event of-
fered to the youth, is an event he en-
joys.
Held in Chattanooga, TN, from
July 25-29, it is a time for youth to
come together to praise and_
worship.


The Day Agency
(Jefferson Square, Monticello)
997-8175
Your Independent Insurance Agency
"Specializing in Small Business.Protection"


PERSONAL
* AUTOMOBILE
* HOME
* FLOOD
* WATERCRAFT


COMMERCIAL
* COMMERCIAL AUTO/TRUCKERS
* GENERAL LIABILITY
* WORKERS COMPENSA-
TION
* SURETY BONDS


Jefferson Nursing Center



Administrator

PauCXovary

1780 North Jefferson Street
(850) 997-2313








We are committed to provide a

premium service based on

respect and a dignity for all.


MEI
































S:..


W We 4Wa Wm twa9 6awde4, ad





Dear Jefferson County residents,

To better meet the needs of the residents of Jefferson County, we are exploring
opening a branch of the Leon County YMCA in our wonderful county. In order to
ensure our residents receive quality services offered by the YMCA, we will need
your input by completing this survey.
Please answer the following questions and return this survey to one of the
designated sites listed below. Your prompt response is appreciated.

1. Please checl$ the appropriate box that best represents the ages of the people living in your
house (please check all that apply).


Infant
1 4 years old
5 9 years old
10 12 years old
13 15 years old
16- 19 years old


a 20 30 years old
o 30 40 years old
a 40 50 years old
a 50 60 years old
a 60 years or older


2. If a YMCA Branch is opened in Jefferson County, I would be willing to join as:


Family
Married Couple
Single Parent,
Single Adult


q Senior (over age 60).
a Senior Couple
a Teen
a .1 am not interested in joining.


3. I am interested in the following YMCA programs (please check all that apply):


Health and Fitness
Sports
Youth In
Government
Aquatics
Leaders Club


a Adventure Guides
o Resident Camps
a Day Camps

o Senior Programs


a Other

4. The best time of day for me to exercise is:


Early morning (6 A.M.)
Mid Morning (9 A.M.)
Noon


o Afternoon (4:30 P.M.)
a Evening (5:30 P.M.)


5. I would use the following services if offered (please check all that apply):


Personal training
Nutritional Counseling
Massage Therapy


a Towel Service
a Fitness Evaluations
a Workshops on health topics


L Other

6. I would enjoy taking the following group exercise classes (please check all that apply):


Step
Kickboxing
Pilates


a Yoga


o Group Cycling
a Circuit Training
a Boot Camp

a Resist-a-Ball Class


a Parent/Child Yoga u a Stroller Exercise


Body Sculpting
Abs and Back
Class


Tai Chi
Organized Walking
Groups


o Prenatal Exercise
o Mom and Tot Exercise
a Youth Group Exercise
Classes
a Trekking (Group
Treadmill Classes)
a Belly
Dancing/Polynesian
Dance/Salsa


If swimming lessons would be of interest to you, please answer the following questions.

7. Which type of swim lesson would interest you?


Parent/Child
Preschool


a Youth
a Adult


8. 'Which class schedule would you prefer?

o 4 week class that meets two times per week
o 2 week class that meets four times per week
p 8 week class that meets one time per week

9. What time of day would you prefer to attend swim lessons?


a Morning
Comments:


a Afternoon


a Evening


Thank you for taking the time to fill out this survey. We are looking forward to the opportunity to
build healthy spirit, mind and body in our community.

Yours in spirit, mind-and body,

Jamie Rogers, Chair
Jefferson County YMCA Steering Committee

Drop Sites: Jefferson County Health Department, City Hall, Jackson Drug Store, The
Learning Center, Union Hill AME Church


[ Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs
that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.


S....-

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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005

Child Identity Theft


Is Growing Problem


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sciences
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
recently shared some information
from the University of Florida
warning parents of child identity
theft.
Identity theft is not just for
adults. Offenses against children
are on the rise, and a UF consumer
education expert says the problem
can actually be worse for younger
victims.
Many parents don't realize that
:child identity theft exists, which
.means the crime often goes unde-
tected for years. Parents need to
-know how to recognize child iden-
tity theft because early discovery
can greatly reduce the impact on
victims.
If the crime is reported promptly,
".the thief has less time to run.up
debt, and authorities have a better
-,chance of finding evidence.
For children under 18, the num-
.ber of identity theft complaints re-
ported to the US Federal Trade
'.Commission increased by more
than half between 2003 and 2004,
'from about 6,400 cases to 9,800.
,,During the same time, the percent-
'.age of child victims among all
i'.'identity theft cases increased from
three to four percent.
In some respects, identify thieves
.treat personal data from children
,.,and adults the same way. Most of-
ten, they use stolen information to
conduct fraudulent financial trans-
actions, though they sometimes use
it to obtain government documents
;":such as driver's licenses or give it
to the police when stopped or
,;charged with a crime.
But when it comes to credit card
'fraud, child identity theft differs in
an important respect: Thieves nec-
essarily create new credit accounts
Sfor child victims, whereas most
cases of adult 'identity theft in-
volves existing accounts. That can
make the crime worse for child vic-
tims.
According to the 2003 FTC Sur-
vey, victims of new account fraud
spend four times as much time and
-almost five times as much money
',clearing their records, compared
with victims who had only existing
accounts accessed.
Victims of new account fraud are
1%,also far more likely to encounter
.other problems, such as a denial of
.'-credit, loss of utility or phone serv-
ice, and criminal investigation.
Safeguarding a child's identity re-
jquir.>S many precautions that par-
',ents should take for themselves, but
with a few twists .
"'A"


Preschool age children are un-
likely to be approached by scam-
mers, so parents must bare the bur-
den of protecting documents and
other information. Parents should
avoid carrying their child's Social
Security card, and should complain
if their child's school uses Social
Security numbers to identify stu-
dents.
For older children, the popularity
of personal computers in homes
and schools creates the risk that
they will be victimized by Internet
scams such as "phishing".
Even bright children who are
computer-savvy may not under-
stand the dangers of being too free
with their personal information.
It is recommended that parents
monitor their children's Internet
use, talk to their kids about identity
theft, and tell them what informa-
tion they should and should not
share with others.
Parents should also monitor in-
coming mail for children of all ages
because credit card offers and even
debt collection notices can indicate
credit activity is taking place al-
ready.
Getting a credit card offer ad-
dressed to your child does not nec-
essarily mean there's a problem. If
you have opened a bank account or
a frequent flyer card in your child's


name, your child may receive mass
mailings from credit card affiliates.
Parents should call the company
that has the child's information and
see if they're on a marketing list.
Receiving debt collection notices
in your child's name is a much
more serious indication that your
child's information is being mis-
used and warrants checking the
child's credit report with the three
major credit reporting agencies:
Experian, TransUnion and Equifax.
Parents should consider checking
their children's credit reports every
year, especially if they suspect their
personal information has been
compromised.
Ordering an annual credit card re-
port for your child increases the
likelihood that you will uncover
child identity theft in a timely fash-
ion. If no credit accounts have
been established in your child's
name, the credit agencies will in-
form you that your child does not
have a credit report.
A new federal law will make free
credit reports available to residents
of southeastern states, effective
June 1. The law provides for a
gradual roll-out of this benefit.
West Coast consumers were the
first to gain access.
Parents who discover evidence of
child identity theft should immedi-


ately report fraudulent activity to
one of the three major credit report-
ing agencies and ask that a fraud
alert be placed on the child's credit
record. Parents should also contact
any creditors listed in the child's
credit report and file a police
report.
It is vital for parents of child vic-
tims to understand the seriousness


of this crime and take action
promptly. _____

A person's credit score is not only
for getting credit, but also for ob-
taining insurance, finding housing,
and applying for jobs. ID theft can
have a very far-reaching impact.
Free annual credit reports can be
ordered by phone at 877-322-8228


Your Hometown Newspaper
Monticello News
Keeping You Informed
Of Our
Growing Community


JEFFERSON COUNTY GRANTS OFFICE

STATE HOUSING INITIATIVES

PARTNERSHIP (SHIP)



The Jefferson County Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program
will receive $350,000.00 for the 2005/2006 program year. We will be '
excepting application for Existing and New Construction for Down
Payment and Closing Cost Assistance with a maximum of $15,000 very
low income, $12,500. low income and $10,000. moderate income. The
sale price of the real property, complete home package, cannot exceed.
$90,000.. The maximum income limit for the entire household to qualify
: 1-person $39,120., 2- $44,760, 3- $50,280., 4- $55,920., 5- $60,360., 6-
$64,920., 7- $69,360. 8- $73,800.,



The SHIP program will assist homeowners with repairs up to $15,000
The maximum limit for the entire household to qualify: 1- person
$26,100., 2- $29,800., 3- $33,550., 4- $37,300., 5- $40,250., 6- $43,250.,
7- $46,250., 8- $49,200.



The applications for home ownership will be ranked by very low, low
and moderate income according to the special need of applicants, disabil-
ity at the time of application, affordability of housing cost.
.'


SHIP funds cannot be used for the purchase, rehabilitation or repair of* ,
mobile homes.


The SHIP program will accept A~ppiertiions from June 1, 2005 through
June 30,.2005 for the current finding year. Apply at the Jefferson County
Grants Office 1697 South Jefferson St., U.S. 19 South between the hours
of 8-5 Monday through Friday.


For additional Information you can call the Grants Office for Lawrence
A. Halsey Interim Director Lola Hightower SHIP Coor. at (850) 342-
0175/0176.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY HOUSING
DON'T MISS THIS WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY


B US INES S 9973568





DIRECTORY ___
I t 1


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
WELL SERVICE
..- Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs





Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All! V .-
"Call Andy"


997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


1EALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing, .
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT Licensed & Insured John A. Kuhn
JOHN COLLINS LL DIRT CAC 058274 Owner

J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
850-997-5808 A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
850-545-9964 850-251-2911 (850) 99 4577

155 JOHN COLLINS RD. 30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Mr. Merchant

This Space Can Be

Yours For Only

$10 Per Week


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

Complete Automotive Repair ; Allstate Insurance Compa
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning 3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite I
$98.99 plus tax l (In Southwood Publix Shopping Cn
Not valid with any other offer.


1538 J rsn


Norman L. Barft
Exclusive Agent
Barefoot Insurance Gro


OPE'N Mondu\'-l'i'daY S AU-:' 10
oup Lmnaii NORMviA NiAR I' Go i 'wallslatec


12 noon to 12 midnight


ny
130
tr.)


040











To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASoSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,JUNE 8, 2005 PAGE 13
'C--

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


SURPLUS PROPERTY SALE: Location:
North Florida Community College, Madi-
son, Fla. Bidders are invited to inspect and
bid on items located in Building #14
between 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m., Monday,
June 13, 2005 and 8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon
Tuesday, June 14, 2005. The sale will be
by closed bid, bidding to end June 14, 2005
by noon. Items include a 1988 Ford 15-
Passenger van, 1990 Chevrolet station
wagon, bleachers, various Cosmetology
equipment including'but not limited to
hydraulic chairs, hair dryers, work sta-
tions, sinks, manicure table, Pedi-spa and
other items. Successful bids will be notified
: by telephone Tuesday. June 14 and
Wednesday,.June 15. Pick up dates will be
June 15 and 16. All necessary bid forms
will be supplied by the Maintenance
Department on days of sale at Building
- #14 Sale Location. For more information,
contact the office of the Director of.Physi-
cal Plant,-North Florida Community Col-
lege, (850) 973-9445. NFCC reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
6/8, 6/10, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
" FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-64; JOHN A. SOPRANO
AND AUDREY M. SOPRANO, TRUS-
0" TEES OF THE JOHN A. SOPRANO
REVOCABLE / TRUST AGREEMENT
S DATED OCTOBER 13, 1999; JOHN A,
SOPRANO AND AUDREY M.
SOPRANO, TRUSTEES OF THE
0 AUDREY M. SOPRANO REVOCABLE
1 TRUST AGREEMENT DATED OCTO-
BER 13, 1999; JOHN SOPRANO; AND
SAUDREY SOPRANO; Plaintiffs vs.
STEVE ELDRED AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF
f SALE; Notice is hereby given that, pursu-
ant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
<" entered in the above-styled cause, in the
S Circuit Court of Jefferson County, Florida
SI will sell the property situate in Jefferson
County, Florida, described as: Lot. No 3,
f# Greenwood Estates, A Private Land-
oo" near's Association Subdivision, in Jeffer-
son County, Florida described as follows:
; Begin at the Southwest corner of the
SNorthwest Quarter of the Northwest
I Quarter of Section 16, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, Jefferson County, Florida
Sand run N. 0 degrees 09 minutes E. 430.0
feet along the West boundary of Section 16
Oto a point, thence S. 79 degrees 22 minutes
'E. 1366.09 feet to a point in the Center of a
4160- foot wide road, thence S. 3 degrees 16
.minutes W, 154.53 feet along the center of
-said road to the Southeasf Corherof' the
.*'Northest Quarter of" the Northwest
iQuarter of Section 16m thence, S. 89
:degrees 06 minutes 18 seconds W. 1335.30
"feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being
\ part of the Northwest Quarter all in sec-
rtion 16, Township 1 North, Range 6 East,
'Jefferson County Florida. Reserving the
!-asterIl 30 feet for roadway easement
rMibile Home 'Identification Number
:711 ,203. '1971 HOLI Title Number
t45322l0 .at public sale, to the highest bid-
.der, fiocash, at the front door of the Jef-
,ferson County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida at\1:00 a.m., on June 23, 2005.
-Dale Boatwright Clerk of Circuit Court.
6/i 6/15,c '
In accordance with FL Statue: Public Auc-,
'ion 'June 11, 2005'@ 10:00 am 1985
-Honda Three Wheeler, June 25, 2005 @
S10:00 am UHaul 'Trailer Vin#
"TAL02AN0bb00022996 TO BE SOLD AS
'IS FOR TOWING & STORAGE
CHARGES. CONDITIONS & TERMS AT
AUCTION. DAVE'S TOWING 7261
EAST WASHINGTON. ST: MONTI-
SCELLO, FL 32344/(850) 342-1480.
'{ 6/8, c: ': .. .. -


HELP WANTED
A behavioral Health Care Center is
Currently seeking: SECRETARY
#2173 High school diploma + 1 year
of secretarial/ office clerical
experience. Typing score of at least 35
cwpm. Starting salary $6.43 shift 8
2 am :- 5pm Monday through Friday.
For more information and a complete
:i listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
850-523-3217, or 1-800-226-2931
Human Resources, 2634-J Capital
' Circle N.E. Tallahassee, Pre-hiring
drug screen & FDLE background
check. An equal opportunity
e affirmative action employer. Drug
. free workplace.
S6/8. c

' Truck Driver Wanted: Class B Local
deliveries. Contact Judson Freeman
@ 997-2519

. Open Positions North Florida
i Community College Madison, Florida
Full-time Groundskeeper: HS
diploma or GED, plus one (1) year of
paid grounds keeping experience. Full
benefits.
SPart-time Security Guard: 27
hours/week. May require evening,


Muscular
Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis,
National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


holiday, weekend work. HS diploma
or GED, plus one (1) year security or
law enforcement experience. Prefer
licensed security guard or law
enforcement officer. Partial benefits.
Send applications by 6/10/05 to
Director HR, North Florida
Community College, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, Fla. 32340.
Application and job description
available at www.nfcc.edu. Questions:
Call 850-973-9487. NFCC is an equal
opportunity employer.
6/8, 10, c
Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal
lovers for summer employment. Must
be drug-free, hard working and! haye
dependable transportation. Call
877-5050 or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c
Monticello Christian Academy: Now
Interviewing for Elementary and:
Middle School Teachers. Call Pastor
Mike 997-3906; 294-1006
5/27, tfn, c
Local business now hiring. FT/PT,
weekends. Respond to: P.O. Box 691,
Monticello, Fla. 32345.
4/27s/d, tfn,
Great earnings potential! Only $10.00
startup Fee!' .Make all your dreams
come true. $250.00 Fast Start Bonus.
Call B.J. at 850-584-6289,.
5/27; 6/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd


The City of Monticello is accepting
-applications for the position of Police,
Patrol Officer: This position requires a
minimum of a high school diploma
and Florida Police Standards. The
successful candidate must live in
Jefferson County or be willing to
relocate. The ideal candidate %%ill have
demonstrated police skills, have some
advanced education and some
advanced police certification, such as
Radar or Breathalyzer. The successful
candidate must complete a
Department field training program
within the first month. The position
requires a background check. Salary
and benefit information available
upon request. Submit application and
Srepsunme,n'-~i.ef-Monticello Police
Dept. 195 S. Mulberry St., _,Ionticello,
FL 32344 b) June t,ff"5 EOE/Drug
Free Workplace.
6/1, 8, c
Sales/Office Manager for Buddy's
Home Furnishing. Please apply in
Person. 1317 S. Jefferson St.
6/3s/d, tfn
Ranch Hand '- part time, mornings.
For care of animals and light farm
duties. 997-6599, 508-2607.
6/3, 8, 10, pd


HUGE PROFITS: Work from Home
Make Money Online! I am so
Confident our system will work for'
you that 111l let you try it for FREE!
htt:p//www.automaticbuilder.com/110
2,6
6/3, 8,10, c


1951 Plymouth Cranbook. 4 dr good
shape & runs Asking $3900
556-9184.
6/8, 10, 15, 17, 21, 24, 29, pd
1996 F-150 PU Truck, 120,000 miles
$4,500. Call 997-3368 (9am 4pm)
6/8 s/d, tfn, c
95 Ford Aerostar mini Van Runs,
good, cold ac Ft & Bk $900 firm.
342-1486, 509-1942 -
6/8, 10, 15, pd


2-3 KRIB Front Tires lor 8' roru or
Furgeson Tractor $50. 4 P225/6 or'16
MICH. tires $40 997-0135.
tfn
52" RCA big screen T.V. $1,000 OBO
call 508-4086.
6/1, 3, 8, pd
Self perpelled lawn mower $125; 120v
Window A/C unit. Large $125; Kids


Moving Sale: Saturday June 11th
9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Lots of furniture
and misc. items Everything must go!!!
10501 Waukeenah Hwy, between
Waukeenah and Wacissa. 519-4522


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS available
1/19 tfn


Do you have just enough religion to
make you miserable? Try a joyous
church. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 am 997-4116.
6/8, c


Backhoe Service: d
ditches, free & shru
piles. Contact Gary
933-3458.
4/28 tfn


Electric Air Hockey game $15; Kids Healthy Weight Loss
yellow care bear shelf $10 and misc. Jackson's Drugs,
toys call 342-1486, 509-1942. designed to curb the
6/8, 10,15, pd and increase energy
5 pc. Beautiful Wicker set w/schase considerable weight
lounge.Large Metal desk & desk chair Hoodiacol consist of
incorporated into ri
Table & 4 chairs, Rocker & Footstool, natucorra flavoring to r
997-5 natural flavoring to
997-2512. taste. In addition t0
may see benefits for
REAL ESTATE nails from the Omeg
Homes for Sale Hwy. 14, Madison. found in rice bi
Use your tax return to make a down Y gordonii is a cact
payment on your own place! Owneri' Kalahari Desert o
financing. Easy Terms. If you have a Unsurpassed as
steady job and a 10% down payment suppressant, it not o
you can choose Nour own interior and but increases the-sen
exterior colors. Front porch included. tends to limit total
Two and three' bedrooms available. 30-40% without exp
Payments as low as $400. per month. Significant weight
Call 997-4000 from such a drop in
1/19, s/d 5/18, tfn


Cute 3/2 Moduln Huome in tid
neighborhood $123,000 Coldwell
Banker -Kelly & Kelly Properties.
Molly 850-528-1707


Appliance Repairs:
stoves, refrigerate
operated by Andy
Leave Message.


6/3, 8, 10, pd 2/11 tfn
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Do you want to be
Madison. Improved lots with septic with no denomi
system, city water, gai and electric creeds, or practices?
pole for -sale. Redy for your late His Church called
model or new mobil n W, SW,,! Christand 3ou can
model or new mobile eohme. -W,
& TW. Site built homes welcome. I'N e are ready to hel
Owner Financing. $1,500.00 down. to learn. Call 997-34
Easy terms 997-4000. 101 Ifn
' I i


srivcway, uauw, r
ib removal, burn I
Tuten 997-3116, 1


s available only at I
Hoodiacol is 1
appetite, burn fat
levels resulting in
loss over time. 9
3 key ingredients
ice bran oil with I
give it a palpable, '
weight loss, you 1
the hair. skin and
ga 3 and Omega 6
ran oil.' Hoodia
us, found in the
if South Africa. 1
an appetite
nly limits appetite
ise of satiety. This
caloric intake by
periencing hunger. I
loss should result
caloric intake. I

washers, dryers, 1
rs. Owned and
Rudd, 997-5648. 1


just a Christian,
[national names,
? Jesus established
I the -Church of
be a member of it. o
ip if you are ready ]
166





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ELED HOMES

$50 dep. I
Officers on site











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1 Living Areas I

ous Kitchens i

ter Bedrooms.

,Pantries

Choose From
uOS iMA




l@'YI) l.


Deliver & setup P "'*M U /l M ,a&&J
Over 1,400 Sq Ft 0
3 Bedroom/ TEN O D
2 Bath I





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1055.. .CAPITAL CIRCLE 576-3007


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES







215 N. Jefferson St.
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 www.cbkk.com


* New Listing-Nobles Subdivision
3BR/2BA, convenient in town
location, remodeled. $101,900
* A Grand Estate- perched high on
a hill, your own 9 acre spread,
custom built brick home, excep-
tional features. $595,000
* Roomy Brick Home- located
north of Monticello, a great buy
on 2 acres. $149,900
* North Ridge Subdivision- 10 to
23 ac. home sites, only ten lots
avail. $10,000 to $14,500 per acre.


(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Great Cash Flow for the Investor
Apartment House currently 5 could be
7 unit apartment building great potential
as a bed and breakfast with suites
$240,000
Beautiful Home on a Sweet Mountian
Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted
pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field all very conven-
ient to Tallahassee for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinc Lots in Town on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000
The Price is Riqht! 2acres high and dry
in Aucilla Forest and Meadows $7,500
Look- Unusual Opportunit!!! On
Waukeenah Highway easy access to Tal-
lahassee high, dry, fenced and ready to
build on, great for horses or cattle $8,500
per acre
Price Reddced Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$169,500 don't miss it!
Horse Farm' 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location north of Greenville
only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on a hill way out.
in the country; new carpet, with 2 acres'
asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice' acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road Under Contract 4 bed-
room 2 bath home with garage, out build-
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres "in the
Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
South Main Ave west of Monticello off
US 90 on paved county road five wooded
acres with well and septic tank $85,000
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Great Buy big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property SOLD On US 90 in
town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Builders 6+ ac sewer and water
$240,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com

We have qualified buyers looking
for acreage between Monticello and
Lloyd can you help?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
Buyers looking for Homes and Land
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Housing Vouche

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMIOD

2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 -4/2 $895 ~
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy (

575-6571'


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO. (FL.). NEWS, WED..JITNE 8, 2005


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For information please call:
Confetti's toll free 1-866-539-3178
Thomasville Ford: 1-229-228-1627

CONCESSIONS LIVE DJ ENTERTAINE


CONCESSIONS LIVE DJ ENTERTAINMENT


Serving South Georgia for 88 Years


a lt tiea lot
rve a te ... save l
12291 226-5133 1-800-255-1282
www.thomasvillesales.com


LINCOLN


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