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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00043
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 1, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00043
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text




LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNiVER.SITY OF FLOCPTA
GAINE' V T,1', r!. 3'611


Mosquito
Spraying Ongoing
in County

Story, Page 6
I w


JES Rewards

Students For
FCAT Scores

Story, Photos, Page 8


ACA
Athletic
Awards

Story, Photos, Page 9


Wednesday Morning


Montic


II


137TH YEAR NO.43, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


Service Expected To Be

Available In 3-4 Months


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


r~. ~.-


PART of the equipment that will allow the city to provii
Internet service will be installed on the water tank ,
Cherry St. It's expected that the city ultimately will be ab
to provide the service to the surrounding area. (Ne;
Photo)


City
tives iT
ning th
and the


The City. Council last Tuesday sumers.
.... night took the step' to become a Expe
high-speed, wireless Internet pro- will be
vider. days ar
By a unanimous 3-0 vote councill to access
members Gerrold Austin and Brian months
, Hayes were not present), the council "Befi
awarded the contract for the pur- service.
chase and installation of the neces- the lev
sary equipment to GrayBar Electric offer
s Company of St. Louis for charge,
$227,644.43. said We
de The council awarded the contract to pass
on for providing the high-speed Inter- the
le net service connectivity to AT&T .-cgulati
ws for a monthly fee of $2,500. v forth."


staff and GrayBar representa-
iet Thursday to begin plan-
he installation of the system
pricing of the service to con-

ctations are that the system
utp and running within 45
id that residents will be able
ss the service in three to four
at the latest.
ore customers can get the
, we will have to determine
el of service that the city will
and what price we will
" City Clerk Emily Anderson
wednesday. "We will also have
.an ordinance and formulate
enterprise's rules and
ions, such as deposits and so


Tuesday night's two-hour special
meeting covered a host.of questions,
many of them so technical in expla-
nation that they defied the compre-
hension of the average person, in-
cluding some council members. Ul-
timately, however, the officials were
satisfied with the answers, as evi-
dent by their approval of the project.
At heart, officials wanted to know
what additional cost, if any, the sys-
tem would place on the city in terms
of personnel and time. In short,
would it require the hiring of addi-
tional personnel? Mayor Julie Con-
ley wanted to know.
The simple answer was no, it
would not require additional person-
nel in the short term.
"Until we reach a level of 100 cus-
tomers or more, we will have to
handle it ourselves," said City Su-
perintendent Don Anderson, a lead
proponent of the project. *
By-ourselves, he said, he meant


.people such as himself, the city
clerk and Charlie Colvin, the city's
technical services engineer.
What about the quality of the
service to be provided? Councilman
Tom Vogelgesang wanted to know.
He noted that citizens' expecta-
tion of the level of service the city
traditionally provides is "phenome-
nal". He didn't want citizens to be
disappointed because the level of
Internet service was not up to par,
he said.
If a citizen's Internet service went
down at 6 p.m., for example, what
mechanisms would the city have in
place to correct the problem? Vogel-
gesang asked.
"We probably haven't looked at
this area in detail yet," (Don) An-
derson said. "But it's something that
can be worked out."
"We do have a reputation of re-
sponding in a phenomenal way,"
(See Internet Page 2)


Kickoff Dinner Thursday


Opens 55th Melon Festival


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The 55th Watermelon Festival
opens 5 p.m., June 2, with the Kick-
off Dinner and Program at the Op-
era House.
Frank Stone will grill chicken,
served with the usual complements.
' Tickets are $7.50 for adults and
$4 for children and can be pur-
chased at the Chamber of Com-
merce.
Advance ticket purchases are en-
couraged to help know how many
meals to prepare. These are avail-
able at the Chamber of Commerce.
In addition, raffle tickets may be
purchased in advance, at $1 each, or
six for $5.
Among the raffle prizes, donated
by county businesses, is a state of
the art color television set.
The Kickoff Program begins at 6
p.m., and includes the introduction
of the winners of the Art Contest for
the Festival Booklet Cover.
Art Contest Winners are: Jessica
Hagan, first place; Kaitlin Jackson,


second place; and third place, Chey-
enne Adams, third place.
Hagan will receive a Festival T-
shirt and a savings bond; Jackson
and Adams will receive T-shirts.
The Fourth annual Bed Race be-
gins 7 p.m., with the Opera House
as the start/finish line.
Sponsored by Altrusa of Monti-
cello, bedclothes will fly as teams
race their homemade beds along
Mulberry Street, next to the Opera
House Garden, vying to take the
Bragging Rights Traveling Trophy
from the current champions, the Ki-
wanis Club.
A prize is also awarded for the
Best Dressed Bed.
To compete, all beds must be a
minimum of 37 inches wide and 72
inches long, with a head and a foot
board.
A mattress is required, but air and
Styrofoam mattresses are prohibited.
US 19 South will provide live
music in the Opera House Garden
for listening and dancing pleasure.
The Little Princess (formerly Jun-
ior Miss) and Little King and Queen
Pageant takes place 7 pm., at JCHS
Auditorium, on Water Street.


Six girls will compete in the Little
Princess Pageant, featuring the
theme of "50's Summer Fun."
Ranging in age from 11-14, these
include: Lisa Kisamore, Kaitlin
Jackson, Megan Lee, Jessika
Prevatt, Ramsey Revell, and Torie
Thor.
A tea will be held on the day of
the pageant to give the contestants
and the judges an opportunity to so-
cialize.
Miss Congeniality is chosen by
the contestants.
Entrants in the Little King and
Queen Contest range in age from
five to seven, and include eight girls
and five boys.
They will perform an opening
number to the Summer Sounds of
the '50's.
Contestants include: James Harp,
Jenny Jackson, Carly Joiner, Sara
Joiner, Donnie Kinsey, Emily
Knowles, Sara McElveen, Brooklyn
McGlamory, Rafael Rosas, Chelsea
Scarborough, Thomas Swickley,
Quinto Thomas, and Ria Wheeler.
For information about Festival,
Events, Contact the Chamber of
Commerce at 997-5552.


ii


- .. .1


CHERYL TURNER, director of Wilderness
Coast Libraries, recently asked the commis-
sion here to contribute $25,000 annually to
help keep the mobile library viable. The
A


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.
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commission indicated it would consider the
request during the budget preparation time,
which is coming up. (News Photo)


CITY COUNCIL members participating in
the decision to make the city an Internet
provider included Councilman Tom Vogelge-


sang, left, and Mayor Julie Conley, right.
City Clerk Emily Anderson, center, is a lead-
ing proponent of the system. (News Photo)


Commissioners To Revisit Idea

Of Numbering County Vehicles


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The idea of placing identifying
numbers on county vehicles keeps
returning to commission
discussions.
The latest to raise the issue was
Councilman Gene Hall.
Hall suggested at recent meeting
that the commission consider put-
ting a 1-800 number on each county
vehicle, in addition to the identify-
ing number that Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin had earlier recommended.
That way, Hall said, it would be


easier for citizens to report inappro-
priate actions on the part of county
personnel.
Commissioner Junior Tuten didn't
see the need for such measure.
"If you look at the tag, each vehi-
cle has a different number," Tuten
said.
"That's not always easy to do
when the vehicle is traveling in the
opposite direction," Sutphin coun-
tered.
And what exactly had happened
to the logo that former Commis-
sioner Gene Cooksey had long
championed and that the board had
adopted in his honor just prior to the


latter stepping down from office,
Sutphin wanted to know.
Could not the logo be placed on
the new vehicles the county pur-
chased, along with the identifying
number?
"Right now. county vehicles are
not readily identifiable." he said.
Tuten's response was that. he
would like to see a cost analysis
done before the commission decided
any thing on the issue.
At that point, Commission Chair-
man Skeet Joyner scheduled the
item for a more detailed discussion
at next Thursday's morning
meeting.


Sheriff's Dept. Actively Monitoring Sex Offenders


The Sheriff Department reports
thL completion of an eye-to-eye
check of all known sexual offenders
in the county.
"There were a total of 19 names
on the list and the deputies verified
the whereabouts of each of those in-
dividuals," Major Bill Bullock re-
ported last week. "All have been


accounted for as of the middle of
May."
He said the checks were con-
ducted at the request of Sheriff
David Hobbs.
Asked if the checks will be con-
ducted on a monthly basis, Bullock
said the department would like noth-
ing better. Unfortunately, it lacked


the manpower to do so. lie said.
He said the plan is to conduct tihe
checks periodically on a random ba-
sis.
"We will be keeping on eye on
them," he said.
1-1He said the checks were not
prompted by any specific incident.
Rather, they were part of a general
department policy, lie said.


Trucking

Industry Driver
Shortage

Editorial, Page 4


, .
: : -.- -^ ... :
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a____


City Plunges into



Internet Services


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44





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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005





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STUDENTS in Jaunita Brockman-Jones
Pre-K classes at JES Boys and Girls Club
work puzzles and play number games. L-R:


Mario Zuniga and Dezmeon Mathis. (News
Photo)


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85@7.316 53


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Finlayson Elected To

Seat On FHSAA Board

their the Commissioner or his desig-
FRAN HUNT nee.


Staff Writer


Aucilla Christian Academy prin-
cipal Richard Finlayson, has been
recently elected to serve a three
year term on the Florida High
School Athletic Association
(FHSAA) Board of Directors in the
Section 1, Private School seat.
The Board is the policy making
body of the FHSAA, which over-
sees series events such as state
championships, and decides how
state champions are determined.
Members comprising the Board
include four public school repre-
sentatives, four private school
representatives, two school super-
intendents, two school board mem-
bers, three community
representatives appointed by the
Commissioner of Education and ei-


Internet Service is Approved


(Continued From Page 1)
Conley said. "I don't want to spoil
that. So that's something we need to
work on."
What would happen when the
first year was up and GrayBar went
away? Conley asked next. Who then
would correct technical and other
problems that might arise?
"We don't anticipate many things
going wrong after the network is up
and running," the GrayBar represen-
tative assured Conley. "It's like a
child learning to walk. Once you're
up' and walking, you don't need to
be held up anymore. Anyway, we
anticipate a good relationship, as
long as there is a relationship. It's
like a marriage."
Tom Love, a longtime Internet
service user and self-described en-
thusiastic supporter of the project.
took it upon himself to prepare a
spread sheet, of possible financial
outcomes.
Although at first skeptical of the
project's feasibility, Love said
rColvin and the others had convinced
,him that it was technically possible.
"I think it's a wonderful thing for
the city to have this feature," he
said.
Still,.he had wanted to assure him-
,self of the project's economic feasi-
,bility, he said. Hence the. spread
.sheet he had prepared, which, of-
0fered an analysis of several-"what-if
assumptions".
.What if, for example, the interest
;rate on the loan was reduced by a
.=,


point, or the number of new custom-
ers per month were increased'?
Based on the initial assumption
that the interest rate would be 4.8
percent and the first loan payment
would be due in six months and go
for 72 months, Love determined that
the city could "go negative and stay
in the hole up to two years."
Plugging different numbers into
the equation, Love then showed that
the financial picture would improve
greatly if the city could either re-
duce the interest rate or postpone the,
first payment until 12 months, or
better yet, do both.
Love calculated the total monthly
cost to the city -- including loan
payment, electricity and technical
support -- would be S6,000.33
monthly.
He calculated the total monthly
savings to the city -- based on the
elimination of five telephone lines,
the alarm system rnd the existing
Internet service, ,!,o:ng other things
-- would be $1,1 3 .96.
According to his hept calculations,
Love said a tota, of 240 ,it...u.,
would be ncedc(d to make the system
viable. At 120 customers, he said, it
would go negative. The ideal sce-
nario, he said, entailed acquiring 15
to 20 new customers per month and
the customers paying $30 monthly
for the service.
"Which is still cheaper than
Sprint," he said.
City officials such as Vogelgesang
emphasized the savings as being the


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main justification for the installation
of the system. The fact was that of-
fering Internm service to city resi-
dents wa',, aide benefit, secondary
to tV Intra et be iefits of the system
to Itc c':, .: c aid. The main and
abiding r, ason for the installation of
system, Vogelgesangr argued, re-
mained to make the city's sewer and
water systems more efficient and se-
cured.
The system is supposed to do this
by eliminating, among other things,
the need for the present security sys-
tem and city employees having to
physically monitor the different
pump stations and wells.
Superintendent Anderson also
made the point that over time, the
annual savings to the city from the
system would more than make up
for its initial cost. To put it in per-
spective, Anderson said, the sys-
tem's initial cost was about the same
as the cost of a garbage truck, which
the council regularly purchased
without expending similar
heartburn.








creating a SAVINGS
New Century
of Savings BONDS


I-


Fror more inrormolion on now you as an eimpioyer canu ep,
contaoc your sate committee of our web site wweigrrorg.
M EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF
THE GUARD AND RESERVE.


"I will work a lot on a number of
different policy issues, including
health in both public and private


schools," said Barker. "Before I
came to Aucilla, I worked in a pub-
lic school here, so I feel I have a
pretty good handle on what's going
on, what's needed and how to pro-
vide as fair a level of competition
as possible.
"I feel that athletics are an impor-
tant part of out children's education
and I feel that this is a great service
opportunity," he said.


Best Resort Areas of North America


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and receive a

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... .) My granddaughter means the
K -' world to me. So I'm controlling
.. ',I- my diabetes. That means I
Keep my blood sugar close to
normal by watching what I eat
.B and walking-every day. I
always take my medicine and
test my blood sugar.

With my diabetes under
control, I feel a lot better
and have more energy. Best
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for my friends.., for life.
Call 1-800-438-5383 to
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YOU ARE INVITED to participate in these FREEservices if you
have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
1 3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
2 Call the Jefferson County ,Health lDepartment to register:
342-0170, extension 218


Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
> Monthly meetings
> Call Jefferson County Health Department
for more information at 342-0170, extension 218


Individual Diabetes Counseling
> Contact your doctor for a referral to the
Jefferson County Health Department
> Call the Jefferson County IHealth Department
for more information at 342-0170, extension 1301


NATIONAL
1) I A B ET E S
E D LI C A"T I 0. N
PROGRAM


Control your
diabetes.


A joint program
of the National
Institutes of
Health and the
Centers for
Disease Control
and Prevention.


A __EVI EO T I P B IC TO


I SnFrT, r4,.


The Odd Couple


it~~lJ(Ti 72 jn, L*2 : in. J


.. I I I, X 11 .'iI* ',I *'i r


I control my diabetes so I'll be around


to see the next Jackie Robinson.'


Controlling diabetes makes a
huge difference.
fr-011 000


an
rl







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005 PAGE 3


OOMO

BOOK MOBILE


Children Lobby Here Via


Poster Art For Bookmobile


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The WILDerness Coast Bookmo-
bile displayed Poster Art, made by
county children in support of the
need for their library on wheels, at
the recent Emancipation Proclama-
tion Day Parade.
Budget cuts have directly affected
funding for the bookmobile and
children and other residents who
regularly use the bookmobile are
feeling it. I
Without the bookmobile, county
residents who can't get in to town,
for whatever reasons, to use the Li-
brary, are losing out on the opportu-
nity to expand their minds through
reading.


If the advantages the bookmobile
offers are cut back any more resi-
dents will become seriously disad-
vantaged.
- Linda Lewis, program coordinator,
and driver for the bookmobile does
not want to see this happen.
Thus she now volunteers much of
her time, as do her helpers.
With the guidance of their schools'
art class teachers, children using the
bookmobile, decided to campaign
for it.
They designed an art project by
creating posters and pictures, and
flyers, calling attention to the di-
lemma and possible demise of the
bookmobile.
One of the posters reads: "If you
take away our books, you take away
our minds' right to travel. Save the


bus for us."
This poster shows a child reading
with his thoughts and dreams drawn
out above his head.
Another poster with colorful hand
prints of the children, says: "Little
Angels Enrichment Center votes
YES, to keep the bookmobile."
Children wanted to voice their
support of the bookmobile and the
great programs it offers to them.
WILDerness Coast Public Librar-
ies is a state funded, tri-county li-
brary cooperative which enhances

H.E. WALLER
CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Remodeling Repairs
Additions
Kitchen & Bath Remodels


the services of the public libraries in
Jefferson, Franklin, and Wakulla
Counties.
The bookmobile visits these cotrn-
ties on a three week rotation. It car-
ries a selection of over 2,500 books,
audio and video tapes, and CD's of
interest to the very young, school-
aged children and adults.
The staff will also take requests
for materials that are not on board.


Mosaic Art Class Set.


CHILDREN made posters to lobby for funding for the Book-
mobile to continue operations here. (News Photo)


Deputies Arrest

Man On Warrants


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Deputies arrested a man wanted
on outstanding warrants, May 20,
and added additional charges in the
process.
Erik Barnhart, was spotted by-
Cpl. Jerry Blackmon, who knew of
his outstanding warrants.
Blackmon called for assistance
from Sgt. Ray Lacy and Deputy-
Gerald Knecht, and then ap-
proached Barnhart at Movie
Gallery to make the 'arrest.
When Blackmon arrested the
man, he was immediately met with
physical resistance. He managed to
subdue Barnhart without anyone
being injured.
Barnhart was then transported to
the Jefferson County Jail and
booked on the warrants.
Blackmon remained at the scene
to talk to witnesses and secure
Barnhart's vehicle. When he and
the deputies approached the
vehicle, they saw what appeared to
be marijuana lying on the floor-
boards.
Drug Task Force Sgt. Dewayne
Hayes was summoned with JCSO
K-9 Deputy "Frodo".
Frodo alerted on the vehicle after
being run around the outside. The
car was moved to the JCSO im-
pound yard and searched.
One pound of marijuana, with a
street value of. approximately
$1,000, was secured and held as
evidence.
Major Bill Bullock reported that
the incident resulted in additional
charges of resisting arrest with vio-
lence and possession of a con-
trolled substance, marijuana.


Now you don't
need one of these
to get your
Federal payment.

Now, even if you don't qualify
for a checking or savings
account, you can have your
Federal payment automatically
deposited to a low-cost,
federally insured ETAS".
Call 1-888-382-3311
(TDD: 1-877-326-5833)
to learn where you can
open an ETA.

ETA@
Bacvioc Tr& r Account


Jane Davis, local artist, will offer
her popular Mosaic Stepping Stone
class 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday,
June 4, at the Jefferson Arts Center
on West Washington Street.
Participants will learn how to de-
sign and create a personalized gar-
den stepping stone from materials
such as broken china, stained glass,
sturdy shells, glass beads, tile, or
similar materials.


Cost for the class is $30, and in-
cludes the stepping stone, adhesive,
and grout.
Participants should bring old
china, broken tile, or similar items
to complete the project, as well as a
hammer or tile nippers.
Both teenagers and adults have
enjoyed the class in the past.
Register by calling Davis at 997-
4320.


Licensed
&
Insured
CRC 049168







xi; "-

I- ^ ..


..^ ..........


Reward for our
lost male beagle.
Last seen in the
Waukeenah area.
No Collar.

850-284-3919
997-8920

Sadie Mae and I Miss
Him!

Simon We Miss You!


USDA


United States Department of Agriculture


The


Tobacco


Program (aiso called "Tobacco Buyout").



You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


0 Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

, Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

> Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The

Monticello News
You Can't Be Without It


Transition Payment


.0 lag









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005
o... ...... -----------------"''%---" .. .. ..~


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

,MEM8, RON CICHON
1 D ~Publisher


SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Trucking Industry,


Driver Shortage


According to the U.S. Bureau of
Labor, trucking carriers will need at
least 600,000 additional drivers na-
tionally by 2010.
This increasing demand for truck
transportation and the limited supply
of experienced drivers make driving
a lucrative career option for the right
kind of person.
"We're looking for the people
who want to work hard and
succeed," said Robert Low, presi-
dent of Prime Inc., North America's
largest refrigerated carrier.
"We offer drivers all the training
and tools to set up their own suc-
cessful and rewarding trucking busi-
ness."
Prime Inc. is based in Springfield,
Missouri. The company currently
works with more than 3,000 drivers,
most of whom are independent con-
tractors.
Truck driving can also pay sur-
prisingly well. The average starting
pay in the trucking industry is more
than $32,000, according to the U.S.
Department of Labor.
That compares with $28,000 for
the average laborer job. Through in-
centives, fuel discounts, and other
similar programs, truck drivers can
quickly earn $45,000 to $60,000 a
year on their own or $80,000 to
$120,000 as a team.
Despite the money, the trucking
"way of life" is not for everyone.
Much time is spent away from home
in an office that always travels with


you but modem conveniences such
as satellite communications and cell
phones help keep drivers in touch
with friends and family.
Some drivers, particularly couples
and retirees are also entering the
trucking profession as "teams," opt-
ing to keep each other company on
the road while avoiding' the dangers
of downsizing and job uncertainty in
today's corporate world.
Despite the benefits of job
security, independence and potential
financial rewards, experienced driv-
ers say it is the freedom of the open
road that lures them to the trucking
industry and the trucker's "way of
life."
"I've always wanted to see this
country and truck driving makes
both that and earning a good living
possible," says Tom Cross, a 10-
year trucking veteran and independ-
ent contractor with Prime Inc.
Once they start their' driving
career, drivers admit that the support
of a trusted company becomes the
key to a long-term career in
trucking. "Any trucking company
can offer me a job; I found a com-
pany that gives me success," ex-
plains Cross.
"I've been in other industries and
driven for several trucking compa-
nies. I came back to Prime because
no other company has helped me
make such a great living while being
able to see so much of this beautiful
country."


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
May 31, 1995
County native and football great
Jack Youngblood will be visiting
here June 3 to address a youth rally
at the Springfield Christian Center
on SR-59, south of Lloyd.
County Officials expected the jail
would be ready for opening by
Monday. That is, all work on the
physical plant was expected to be
completed by Monday.
TWENTY YEARS
May 29, 1985'
Veterans, families, widows and
friends gathered in the cool quiet
morning peace Memorial Day to
honor those who fought and died in
war. 1
New computer equipment and ag-
riculture information scheduled to
arrive in September at the public li-
brary may force a move of the Vet-
erans Service office next door.
This is graduation week 134 Jef-
ferson County High School seniors
and 16 Aucilla Christian Academy
seniors.
An insider's view of the Florida
Criminal Justice System was pre-
sented to Chamber members by
State Attorney Willie Meggs this
week.


THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 29, 1975
Sixteen girls from Jefferson
C "n "^ : :- *,.:0 -'--p, f lhep
1975 Watermelon Festival Pageant.
One will be chosen as queen on June
20. Maijanou Alexander, Glenda
Cone. Louise Coxc~tc', Carolyn
Edenfield, and Debbie Ethler are
five of the contestants.
Mrs. Gertude Jackson was hon-
ored for her dedication and devotion
for. serving mankind through the
teaching profession for 45 years.
The appreciation dinner-banquent
was attended by 60 people, most of
them former students of Mrs. Jack-
son.
FORTY YEARS AGO
May 28, 1965
Two senior boys, Fred Wilder and
Darryle Waldron received appoint-
ments to attend the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy in New London,
Conn.
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Franklin
Chancy Jr, announce the birth of
their first child, a boy.
William Smith was the guest
speaker Tuesday evening at the
Methodist Men's Club in Live Oak.
He also installed their new officers.


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.

500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


From Our Photo File




W4;. -
,1.1" 14
,-: .- ', v..''= -,"". .,tIV-A


DRo LOUIS ROCCA had this home moved
from Taylor County to the Reichdorff Subdi-
vision off Ashville Highway, in. Oct., 1988.


His plans were to sell the house. Photo
shows the house being moved down Pearl
Street. (News File Photo)


--Opinion & Comment


Excuses Very Common Today


We're living in a "dog ate my
homework" and "I'm late for work
'cause my wife didn't wake me up"
era. Frankly, it stinks!
Personal responsibility 'is not
vogue today. Too bad.
Whatever happened to the days
when folks said they'd do some-
thing and they did it, they said
they'd be somewhere at an ap-
pointed time and they were there'?
I suspect this is showing my age
but I can't imagine arriving for an
appointment 30 minutes late. I also


Publisher' s

Notebook


.Rol aii Cuiu


can't imagine agreeing to do some- didn't fly in any of those activities, rant to customer who has waited 15
thing and not doing it. Like most of you, I frequently minutes for his baked potato for
. This kind of irresponsibility was : shake imy head 'in amazement at which he had already paid: "We've
not tolerated by my parents when I' what passes for responsibility. Here been out of baked potatoes for a
was a child. are some e-.ample, week!"
So, thanks to them, I learned ,,.. ., .. Methanic to customer on thii-d try'
something about personal responsi- Young woman applying loir .:il to get their car repaired. "You're
ability. Then came years in scouting, "I know I was supposed to be lucky I can get to this today."
where responsibility was stressed, here 45 minutes ago for my appoint- You can add some of your own fa-
followed by four years in the mili- ment but my boyfriend wouldn't vorites to this list, I'm sure.
tary. leave the house." Now that we're in this age of irre-
"Dog ate my homework" stuff Counter person in fast food restau- sponsibility, how do we get out?


The obvious answer is not to ac-
cept irresponsibility. That's good
but oftentimes we don't have a
choice, so we put up with it.
My one man campaign is to com-
pliment those people who show up
on time, and those who do what they
say they will do. They are the stand
outs these days.
I figure if we fuss over the respon-
sible people, the not-so-responsible
folks may get the ,message.
Over at the Table of Knowledge
we debate many issues and opinions
are varied, but there is agreement on
the need for personal responsibility.
Responsibility is not a Democrat
or Republican issue, it is not conser-
vatiVd-or -liberal, rather it cuts across
theilines and comes to the very heart
of determining the kind of society
we have.
If we expect a bright future for our
nation we'll have to turn the comer
on the issue of responsibility.


Control Nixed, Freedom Boosted


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist


Which do you choose'? A way of
life in which you are the master of
your destiny, or one in which virtu-
ally all decisions are made for you
by one ruling body or another'? It's
the classic struggle facing every hu-
man on earth. Freedom or control.
Truth be known, there are many
who actually choose control. It
makes for a well-ordered society
.with few surprises.
In a controlled society, one does-
n't have to make complicated career
choices, health care is provided.
Community planners decide where
housing will be placed. Committees
decide what industries are to be al-
lowed and how they will operate.
Watchdogs decide the foods that
shall be permitted to eat, to protect
our health, of course.
Family planners decide the numb-
.ner of children allowed. Those chil-
dren, of course, will be well-taken
care of every day in public educa-


tion centers that, not only provide
for all physical and mental health
needs.
No reason for crime because there
are no real possessions to steal and
no personally-owned weapons to
threaten bodily harm.
The aged have no fears for the fu-
ture, as they are taken care of with
government controlled social secu-
rity accounts.
Economic security is promised for
a better world as everyone equally
sacrifices to help their fellow man.
Everything is well organized, peace-
Sful and controlled. Everyone is se-
cure in the knowledge that
tomorrow will be just like today.
On' the other hand, there is the
chaos of what some foolishly call
Freedom.
In such a society, people are fully
responsible for their own actions.
Unmefthered individuals throw a
monkey wrench into a well-ordered
society by inventing new gadgets
that make life easier and more pro-
ductive, but threaten old ways.
Selfish people pursue their own


dreams and ideals without ever wor-
rying'about how they fit into the or-
der of society.
They want to benefit from the
fruits of their labor, own property
and raise families without controls
established from the wisdom" of the
community.
Imagine such a society which par-
ents get to decide how best to edu-
cate their children. And think of the
irresponsibility of individuals actu-
ally being able to choose if and how
they want to invest their money to
prepare for retirement.
In the so-called free society, peo-'
ple eat what they want without
benefit of government approval.
Children are part of the family that
bore them, not overseen by the state.
People start enterprises without
asking permission. Nothing stays the
same, except that individuals are se-
cure in their homes and have the
ability to live their lives as they
choose.
Control today has a name, Agenda
21. This is the name of a treaty that
was first unveiled at the United Na-


tions' Earth Summit in 1992.
Implementation of the treaty is
through a policy called Sustainable
Development. This program is now
the official policy of the United
States and is being systematically
imposed in every single state of the
Union and in every city and town.
There are very few exceptions.
Sustainable Development is no less
than a ruling principle through
which decisions for all aspects of
our lives are determined through
public/private partnerships between
government (at all levels) and pri-
vate institutions in our communities.
They provide guidelines to deter-
mine business decisions; property
use; medical care; education cur-
riculum; foreign policy; economics:
taxes; labor policy; career decisions;
housing; building material: farming
policy; and much more. Agenda 21
is based on the principle that gov-
ernment grants our rights.
If you choose freedom, then there
is a counter to Agenda 21 and it's

(See Control Page 5)


Walker Shares MS Experience


Multi-platinum recording artist
Clay Walker is a busy man!
For the third straight year, Walker
is hitting the road to share publicly
his nine-year journey with multiple
sclerosis (MS) and provide his
unique message of hope and inspira-
tion with thousands of others across
the country living with the disease.
His Sharing Solutions for MS pa-
tient program series begins in the
spring.
He will make numerous stops
around the nation, where he will
speak at MS patient programs, par-
ticipate in fund-raisers for MS re-
search, and appear at other MS-
related functions.


Walker was diagnosed with
relapsing-remitting multiple sclero-
sis (RRMS) in 1996.
In 2003, when he learned that only
half of those living with MS are tak-
ing advantage of treatment, he de-
cided to step off the sidelines and re-
veal his journey with MS and help
people take a pro-active stance
against this disease.
Since going public, Walker's two
goals have been to raise money for
research to find a cure for MS and to
raise awareness of the importance of
therapy in managing the disease. Al-
though people respond differently to
therapies, since beginning a daily in-
jection almost five years ago,


Walker has been in remission.
"When I was first diagnosed with
MS and looking for therapy options,
I read a story in the newspaper
about a man who was taking a daily
injection and was in remission,"
Walker said.
"That story was so inspiring I
asked my neurologist about it at my
next visit. I hope my story will in-
spire others who are in the decision
making process. Ultimately, I chose
my therapy because of its efficacy
and safety. It has been studied for 12
years, and I just learned the study
will be extended to 15 years. It is
important to work with a doctor to


find the right therapy."
Walker's emerging status as a
leader within the MS community
was recognized in 2003 by the Na-
tional Multiple Sclerosis Society
(NMSS), which presented him its
most prestigious award Ambassa-
dor of the Year for his work in
education' people about the impor-
tance of taking an active role in
managing their MS. In addition, the
NMSS again recognized Walker in
2005, naming him Honorary Am-
bassador for this year's MS Cycling
Series.
"I kept my battle with MS private

(See Walker Shares Page 5)


'.,








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...


Resident Presents His Take


On Humane Society Issue


Dear Editor:
I am responding to the Humane
Society article in the Wednesday,
May 25, 2005 Monticello News.
I am already the designated bad
boy regarding animal issues in Jef-
ferson County, so I thought I would
take a stab at this article.

First, I feel the Monticello News is
doing a fair, balanced reporting of
meetings and events regarding the
Jefferson County Humane Society,
Inc. (JCHSI,) and the Responsible
Pet Owners of Jefferson County
(RPOJC.)


I don't know Wendy Moss from
Adam's house cat, so I have no
comment on this woman.
I do know Betsy Pertierra from
working with her on the previous
JCHSI Board of Directors (Board.)
When she was on the Board with
me, she worked just as hard, and
sometimes harder than other Board
members. She is very passionate
about animal issues.
I resigned from the Board a month
or two before the Board ouster in
April, 2004. I resigned the day after
the Board voted to merge JCHSI


with Extended Circle, of
Tallahassee.
I just couldn't stomach where
JCHSI was headed, but felt no op-
tion other than to vote for the
merger because of a lack of volun-
teers, and community apathy to-
wards JCHSI.
I didn't support the way the ouster
occurred, but I do believe the cur-.
rent JCHSI Board is doing the best
it can, has gotten a small group of
volunteers, and secured a sizable,
one-time, and recurring donations.
People should stop trying to trash
the current JCHSI Board because of'
vindictive, personal reasons.


I got over it; everyone else should
also.
In regard to Betsy's statement to
the County Commission of "This or-
ganization's absolute disregard for
the law," what in the world are you,
Betsy, talking about?
You should not be making broad,
unsubstantiated comments like that
in public.
If you have evidence of laws be-
ing broken, go to the Police, District
Attorney, State's Attorney, or any-
one else who will listen.
If you have no evidence, shut up
and go away. There is no sense be-
ing a festering boil on JCHSI's be-
hind. Stop trying to ruin an
organization that is doing its best
under the circumstances in which it
is forced to operate.
I made a formal request of the
JCHSI secretary for all the minutes
and related relevant documents
since the ouster of the old Board.
After receiving and reviewing this
documentation, I may have further
comments.
Yours truly,
Guery Watson


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN


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Monticello *Border /
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MAHAN


Walker Shares Experience


(Continued From Page 4)
for more than seven years," Walker
said. "It was very difficult to stand
up and talk to others about it. Now
this is something I feel like I was
chosen to do; it's bigger than me..
"I want to inspire others with MS
to take an active role in treating the
'disease because the worst thing they
-can do is nothing. My hope is other
people will become empowered like
I did, educate themselves about all
the available therapies, and choose
the one which is right for them."
"If I can convince even one person
at every patient program to take
ownership and take that first step,
then it's been worth it."
Walker was also recently honored
by the American Academy of Neu-
rology (AAN), which created a
clinical research fellowship in neu-
rology in his name. That fellowship
will be officially announced at the
AAN Annual Meeting in Miami this
April.
The success of Walker's treatment
and lifestyle changes has allowed
him to lead an active life and con-
tinue .. I-,,_ his dreams. He gains
confidence inhis .health with each
new visit to his neurologist, contin-
ues to live each day to the fullest
and enjoys many hobbies.
Cycling has become a recent pas-
sion for Walker, and he and several
of his band members have commit-
ted to participate in select MS150
bike rides this year. To help prepare,
Walker and his band have been
training across the country at vari-
ous stops on their concert tour, often
enlisting the help of local cycling
clubs that assist in mapping out the


I


L-~~
1~.
0~~~~
~ ~n C. I


best training courses in their'city.
"I still have my physical abilities,"
Walker said. "Being able to ride for
the cause, being able to play golf for
the cause everything that I am now
is about finding a cure for MS, rais-
ing awareness of the benefits of
treatment and, along the way, mak-
ing sure people out there know that
just because you have MS doesn't
mean you have to give up your
dreams."
In 2003, Walker successfully
launched his not-for-profit Band-
Against MS Foundation. Since
then, the Foundation has given two
research grants to the University of
Texas Medical School in Houston.
Walker's Foundation plans to pre-



Control
(Continued From Page 4)
Sustainable Development program.
It's called Freedom 21, and it's
quickly growing into a "freedom
*movement." Freedom 21 is not an
organization. It is a loose coalition
of groups and individuals who be-
lieve that our nation's Founding Fa-
thers had it right when they
established this nation as one with
tightly controlled reins on govern-
ment.
The Founding Fathers believed
that all individuals were born with
their rights of individual liberty, and
that government's job is to protect
those rights as individuals pursue
their own dreams and goals. That's
the basis for the Freedom 21
agenda.


sent a grant to a leading medical in-
stitution each year to be used for
research into a cure for MS.
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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be base
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Personal Injury
& Wrongful Death
* AUTOMOTIVE, TRUCK, & MOTORCYCLE
ACCIDENTS.
* DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS
* MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE/MALPRACTICE
* SLIP & FALL PREMISES LIABILITY
* NURSING HOME NEGLIGENCE

C No Fees or Costs
until Recovery

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1307 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32344


-D














C All Dlastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.
;: -

















All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
etc
SAluminum cans -soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes, e
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.
0
SAll glass bottles jart, etc. (cear,, brown & green).
Residents can bring these items dire cl r cycling Center located a

Scollection sites in the County. .







Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfii
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?
o


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
l e et c. r









*Waste Tires. (not accepted at the Recyce Center)c

eBat iteries i te
*White Good s (which consi st of) Refrigeratos, freezers, washing o
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted ate l ot

c yd e c
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Cot eio t n Debris (which consia st of Lumber, shingles sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree shrub
aclippiegs, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)
0.

S leUsed Oil & Oil Filters County

S Houehold Hazardouso Waiste p esticides, swimming pool fsh
chemicals, e paryin, ai nt thinner etc. (Please have all containers
Sod clearly marked to identify contents)

Sn VThe Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
S a ccept medical & pharmaceutical wasto e. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off. s

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005


Lifestyle


Azalea Garden Circle

Meets For Last Time

Prior To Disbanding


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The final meeting of the Azalea-
Garden Circle took place at Frazier's
Grill in Thomasville, to remember
times past and old friends, prior to
its disbanding.
As they lunched, members
talked about times past and the
changes the Circle has experienced.
At one time the Circle exceeded
the 25 member limit suggested by
the Monticello Garden Club (MGC)
by-laws.
The Circle has participated in
many of the MGC projects, includ-
ing the decorating of a Christmas
tree at the Opera House for many a
'year; the Monticello Christmas
Drive; the Tour of Homes; the gar-
den at the Opera House; planting
trees for National Arbor Day and
helped with plantings at Hospice.
The Circle has always had willing
helpers, even though they were not
large in number in recent years.
Among its members, were several
Past Presidents of the MGC and nu-


merous other officers.
The Circle meetings have included
such programs as: creating decora-
tive vases, embellishing china
plates, creating garden art, learning
the meaning of flowers, festive pot-
luck and holiday lunches, dining to-
gether at area restaurants, touring
area plantations and museums, mak-
ing wall hangings and topiary trees
using dried and paper roses, attend-
ing flower shows, and participating
in plant-a-tree programs.
Some of the members will join
other Circles for monthly meetings,
while others will take a break from
Circle activities, as they pursue
other interests.
Chairman Ardis White ended this
final meeting offering good wishes
to all, and thanking everyone for
their years of dedication to the Cir-
cle. 0
c .She gave members a parting gift
as the meeting drew to a close.
Members attending were: White,
Jayonn Brown, Carol Greathouse,
Mary Nowell, Louise Chitwood,
Amanda Ouzts, and Illean Vorce.


Mark Moore Receives

Leadership Award


Lt. Col. Mark-D. Moore, son of
B,-tty and Thermon Moore, received
the Lance P. Sijan Leadership
Award for 2004.
Brother Thermon Moore has
served as pastor at First Baptist
Church since March, 2005.
Lt. Col. Moore had served in the
Air Force for 19 years, and is a F-16
fighter pilot with more than 3,000
hours in the aircraft.
Prior to flying the F-16 Fighting
Falcocn. he fle'. the OV- 10 Eorwarxd
Air Control aircrarft,'i and`' earhed
more than 1,000 flying hours.
Moore's citation states why he was
chosen the Air Force winner.
As commander of the 555th
Fighter Squadron, he exemplified
leadership by managing'an aggres-
sive flying hour program and led


multiple deployments.
At Ramstein Air Base in
Germany, Moore developed the
concept of operation for the Critical
International Security Assistance
Force expansion.
He also oversaw the integration
plan of four new nations into the
Northern Region into vital air polic-
ing operations.
In briefing visitors, his articulate
.style has been eSsential in bringing
the-diversit of-:.NATO into sharp
focuL Tfroperations in Afghanistan
and the Baltic.
The Lance P. Sijan Award is
named for a Medal of Honor recipi-
ent during the Vietnam conflict, pre-
sented to a senior officer, a junior
officer, and two enlisted person, an-
nually.


,-Mosquito Spraying

,Ongoing In County


.DEBBIE SNAPP
, Staff Writer

County Mosquito Control Fore-
* man Bill Pitz reports mosquito sea-
-son is in full swing.
"Because of the unusually, high
% olume of rain in the last month or
,so mosquitos are becoming a real
Problemm" Pitz said.
He reminds residents of the 5-D's
,for mosquito prevention: Dusk;
'Dawn, avoid being outside; Dress,
.wear clothing that covers the skin;
.DEET, use mosquito repellents that
-contain DEET; and Drainage, drain.
%any standing water around your
home.
By remembering the 5-D's Rule
discomfort caused by mosquitos,
can be reduced.
Jefferson County has three trucks
equipped for mosquito spraying.
One of the three trucks is on county
roads nightly as needed.
"We've been spraying for mosqui-
tos for a number of weeks, and have
had a marked increase in requests

IN MEMORY OF OUR FATHER
Richard E. Rooks, Jr.
Dec. 1, 1958-May 31, 2004
This Monday makes a year that
you've been gone, but inside of us
your teaching and preaching still
live on.
We were truly blessed to have a
father like you, someone who loved
us so much there was nothing he
wouldn't do.
Were taking time right now to
thank God for blessing us with you;
but we must understand you were
our father, a strong and humble
man, but also God's child, and this
was all part of the Master's plan.
We miss you and we love you.
Your Kids


tor spraying in the last two weeks,"
Pitz said.
Pitz also reminds residents that in
order to have their property sprayed
for mosquitos they must call Mos-
quito Control weekly at 997-3343,
and spell your name, your 911 ad-
dress, and a telephone number
where you can be reached.
Gambusia fish forms, for October
disbursement, can be picked up now
at the Health Department.










V-
-. ,





ROOKS
IN LOVING MEMORY
Richard E. Rooks, Jr.
Dec, 1, 1958-May 31, 2004
Words can't express how much we
truly miss you. You were the best
husband, father, grandfather, son,
brother-in-law, and best friend.
It doesn't feel like you've been
gone so long for we feel your pres-
ence with in us everyday.
You will always and forever live
on in our hearts because we love
you so dearly.
Love,
Your wife Janet,
Your kids,
Your grandson, Julian,
Your co-workers
at Simpson's Nursery


Eve, Named

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

"Eve" has been named by the Hu-
mane Society, as the adoptable fe-
line Pet of the Week.
She is a short hair gray tabby ap-
proximately 10 weeks old, spayed
and all vaccinations are up to date.
Eve is described as being exces-
sively playful, lovable and purrs a
lot.
To adopt Eve or any of the other
many felines at the shelter, call
342-0244.


AZALEA GARDEN CIRCLE members meet Amanda Ouzts, Illean Vorce, Jayonn Brown,
for the last time. From left, Ardis White, and Carol Greathouse. (News Photo)
chair, Mary Nowell, Louise Chitwood,



Quilters Meet At Sheats'


Home During Library Move


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Crazy Quilters have moved
their quilting location to the home of
member Barbara Sheats at 590 Mis-
sissippi Street.
The group formerly met at the li-
brary, which will be closed soon for
its forthcoming move.
When the library is up and run-
ning in its new location, arrange-
ments will be made for a more
permanent time, date and schedule
of meetings.
In the meantime, the Quilters will
meet 10 a.m.,Tuesdays, all day, and
on Thursday at no scheduled time.
Sheats requests that members call
her to let her know of planned arri-
val times.
She ,can.be contacted at 997-8"32'
Quilters .have been '.c.,rking dI;,.'
gently on their most recent quilt, [le
North Carolina Lily.
The quilt pattern consists of red
lily blooms with green stem, and
leaves on a backdrop of pure white,
with red trim and border.
It is nearing completion and raffle
tickets are in the process of being
printed.
The Quilters are planning to have
a booth set up during the Water-
melon Festival, and to begin selling
the tickets and stitching onthe qdill
at that time.,


The tickets will sell for $1 each.
Six tickets for $5. Proceeds will be
donated to a local organization that
accepts charitable donations which
are used in the Jefferson County
area, for the benefit of its residents.
The winning raffle ticket will be
drawn at the Christmas in Monti-
cello event during the lighting of the
tree ceremony.
In other Quilting news, material
and other sewing items are still be-
ing collected by the group.
Donated items have been sent to
south Florida for victims of hurri-
canes last fall season.
Items will continue to be sent as
the need continues. Items coming in
now will be donated to local .resi-
dents and groups making gift items.
for charity.

Aucilla SNApE
Signup Dates
The Aucilla SHARE program has
announced its schedule for the June
food program.
Registration will be taken 10 a.m.
until noon, Saturday, June 4 and
Saturday; June 11, at the Central
Baptist Church, and at the Library.
Distribution will be from 9 a.m.
until 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 25 at
the Central Baptist Church located
on Tindell Road
For additional information call
997-2631 or 997-2220.


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JES, HMS Parents Must


Make Academic Choices


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

District School Title I Director,
Lynn Rhymes reports that Jefferson
Elementary, and Howard Middle,
both Title I Schools, have continued
to improve academically as shown
by the recent FCAT scores.
"It is our intention to keep parents
informed in the decision making
process concerning their children's
education," Rhymes said.
"No Child Left Behind, and the
School Board, seek feedback from
you in School Choice options," she
continued.
In the event a copy of the letter
that was sent home with every child
attending JES and HMS in grades
K-8, was misplaced, a copy is
printed below.
The letter follows:
Dear Parents:
Even though we are making pro-
gress in Reading and Math, we
haven't yet met the requirements of
the No Child Left Behind Law, and
your child may be eligible for addi-
tional services.
Please choose one of the options
below:
*Option 1: Participation in Accel-
erated Learning Classes at JES.
These classes will be incorporated
during the school day. The services
will utilize a new research-based
reading curriculum to accelerate stu-
dent performance and have the most
qualified teachers.
Priority for the Accelerated Learn-
ing Classes will be given to the low-
est performing students in grades
3-5.
*Option 2: Participation in supple-
mental services from approved pro-
viders.
These services will be after
school or on Saturdays, and may in-
clude tutoring or computer-assisted
instruction.
Parents are required to provide
transportation.
Priority for supplemental services
will be given to the lowest perform-
ing, low income students in grades
3-5 ,. ,
*Option 3: None of the abo'.e I
believe that Jefferson Elementary is




^ *... .. ... .









GHEE

First Birthday
Walter Ghee III will celebrate his
first birthday, June 1, with his fam-
ily.
He is the son of Laketha and Wal-
ter Ghee, Jr. and has a sister
Lashawn.
His maternal grandparents are
Etheline Ghee and Walter Ghee.
Paternal grandparents are Be-
becca Abdul Hamid and Jonish
Hayes.


on the road to improvement and
continue to support its efforts.
Parents of students at Howard
Middle School also have a choice of
three options.
*Option 1: Participation in Accel-
erated Learning Classes at HMS.
These classes will be incorporated
during the school day. The services
will utilize a new research-based
reading curriculum to accelerate stu-
dent performance and have the most
qualified teachers.
Priority for the Advanced Learn-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

JES first grade student, Tyshun
Therman, 6, received academic Cer-
tificates of Achievements, recently.
He was reccognized for maintain-
ing an "A" average all year in
Writing and Reading, and also for
Accelerated Reading (AR), which is
a program at the school which en-
courages students to read numerous
books throughout the year.
For each book read, points are
earned, and at the end of the year
students are allowed to redeem the
points for prizes in the AR Store.
Therman received a trophy for
having the highest AR score in the'
first grade.
He also received another trophy
for placing second in the entire,
school for the number of books
read, more than 150, since August,
2004.
He earned sufficient points to se-
lect a variety of items from the AR
Store.
He is a member of the Tabernacle
Church of God and Unity.


ing Classes will be given to the low-
est performing students in grades
6-8.
*Option 2: Same as for JES
*Option 3: None of the above. I
believe that HMS is on the road to
improvement and continue to sup-
port its efforts.
Letters must be returned to
Rhymes no later than June 30, 2005.
Contact Rhymes at 342-0100, if
you have not had the opportunity to
select an option.


His hobbies are T-ball, soccer, and
reading.
Therman and his family express
their thanks to Sharico Parrish and
Nancy Whitly for their dedication
in helping Therman achieve his edu-
cational goals.


GRAND OPENING of Snapdragon gift bou-
tique, 140 East Dogwood St. L-R: Chief
David Frisby, Mayor Julie Conley, Owner
Kevin Winchester with scissors, daughter


Gaige and wife Hayley, Judge Bobby
Plaines, Realtor Diane Westbrook, Chamber
Director Mary Frances Drawdy. (News
Photo)


Library To Present Mini


SISummer Reading Program
." *. The story of Little Red Riding


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


With the library closing next-
month to prepare for the move to
South Water Street, a Mini Sum-
mer Reading Program will be pre-
sented, rather than the usual
extended program.
The closing was originally set for
July, but has been advanced to June
17.
Librarian Linda Hamedani ex-
plained that the closing has been
advanced because the air condition-
ing has gone out, and the roof is
leaking.
The Library is expected to reopen
at its new location at 375 S. Water
Street in mid-July.
"Space wide, we'll be better off,"
said Hamedani. "We'll have about
9-10,000 square feet, where here,
we only have about 7,000 square
feet."
All Summer Reading Events will
be held at the Jefferson Elementary
School Media Center, unless other-
wise specified.
The entertainment begins 10
a.m., Thursday, with the Laing Ac-
robatic & Comedy Show.
Laing is returning by popular de-
mand with her 200 year-old ancient
art form, which includes balancing
and spinning while working with
knives, plates and water.
"Red vs. the Wolf', is scheduled
for 11:15 a.m., Saturday, June 18,
from, at the Opera House.'


Hood is retold, from the viewpoint
of the wolf. Will the wolf persuade
the world that all along he has got-
ten a bad rap? .,
The cost is $2 per person.
The Kaleidoscope Storytellers are
scheduled 10:30 a.m., Thursday,
June 23.
Coordinators say get ready to sail
with a Florida Story Cruise by
spinning the storytelling wheel. A
kaleidoscope of puppets and tales is
planned.


.- pr -


The Atlantic Coast iTheateri ror
Youth will be performing. One
mouse sings rap, and the other
sings country.
Will the city mouse and the coun-
try mouse be able to find common
ground? .
This is an updated version of the
Aesop's Fable.
For further information, call 997-
0205.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLTO,(FL), NEWS. WEDl.,.JUNE. 1. 2005l


BEVERLY REMLAND, JES Guidance Counselor, swallowed
a nasty looking combination, said to be rat intestines.


GLORIA HEATH, wrapped with a boa constrictor from the
Science Lab, had students looking for the nearest exit.


ANDREW LEWIS slowly applies a slime facial of avocado,
lemon, Egg Beaters and dry oatmeal to Debra Bishop,
reading coach.


Stude dSRSeEarW eat the small intestine of a rat.
She pulled a disgusting strand of

mixture of candy Gummy Worms
For Hig h Scoand Tootsie rolls), from a wrapper
O I i C 0 S F A and began to tell students what the
For~ High rcores0small intestine was.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson Elementary School stu-
dents who were high achievers on
the recent FCAT, were recognized,
Wednesday, May 25.
Total numbers of students are: 27
in, reading, five in math and 13 stu-
dents in both areas.
In addition, the PTO supplied
cash awards for 17 of the highest
scoring students in reading, writing
and math.
Students receiving cash awards
include: Jade Greene, .Christopher
Haugen, Caitlyn Holland, Phidell
Lewis, Nortory Mack, Yasmire
Whigham, Cody Bell Hannah Eby,


Denzel Whitfield and Simone Wil-
liams.
Also, Emily Howell, Laken Brad-
ford, Tre'Von Youman, and for
high scores in Florida Writes, Tyk-
eria Jones, Courtney Norton,
Brooke Bumalough and Dana Bar-
ber.
The Grand Finale was called:
FCAT Fear Factor, similar to the
TV Program.
Earlier students presented for
approval, a list of possible stunts
for school officials to perform
The first victim was Reading
Coach Debra Bishop, who had to
undergo a "Slime Facial".
Student Andre Lewis was called
from the audience to perform the
task.


He mixed together fresh lemon,
raw egg, ripe avocado,. Egg Beaters
and dry oatmeal and applied the
concoction to Bishop's face.
Dean of Students Omari Forts was
the second victim. He had his beard
spray painted. .
Students Delicia Davis, Desiree
Brown and Blair Wooley were the
painters, using cans of red, white,
blue, black and fluorescent green
washable paint and quickly went to
work.
Apparently, students weren't
happy with just spraying his, beard,
as blue paint was also sprayed on
his bald head.
Guidance Counselor Beverly
Remland was next, and she was to


. Then came time for Principal
Kathy Joiner and Asst. Principal
Gloria Heath to have their hair
spray painted.
Simone Williams, Joshua An-
drews, Sara Boland and Nathan
Shiver, were chosen for the task.
The end result was two ladies
sporting colorful clown-like coifs.
Forts was recalled and had whi-
ped cream applied to his bald head.
Amber Norton and Devrick Byrd
performed the deed.
Math Coach Indy Mack was to
swallow a bug with cod liver oil.
She walked the little black beetle'
around the room so students could
see that it was real and let students
smell the cod liver oil.
Mack mixed the beetle in a medi-


cine dose cup about one-fourth full
of the. concoction, held her nose,
counted to three and down it
quickly went. By the apparent look
on her face, it wanted to come up a
lot quicker than it went down.
Now it was time for the students
to take on the top administrator, Su-
perintendent of Schools Phil
Barker.
"I went through your sugges-
tions for my stunt and the one that
really grossed me out was having
to drink a. rat blended in a blender,"
said Barker. "Who suggested that
one?"
No one confessed.
"Then there was one that I wear a
dress, hose and high heels and run
around the school six times. I
checked my closet and I no longer
have a dress that fits me.
"Then, someone suggested that I
wrestle a skunk. I was up all night,
looked everywhere, and couldn't
find one.
"Several students suggested spray


painting, so I went and bought
these white pants and red, perma-
nent spray paint, for the occasion,"
Barker said to the cheers of the stu-
dents.
After warning students not to
spray his arms from the neck up,
Colby Scarborough, Early Brewster
and Rachel Simms were chosen to
do the honors.
Students thoroughly applied the
paint and made sure to saturate the
white pants and his T-shirt.
, Shortly before the grand finale of
the program, Heath announced to
the children that they should re-
main quiet and seated for the final
stunt, "Don't move or the stunt
could go bad," she said.

Moments later, Heath reentered
carrying a live large red tail Boa
Constrictor over her shoulders and
partially around her waist, the stu-
dents sprang to their feet, some
screaming and scoping out the
nearest exits in the media center.


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005 PAGE 9


Aucilla Christian Academy


Athletic Awards Ceremony


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy held
its annual Sports Banquet was held
recently at the First Methodist
Church Fellowship Hall.
Though Athletic Director Ray
Hughes couldn't be present because
his son was graduating from the
Seminary, he found a creative way
to be there in spirit, video taping
himself talking about each of the
athletes on the boy's 7, 8 basketball
team, JV football, and varsity base-
ball.
A video presentation prepared by
Mary Beth Bishop, featured photos
of players from all of the teams,
complete with a humorous .phrase.
Recipients of awards were de-
cided by the vote of teammates.
Awards presented and recipients
include: Academic Athlete Awards
to Daniel Roccanti and Amanda
Sapp.
Varsity golf, John Stephens, AKA
-"The Lone Golfer".
Weightlifting, Colby Roberts.
JV Cheerleaders: Casey Joiner,
Most Improved; Dana Watt, Most
Spirited; and Savannah Williams,
-Most Valuable Cheerleader".
On the varsity squad, Courtney
Kinsey, Most Improved; Ramsey
Revell, Most Spirited; and Fran
Walker, Most Valuable Cheer-
leader.
In Boys Grade 7, 8 basketball:
Will Hartsfield, Best Lineman; Ca-
sey Anderson, Best Defensive
Player; Luke Whitmer, Best Of-
fensive Player; and Matt Bishop,
MVP.
Boys JV Basketball: Rob
Searcy, Hustle Award; AJ Connell,
Sportsmanship Award; Wade Scar-
berry, Most Improved Player; and
Kyle Peters, MVP.
Girl's J\ basketball: Nicole
-Mathis, Hustle Award, and Best
Defensive Player went to Nicole
Mathis; Bethany Saunders, Best
, Defensive Player; and 'Mallory
Plaines, MVP.
Boys JV Basketball: Stephen
Griffin, Most Improved Player;
Daniel Roccanti, Sportsmanship;
Jeremy Tuckey, Best Defensive
Player; Ridgely Plaines, Best Of-
fensive Player; and for the second
consecutive year, Drew Sherrod,


Girls Varsity Basketball: Corie
Smith, Sportsmanship'; Rikki Roc-
canti, Most Improved Player;
Amanda Sapp, Best Defensive
Player; Abbey Hunt, Hustle Award;
and Fran Walker, MVP.
JV Football: Will Hartsfield,
Best Lineman; Daniel Greene, Best
Defensive Player, Matt Bishop, and
Kyle Bamrnwell, MVP.
Girls Cross Country: Abbey
Hunt, Most Improved Runner;
Rikki Roccanti, Coach's Award;
and Olivia Sorensen, MVP.
Tennis Team: Best Match Re-
cord, 14-2, went to sixth grader
Caitlin Jackson.
Rebekah Aman, Most Improved
Player; and Sapp MVP.
JV Softball: Nicole Mathis, Best
Defensive Player; Lindsey Day,
Best Offensive Player; Nikki
Kisamore, Coach's Award; and.
Paige Thurman, MVP.
JV Baseball: Rob Searcy, Hustle
Award; Connell, Sportsmanship;
Stephen Dollar, Pitching Ace; and
Bishop, MVP.
Varsity Softball Team: Carrie
Brasington, Hustle Aware; Brit-
tany Hobbs, Coach's Award; Lisa
Bailey, Defensive Player of Year;
Cassi Anderson, Offensive Player
of the Year; and Kayla Gebhard,
MVP.
Hughes said that Varsity Base-
ball Awards would be determined
at a later date, as the team was still
in regional play during the Awards
Ceremony.
Drew Sherrod, Male Athlete of
the Year; Sapp and Gebhard, Fe-
male-Athletes of the Year.
In related news, at the conclusion
of the baseball season, Hughes
gave season statistics for top play-
ers.
Lead hitter was Drew Sherrod
with a bating average of .500 with
five home rui,. I .,u1.,L _. t.J j.
school record in RBI with 46 and
on the mound, pitched 63 and one
third innings, striking out 54
batters, seven wins, two losses,
three saves and a Earned Run Av-
erage (ERA) of 1.55.
Chris Tuten had a .430 batting
average with seven doubles, scored
46 runs and stole 13 bases. On the
mound, he was 3-0 with a 1.36
ERA.
Casey Gunnels batted .422 with
three doubles, three triples, three


home runs, scored 47 runs and
stole 21 bases. On the mound he
held a 3-0 season and he had a 1.98
ERA.
Ridgely Plaines batted at .369,
scored 21 runs and on the mound,
pitched 47 and two thirds innings,
striking .out 61 batters, a 9-2
season, two saves and an ERA of
2.06.
Josh Carswell batted .316 and
had 24 RBI, Jason Holton hbit.ed
3.16.
From the mound, Dustin Roberts
had a 4-0 season with a 2.78 ERA.
Playing center field, Glen Bishop
had the highest fielding percentage
with .984 and only committed on-
erous during the season.
The Warriors wrapped up their
season 26-4.


NAMED Aucilla Christian Academy Athletes
of the Year, at the Annual Athletic Awards
Banquet, were: L-R: Drew Sherrod,


JOHN STEPHENS, golfer, was awarded a plaque and cer-
tificate at ACA Athletic Awards Ceremony.


baseball; Kayla Gebhard, softball; and
Amanda Sapp, Tennis.


COLBY ROBERTS received a plaque and certificate for rep-
resenting ACA in weightlifting competition. (News Photos)


.Monticello Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.

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Certification Exam
HIPAA and Food Safety
Programs offered on-line!! ..............................
New Courses required for Phlebotomy Tech
the Rouestaurant and f Learn this highly needed skill.
Medical Professionals! Prepares you for a
Call for more details!! National Certification Exam.
Call for more details!! .... .............
KAISER COLLEGE
Department of Continuing
& Professional Education
Call 906-9005R!!


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


Jazz Up Your Saturday Nights


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening




1630 E. JACKSON ST.







PAr 1 uMONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS. WED., JUNE 1, 2005


VARSITY BASEBALL Team at ACA includes:
Front, L-R: Daniel Roccanti, Ridgely
Plaines, Drew Sherrod, Jim Stephens, Chris
Tuten, Jeremy Tuckey, and Coach lan Sears.


Back, Josh Carswell, Kyle Peters, Jason
Holton, Glen Bishop, Chris Boykin, Casey
Gunnels and Matt Bishop.


JV BASEBALL Team includes: Front, L-R:
A.J. Connell, Daniel Greene, Kyle Barnwell,
Michael Kinsey. Back, Hunter Greene, Kyle


Peters, Elliott
Rob Searcy.


Lewis, Wade Scarberry, and


TENNIS TEAM
Amanda Sapp,


at ACA includes: Front L-R:
Rebekah Aman, Alfa Hunt,


Ramsey Revell, Dana Jane Watt. Back, Liza
Shirley, Caitlin Jackson and Caroline Blair.


VARSITY CHEERLEADERS recognized at
ACA include: L-R: Jenny Tuten, Taylor Rei-
chert, Amanda Hunt, Joanna Cobb, Brittany


Hobbs, Suzanne Walker, Melissa Kinsey,
coach, Frank Walker and Ramsey Revell.


RECEIyING recognition
at ACA are: Front,
Amanda Sapp, Brittany


for Varsity Softball
L-R: Fran Walker,
Hobbs, Lindsey Day,


Katelyn Murphy and Bethany Saunders.
Back: Lisa Bailey, Kikki Roccanti, and Ab-
bey Hunt.


CROSS COUNTRY Team includes: Front, L- Sorensen, Lisa Iisamore, Abby Hunt, Eliza- Y
R: Kikki Roccanti, Angela McCune, Michaela beth Shirley, Tristen Sorensen. (News Pho-
Roccanti, Nicole Mathis, Sarah Sorensen, tos)
and Hannah Sorensen. Back, Olivia


-


BUSINESS


S


___ DIRECTORY


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
,,,. WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs


Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All! -
=7 "Call Andy" 1:-


997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT


850-997-5808

850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


U


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


w


Licensed & Insured
CAC 058274


Northside Mower and
Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


John A. Kuhn
Owner


J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
(850) 997-4577
30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Mr. Merchant

This Space Can Be

Yours For Only

$10 Per Week


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSU RAN( CE


Allstate In sturance ( o l)an '
3sI 131111 Simic Road. SitcI,,()I


J~t 878-8077
ON N \Iolk,i ltN II ,:1\ ,S


S Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning 1
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


Normnha L. Harfc


p -


L


_ 4


4
Li.. A


V


.(850) 997-4340)
w~ww.I Ilea rx. co n)


I if-
'Am


AP


A
r-P







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005 PAGE 1 I


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

The City Council of the City of Monticello
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2005-05 AN ORDINANCE
OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, AMENDING ARTICLE I
SECTION 25-22 OF THE CODE OF OR-
DINANCES OF THE CITY OF MONTI-
CELLO, FLORIDA TO REFLECT
INCREASED MONTHLY WATER SYS-
TEM SERVICE RATES, AND PROVID-
ING. FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The


LEGAL NOTICE

entire text of the ordinance may be in-
spected at City Hall, 245 Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:0q p.m., Monday through
Friday. Public hearing on the ordinance
will be held on Tuesday, June 7, 2005 at
7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall. Inter-
ested persons may appear at the meeting
and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.
6/1, c


NOTICE



A special Called Meeting of the Board of Trustees
of Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc., will be
held at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, June 2, 2005, at the
Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. headquarters
building located on U.S. Highway 90,
approximately two miles West of the City of
Madison, Florida.


This Special Called Meeting is to discuss and take
action on settlement of Clay Electric Coop'erative,
Inc. vs Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc.
litigation.






WILKINSON WAREHOUSE SALE

Saturday, June 4th

DOOR OPEN 8 am 12 noon

1701 West Gordon Street ~ Valdosta, GA
Call For Directions 800-633-2215





2000 Polaris Priced





p2499.

EXCELLENT CONDITION
*325 Magnum *Automatic
02 Wheel Drive *Reciev'er
PHONE: (229) 558.9016
rJ TOLL FREE: 1.800.558.9016
fJo lr"-"S nS"mT FAX: (229)558.9179
14591 HWY. 19 SOUTH THOMASVILLE, GA
HOURS: MON-SAT 8:30-5:30 1695ss73


HELP WANTED

A behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: SECRETARY #2173
High school diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/ office clerical experience.
Typing score of at least 35 cwpm. Starting
salary $6.43 shift 8am 5pm Monday
through Friday. For more information
and a complete listing of available
positions: www.apalacheecenter,org.
850-523-3217, or 1-800-226-2931 Human
Resources, 2634-J Capital Circle N.E.
Tallahassee, Pre-hiring drug screen &
FDLE background check. An equal
opportunity affirmative action employer.
Drug free workplace.
611, C

Busy Boarding Kennel located 2 miles
from Lloyd is looking for animal lovers
for summer employment. Must be
drug-free, hard working and have
dependable transportation. Call 877-5050
or fax resume to 877-5010.
s/d 5/18, tfn, c

Monticello Christian Academy: Now
Interviewing for Elementary and Middle
School Teachers. Call Pastor Mike
997-3906; 294-1006
5/27, tfn, c

Local business now hiring. FT/PT,
weekends. Respond to: P.O. Box 691,
Monticello, Fla. 32345.
4/27s/d, tfn,

Great earnings potential! Only $10.00
startup Fee!! Make all your dreams come
true. $250.00 Fast Start Bonus. Call B.J. at
850-58A 6289.
5/27. 61./ 1 1 '". rd


The city of Monticello is accepting
applications '"-, the position of Police
Patrol Officer. This position requires a
minimum of a high school diploma and
Florida Police Standards. The successful
candidate must live in Jefferson County or
be willing to relocate. The ideal candidate
will have demonstrated police skills, have
some advanced education and some
advanced police certification, such as
Radar or Breathalyzer. The successful
candidate must complete a Department
field training program within the first
month. The position requires a
background check. Salary and benefit
information available upon request.'
Submit application and resume to: City nf
Monticello Police Dept. 195 S. Mulln rry
St., Monticello, FL. 32344' by June 10,
2005 EOE/Drug Free Workplace
6/1, 3, c

GARAGE SALE

Moving Sale 5705 Old Lloyd Rd.
Moutii;ello 850-997-2512 Fri. 6/3 and Sat.
6/4, 9am to 5pm
pd

Yard Sale, Sat. June 4th, 8-2 645 E.
Madison St. Household Items, lawn equip.
variouss treasures.
6/1.3, pd


FOR SALE
2-3 RIB Front Tires for 8' Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50. 4 P225/6 or 16
MICH. tires $40 997-0135.
52" RCA big screen T.V. $1,000 OBO call
508-4086.
610 3, 8, pd
Two wheel tow trailer $250 firm 997-2076

1993 White Chevy Caprice, Police Pack-
age, runs great. $2500 call 342-1185 (leave
message).

FOR RENT

2 Bedroom, 1 bath, in Town $595.00 per
Month Call 544-2427.
5/25, 27, 6/1, 3, pd
3 bedroom, 2 bath and much more.
Renovated and ready! 251-0760 or
www.blueradish.biz
6/1, 3, c

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
1995 16'X70' Redmond Mobile Home.
Two bedrooms, one bathroom double sink,
garden tub, shower. Large Kitchen with
open floor plan. On nice lot in
Waukeenah, 850-519-4522.
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14,-Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd

FOUND
Black & Silver 3 month old puppy.
wearing collar, near Lloyd acres. Call
Humane Society Shelter to Identify.
342-0244
6/1, c nc

SERVICES
We are a church that values tradition, but
we are not fundamentalists. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday service at 10:00 am.
)497.4116.
6/1, t
home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn

Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is designed to
curb the appetite, burn fat and increase
energy levels resulting in considerable
weight loss over time. Hoodiacol consist of
3 key ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavoring to give it a
palpable taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a
cactus found in the Kalahari Desert of
South Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite but
increases the sense of satiety. This tends to
limit total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger. Significant
weight loss should result from such a drop
in caloric intake,
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tfni
Do you want to be just a Christian. with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
S10/1 tfn



Prime Downtown

OFFICE SPACE
Cherry Street Commons Bldg.

Available in June


Call: 997-1980


Aucilla Shores Cute
Starter Home:
IBR., IBA., W/SCREENED
PORCH, SHED.


Lots of room to grow
on 5ac. A bargain @
53,000. 570-0215
L V MSG.


W *When Only the Best Will Do! Custom Home
on 9+ acres- offers Pool, Sunroom, Study, 3 car
garage, Hilltop with spectacular views
KELLY & KELLY ....... $595,000
PROPERfflES *Coopers Pond- great family subdivision, 4
BR/ 3BA, huge master suite,privacy fenced with:
above ground pool........ $174,900

*Price Reduced! Spacious 2003 modular home
a half acre lot, located north of Monticello.
.......$123,000
*Doublewide in town in Nobles subdivision,
convenient location, large workshop.... $54,900
*Doublewide on 10 acres-woods and wildlife
215 N. Jefferson St. await you, 2002 home in excellent condition.
(850)-997-5516 .....$89,500
ww.cbkk.com


: : : ... l i J i i .J -i di .. i s i = J =.ai. = i.a n J r ::


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com 1

Great Cash Flow for the Investor 1
Apartment House currently 5 could be
7 unit apartment building great potential
as a bed and breakfast with suites
$240,000
Beautiful Home on a Sweet Mountian
Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath yellow brick
home circled with 10 year old planted
pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field all very conven-
ient to Tallahassee for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Mor-
ris Road call for details $10,000 to
$40,000 I
Look- Unusual Opportunity!!! On l
Waukeenah Highway easy access to Tal-
lahassee high, dry, fenced and ready to
build on, great for horses or cattle
$8,500per acre
Price Reduced Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$169,500 don't miss it!
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location north of Greenville
only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on a hill way out
in the country, new carpet, with 2 acres
asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road Under Contract 4 bed-
room 2 bath home with garage, out build-
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres in the *
Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
Cheap!! Contract Pendinq 80 acres w/
approx. 10 ac in planted pines, the bal-
ance in real rough hunting land, a great
buy $79,500 1
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Great Buy big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property SOLD On US 90 in
town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Builders 6+ ac sewer and water
$240,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front- 1
age $14,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com

We have qualified buyers looking
for acreage between Monticello and
Lloyd can you help?

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate 1

Buyers looking for Homes and Land








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 1, 2005


REZENDES SHOFNER


Shofner, Rezendes

Speak At Club's Early

Holiday Observance


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Triple L Club members celebrated
an early Memorial Day program
Tuesday, May 24, at the First Bap-
tist Fellowship Hall, decorated in
ied, white and blue.
Speaker, Msgt. Fred Shofner, re-
tired, read the poem "A Soldiers Fi-
nal Inspection," and shared his
thoughts about American military
personnel.
He said that Memorial Day is a
day of remembrance and gratitude
for those military personnel who
gave their lives for all of America
and its freedoms.
: Shofner is a resident of Monticello.
He was instrumental in establish-
ing the JROTC program at JCHS,
where he was an instructor for a
number of years, and is remembered
fondly by his students.
He is a member of the School
Board.
Ernie Rezendes, a retired Colonel
in the US Army, joined the military
in 1943 at the age of 17, and has
served in WWII, the Korean War,


and in Vietnam. He retired in 1973.
He spoke about his military career
and his active life after the military.
He then moved to Tallahassee and
began a career as a hospital consult-
ant with the Florida Department of
Health, from which he retired after
17 years.
For the last five years he has been
involved with Veteran's Organiza-
tions in and around Tallahassee.
Rezendes noted that Memorial
Day was recognized as Declaration
Day in his younger days.
He said that interest seems to
have been lost in the holiday, per-
haps because of the date change to
suit the 3-day weekend.
This year, he said, Memorial Day
falls on May 30, the date officially
designated as this day.
Both speakers spoke about the his-
tory and purpose of the Red Poppy.
A buffet style meal was served af-
ter the meeting featuring a variety of
dishes and desserts brought by
members.
Triple L President Mary Helen
Andrews reported that a cookout
was planned, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June
7, at the church.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local residents Ann and Gene
Windham are coordinating a "Used
Cell Phone" Drive to help raise
money for their grandson Devin
Windham.
Devin is the focus of a fundraising
campaign to assist with his bone
marrow transplant related medical
expenses.
Born on May 13, 1998, he was
diagnosed with Fanconi Aplastic
Anemia, and doctors at Fairview
University Media Center in Minnea-
polis, MN. have recommended a
lifesaving bone marrow transplant.
An estimated $85,000 is being
raised by Lake Mary and Jefferson
County volunteers to assist him with
these costs.
Cellar One will make a $300 de-
posit into Devin's bank account for
every 100 used cell phones
collected.
' Cell phones can be dropped off to
Janie at the Monticello First Baptist
Church office, or arrangements can
be made for drop off or pick up by
contacting Vi Payton at 997-3627..
Volunteers are still needed to as-
sist with the fundraising.
Individuals and groups interested
in more information can contact
Michele Hartz at 1-800-366-2682 .
In addition to transplant related


expenses, post transplant treatment
is costly.
Tax deductible donations may be
made in person at any Wachovia
Branch Bank location using account
number 3000025423177 or mailed
to the Children's Organ Transplant
Association, 2501 COTA Drive,
Bloomington, IN. 47403. ,
Checks or money orders should be
made payable to COTA for Devin
W.
Secure credit card donations are
also accepted.
Devin's family has asked for assis-
tance from the Children's Organ
Transplant Association, a national
charity dedicated to organizing and
guiding families and communities in
raising funds for transplant-needy
patients.
The organization's priority is to
assure that no child is denied a
transplant or excluded from a trans-
plant. waiting list because of a lack
of funds. One hundred percent of all
funds raised are used for transplant-
related expenses.
Fanconi anemia (FA) is one of the
inherited anemias that leads to bone
marrow failure (aplastic anemia.)
It is a recessive disorder. If both
parents carry a defect (mutation) in
the same FA gene, each of their
children has a 25 percent chance of
inheriting the defective gene from
both parents,;. When this happens,
the child will have FA, and often de-
velops leukemia and other cancers.


Welcome All To Our Watermelon Festival!

CUSTOM PORK, BEEF
SLAUGHTER. & WILD GAME


THE LIMESTONE MEATHOUSE
"Country Smoked Sausage"
(Florida Inspected)
We raise our hogs


AUBREY CONNELL
(904) 997-4446


Rt. 3 Box 104-C
Hwy. 259 S.W. Of
Montic.llio FI Q2 .44


STAR WARS 3 (PG13)
Thurs. Thurs. 12:45 3:55
7:00- 10:15
NO PASSES

STAR WARS 3 (PG13)
Thurs. Thurs. 11:15 2:20
5:25 8:30
NO PASSES

LONGEST YARD
(PG13)
1:30-4:10- 7:05 9:40
NO PASSES

MONSTER IN LAW
(PG13)
12:50 3:05 5:20 -
7:45 10:00

KICKING AND
SCREAMING (PG)
1:10 3:25 5:40 -
7:55 10:10

MADAGASCAR (PG)
1:00 3:15 5:30 -
7:40 9:50
NO PASSES

HOUSE OF WAX (R)
1,:25 4:30 7:30 10:05


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Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMODELED HOMES
2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy Officers on site

575-6571


Fundraiser Helps

With Medical Costs


I


7W