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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00038
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 13, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00038
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text









Gathering Hears
About Rising
Property Values

Story, Photo, Page 3


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GA NESVILLF, FL 32611


Emancipation Day
Activities

Sunday, Monday

Story, Page 5


Waukeenah UMC
Men Plan

Wild Game Dinner

Story, Page 9


Tangible
Personal Property
Tax Roll

Listing, Page 13
IO


f Friday Morning





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.38, 50 CENTS


Ilo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2005


School Board OKs
1H I "''




22 Staff Layoffs,



New Budget Plan
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PREVATT REVELL


LEE


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THOR


Six Entrants Compete In


Junior Miss Pageant


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Designed for girls not old enough_
:for the Watermelon Festival Queen
'Pageant, the Junior Miss Pageant
takes place, 7 p.m., Saturday, June
-4, at a site yet to be determined.
Six contestants will compete for
--the title of Jr. Miss, with the winner
:to ride on the Queen's float in the
-Festival Parade.
Parents of the runners-up must
-furnish a vehicle and make all ar-
rangements for them to ride in the
parade, if so desired.
Others contestants may also ride
in the parade, but a decorated vehi-
cle -must be furnished, an arrange-
ments made through the Parade
Chairperson.


Winners of the pageant are ex-
pected to make appearances after
the pageant, with written notices to
be mailed to the home of the win-
-ners, as soon as the dates are re-
ceived.
If the winner moves out of the
county during her term as Junior
Miss, she will automatically relin-
quish her title to the first runner-up.
Ranging in age from 11-14, in al-
phabetical order, the candidates are:
Kaitlin Jackson, daughter of Cathy
and David Jackson. She is 12 years
old and in the sixth grade at Aucilla
Christian Academy.
Her hobbies include dance, scrap-
booking, shopping, spending time
with friends and family, playing ten-
nis, basketball and cheerleading.
Lisa Kisamore, daughter of Carol
and Tom Kisamore. She is 12 years


old and in the sixth grade at Aucilla
Christian Academy.
She is an honor roll student and
her hobbies include Cross Country
softball, singing Karaoke.
She enjoys shopping and loves the
Dolphins and Cats.
Megan Lee, daughter of Sherise
and Danny Lee. She is 11 years old
and in the fifth grade at Aucilla
Christian Academy.
Her hobbies include soccer and
softball, play acting, and hip hoi
dancing.
She is very athletic, a gooc
dancer, and easy to get along with.
SJessica Prevatt, daughter of Dyana
and Wayne Prevatt. She is 13 years
old and in the seventh grade at Swift
Creek Middle School.
Her hobbies include dancing
(See Jr. Miss Page 2)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


By a 4-1 vote, the School Board-
approved 22 staff layoffs recom-
mended by Superintendent Phil
Barker, Monday night, in a standing
room only board room.
Voting in favor were Chair Bev-
erly Sloan, 'and Board Members
Fred Shofner, Franklin Hightower,
and Ed Vollertsen.
The lone nay vote was cast by
Board Member Charles Boland.
The 22 staff members were not re-
vealed at the meeting, pending their
notification of the layoff.
However the breakdown of staff
Includes: two administrators, and a
combination of teacher aides and
non instructional personnel.
WCTV Channel Six was on hand
to record the event, as Board Mem-
bers expressed their thoughts after
acting upon the agenda items.
"This is the first time I can recall
the Board having to lay off non-
S instructional personnel," Sloan, who
has been a Board Member for a
Number of terms, stated.
"It has been a. very difficult
choice. My experience has been that
e often when we pray about a situa-


I


I
)


BROWN


problem and it is very difficult for
all ofus."
Hightower made no comment.
R en Barker said: "I want to make it
Reductions clear that Bill McRae (former super-
intendent) left us in good financial
Replace shape.
shape.
Fund "Our financial crunch developed
over the last five years. We were
Balance alerted several times of the impend-
ing problem, but were reluctant to
lay off personnel.
"We chose instead to reduce staff
by attrition."
tion, if one door closes, another In fairness it should be noted'that
door opens." over the last five years, enrollment
Shofner said: "This has been a continued to decline, as it had been
painful choice for us, but we have to doing for years before that.
fix the problem, and examine how With declining enrollment comes
we got in this predicament in the declining FTE and other monies.
first place." A 5.5 decrease in enrollment is
Boland said: "I know selling our projected by DOE for the coming
buildings (on Water Street) would school year.
be a one time deal, but we could use The percentage of increase of state
the money to build the athletic fields aid is 2 percent, which equals less
we need at the new high school, and than $150,000, Finance Director Hal
avoid having to transport students to Wilson said Monday
the old fields. In a related vote, the Board voted
"We'd save money on the trans- 4-1 in favor of the overall Budget
portation and personnel, if we did Reduction Plan recommended by
that." Barker.
Vollertsen said: "If we sold the Again, Boland alone voted nay.
buildings, what would we do next The plan indicates the following
time around? We have to fix this
(See School Board Page 5)

Shanduala Brown
JCHS
Valedictorian.


Rebecca Redmond
JCHS
Salutatorian

See Stories, Page 14
REDMOND


County Scores Success In Legislative Session


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Although a little premature possi--
bly, members of the Jefferson
County Legislative Committee --
alias the lobbying committee -- were
celebrating- their almost within-
grasp victory Monday night.
It's to say that the Governor had
yet to sign off on the appropriation
bill passed by the Legislature. But
as of Tuesday -- and barring any
last-minute line item veto by the
Governor -- the county was set to
receive $4,095,144 in
appropriations.
Among the projects the House
and Senate funded in the appropria-"
tions bill:
$500,000 for the renovation and
conversion of the former high
school buildings into a a courthouse
annex. The idea is to relocate most
county operations to this site within
the next year or so.
$250,000 for the purchase of the
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
building next door to the public
health clinic for expansion of the


Health Department.
$582,000 for the long-pursued
expansion of the city's sewer system
into the Cooper's Pond Subdivision.
Another winner was Building-A
of the old high school, formerly the
administrative building. The Legis-
lature appropriated $347,882 for the
continued restoration of the historic
building.
In fact, of the several major pro-
jects the community was pursuing,
the one notable failure was the agri-
culture and community development
center, for which the community
was seeking $100,000.
Another disappointment was the
Governor's Rural Initiative, which
reportedly failed to pass at the last
minute. If approved, the Rural Ini-
tiative would have assured this
county of more than $500,000 in re-
curring funds annually.
A breakdown of the remaining al-
locations approved by the Legisla-
ture for Jefferson County: $76,408
for vocational rehabilitation; $1,096
for workforce education
performance-based incentives;
$191,794 for workforce education
program; $500,000 for adult com-


munity mental health services; and
$1,646,024 for the voluntary pre-
kindergarten program (to be shared
with counties .in the Early Learning




hI)


Coalition). work during the session. She espe-
Julie Conley, chairman of the leg- cially credited committee members
islative committee, on Tuesday Kurt Kiser and John Culbreath for
praised the committee for its hard their work on behalf of the county,



S, i T
.:e .d .0 z


,a .



k-



AMONG THOSE attending the celebration of
the success in securing legislative funding
for local projects are: L-R: Curt Kiser, Dick


Bailar, Ron Smith, Merry Ann Frisby, David
Frisby, John Culbreath, Skeet Joyner, and
David Ward. (News Photo)


as well as Chris Doolin, with the
Small Counties Coalition.
The legislative committee was or-
ganized about three years ago with
the aim of better representing the
county's interests in the legislative
process. Since its formation, the
committee has worked diligently to
fulfill that purpose.
This year especially, the commit-
tee made a concerted effort to keep
the county's interests before law-
makers. This entailed meeting re-
peatedly with the lawmakers;
participating in functions that raised
the county's profile, such as the
Northwest Florida Legislative Day;
and bombarding lawmakers on a
daily basis with e-mails, phone calls
and personal visits whenever possi-
ble.
Among the state officials that
group met in its efforts to promote
the county were Gov. Jeb Bush and
Lt. Governor Toni Jennings. Mem-
bers also worked closely with the lo-
cal legislative delegation, which
consists of Senators Al Lawson and
Nancy Argenziano and State Repre-
sentatives Loranne Ausley and Will
Kendrick.


JACKSON KISAMORE








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005

"
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.rl F~ p; n-A5~


PLANTING A TREE in honor of Congressman
Allen Boyd, which will grow and flower as
the Green Institute prospers are L-R: NFCC


Gift Closet


Patients
For Cancer

DEBBIE SNAPP
SStaff Writer


President Morris Steen,
Boyd.


Gail All


a.
- a.~'


*I~
0I-. --.


NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
President Morris Steen speaks of the in-
crease in federal funds Congressman Allen


Boyd secured for Green Industries
Steen, Boyd. (News Photos)


Green Industry Institute


Honors Congressman Boy


FRAN HUNT
Staff \ writer
l .. .
Congre.'ma3n Allen B,:,d v as
honored by Green Industries Insti-
tute, Monday, for his efforts in se-
curing federal funds for the
program last year.
Boyd secured an increase in
funding, $360,000 for the upcom-
ing fiscal year, to allow the institute
to enhance its video conferencing
capability. Last year, $280,000
was secured, the previous year,
$300,000.
Representatives from North Flor-
ida Community College, the
County School Board, and Green
Industries were on hand for a tree
planting ceremony in which a Pig-
nut Hickory tree was planted in
honor of Boyd for his support of
horticulture education and research
at the Green Institute.
Green Industries spokesperson
Gail Albritton said the planting of
the tree was to symbolize Boyd
watching the institute continue to
grow and blossom in the future, as
the tree did likewise.
NFCC President Morris Steen re-
ported that this year, 392 students
went through the program at the in-
stitute.
Boyd said the success of the insti-
tute was the result of a lot of hard
work and dedication from many
people. "The facility looks great
and I'm proud of what you have


done here," said Boyd.
A plaque placed in front of the
fresh\ planted tree reads, "Green
Industries Instiute appreciates the '
continued support of Congressman
Allen Boyd in the development of
our program."
Those attending the ceremony in-
cluded Superintendent Phil Barker,
Board Members Franklin High-
tower, Beverly Sloan, Chair, Fred
Beshears, Fred Shofner, Boyd
Stafer Carmen Cummings, Green
Industries representatives and the
NFCC Board of Directors.
Established. in late 2001, Green
Industries Institute is a horticulture
training facility in partnership with
NFCC, Florida A & M University,
the University of Florida and the


nursery, landscape and h
industries.


The American Cancer Society
(ACS) announces the opening of a
gift closet for cancer patients in
Monticello.
Elaine Daffin, area patient service
representative, explains that the gift
closet will offer a variety of re-
sources for any patient diagnosed
with cancer.
It is located at the Jefferson
County Administrative Environmen-
tal Health Mosquito Control Build-
britton, ing at 1175 West Washington Street.
Hours of operation for the gift
closet are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Daffin can be

nation.
The gift closet includes donated
wigs, prosthesis bras, and hats, all
free of charge to the cancer patient.
The closet will also offer bro-
Schures with information helpful to
cancer patients.
The ACS is the nationwide com-
munity based voluntary health or-
ganization dedicated to eliminating
cancer as a major health problem by
preventing cancer, saving lives and
S diminishing suffering from cancer,
through research, education, advo-
cacy, and service.

r Jr. Miss
(Continued From Page 1)
. L-R: singing and cheerleading.
Ramsey Revell, daughter of Carol
and Davis Revell. She is 14, and in
the ninth grade at Aucilla Christian
Academy.
Her hobbies include cheerleading,
playing the piano, tennis, cooking,
Reading.
SShe is a member of the Beta Club
rd and has been captain of the JV
Cheerleading team.
Torie Thor, daughter of Dawn and
horticulture
Ronnie Thor. She is 12 years old
and in the sixth grade at Central
Middle School.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
MONTICELLO LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY

The Local Planning Agency of the City of Monticello
will conduct a special meeting on Monday, May 6,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. to consider an application for
preliminary plat for Orchard Pond Subdivision located
on Rocky Branch Road in the City of Monticello.
The meeting will take place at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida. For more
information, contact City Clerk Emily Anderson
at 342-0153.




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DAVID WARD, property appraiser spoke at property values and the real estate market
..

















the gatheringof local reactors, about rising here. L-R Ward, Atty. Teresa Cooper Ward.



Industry Gathering Focuses


On Rising Property Values
On Rising Property values


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

SAbout 35 realtors, bankers,.devel-
opers and others in associated indus-
tries gathered Tuesday morning at
the Opera House to hear Property
Appraiser David Ward talk about
land values and related issues.
The gathering, sponsored by At-
torney Teresa Cooper Ward, of At-
torneys' Title of North Florida Inc.,
Ss an indication of the growing vital-
ity of the real estate market here.
S"We're in a dynamic real estate
market," Property Appraiser David
SWard told the group in his opening
remarks. "Large investors from out-
side the state are looking at Jeffer-
son County and the Panhandle. In
fact, a lot of land prices today are
being investor driven."
S: Ward said many of the investors
were coming from places as far
Sway as Europe and California.
"They see the Panhandle as an un-
dervalued real estate market," he
said.
Properties that two and three years
ago were valued at $5,000 an acre
were now selling for $20,000 and
more an acre, Ward said. And prop-
erties that were selling for $2,000 an
acre a few years back were now
selling for $7,000 and more an acre.
"You're seeing a substantial in-
crease in property values," Ward
said.
He said the escalating prices were
uniform across the county, with a
gradation from west to east. Mean-


ACA Art Show I

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

More than 250 citizens attended
the Aucilla Christian Academy art
exhibit held at the Opera House,
Monday. *
The exhibit included the works
from approximately 30 students,
grades 9-12, from both the high
school art studio classes and the


ing that the closer the properties
were to the Tallahassee/Leon
County market, the higher their val-
ues.
One of the reasons for the get-
together, Ward said,'was that his of-
fice was seeking input on how it
could do a better job. One current
problem, he said, was that his office
assessed properties based on the ex-
isting situation on Jan. 1 of each
year.
If a property owner then sold the
property after Jan. 1, his office
wouldn't pick up the new owner un-
til the following year, Ward said.
Meaning that tax bills and related
correspondences would continue to
go to the original owner. *
This could create confusion, Ward
said, if the former owner didn't then
forward the information to the new
owner.
The same situation existed with
partial purchases, where an individ-
ual bought only a part of a property.
Until the transaction was picked up
the following Jan. 1, all paperwork
relating to the property would con-
tinue to go to the original owner, he
said.
"I don't want to over-dramatize
the problem," Ward said, "but
around March I get a dozen or so
people who come by and say they
didn't know about the taxes."
Among the possible solutions of-
fered were the ideas of mailing the
new owners a reminder or mailing
them a copy of the tax bill.
Another issues that came up was
the homestead exemption, in rela-


Draws 250
dual enrollment art classes.
More than 200 art works were on
display.
Many stopped to admire particu-
lar pieces of work, and some of-
fered to purchase works from the
students.
The exhibit featured pieces en--
tered earlier in the NFCC Spring
Arts Festival, many of which were
awarded ribbons during that event.


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tion to heir properties. Ward said
one approach that he was taking was
to put gentle pressure on people to
probate their properties.
It bothered him, he said, to see
people lose their properties because
of simple inaction.
"I can think of one place that's
160 acres and worth three quarters
of a million," Ward said. "But if the
people do nothing, they will lose it.
I don't want to see this happen."


Baccalaureate

Set Sunday

For JCHS


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


Jefferson County High School
Baccalaureate Services are sched-
uled 7 p.m., Sunday, in the Jefferson
County High School Auditorium, on
Water Street.
The program is cosponsored by
the Jefferson County Minister Con-
ference, with 56 students expected
to attend the ceremony.
The Processional is the "War
March of the Priest," from
"Athalia.."
It will be followed by an hymn:
"There is a Fountain Filled With
Blood," sung by the congregation.
Minister Orenthya Sloan, of Me-
morial MB Church, will give the in-
vocation.
Special Music will include a ren-
dition of "Amazing Grace."
Principal Michael Bryan will
make the announcements.
Minister Joretha Sloan, of Memo-
rial MB Church will preach the ser-
mon.
The hymn "Jesus Keep Me Near
the Cross," will be sung.
Following the benediction by
Minister Orenthya Sloan, students
will exit to the recessional, "Pomp
and Circumstance "
The audience is requested to coop-
erate in the taking of pictures, by
keeping the aisles open, so that the
events that have been planned for all
students will move smoothly.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005 PAGE 3



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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005
::.:.:..:.:..:.:::..:..:.:.....::**......"


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

q MEMa RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
SPeriodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
:POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
;Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Teen Drivers Lack


Road Experience


If you want to pinpoint the reason
many young teens have serious
crashes, it can be summed up easily
inexperience.
Whether they are on their way to a
party, the mall or a friend's house,
teens may find themselves in driving
situations they aren't equipped to
handle yet.
Teenagers can become safer driv-
ers by developing more experience
and avoiding certain driving situa-
tions until they are better prepared
to handle them.
:Here are some specifics:
S* Develop the right attitude about
driving.' Many teen auto accidents
are a result of attitude and maturity.
Make a commitment to yourself to
practice a responsible attitude about
driving.
You're controlling over 3,000
pounds of fast-moving metal, and
cou ooe.ve -to-yourself, \our passen-
&ers and other'dri.vers to drive re-
sponsibly,
Get as much supervised practice
driving as possible. Your parents
,should take an active role in your
.practice driving. Make a firm sched-
:ule with them and stick to it. And
*keep:it up until you take your test to
Sget a license.
S* ALWAYS wear your safety belt.
Get into the habit of wearing your
'safety belt whenever you drive or
ride no exceptions.
Underage drinking and drug use
is illegal. Even if you've consumed
only one drink or smoked one joint,
There is a chemical effect on your
Brain that can impair judgment and
reaction time.
Driving under the influence of al-
s cohol, marijuana or other illegal
Drugs can cost you your license or
your life.
Limit your passengers. Your risk


of a fatal crash increases with every
additional passenger. When you're a
new driver, it's best to limit your
number of passengers.
Young.drivers should also:
Limit your night driving. Your
risk of a fatal crash is three times
higher at night than in the, day for
every mile driven. It is. better to
avoid nighttime driving until you're
comfortable driving during the day.
Keep it slow and safe for
starters. Fast-moving, high volumes
of traffic can make you feel uncom-
fortable, so avoid them until you can
get enough supervised driving expe-
rience.'
Then you can gradually introduce
more difficult driving situations, like
highway driving, merging off ramps
and driving in cities.
Train for poor weather condi-
tions. Even when you begin to feel
confident driving on dry pavement,
it's best to ` bvoid dri"vine iri bad
-weather -.conditions unsupervised.
Keep it simple at first, and get as
much supervised practice driving in
poor weather as you can before try-
ing it on your own.
Cell phones are for emergency
use only on the road. One of the
worst habits anyone can get into is
talking on a cell phone while
driving.
Keep a cell phone with you in the
..car for emergency situations only. If
you have to use a cell phone, pull
safely over to the side of the road.
Drive a safe vehicle. If you are
thinking of getting your own car,'
look for one with high safety
ratings.
Avoid small cars, trucks and sport
utility vehicles.
Check out federal statistics and
consumer report literature to help to
evaluate the safety rating of a car or
truck (NAPS)


Chemicals Can Help,


Hinder Our Health


SBY REX M. ROGERS

"Better living through chemistry"
Shas been one mantra of American
culture for at least a century. We've
found ways to ease headaches and
toothaches, destroy harmful germs
carrying disease throughout our
Bodies, and reduce pain and infec-
tion resulting from life-threatening
wounds.

Penicillin is one reason I am alive
today. Who want to reverse our
knowledge of lifesaving and life-
enhancing medicines?

Now we have drugs to help us lose
weight, Botox for reducing
wrinkles, Collagen to make our lips
sexier, Prozac if we are weary and
SValium if we, are hyper, and certain
drugs to extend our sex lives into
our 90s.

Since the '60s, we've also strug-
gled with chemicals that introduced
terms to our vocabularies like "psy-
chedelic," "junkie," "Crack," "Nar-
cus," and now "steroids." "Better
living through chemistry," we have
l- earned, is not always better.
Like all other life questions that


confront us, whether and how to use
chemicals is preceded by deeper
spiritual questions: Do we know
God and his purpose for our lives?
Are we trusting Him or looking to
chemicals and other surrogates to
fill the hole in our souls? Do we use
chemicals to glorify God or to fulfill
narcissistic yearnings?
In the Garden long ago, God
granted human beings the power of
reason and commanded us to use
that power to develop culture and
steward the earth and all that is
within it for His glory.
So, incredible advances in medical
science and technology are direct
descendants of that ancient divine
mandate. God also granted human-
ity the freedom and moral responsi-
bility to choose.

Other choices regarding the
chemicals we place in our bodies
should be determined by whether
the results would harm our beings,
and 'how the results will affect oth-
ers. Chemistry is a gift from God
that can be used wisely or waste-
fully.
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., is an
author and president of cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids, Mich.)


From Our Photo File


9f


- .


U


ot


LIZZIE GILLEY, seated, celebrated her
100th birthday in Sept., 1988. Family mem-
bers sharing the celebration are, L-R: Wil-


Opinion & Comment


U Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I consider the paint on a house
like a haircut. If you don't like it,
just let it grow out. If you don't like
the color, you can always paint over.
Of course, I have seen a very,
young man in town has flowing long
green hair, so he will have a long


a pea soup green, the Parrott's is
light and dark blue, the Conner's is
lavender. We also have many
charming shades of gray and
gray/blue. I really like these bright
and colorful houses. They liven up
the whole 'Hood'.
My favorite color is the Morris
sea-foam green house. I just really
like the color. When I was a child I
4. 0- --F- ----- 1-


:!~i~ ~heL~hangs~~is nlij ~i~ ate, the si rlrYga-loam green cra~o~e
guifhie chang;s~his minid ., '* Z'CIliC ..' I gIcel c !.ne
Thi'. look he has nrobahlxr t6ok~ cause..I liked it i Cmuch.-I, v6not
nis lok h has'pr~bbl 6k,


-.1. .. .. -- --- --- .- .-- -
lot of work, so I bet he won't
change it until he gets a girlfriend.
Have you ever noticed that all the
young men with really loud tailpipes
or really loud radios never have a
girl in the car?
The Madison Street neighborhood
where I live is becoming really
jazzy. The Davis/Graminski house is


recommend this form of.childish
adoration. You will get a real belly-
ache.
Lots of bellyaching at numerous
meetings concerning the growth in
our County. I think we have been
discovered.
I drove the country roads to visit a
friend and was surprised by the
large number of houses sprouting


up.
Naturally all of us who live here
have known what a great place this
is for a while. I say "thank you" to
all boards and folks who wrestle
with the planning problems. I am
certain if one thing, we do need to
plan.
Monticello has a great tolerance of
differences. I recall a man who used
to glue small plastic toys to his .car
and ride in,the Watermelon Parade.
What happened to him?
A succession of lawnmower trail-
ers announced they carried the
owner's "stuff."
There is some gentleman who
drives a black truck. On the hood he
has painted "Peaceful as Doves"
which never fails to make me smile.
Less peaceful are some large trucks
that roar through our town.


I have noticed something. Without
exception, all the truckers, who
drive these roaring menacing beasts,
have lots of hair sprouting out of
their noses, ears and the like.
The polite truck drivers are clean-
shaven and neat looking.
I have come to think of the former
drivers as chia truckers. Take a look
while you are walking around town
and see if you can confirm my ob-
servations.,
SHubby started swimming in our
pool this week. I watched him wade
in and when the 67-degree water got
to his chest, his heart told his legs
"Don't do it!" He got out and
jumped in.
We all have troubles in life and it
occurred to me that when our hearts
tell our legs not to move, sometimes
we just need to jump in.


New Forecasts Help Farmers


Farmers in the Southeastern
United States can now leam about
changes in seasonal climate patterns
earlier than ever, thanks to a new
long-term forecasting system devel-
oped by the Southeast Climate Con-
sortium (SECC), a partnership
among six universities in Alabama,
Florida and Georgia.
SECC researchers are using data
that has been collected daily for the
past 50 years from 214 weather sta-
tions in Alabama, Florida and Geor-
gia to make county-by-county fore-
casts that farmers can view on the
Internet. The SECC, which produces
its forecasts at Florida State Univer-
sity in Tallahassee, has issued the
first in a series of quarterly forecasts
aimed at helping farmers reduce
risks to their crops and increase their
odds of a successful growing
season.
The SECC's new spring outlook
indicates that unseasonably heavy
rain in March has recharged soil
moisture, thereby allowing crops to
flourish.


"March rainfall was up to three
times above normal in Georgia,"
said David Stooksbury, a SECC re-
searcher and state climateologist at
the University of Georgia in Athens.
"By the middle of April, soil mois-
ture across most of Georgia is
ranked near the 80th percentile for
this time of the year. This means
that in 80 out of 100 years we would
expect soils to be drier in mid-April
than they currently are."
Recent heavy rains have also re-
duced the risk of wildfires this sea-
son, the SECC spring outlook said.
The outlook is based on the Keetch
Byram Drought Index, which pro-
vides a monthly assessment of wild-
fire risks in the Southeast.
"The SECC approach to forecast-
ing is based on climate phases and
wbrks great during an El Nino or a
La Nina phase, but it's less useful
during what's called a neutral
phase," Stooksbury said.
"For the past two years the South-
east has been in a neutral phase,"
said Jim O'Brien, director of the


Center for Ocean-Atmosphere Pre-.
diction Studies at FSU. "People of-
ten assume that a neutral phase will
bring average weather."
'But, he said, that's not true.
"Weather can be all over the place -
from dry to wet or average in a
neutral phase. Still, there's currently
no indication of drought this sum-
mer, so chances are good that crops
will have adequate moisture," he
said.
Stooksbury also said that, with the
variability associated with day-to-
day weather during the neutral
phase, a cold spell or two is still
possible across much of the South-
east.
SECC's Web site,
http://agclimate.org, is available to
the public and provides monthly
forecasts of rainfall and temperature
for all counties in Alabama, Florida
and Georgia.
It also allows farmers in some
counties to get personalized predic-
tions of the probability that their
yields for peanuts, potatoes and to-


matoes will be good, average or
poor. Users can tailor their crop
yield forecasts based on the soil type
of their land, whether or not they ir-
rigate ad their average yield in the
past.
The Web site's highly specific
forecasts are important because
what a producer is experiencing fre-
quently is quite different than what's
happening in neighboring counties,
said John Bellow an SECC exten-
sion specialist at FSU.
"We hope that more growers will
use our Web site when their planting
and harvesting, and prepare for
freezes," said Clyde Fraisse, an ex-
tension specialist and SECC re-
searcher at the University of
Florida's Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences, or UF/IFQAS, in
Gainesville.
Jim Jones, a distinguished profes-
sor of agricultural and biological en-
gineering at UF/IFAS and SECC
researcher, said additional crop data
is being added to the site to help
farmers.


Cocaine Exposure Hurts Fetus


Children exposed to cocaine be-
fore birth show subtle but discerni-
ble differences in their ability to
plan and problem-solve once they
reach school age, University of Flor-
ida researchers report.
Still, most fare far better in the
first few years after birth than many
experts once predicted, contradict-
ing the notion that as a rule,
cocaine-exposed infants would be
born with devastating birth defects
or miss major developmental mile-
stones.
"I think the early information we
had was that these children might be
irreversibly damaged that they


would potentially have lots of prob-
lems in school, that they might have
lots of behavior problems, that they
might have problems thinking and
learning," said UF neonatologist
Marylou Behnke, M.D.
Instead, UF researchers write in
the April online issue of Journal of
Pediatric Psychology, prenatal co-
caine exposure is linked to smaller
head circumference at birth and to
less optimal home environments,
which in turn have direct yet mild
effects on developmental outcome at
3 years of age. Those effects persist
at ages 5 and 7, once more demands
are placed on the children during the


formal school years, according to re-
lated findings the researchers pre-
sented at the recent annual meeting
of the Society for Research in Child
Development.
"We have found that at age 3, the
more cocaine the child was exposed
to, the smaller the head circumfer-
ence at birth, the worse the develop-
ment or cognitive outcomes," said
Behnke, adding that head circumfer-
ence at birth is an important meas-
ure because generally the head
grows as brain size increases. "So
cocaine is not directly affecting out-
come, but it affects this intermediary
measure that we're looking at that


then goes on to affect outcome. We
think that head circumference may
be some sort of a marker for what is
going on in the prenatal environ-
ment, that it's a proxy marker for
other things."
Each year, about 45,000 infants
who were exposed to cocaine in the
womb are bor, according to the
National Institute on Drug Abuse.
When the dangers of prenatal co-
caine exposure first grabbed head-
lines in the mid-1980s, no studies
had followed children beyond in-
fancy. UF researchers began study-
(See Cocaine Page 5)


liam T. Danley, Sr.; Laura Danley, Laura
Gilley, Sylvia Danley, and Cass Danley Ar-
nold. (News File Photo)


i i Fl I I


ol IL IL ~CrP


I











Letters...


Resident Tells How Doing


Something Nice Pays Off


Dear Editor:
; My husband, while busy with the
unending job of renovating and
maintaining our bed and breakfast
and restaurant, The Cottage, became
disgusted with the condition of the
trash can area, and decided to do
something about it.


He was considering that morning
all the people and lives that are in-
volved with the things we take for
granted, such as having produce,
clean water and even trash pickup.
He decided he'd do somehting for
us that was also a little "thank you"
for the sanitation workers.


He made a little "home" for our
garbage cans and those of our
neighbor, a day care center.
It is really beautiful, and keeps the
cans and bags in place behind a
door, away from animals, and out of
the rain, making them neater, and he
hoped more pleasant for the city


Cocaine Exposure Hurts Fetus


(Continued From Page 4)
ing crack and cocaine users and
their offspring about 13 years ago,
launching a study funded by the Na-
tional Institute on Drug Abuse that
assesses physical and developmental
outcomes among 300 children from
birth on. Half the study participants
were exposed to cocaine in utero,
half were not; all were from rural ar-
eas of north Central Florida.
Average daily cocaine use among
the 154 mothers who used drugs
throughout pregnancy was $32.70,
the cost equivalent of approximately
three rocks of crack cocaine. Of that
group, one quarter were considered
"heavy users."
"We have found in our develop-
ment studies of our newborns that
there were some subtle differences
between the groups, not the kind of
thing that moms and dads would no-
tice particularly, not the. kinds of
things' that family members might
. suspect if they saw the-baby," said
Behnke, a professor of pediatrics at
UF's College of Medicine. "As the
children have started to get older,
we have begun to see a few more
subtle effects, so by the time they
were at six months, we could see
some effect of cocaine on their de-
velopmental processes, but again,
we're not talking about dramatic ef-
fects. And asthey moved on to age
3, we began to see even more
effects."' :' : ,
Cocaine-exposed childreri %re
aissets'ed' a't g'gtn part'bj u'sig the
standardized assessment known as
the Bayley Scales of Infant Devel-
ojment, which assesses a child's
ability to perform age-appropriate
functions such as following simple
directions and completing puzzles
and other problemn-solving tasks. At'
5 and 7, more extensive neuropsy-
chological and intelligence testing
was done.
"Some kids just have trouble get-
ting going, getting started and once,


they get going they do a little
better," said co-researcher Fonda
Davis Eyler, a UF professor of pedi-
atrics. "Others have trouble main-
taining their attention and they re-
spond to other cues and not what
they're supposed to be targeting on
and doing, or they only have simple
strategies, not more complex ones."
The quality of the home environ-
ment was even more likely than
smaller head size 'to influence out-
come, Eyler said. UF researchers
have analyzed measures of depres-
sion and self-esteem among caregiv-
ers and studied their views on par-
enting and child development. Chil-
dren living in nurturing environ-
ments with supportive, competent
caregivers scored higher on devel-
opmental measures, even when they
had been exposed to cocaine before
birth.
The children participating in the-
study are now entering the preteen
years. As their academic responsi-
bilities and social pressure increase,
other, more serious effects may sur-
face, Eyler said. Meanwhile, re-
searchers are increasingly able to re-
fine the tests they use to more pre-
cisely assess the children's progress,
homing in on the areas of the brain
more involved with planning and
thinking strategically the regions
that cocaine, in theory, would most
likely-affect. ; *:-
"''n this next arm of the stud'. all
will undergo'. intelligence and
achievements tests, including assess-
ments of language ability, attention,
problem-solving and abstract think-
ing, Eyler said. Researchers also
will ask the youngsters about their
attitudes, behavior, family relation-
ships and friendships. In addition,
they will assess the children's home
environment and interview their
caregivers and schoolteachers.
Deborah A. Frank, M.D., a profes-
sor of pediatrics at Boston Univer-


sity School of Medicine, said the UF
team's work will "do much to dispel
the inaccurate and hysterical predic-
tions that inaccurately stigmatize
children with intrauterine cocaine
exposure."
"This is an important contribution
to the field, since it thoughtfully ad-
dresses both biologic and social risk
factors, viewing intrauterine cocaine
exposure as only one of many possi-
ble influences on children," Frank
said. "The importance of positive
environmental characteristics in pro-
moting toddler development, regard-
less of intrauterine cocaine
exposure, is a crucial finding of this
work that can guide evidence-based
interventions for families.
"Although these findingsare reas-
suring, long term follow-up of this
sample will be important, since in-
trauterine exposures such as tobacco
and marijuana have been shown to
have 'sleeper' effects on develop-
ment that do not emerge until ado-
lescence." she added.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Martin Luther King, Jr.,
Community Center Inc:, will host
the third annual Emancipation Day
activities and parade May 15 and
16.
Activities begin 5 p.m., Sunday,
with a pre-Emancipation program,
to be held at the Greater Fellowship
Church.
Spokesperson Mary Madison said
the purpose of the program was to
commemorate May 20, 1865, the
date slaves were freed, known as
Emancipation Day.
The parade and subsequent ac-
tivities begin 10 a.m., Monday, in
front of the Capital City Bank and
proceeds to the MLK Community
Center at 1420 First Street, east of


the Howard Middle School base-
ball field and behind the Jefferson
Arms Apartments.
The MLK Committee and mem-
bers continue to solicit individuals
and groups to walk or ride in the
parade and perform at the MLK
site.
"Our celebration of freedom must
remain forever in our community,"
added MLK Chairman Charles Par-
rish.
Madison said, "We are also ask-
ing your support by joining the
MLK group to help manifest The
Dream, the idealists of the past,
present and future have envisioned
for our community."
She also stated the Jefferson
County is the only one in the state
in which public schools are closed
in honor of the Emancipation, cele-
brated'this year on May 16.


School Board OKs Budget


(Continued From Page 1)
actions and dollar savings:
*Eliminate Aide Positions in Janu-
ary, (7 positions half year FY06),
$67,362.
*Consolidate High School and
Middle School in FY 07, $442,
534.
*Eliminate Non Instructional Posi-
tions (16 in FY06), $331,869.
*Eliminate Administrative Posi-
tions (2 positions in FY 06),
$72,637.
Reduce Teacher Aide contract-
from 191 to 180 days, $17, 684.
*Reduce teacher aide work day


form 7.5 to 6.5 hours, $56, 142.
*Bill Non Required Student Trans-
portation to Internal Accounts (field
trips, athletic trips, and the like).
*Reduce General Fund Travel,
$10,000.

*Eliminate or reduce summer em-
ployment:
a) Instructional, $5,569
b) Non-instructional, $1,631.
*Eliminate General Fund Paid
Uniforms, $20,672
These measures produce
$1,105,427 saving in FY06 and bal-
ance the budget for that year..


workers.
A fairly long time passed after he
finished this project, but one day
there was a knock on our door.
A gentleman stood there, who said
in a friendly, outgoing way, that he
was our garbage man and he wanted
to say thanks for the nice garbage
area JM put in.
He said he really appreciated this.
In addition, he said that he was con-
sidering having a birthday party for
a friend, and wanted to find out our
prices.
As good as his word, he brought
back his wife, and they discussed
what they wanted with us.
We ended up hosting their dinner
party and just had a lovely time.
We consider them friends now,
and asked, since very few town folk
have ever come to eat at our place,
what was keeping people away.
The answer was that folks seemed
to be wanting to hear from someone
who'd eaten with us, how it was.
They promised to go and report to
all our neighbors how good it was
and encourage them to come and
dine with us.
When you go out of your way to
help others, they return the favor,
and we made some friends.
.We want to encourage all of you
to go out and do something nice for
the under appreciated, important
civic, county, state, and federal
workers, who make life, as we know
it, possible.
Even if you just say "thank you,"
go and thank them, or do something
nice for them.,
Sincerely,
Martha Cravanzola

American Heart
Associationtl
FightingHearDisease
andStroke

A Call to Arms:
Check Blood
Pressure.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005 PAGE 5


The Home Tutor
This summer, help your little campers
catch up on reading and math.
Mrs. Hartung $30/hour 222-5656


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AUTHOR

AND PULITZER PRIZE WINNER



WITH LOCAL MUSICAL LEGEND

AND GREAT VETERINARIAN

MICHAEL PURVIS



IN




AMERICAN HOURS D'OEUVRES

FOR THE BRAIN & SOUL
(A READING WITH MUSICAL INTERACTION)



Heavy Hors D'oeuvres
Cash Bar
6:30PM Saturday, May 21, 2005
Monticello Opera House
$25 / person* Reservations Required
Call Monticello's Chamber of Commerce 997-5552
Or Monticello Opera House 997-4242


*Proceeds to benefit local community and international projects of the Monticello Rotary Club.


Emancipation Day


Parade Monday










AGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13,
PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005


Lifestyle


, _ _


Tracy Harper Honored At


Numerous
L A series of parties and showers
ifave rtccncl been given in honor of
Fracy Harper, \\ho will be married
anturdax, in Tallahassee,
Tracy is the ,l...htic OfCiuld', Roe
I l,;]i L.', afa d I r:.- :%. 4,utp
. She is the gratiitdaughtor o' Joh-
iOc Roe W id the late Williamn

li embte, a "Meet the Gowi ii"
'i,':r'.*.. a wahs held at the home of
the brides ;,,'.iC:! l. Ciud,. and
CliJk I.;!a'inll. in Tallahassee for
b! id -'. .,,' S:, .i n 1P. 11il;,.
SShawn's ..,i' s K.uh! and John
Herndon i,'nm Cleari .tier met
ntany of Tracy's friends and rela-
ties.
2 In January, Melissa Joiner, Linda
Long, and Diana \'right gave a "Ya
Ya Sisterhood Bridal Brunch" for
the bride at Julie's Place Restaurant
in Tallahassee.


Each guest was given a Ya Ya
name such as "Marchioness Danc-
ing Greek," which was the mother
of the bride's name and "Princess
Singing Cloud," which was the
bride's unmarried name.
Guests made Ya Ya hats for the
bride to wear to all her other events,
including the bachelorette party and
the rehearsal dinner.
In March, Janegale Boyd and
daughters and daughter-in-law Beth,
Erin, and Heather gave a Pampered
Bride Kitchen Shower at the Boyd
home, in Monticello.
The home was decorated with the
bride's colors of Seamist and Ivory.
Heather Boyd demonstrated a rec-
ipe for the bride to use later. Guests
brought their favorite recipes for the
bride to use in her new home, and
all signed an apron as a keepsake for
the bride.


In mid March, the bride's bridal
party and friends gave her a Bache-
lorette Party in Atlanta, GA. She
was coerced into wearing the Ya Ya
hat, and all had a wonderful time.
The theme for the weekend was
"The Burning Of Atlanta," which
was in keeping with the bride's Old
South theme for her wedding.
Later in March, on a Saturday eve-
ning, the bride and groom were
given a Jack and Jill Party at the
home of Steve and Evelyn Moldal in
Dunedin.
The home was decorated in an is-
land theme, since the bride and
groom plan to honeymoon in the
Caribbean. Jerk chicken and other
island fare were served.
In April, Kara and Marcia Thorn-
berry gave an afternoon Lingerie
Shower at the Thorberry home in
Tallahassee.
The beautiful Old South home was
decorated in the bride's chosen col-
ors. Guests were served appetizers
including fried green tomatoes, iced
tea, and cobbler.


Ms. Crowder

To Marry
Mr. Tucker
Danielle Crowder and Latheren
Tucker will marry 4 p.m. Saturday,
May 14, 2005 at 1761 Old Lloyd
Road, at the home of Maryann and
Scott Coen.
Crowder is employed at the
Chicken Delite. She is a 1996
graduate of Jefferson County High
School.
Tucker is employed at Badcock
Home Furniture & More. He is the
son of Maryann and Scott Coen.
Rachel Duncan will be the brides-
maid and Johnny Fountain will act
"Giving the bride away will e
Lance Duncan, a family friend for
many years.


DANIELLE CROWDER AND LATHEREN TUCKER


County Coalition To

Provide Service Update


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
, Jefferson County Community
Coalition will meet 9:30 a.m. Friday
at the County Public Library on
Cherry Street.
Guest speakers are Pam East and
Erica Carpenter, who will provide
an update on the services available,
and the structure of the child welfare
system.


Ist Baptist
Choir Seeks

Senior Voices

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Hallelujah Choir from First
Iaptist Church is looking for senior
adults, age 55 and up, to join their
choir.
The group travels once a year to
major cities such as Birmingham,
AL.,and Mobile, AL.
Its primary ministry is to area
nursing homes and churches.
With 25 members in the choir,
there is a particular need for male
voices.
Most rehearsals and performances
occur on Thursday mornings. South-
ern Gospel Music and hymns are the
major presentations.
Destin DuBose is the Minister of
Music at First Baptist, and can be
reached at 997-2349 for more infor-
mation about the choir.


Lions Club
To Meet
Lloyd Lions Club meets 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, at the U-Haul Sales &
Storage Warehouse located' at
7337-A Old Lloyd Road.
The agenda will include upcoming
events and fundraisers, planned
speakers, and a group discussion
about how far the Club has come
this past year.
For more Club information con-
tact Chairman Kevin Campbell at
342-1054.


This Healthy Start Coalition pro-
vides a forum for social service pro-
viders that serve pregnant women,
children, families, and the aging
adult.
The purpose of the meeting is to
network, share information, and fa-
cilitate referrals.
Information regarding upcoming
events, new services, and how to ac-
cess services are shared.
The group uses this forum to solve
client-related issues, match appro-
priate resources to the client's need,
and identify barriers to care for the
identified population.
The forum is also used to develop
strategies and action steps to address
identified community issues that im-
pact services to pregnant women,
children, families, and the aging
adult.
For more information contact
Donna Hagan at 948-2741.


BARNHART-BROOKS

Barnhart-Brooks
Earns NFCC
AA Degree

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Cayco Barnhart-Brooks graduated
from North Florida Community Col-
lege on Thursday, May 5, 2005,
where she received an Associate of
Arts degree.
She is a graduate of Jefferson
County High School and a veteran
of the United States Army.
Barnhart-Brooks is the wife of
Kassolando Brooks, and the mother
of four children; twins, Kass Jr. and
Cassandra, D'Andre and John.
She is the daughter of Cornelius
and Cecil A. Barnhart.
Her paternal grandparents are Wil-
lard and Dorothy Barnhart and her
maternal grandmother is Dorothy
Akins.


Church News


Springfield AME Church youth
will hold a fish fry 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Saturday at the park, in LIqyd. ;


Celebrating Florida's Diverse.
Heritage at the Stephen Foster
O F T Folk Culture Center State Park
FOLK FESTIVAL in White Springs, FL
MsiC. HERITAGE .LEGEND.. MAY 27-29, 2005
Experience old-fashioned Florida storytelling, crafts and culture,
plus Eummylou Harris and over 300 performers.
Visit FloriladolkFestival.com today, or call 1-877-6EIFOLK.
sponsored In Part By
Florida tumanties. Council Coqrtsast Spotligbt Quality Hotels by Choice Hotels
S ConeDsiisLrbulig, #Ic. .-, GOLD &Associates, Inc.
rousht toyou by the Plorid DpMtaenat of livirow tal Protect Dton. sio o nf Rreau dParks.


MonticeCCo Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


Badcock
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Prenuptial Events


Clothing
Giveaway Set
At 1st Baptist

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

First Baptist Church of Monticello
will hold a Clothing Giveaway,
'Given In Jesus' Name', 9 a.m. until
3 p.m. Saturday.
This clothing ministry will take
place in the Fellowship Hall.
Items offered range from chil-
dren's clothing to adult clothing and
larger size clothes.
There are also some accessories
including shoes, handbags, belts,
and the like.
Also, a few miscellaneous knick-
knacks and household items will be
available for the taking.
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Wednesday:
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SHOPPING at the library book sale are: Lisa brought in
Thompson and Glenn Lewis. Books and Photo)
magazines priced from 25 cents to $5


Library Book Sale


Brought In $700


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The County Democratic Party
sponsored a Book Sale to benefit the
SLibrary, Saturday and raised $700.
The Sale took place on the side-
walk area, outside of the Library.
The dry, warm and sunny day
drew a good turnout.
All proceeds from this Sale are for
the benefit of the Library, and all
funds will be given to the Friends of
the Library for placement where
most needed.


Because of the recent drastic Li
brary budget cuts, this and othe:
fundraising events are needed tc
help support the Library.
Of the 700 books in the sale, 75
percent came from the Library's col
election. The other 25 percent waE
donated by the community.
There were books for all ages
books-on-tape, new hardcovers, pa
perbacks, magazines, collectibles
and some old and antique books.
Prices ere marked to sell, front
25 cents for magazines and up to $f
for special books.


ERMA MORRIS, receives an award at the Family Self-
sufficiency Award Luncheon. At left is Program Manager
Anita Morrell, Morris, and Caseworker Pat Hall.


Local Citizens Honored

For Self-Sufficiency


Local residents, Erma Morris ai.
Meshia Moore were honored re-
cenlty at the Family Self-Sufficient
Awards and Luncheon, April 15,
held at the Tallahassee Department
of Parks and Recreation.
SMorris is pursuing a Nursing ca-
reer at Southwest Georgia, and has
maintained a 4.0 GPA.
Moore is pursuing a career in
Early Childhood Education at Talla-
hassee Community College, and has
maintained a 4.0 GPA.
Other participants in the program
were: James Johnson, Tracey Jones,
Mary Miller, Polly Crumity, and
Erin Mays.


Homes Of

Mourning
Annie Lee Johnson
Annie Lee Gilley Johnson, 81 of
'Monticello, FL died on Saturday,
May 7, 2005 at her home in a house
fire in Monticello.
SThe funeral will be on Saturday,
iMay 14, 2005 at 11:00 am at St.
Paul Primitive Baptist Church in
Monticello with burial following at
Mt. Olive Cemetery in Monticello.
Mrs. Johnson was a native and
lifelong resident of Monticello. She
was a retired homemaker at an ac-
tive member of Junious Hill Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.
Among those left to mourn her
passing and to forever treasure her
love and memory are her daughter,
Willie Mae Francis and husband
Samuel of -Macon, GA; her four
sons, Cleveland Johnson of Monti-
cello, John "J.C." Johnson and wife
Antenette of Miami, Matthew John-
son and wife Karen of Woodville
and Alphonso Johnson and wife
Ronda of Sanford, a sister. Laura
McCoy and a brother Bennie Gilley
both of Tampa, 15 grandchildren, 16
great-grandchildren and a host of
other relatives and friends


The Family Self Sufficient Pro
gram (FSSP) receives the majority
of its Community Service Blocl
Grant (CSBG) budget and is the cor
nerstone of its family support serv
ices.
This program provides intensive
case management and financial sup
port to move families from financial
crisis to financial independence.
To achieve this goal, the program
targets three key areas: employment
housing, and education.
Contact Pat Hall, caseworker fo
the coalition, at 997-8231, to appl:
for the FSSP.


some $700 for the library. (News


r



5


Light refreshments sold out.
This event was organized and
staffed by members of the Jefferson
County' Democratic Committee, in
an effort to keep the Library, a vital
part of the community.


Jazz Jam

Concert

Sees Good

Turnout

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The free Jazz Jam Concert held
Tuesday evening at the JES Boys
and Girls Club, drew. a sizeable
crowd to enjoy the talent shown by
FAMU and FSU students.
On stage were: Nathanel Fareed
Mahluli, on saxophone and vocals;
William Delesforte, on keyboard;'
Will Gobel, on bass, and Eric Steitz
on percussion.
The Jazz Jams is a series of out-
door jazz concerts that take place at
mostly Leon County Schools during
school hours. The entire school at-
tends.
Jazz Jams are funded by several
partners through 2006 with the goal
of serving all elementary, middle,
and high school's .
The purpose of Jazz Jams is to
keep the jazz legacy alive and pro-
vide children a positive music alter-
native.
Few children otherwise have an
opportunity to experience live jazz
or learn about this original Ameri-
can art form.
While most concerts take place
in Leon County, Tuesday's Concert
here is the first of hopefully many:
more in Jefferson County, adds
y Margaret Van Every, volunteer and
k coordinator of the Jazz Jams Con-
certs.
She can be contacted at 894-2302
for information on upcoming con-
ecerts, to book a free concert, to
make a donation or to become a :
l partner with Jazz Jams.


t,

ir
y


MANYGEEHUS ASESASACAR,

PrtetinAgency andth
* D e ar g. *
I.., -.


Monticello Moms
Enjoy Cookout

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Moms, a local group
of stay-at-home moms, met recently
at the home of Jacqueline Hughes,
for an afternoon cookout.
These moms meet at 10 a.m. on
Friday with their children ages
birth to pre-K.
Members meet to exchange ideas
and valuable information. They dis-
cuss important topics and share spe-
cial moments.

They also offer friendly support,
and on occasion, they take day trips
or just walks around Our Town.
The meeting places vary, said co-
ordinator Heather Boyd. She can be
reached at 443-4381 for this upcom-
ing Friday.


*KBSEamaIONC^oeZ -


ooo oo 8-a-a-o ro-V-r-oTo -rnrrB aor on --T-o --o o a -a o- o o-o -roTo a- m o o -a o--rr o "a ao














The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
j the, following items for recycling:

e All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
C laundry detergent bottles, etc.
10 .0
0 .All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
10 etc.
SAluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.
a
I .

G News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.



Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
S1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the s
Collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong? '


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
Household garbage
10"

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries p
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
S machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
S clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters 1

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
S chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers

S i**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
S into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
Sfor recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further i
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call :1
0
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


SPlease visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the
1H Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.



.. Visit the www. Eartn9e ai .org Recycling Information web page
/Tiro conso o o BrB o oo To wro a-voioroBB o a irave rroc(nn rnranaro B cano ooo rrrnnnrnn


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005


How'






The best thing about this si
that you don't have to do it
simply have to try.


ToTAI
10BOU


To


YOUR


DRUGS.


subject
t well.


is
You


If you try, your kids will get the
message.
That you care about them.
That you understand something
about the conflicts they face.
That you're there when they
need you.


It's never


The alternative is to ignore the subject.
Which means your kids are going to be listening
to others who have strong opinions about the
subject. Including those who use drugs. And
those who sell them.
ACCEPT REBELLION.
At the heart of it, drugs, alcohol, wild
hairstyles, trendy clothes, ear-splitting music, ,
outrageous language ,are different ways of ; :
expressing teen-age rebellion.
That's not all bad. Part of growing up is to
create a separate identity, apart from parents a
process which ultimately leads to feelings of self
worth. A step alorg that path is rebellion of one
kind or another which is to say rejecting
parental values, and staking out new ones.
You did it. They're doing it. And that's the
way it is.
The problem comes when kids choose a path
of rebellion that hurts them, destroys their self
worth, and can ultimately kill them.
That's the reality of drugs.
DON'T GET DISCOURAGED.
When you talk to your kids about drugs, it may
seem as though nothing is getting through.
Don't you believe it.
.The very fact you say it gives special weight to
whatever you say.
But whether or not your kids let on they've
heard you, whether or not they play back your
words weeks or months later, keep trying.
START ANYWHERE.
"Have you heard about any kids using drugs?"
"What kind of drugs?"
"How do you feel about that?"


"Why do you think kids get
involved with drugs?".
"How do other kids deal withpeer
Pressure to use drugs? Which ap-
proaches make sense to you?"
"Hav you talked about any of this
in school?"
However you get into the subject,
too early to start. it's important to state exactly how
strongly you feel about it.
Not in threatening tones. But in matter-of-
fact, unmistakably clear language:
"Drugs are a way of hurting yourself."
"Drugs take all the promise of being young
and destroy it."
"I love you too much to see you throw your
life down the drain."
.SOME DOd'S-D DDON'TS. ..
The o s are as simple as speaking from the
heart.
The biggest don't is don't do all the talking.
SIf you listen to your kids really listen and read
between the lines you'll learn a lot about what
they think. About drugs. About themselves.
About the world. And about you. They'll also
feel.heard and that, too, is a step along the path
Stewards self esteem.
There are other do's and don't: Don't threat-
en. Don't badger them. Don't put your kid on
the spot by asking directly if he or she has ever
tried drugs. They'll probably lie which under-
mines your whole conversation.
If you suspect your child is on drugs there
are all sorts of symptoms that's a different
Smatter. Then you've got to confront the subject
Directly. (This willbe another ad in this contin-
Suing series.)
S In the meantime, just talk to them.
It's okay if you don't know much about drugs.
Your kids do.
But they need to know how you feel about
the subject.
And whether you care.
For more information on how to talk with your kids
about drugs, ask for a free copy of "A Parent's Guide to
Prevention." Call 1-800-624-0100.


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PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE FLORIDA
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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005 PAGE 9


strong, as well as Desrick Jones
and Robert Nealy, just to name a
few.
The Tigers have been working on
both offensive and defensive strate-
gies.
"Defensively, we're working on a
3-5-3 (three down linemen, five
linebackers and three defensive
backs) as play options for a new
front line," said Schaum.
"Offensively, we'll still run some
one-back and put in some split
back veer."
Beginning Tuesday, Tigers were
conducting scrimmages and
Wednesday, FAMU Offensive Co-
ordinator Bob Cole observed the
scrimmage, looking for possible re-
cruits.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tigers continue Spring Football
practice with 50 players, many re-
turning, in what Head Coach Jeff
Schaum said looks to be an even
stronger and better looking team
than the previous season.
He added that he will also have
13 young players from Howard
Middle School, who are also look-
ing quite impressive.
Presently, Schaum is looking
closely at Mario Rivers and Breon
Parker to replace Quarterback Carl-
ton Hill on next year's team.
He added, that Jonathan Dady
and Chris Branham are looking


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Waukeenah United Methodist
men will host their annual Men's
Wild Game Dinner, 6 p.m., Satur-
day, May 21, in the Fellowship
Hall.
Guest speaker is John Riley, a
former Oakland Raiders football


JCHS TIGERS practice a fake hand off play to sharpen
their skills last season. (News Photo)


ACA Continues To Top

Big Bend Leaders List
In home runs, Sherrod is at num-
'RAN HUNT ber four with five.
;taff Writer In pitching, Ridgely Plaines is in
at number three, with a 7-2 season;
ACA continues to lead the lat-- and Sherrod is at number seven,


est list of Big Bend Leaders.
In baseball, Aucilla .stands at
number one with a 24-3 season af-
ter winning the district finals, for
the third consecutive year.
The Lady Warriors completed
their season with a 17-5 record af-
ter taking the district championship
for the second year in a row.
In baseball batting averages, Ca-
sey Gunnels stands at number five
with 35 hits and 72 times at bat, an
average of .486.
Drew Sherrod is at eight with 30
of 64, an average of .469.
Chris Tuten is at 13 with 32 of
73, an average of .438; and Ridgely
Plaines is at number 38 with 26 of
39, an average of .377, new to this
week's list.
In RBI, Sherrod is number one
with 39 for the season; and Josh
Carswell and Casey Gunnels are
tied for number 10, with 22, both
just added to the list.



Park Directc

Spring Spor

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman reports the scores for-the lat-
est round of spring sports.
In T-ball action, Jefferson Build-
ers Mart (JBM) downed Capital
City Bank (CCB) 25-12 win.
Rotary beat Bishop Farms,
22-13.
Rotary squeaked by CCB for a
16-15 win, and Bishop Farms
inched by JBM 27-26.
In Coach Pitch, Hiram Masonic
Lodge (HML) won over Chicken
Delite, 20-11.
Kiwanis won over State Farm In-
surance (SFI), 17-9.
HML downed SFI for 18-7.
Kiwanis was edged C & F Fenc-
ing (CFF), 13-12 and in a second
game, Kiwanis defeated the Fenc-
ers 21-9.
In Little League action, Williams


with a 6-1 record.
In earned run average, Sherrod
stands at number seven with 1.478,
in strikeouts.
Plaines is in at number nine with
46; and in innings pitched, Sherrod
is at number nine with 48 for the
season.
Winding up softball action, Cassi
Anderson is at number four, with
24 of 44, averaging .545.
Kayla Gebhard is at number 13
with 23 of 50, averaging .460; Lisa
Bailey is at number 16 with 23 of
51, averaging .451; and Brittany
Hobbs is at number 21 with 22 of
56, an averaging .393.
In pitching, Hobbs is at number
seven with a 9-3 season record; and
Bethany Saunders is in at number
11 with a 6-0'season.
In strikeouts, Hobbs is at num-
ber 10 with 64, and in innings, she
finishes at number nine with 83 for
the season.


Dr Tells

t Scores
Timber (WT) beat Jefferson Farm-
ers Market (JFM), 8-5.
Monticello Milling (MM) de-
feated Farmers and Merchants
Bank (FMB) for a 6-2 win.
The Millers then left JFM in the
dust with a 13-5 victory and FMB
beat WT 4-2.
In Softball Action, Joyner's
Travel Center overtook Jackson's
Drug Store 13-7.
Jackson's came back to win over
Joyner's 10-8.




Muscular
Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis,
National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


player, and full tin
for the past 30 ye
wit, humor and "d
"A combined
than two million
countries, have er
tional messages,"
ordinator Stan Mo
"John is also
man and is vary
procurement of


Tigers To Play In Sprin!

Jamboree In Jacksonvi
1A Potter's Hous
FRAN HUNT and the 1A Un
Staff Writer Christians.
The host schoc
The Tigers football team will be sity Christian, loc
participating in the Annual Spring of 1-95 South an
Football Jamboree, 7 p.m., May 26 sity Blvd.), in Jac
in Jacksonville. The Tigers \
Participants in the event include quarter against B
the Tigers, as well as the 2A quarter agair
Booles High School Bulldogs, the Christian.


ring; Edward Walker, III, 1st place, forms,
2nd place, sparring; Alphonso Footman, 1st
place in sparring.


M en wild critters," Monroe said.
All men are encouraged to attend.
inni er "this event, which brings men to-
in n er gether in a meaningful time of fun,
e p c s food and fellowship.
me public speaker
ars, known for his Men are encouraged to bring
own home" style. their fathers and adult sons, as well
audience of more as their neighbors, friends and co-
people, in eleven workers, Monroe said.
joyed his inspira- There is no charge for the event.
reports event co- Covered dishes are welcomed but
reports event co-
not mandatory, however, a love of-
,nroe.
an avid outdoors- fearing will be accepted.
familiar with the Individual reservations are not re-
and feasting on quired, however, other men's or-
ganizations are encouraged to call
for group reservations.
g Monroe said on average, 60-80
men attend the event each year, and
lie they have had as many as 150 at-
tend.
se Christian Lions He notes that they expect to serve
diversity Christian many dishes, including the usual
local animals, wild hog, deer,
ol will be Univer- squirrels, turkeys, alligator, and
cated at the corner sometimes the exotic, wild bear,
d exit 13 (Univer- caribou and elk.


ksonville.
will play the first
olles and the third
ist University


/7[ HOME
FURNISHINGS
'ilillfWW/~(HI iW~[W~~tll(-Il[- -14wIm' ilTOwllll--,lw^[ l 1w)
1317 W. Jefferson St. Monticello 342-3201

RENT To OWN *6 MONTHS SAME AS CASH *
Visa Mastercard EBT Accepted





That's right! Just $7 pays first weeks rent on
virtually any item in our store.




Now you don't need
one of these to get your
Federal payment.

dl Now, even if you don't qualify for a checking
or savings account, you can have your
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to a low-cost, federally insured ETAS.

Call 1-888-382-3311 (TDD: 1-877-326-5833)
to learn where you can open an ETA. Or
visit our Web site at
www.eta-find.gov. A o
Electronic TransferAccount

ii~iaiiiiia.... .iii....i,.i.,tjin,


Office 912-367-6043
Home 913-632-2755


JCHS Football Team


Looks Good, Coach


Fax 912-367-0380
Mobile 912-337-6740


FARMYARD DAY CAMP
Good time in the country. For kids aged 5-10
jL JMonday-Friday 9-4 Early/Late can be arranged
WEEK A June 13-17
ed WEEK B July 11-15
o' $25/WEEK
OVER NIGHT RIDING CAMP WITH SOME SPACE STILL AVAILABLE
BOYS OR GIRLS AGES 9+ "COME JOIN THE FUN"
CALL "BOB" FOR DETAILS
850-997-5590 WWW.PAINTEDPONY.US


Package Deal! $9o95
Diesel Tractor Package 4995
*Diesel Tractor
*Rotary Cutter
*Boom Pole
*Drawbar
*16 ft Dual Axel Trailer
*Includes Warranty
*Other Pkgs Available
CHECKS CREDIT CARDS A

$0 Down $99/mo WAC

LASTINGER TRACTORS "THE TRACTOR
Exit 11 off 1-75 1/4 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


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100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
,-j odFOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Point Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
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( 1630 E. JACKSON ST
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall) '


'
'''-
..
N a


BOYS, GIRLS CLUB members took part in
the First Coast Open Karate Championship.
From left, Joshua Westley, 5th place spar-


Waukeenah UMC I

Host Wild Game D


TIMBER BUYERS SPECIALIZING IN WET AREAS
J M FORESTRY INC. FORESTER
RAY CARTER

1231 EAST PARKER STREET ~ P.O. Box

249 BAXLEY, GEORGIA 31515


Club Winners

In Karate

Championship

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello and Tallahassee Boys-
and Girls Clubs of the Big Bend
participated in Porter's First Coast
Open Karate Championships in
Jacksonville on April 23.
Types of Karate featured at the
tournament included: Gojitsu, Kwon
Dojo, Art Den, and Jitsu Ryu Sys-
tem.
Winning First Place from the
Howard Middle School Club was
Edward Walker, III, for Forms.
Winners from the Jefferson Ele-
mentary School Club were Al-
phonso Footman, First Place
Sparring; Charlene Austin, First
Place Sparring.
Emily Howell won Second Place
for Sparring; Lanesiya Massey,
Third Place Sparring; and Joshua
Wesley, Fifth Place Sparring.


ACA Athletic

Banquet Set

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian. Academy will
be hosting their annual Athletic
Awards banquet, 6 p.m. Saturday at
the First United Methodist Church
on Walnut Street at 6 p.m.
The meal will include chicken,
ham, garlic mashed potatoes, green
beans, salad, beverage and dessert.
.Many Warrior athletes will be
recognized for their many accom-
plishments throughout the school
year.

In Case Of

Emergency:
Dial 911










PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005


DELINQUENT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES


All unpaid Tangible Personal Property Taxes assessed for the year 2004
became delinquent April 1, 2005.These taxes are accruing interest at the rate
of eighteen percent (18%) per annum. 197.402 F.S.


If the taxes are not paid, a warrant will be issued. The Tax Collector must
then apply to the Circuit Court for an order directing levy and seizure of the
personal property for the uipaid taes. 7.413 F.S. /



ois Hunter, Jefferson County Tax Collector


F'0000200 $240. 80
5000005
60NETWOR KS (USA) I: NC
1066 W HASTINGS SR STE 15
VANCOUVli:ER, BC
VAE 1X


IF'0001400


$114.44


5000030
ADVANTA I...ASING COIP
C/O CBIZ 'PROP TAX -PMB 30
4:151 BELTLINE RD STE 124
ADDI:SON, TX 7500:1.

P0001500 $51.47
500003:1.
AI...DER DAVID
P 0 BOX 603
MONTICELLO...... FI.
32345-0603

P0004200 $49.35
5000070
ANDI:RSON LAW OFFICE 00
PF)O BOX 56"
MONTICELL......O :,- FI.
32345-0056


F'0004700


$57.04


550001.155

t:ii 7 DB:)X 009-'T
QLL.AtH*ASSEE FLt.32300

.7 P0004800 $303.;.


ASHBIIURN ROCIBERT S & REBEI:
I::":! G BO3)X 5:1.4

32Y349....0

P10006600 $17.4
5000330)

5043 BOC)STOII HIWY
32344

P0009100 $577.0
566406
140 :SSt9AU RI::CH..AR:D A
DFIA SUJEBWAY- L I.O..C)YD
925 SCOUTH-t HCHRSESHOE RI)
TA.AHASSEEFL.323:1. :1.


o P'0009900

5< (00680
BRADLEY NATHAN IEL
3J1 BFRADL...EY RD
M'CNTICEI...I... ., FL
S. 323.

1' 001.3500
5QO0937
CARRI W:I...l..IE J
16 V:I...I...A NOVA
BARBER HI...... RD
LAMONT., FI...32336

POO0015000
0)C0 :I. 07')
CHICKEN DEL.ITE
635 S JEF:FERSON ST
MONTH ICEL.I...LO, IFL
'* -v t 323


96


CC


500:1. 563 500261:1.
E:H :i:C' JOHNSON & JOI-INSON INC
DBA HtDI..E HOUSE 362 SIGNAGE- JEFFERSON COUNTY
P:' I BO(X :1796 :' P0 B(OX 157
BRUNSWICK, G1A 3:21-796 (I:-:10 [PECAN HOUSE:)
BI C 1..L-9 MONTICELLO, FL.


F0025400


5001589'
EURE CONSTRUCTION CO IlNC
- 2503 JiRABON RD
MONTICEI...L...O FL 32344

.'/t ,.>,:.,. nz.+


500:1. li95
EVERGREEN MAR KETI NG(
P' 0 BOX :1332
TALI...AHASSEE, F... A 32


500165. 3
FAIRY TA...E PHOTO SH
:1.295 S JEFFERSON"I
MONTI:CEI...O, FL. 323


;44


F=0028300


$241.17


500:1.827
I::'LORI:Di A MEI...I:LODY BOYS
282 FOI::'RE:ST
MONTICELLO, FL 32344


P0029800
5002010
GADSON JAMES
PO BOCX 84
...LOYD, FL 32337-0

P0031200
5002089
GOOCHII MARC & TEIKOU
870 BASSETT DAIRY
MONTH 1 CEI..LO, FL... 32


49 ~6031400
5002:1.06
C)RANT'S'! IYI) ITO NTI 1.1~(
1.270) N JEFIT'.:E:RS)OI '.
IYIOII*T,:: ("Fl.. C '*L


33


1146.72





44-9525

$287.43






$341.73




44-1823


P0019700 $285.92
5001348
COURTYARD RESTAURANT
1:1.0 E DI)OGWOOD) ST
IMONT I CELLO( FL 32344


P0021700


$31.06


5001.430
I) D E MI CO(
:1.8:1.7 W CAFP:'S'
(B:)OBBY F:I...OYD)
IMOINTI:CE:I-LO.. :, FL. 32344


P0023000


I=0031500


$


5002:1.07
GRANT'S" SERVICE. CE


1270 N JEFFERSON .-ST
MONTH ICELLO.., FIL 32344

F0032700 .$1150.21
5002200
1-1K -JEFFERSON ARMS LI...C
9021 TOWN" CENTER PKFWY
BR:ADENTON, FL 34202

P='0033600 $26.83
5002242
HARRELI...I... ROBERT"
226 W L.AIKE RD

P0033900 $169.16


5002263
HIARVEY KE'NNETH
900 RIDGE RDI
MONTH I CEI...L.O.., FI...


P0034300


E'

* 32344


$107.12


32345 0:1.57


P0039200 $9
5002670
JONL.ES OLA
BLUE HERN CAFE
790 TUNG ST ,


5003680
NIXON TED
95 PECAN PLACE
MONTIC ELLO, FL 32344

.PF005250 $785.7!
5003700
NORMA INC
408 S LEE ST
C/O VYAS BHADRESH
ASHBURN, GA 31.714

POO55200 $426.7
500389.4
PENA RAYMOND A & SUSAN T
594 OLD TUNG GROVE RD
MONTH ITCELLO,. FI.. 32344


Pl0056600


$226.77


5003983
POMEROY PHILI:P JR
660 WHISPERING HILLS RD
MONTH; CELLO, FL


P'0057100


1.48 5003988
PREFERRED INVEST
1390 S JE:FFERSC
F:' BOX 730
MONCI I': CELI..C, FL..


5004433 .
SG ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
IC--F'PMB 401 (TIME SAVER
820 S MACARTHIUR STE 105-4
C/C CB:AZ F'PROP TAX SOLUTION
5 COPPFELL, TX 75019


P0064600


$,.)2.26


5004434
SG ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
:l C. -PMB 40:1. CAPITALA. CITY
820 S MACARTHUR STE :1.05-4
4 C/O CBIZ PROP TAX SOLUTION
OPPEL...L, TX 75019


P0064700


$32.54


5004435
SG ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S$
INC--PMB 401:(DOWNTOWN FOO
820 S MACARTHUR STE 105-4
./0 CBIZ PROP TAX SOL.TIO
COPPELL, TX 75019


32. !54


32344--952, 28 I;..
5004436
$185. 66 S ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
INC--PMB 401 (PIC-N-CHIC)
3TORS INC 820 S MACARTHUR STE .105-4
N C/ C.BI.Z P"ROP TAX. SOLUTION
N COPELL......, TX 7"5019


32344


'0064900


$25.45


MONT I.CEL...., FL... 32304 i mn5vm'
P0057800 $120.82 00443
SRVC P0039300 $61.2 4 5004000' O INC--PINE EN AI (W ENTY' S
,5002685 .I1PRO TEI...ECOM ::NC :I:NC.--FM 4 01. (WENDY'SY
5002:68,5 P T M IPL1 820 S MACARTHUR STE 105.-4
,30,2:>. JONIES FYMOND & JUDITH P P C I BOX 1440 : CBI. PO fAX SOL:UT
523 SILVER LAKE RD I PANACEA FL 32346-1.440 CCIZ OP TAX SU
16.1 MONTICELLO Fl C .... TX 7 5019
$,620 ":].CE .L._O F:'IJ... ,


P0039900


32344-.-5

$97


5002764
LIKELY DONIlNA LEA
3984 W CA:PPS
MONTH I CELL...O, FL 32

SP0040200
5002767
KEY 'S CHEVRON.
285 E WASHINGTONI S
MONTICELL..0, L 32

P0040500


"344


5004043
7.464 R:iABO IFAR M::.ARM SUPPr.:.LY :I:
:1.99B5SJE:FFERS ON
MIONTICELLOii F L : i 32-

P0069100


$33.90


3T
!344

$157.75


'084 50027 85
I $226.57 DBA K(INSlEY'S COWN & TRACT
6307 E WASH1INGTON
MONTH I CELLO., F ...32344
RD -
344 P0041500 $81.16
5002857 7
$450.81 I...AWRENCE ,I SIR:.AL & .JAI IE:
8857 GAMBLE RD
LAUNDRY IMONT:I CEI..I... 1 F 32344
T
344 P0045400 $47.81
500311. I
1446.75 MARTIN ROY A
85:1. OAKL.ANDS PLANTATI ON
NTER :IN MOUNT I:CEI..LO, FL 32344


5004063
RDMC INC'
180 HICKORY LANE
MONT I CELLO., FL 323

P0059600
5004085'
REICHMAN MICHAEL A
PO BOX 41
MONT :I:CEi.L....), FL..
3234

P0061300
5004:1.85
ROB:INSN 'S PECAN .I-O
63 GAFI:F:NEY RD
IIMONTICEI..O, FL --323


P0061400


5004:1.90
RODDENBIERRY K F' 0 BOX 661 .
MIONT ICELLO, FL
32;

P0061700


PI006 500


$25.45


.I 5004438
S(3 OONL:INE ENTERTAINMENT S
4 INC---PI'MB 401 (JOYNER'S)
;44 .
820 S MACARTIIHUFR STE: 105"-4.
$78.4.1 C/O CBIZ I=:ROP' TAX SOI..L.UTIO
COV IEL.. TX 75.9
,O'- L.L.. TX 730.19 .


P0065160


$20.52


5004439
SG ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
I:C--PMB 401' (FAST TRACK,
820 S MACARTHUR STE 105--4
C/O CBIZ PFROP TA AX SOLUTION
COPI:PELL.L.. TX 75019


P0065200


$32.54


5004440
81.85 SG ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
INC.--PMB 401 (WINN-DIX:IE)
8. 20 S MACARTHUR STE 105-4
C/O CBIZ PROP TAX SOLUTION
an COP"PELL, TX 75019
'.44[, 1 "I=:._ .


$60.88




345-0661


$444


P0045600 $90.44 5004235
500313.0 :ROGERS INVESTMENTS 1...LC
MAX BEAUTY SUPPLY (DBA) 7612 MIL.. POND LOOP
MONTH ICELLO BEAUTY SUPPLY TA...L.AHASSEE FL. 323:17
1275 S JEFFERSON ST
MONT ICELL....O, FL 32344 P0062500 $208


P0046300


$


5003220
MICHAEL PAUL farmR)
' 0 BOX 730
MONTH ICELL.O, FL.
3234

P0046400
5003230,
MILADYS SHOI'
230 W WASHINGGTON ST
MI fNlNTICELI...O, FL.


$410.09


5002270
IIATC.'IIER F*RA.l 1<1.INI 1-1
D)1A EI:ARTHI-IWCOR KS
22,:1 I:RABOC)II RD)
IFl 32344


P0035800
500241.0
I-lF:'13OPSON ROY
459 HO'PSONC) RD)
MONTICELL...O FL
3:

P0036000
5002460
IAUI 14633 MAHAN DR 5O
TALI...AHASSEE, FL.


$2


S F,'004680
505*.255


. 3234

6 $


F'0069100 $26'
5004660
STANFORD GAS LI...C
902:1. TOWN CENTER PKWY
BRADIETON,F FL:-. 34202


P=0072400


$630.59


-64 .004986


l 3ITINTI:rCEI...L(:) *I.. 32344


.87


5004280
182.65 SARA LE C(OFFEEl & TEA F:'OO
990 SUP8LRME
ATTIN' ACCOUNT(ITN i-I' r'Y'


5--0730

$33.81




14 J.442

119.32


MI :1 I...L.ER D G:1 BABIES .J R
1.410 EC '.PFARL S'T
3 6,3 MONT : CEI...LO, F. 32344
3.63


1'0047400
5003300
MIN ITON IIENIRY
2903 BROCK RDI)
MOUNT ICELLO, FL.
.1.


$172.08


323003--9603*


$144.18


500:1.480
DEI...TA I..AND SURVEYORS ::NC
440 S I.TJEFFEI::' RSONtI ST
MONT I:[ CE:i...I..., Fl..


F'0024300


32344--1. 820

$803.20


500:1. 53"
DRAWDYS BACKHOE" SERVICES
I: : B)OX 91.6
MONTH I CEI....I..O, FL.


F ,::0024800


3234 5"0916.

$963.38


I P0036900 $393.-99
5002490
J3 M (3IR:)CVE:R IFARMlvS ti..(:
:t.47 BO'?4C)STO:)N HWY''
MONTtIC:ELLOFL 32344

P:.0037700 -$1722.96
rQQ02563

RR I'(:BOX 38
C(1B:tOMIASS t::'I...ANTI)
.MONTI3CELLOFL.32344


1.0038400"


$201.73


F'0050200


$46.88




32344-9505


$100.90


500)531.
I'I(CCI.EIIX ) OI't IMAR TI-IA
D)BA THE*tii: COCTTACGE BEDI) & ERE


FP0050400


$245.98


OCCOR:D M:I:ILL.ARD C*
250 MO)RINsI IG SH1tAI)CDW LAINIE
MONTIELL~ FL 2344l

P0050900 $45.14
5003545
MCOLAAI'1gRY' STEVEilli
555 WAUKEENAH AlR-l WY
MONTI1CELLO ,FL32344

'00052300 $60.1


:PO BOCX 72
MONT I CEL.L..., FI


P0063100


WAT KINGS) IHEAL...TH CENTER
C/O T* W WATIKINS
::' BOX 4:18
MOlNT I CEL.I...C., FL. 32344


P 10079800
3t)0 5484


WILI...AMS DAVID
:' .0 BO)X 832
32344-0072 MONT I C


$95.87


5004340
SCOTT MARGARET
1.638 TIHOMPSON VALLEY RD
(DECEASED)
...AMONT,, FL... 32336-9744


5004360
S(ULJ...:Y AUTO PA
'PO BOX 366
MONTI CEr::...LO, FL


P0064200


$118.68


500 5(:3 1X
WOODIWY DRA-KE:i ::II[
F-' 0 X-* i(:X 429j


$350.74




32345-0832

$382.28




32330-0429

$288.96




32344-974:1.

$80.97

......*.


$2091.5. 15Y


P'0081400


=P0082200


.RTS 1NIC "0 6
YA)UN F:':JIARMTIS
2689 N SAI...T RD
110..., Tl CE...L., FL
,32345"--0366 s


$39.52
SOC)430 I* ~-s)'J'


5004430 vv....v
S' ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S 5005570
Y(OU..NI,(3 JO3HN M
INC--PMB 401(L.AMONT FOOD .YOUNG)
:1.9 RC)SE1i: RI)
820 S MACARTHUR STE 105i-4 '
MONIT:CELL.(, F:'I...
(C/ CBIZ PROP TAX SOLUTION .
COPPE...L, TX 75019'


I"'0064300


5004431
Sit ONLINE ENTERTAINMENT S
I3NC--PMB 401 (PIT STOP QU
820 S MACARTHUR STE 105-'4
C/O C:BIZ F:ROP TAX SOLUTION
CO:PPE:I', TX 75019


F0064400


$20.82


5004432..
29 SG ONL.:INE ENTERTAINMENT S
IENC---F'MB 401 (FAST TRACK
6.0 S MACARTHUR STE 105-4
C/O CBIZ :PROP T.AX SOL.UT:IO
COPPEI...L, TX 75019


40


Help your community
when a disaster strikes!

Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.




American
Red Cross


1'0064500


I='aOOA6200


4K


2fi7-7, .1.I


.' PAMQt: "In


-" '










Neuromuscular


no running,
walking -
even
breathing.
Help MDA
help ::
people.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005 PAGE 11


Exquisite Wlteetf'ont Mansion and
Personal Property to be Sold "Piece by Piece"

Trustee's Auction
2349 Foxworth Drive
Panaiua City, Florida, 32405
11AM Saturday* May 14
1PM Sunday May 15
'la.sioln l Fea.t us -
7 Bedrooms 7 Bathrooms 8,000+
Sq.Ft. Gunite Pool *-1.64 Acres
.396 Ft.of Waterfront

Designer Accessories. Original Works of
Art by Picasso,Picot, Agamin, Chagall,
Dali, Miro, Deniz and more. Sports
Memorabilia. Bronze Statuary. )Diamond
Jewelry. Oriental Rugs. Addl Items.
Auction Company of America
"America'st # Auction Team" M GALL- CHAMPION AUCTIONEER
Licensed Real Estate Broker ABI & 11,4'lAU 2
888.573.1616 www.AuctionCompanyofAmerica.com


i





This
age :,i
plum b,
more, (
Americ


&S .'-if dlt.
J,'s ,l;s,. m.,,. st,..' L; .,.; t*//

SAmerican Heart
Association


BUSI NESS




__ DIRE TORY i
I I 1


You l)'m( l 11 r .rl lc. ui/ IiI I
Interior Exterior


34 23288
I c c w & l ts m I -i .11 f 7 (


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co, Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296
Mobile: 508-2383
.Lic. # CGC #1507547


Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


1830 T1
Tallaha
(850
(800
Fr
Tallah
F


Sj 5 .r/,w'"


l 'Alyn Sikes
Owner


homasville Road
issee, FL 32303
) 224-3473
) 541-8702
ee Delivery To
lassee Hospitals &
uneral Homes


. Lot Cleaning-Driveway-~
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850).997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D. O.H Lie.
#SR0971265


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing
THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-
NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS'
ACCESS CONTROLS '
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS
LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE
BIG BEND '
COMMUNICATIONS Co.

997-4150


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T :STARTER

A
SV
VI Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR ,
SPRING SPECIAL!! $15 OFF
ANY REPAIR BILL OVER $75
(Not Valid With Any Other Offer)


S8-10 Chevron
rand + Tax pk. 3 pks ct.

305 $1.59 $4.47 $14.00
2ct+ $13.30 each
DTC $1.70 $4.80 $15.20
2ct+ $14.40 each
Marlboro $3.00 $8.69 $27.65
Another Delivery Ladies Leather Purses $5.99- $18.99
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all


DOUG'S.
TREE & LAWN
S.,:,:SERVICE
,f"Irhiffig Mbd'ig .i
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


SCREENPRINTING
& EMBROIDERY
ALL OCCASIONS


7'


Register's
Mini-Storage


315 Wakileenah
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Don' LetA Oldl!I


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior ~ Exterior
Residential Commercial
Insured License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
S.... Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


Thurman
Tractor
Service
\ ( Mowing
. jHarrowing
vrqFood Plots

Licen.seo Il/su.cJ '
James Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest L:onsi
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
SMon. -Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff Tallahassee
575-7682
plplao A!


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NELL) I SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS' KRE'AIR JI'UP,K D)LS
INS FALLtTIONS CO r'QjULArIONS
CUSfOMV C O, MPL'ILRS ILI'ORIAr '
RE-MOVAL Of VIRC.SFS, ADV'ARE, SW :v'.iK


I I U


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Got an idea?


C!_.


manufacturer's coupon :


1400 S. Jefferson Streel p.lnrlello FIordoa 323-44
Phone (85Ci 97.-51 FA \i85C.0i 997-0692


*Tractors *Ditclh itch *Backhoe *Construction
Canisters *Pressure r liasherrs *Power Tool
*31Muih more

Brolvrinig Carolina
Snake Boots- I ork Boots-Casual


REAL GOOD P.-AI, T
REAL GOOD PRICE
NIANY COLORS
$5 PER G.-LLON,
342-3.il288

342-3288


Border 2 Border


Lawn & Landscaping



Ad & Receive I
I I
A A 10%
Discount

11025 East Mlahan
877-4550


Gene Hall

County Commissioner


(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or
ghallboard@yahoo.com


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-)97-5808
50-()-55-I 5-9-)(I
850-25 i-29I I
1 55 ,Joi


GLENN GRIFFIN
L.L.C. Co.
GR -DING FOR ANDSC.\rlING
Drn\e\a\ a Instillation &
Repair Light Clearing For
Construction
3,I + 'Ii 's elV / 'lcC /I "C

850-997-9947
Call 508-7071


4L- -II I I_-


c 'tild ICad t' a blcl-:
.'d nii-'d ITmre thar a
'r tu fix. IT.: learn
contactt your nearest
:an Heart Association.


C..




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Have a concern?


J


_ I


-j


m


. k -


aI


ILE


m


a


Irg~~~
~~ P AI''
~-
-~8a.
I-q*p~~
4


850-997-2798
5 3 8 North Jefferson St.
W.J


I


I


.I .









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005


Extension Agent Copeland


Explains New Food


FRAN HUNT
itaff Writer

Family and Consumer sciences
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
coinments about the new Food
Pyramid, unveiled-April 19.
The new pyramid is designed to
approach healthy eating by consid-
ering individual needs, while add-
ing a visual reminder to include
physical activity.
Activity, moderation, personal-
ization, proportionality, variety and
gradual improvements are high-
lighted in the new design.
'Copeland explained that variety
is' symbolized by the six color
bands representing the five food
groups of the pyramid and oils.

Foods from all groups are needed
each day for'good health. From
left to right, grains are symbolized


by the color orange; vegetables,
green; fruits, red; oils, yellow;
milk, blue; and meat and beans, by
purple.
Proportionality is shown on the
new pyramid, by the varying
widths of the food group bands
around the pyramid.

The width of the bands suggest
how much food a person should
chose from each group.

Moderation is represented on the
new pyramid in the narrowing of
each food group from bottom to
top.
The wider base represents foods
with little or no solid fats or added
sugars. These foods should be se-
lected more often.

The narrower areas represent
foods containing more sugars and
added solid fats.


Pyramid
"An easy way to think about this
is the more you process most
foods, the higher up on the pyramid
you go.
"An ear of fresh corn would be at
the bottom. Processing that corn
into a corn chip rises towards the
top of the pyramid," said Copeland.
Personalization is illustrated on
the pyramid by the person walking
up the steps.
The new pyramid web site offers
12 different calorie levels for males
and females, ages two to 76 plus,
with activity levels ranging from
sedentary, moderately active and
active.
Copeland stated that the USDA
recognizes that no one can make
the changes in diet and activity pat-
terns overnight but, maybe the new
graphic will be a symbolic re-
minder to help consumers make a
gradual improvement in their diets
and add physical activity to each
day.


Resident Certified Gopher


Tortoise Residential


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Local resident Martha Canady
has recently completed the training
and became certified as a Gopher
Tortoise Residential Expert
(GTRE).
She said her interest was sparked
because Gopher;'-Trtoises have
lived on her land for the past 25
years and she justr-wanted to "Get
to know more- about, my
neighbors."
Canady said that by state law, it
is illegal to even touch a' Gopher
Tortoise, even if it resides on your
land.
"I also learned that before one
can be relocated, it has to have its
blood tested because they carry an
upper respiratory virus and bacteria'
tha can be spread to other Gopher
Tortoises in the area."'- t' "' .i:'
Canady said it is no easy or inex-
pensive task to have a Gopher Tor-
toise relocated. -The procedure in-
cludes time, expense, an experi-
enced back-hoe operator, a trapper,
and a consultant, nobito mention the
biggest danger of rdljatinig a Go-.
pher Tortoise, is the risk of rattle
snake bite. ,


Canady explained that Gopher
Tortoises reside in what is called
the chamber, a big hole bedded
with leaves, usually right at the wa-
ter table.
She added that they like heavy
sandy areas in open ground and
they alternate their grazing habits
throughout the Near They seem to
prefer Bahaya grass, St. Augustine
grass, new grass, new spouts and
new growth.
Canady said that turtles, espe-
cially box turtles, are being ex-
ploited for their livers. "It's part of
the Oriental liver trade," said Ca-
nady. "The livers are packed in al-
cohol and sent to China for use as
aphrodisiacs.
During the class, Canady also
learned how to draw blood samples
.,fropn the tortoises ,"Someone has
to hold .he runle-dsin, then. you
have,tg pujJ put his, left fr:ni foot.
It is exceptionally hard because
they do put up a fight. Just above
the tendon is the vein from which
to draw the blood."
Canady also learned how to con-
duct a transect (mathematical for-
mula to determine how many
Gopher Tortoises reside' in a spe-
cific area) on her property. "I want


Expert
to find how many I have according
to the State Formula," said Canady.
She said that she would,
however, require some assistance
to do the transect and she would be
more than willing to teach others
how to assist her.
"I plan to take more Ray Ashton
Courses over the course of the next
year," said Canady. "I took this one
specifically as a land owner. If I'm
going to keep living with them, I
need to be informed and educated
about how to take care of my Go-
phers, keep then happy and keep
them there.
Canady said that she counted 64
on her land last year, and she has
only counted 37 this year that are
active.
Gopher tortoises can live more
than 60 years.
The main reason for the decline
of the species are habitat alteration
and land development.
Other cited reasons include: for-
estry practices that plant pines too
closely., preventing sunlight from
penetrating to the forest floor, dis-
ease, road mortality and the illegal
hunting of tortoises for their meat.
To volunteer to help Canady in
performing a transect, call 997-
2087.


LEGAL NOTICE


LEGAL NOTICE


Funstation,Your Fun Stop

For Summer Fun!
lmii


Funstation is the fun
alternative to your
summercamp needs!
We- offer- a variety -otf
programs for all ages!

Call John Jusko for
more details
(850) 383-0789 ?


3,000 e ri can c hlrdere n




Of those 3,000 new smokers:
30 will be murdered
60 will die in traffic accidents
750 will die from smoking-related
diseases, including lung cancer,
emphysema and heart disease.


t AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION


Prevent lung disease:





TALLAHASSEE MUSEUM'S

SUMMERADVENTwfEU AP
Nature, crafts, games, field trips,
water fun and zoo adventures for
Pre-Kindergarten through 8th grade.
May 31- August 12


Fair skinr. 1ht uteys mnd 0 Itendrncyi

1o burn in the sun. also put tour atl

AiaIicr ris.5. So. ('xcoiniOy(o. 1) shi

I-C-44110rrj. //'You ind unylb~rin4

UnUSLIr~cd. SCC YO~oo' dtll71U10/04ipi s.


CALL
575-8684, Ext. 126 or
visit www.tallahasseemuseum.org
Reserve your space now
for one or more days!
(Limited space available)


TALLAHASSEE MUSEUM
3945 Museum Drive


MONnAY


TUESDAY


Group Fitness Schedule

/*


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & JillsPit
3 to 5 yr. olds Pitates t


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds



5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
(Fitness Combo (Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


S FA 1T OF FI OIORIDA
1)I'AR IMI'N I (OF INVIRONM IN IAL PRO FE(I ION
NOI) [IC(' DRAlI' PtRMIT
The Departmccnl of Enviionmental Protection gives notice of its preparation of'a drali
pennil. FLA18391 I. ior B & D Dairy to Mr. David J. Arnold 622 Milkv Way Llle.
Greenville. FL 32331 to operate an existingg daily I'arin operation (SIC Code 0241 ). with a
herd sit/e ol 2.6(50 i .....-i annual average). including 2.350 lactating cows and
3001 dv cows. In I. .. .. ... ir heilers and clves will be raised on the site. The
acillily consists of live total confinelnent Ireestall barns, a, milking parlor. a wastewater
treatment system and land application areas. All lactating cows will e housed in the total
conlinement Ireestall barns. The drv cows and heil'ers will reside on open pasture.
Manure in the Ircestall bamrs will be flushed and directed to the wastewater treatment
system The milking parlor flush and clean up wastewater will also be directed to the
treatment system.
A Nutrient ManagementPlan (NMP) has been developed lbr this facility. It consists of
a system designed based on an average of 222,000 gallons per day of wastewater and
includes a solids separator, a 14.1 m llion gallon two cell carthen lined waste storage
ponds and 389 acres for wastewater irrigation, based on agronomic rates for nitrogen. An
additional solids separator will be constructed. The wastewater system is designed to
contain run-ofl f om the production area, which consists of anilnal confinement areas. the
wastewater collection system, and the manure staging areas, and is 6.9 acres in size, bor a
25-year 24-hour storn and 35 days of waste storage. Clean water roman roof run-oll is
diverted away fromi the waste collection system.
The treatment system is designed as follows: Wastewater is generated from milking
parlor, work area, and flreslall barn flushes, milk rooin and parlor wash water cow
washers, cooling sprinklers, and stonnwater runoff from the production area. The
wastewater is directed to the solids separator. From the solids separator the wastewater
flow. into.to the waste storage pond. Wastewater from the waste storage pond will be
pumped to 5 sprayfields, totaling 389 acres for use as irrigation water. ',.I'd removed
from the solids separator will be spread on forage fields onsite or hauled I I .Ii. for land
application at agronomic rates. The facilityy is located at latitude 300 36' 55.o? longitude
83 37' 55.48" W on 622 Milky Way Lane, Greenville, FL 32331 in Jefferson County.
Any interested person may submn i. i ...mments on the draft pennit of the
Depaltnent or inay submit a written ... i i' a public meeting to Ed Cordova, P.E.
Northeast District Office, 7825 Baymcadows Wav, Suite 200B, acksonville, FL 32256-
7590 in accordance with rule 62-620.555 of the Florida Administrative Code. The
comments or request for a public meeting must contain the information set forth below p
and must be received in the Northeast within 30 days of publication of this notice. Failure
to submit comments or request a public mectine within this uile period shall constitute a
waiver ofany light such person lma Iavve o su'Tnit comments or request a public meeting
under Rule 62-6220.555, Florida Admiinistlative Code,
The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the following information:
(a) The commenter's na m, address, and telephone number, the applicant's name and
address, the Department Permit File
Number and the county in whicli the project is proposed;
(b) A statement of lhM ani when notice ol'the Department action or proposed action
was received: .,
(c) A statement of the facts the Department should consider in making the final
decision.
(d) A stlaement ol which rules or statutes require reversal or modification of the
Department action or proposed action, and
I() If' J1. '...1 a request that a public mectimi be scheduled, including a statement of
thleInature l i il issues proposed to be raised at the meeting. However, the Department
may not always grant a request '-.r l r.uhl; ,..i Th-:refore, written comments should
be sub _nitted within 30 days ofl -"u' t. I '.i n a., even if a public meeting is
requested.
Ifa public meeting is scheduled the public comment period is extended until the close
ol the public meeting. I 'a public ineetin" is held any person may submit oral or written
statements and data at the meeting on the Departnent proposed action. As a result of
significant public commelo the Department final action may be different from the position
I I f. by it in this dral'l permit.
I he permit application file and supporting data aire available for public inspection
during normal business ho:irs,. 8:00 a.m. to 5:l)0p.m.. Monday through Friday, except
legal holidays. at Northeast District Olfice, 782 Ba\mcadows Way, Suite 200B,
Jacksonville. FL 32256-7590. Tel (904) 807-3300.


Jamie 's Bo Works.....,..~Y I


LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-88-CA: JULIE K. NIX
BARRON; Plaintiff, vs. PAUL
LASTOWSKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
PAUL LASTOWSKI; JOHN RODGERS;
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN
RODGERS; STEVE LASTOWSKI;
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
PAUL LASTOWKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF PAUL LASTOWKI; JOHN
RODGERS YOU ARE NOTIFIES that a
Complaint for Quiet Title has been filed
against you and others, and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E.
MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH THOMP-
SON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plain-
tiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road,
4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this
notice of action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 28th day April, 2005 Carl D.
Boatwright.
5/6,13, c

SECTION 00100 ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BID PROJECT: Jefferson County
NRCS Eroison Repairs Project No.
04100-669-01 OWNER: Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners 1 Court
House Circle, Room 10 Monticello,
Florida 32344-1900 ENGINEER: Darabi
and Associates, Inc. 730 NE Waldo Road
Gainesville, Florida 32641 Telephone:
(352) 376-6533 1.0 WORK
DESCRIPTION The Projects are located
in Jefferson County, Florida, and consist
of erosion repairs, channel debris removal,
embankment restoration, and protection.
Refer to NRCS Project Worksheets, and
details at the end of technical
specifications and contract documents. A
contract will be awarded based on Lump
Sum prices. 2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS All
Bidders shall be roadway contractors
pre-qualified with the Florida Department
of Transportation in Tallahassee, Florida.
Bidding and contract documents may be
examined at the Jefferson County Board
of Commissioners Office. Copies of the
documents may be obtained at Engineer's
office for $100.00 dollars per set; which
constitutes the cost for reproduction and
handling. Checks shall be payable to
Engineer. Payment is nonrefundable. Bids
shall be completed on the enclosed Bid
form as set forth in the Instructions to
Bidders and otherwise be in compliance
with the Bidding Documents. Sealed bids
will be received at the Jefferson County
Board of Commissioners, 1 Court House
Circle, Room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344-1900 until 11:00 am. (local time) on
May 23, 2005, at 11:30 am. (local time) in
the Jefferson County Board of
Commissioners Office, 1 Court House
Circle, Room 10. For Further information
or clarification, contact Frank A. Darabi,
P.E., at Engineer's office
5/6,13, c

No sunscreen.

/ *. For more information,
AnDl see your dermatologist.
"*;Z i www.aad.org








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
Personal Assistant: Are you bored in your
current position? Believe that you are
capable of doing more? Do you have a
bushy tail? Are you highly organized?
Can you navigate the Web? Understand
all of the workings of MS Office? Have a
roll up your sleeves attitude? Are you
comfortable speaking with anyone on the
phone? New business to Monticello
looking for person to be the right hand to
the president. Part time to begin. Please
call Renee @ 997-0222.
5/13. 18. nd
Local Business now hiring Ft/Pt, weekends
respond to: PO Box 691, Monticello.
4/27, s/d tfn
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
Come, join our growing team. If you want
to be challenged in a busy newspaper
office and want above average earnings
and have the drive to be a positive team
player, we'd like to talk to you. No
slackers, dunderheads, doper, drama
queens, please. Call Ron Cichon 997-3568.
Part time dependable and willing to work
Saturday. Apply in person to Coffee Break
190 N. Jefferson St. 997-9996
5/13, 18, 20, c

SERVICES

Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
CAREGIVER, willing to work weekdays
and weekends. Call 342-1486 or 510-0998.
5/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 24, 27, pd
Lawn Mowing Maintenance and Pressure
SWashing services now available. Please
Call 997-8635 anytime for estimates.
5/6, 13, 20, 27,c
"OUR PLEASURE" We can save you the
time and the hassle. We prepare business
cards, business letters, Company Letter
Head, Flyers, Obituaries, Programs, Ads,
etc. (T-shirts) "If it's on paper it's Our
Pleasure." 591- 4152 or 212-3142.


EARN YOUR DEGREE Onliti'"fronrl':
home. Business, Paralegal, Computers,'
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance, and
computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.
5/13 fcan
Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
yard work, cleanup, home repairs. By day
or week. 342-1486, 510-0998.
5/13, pd

GARAGE SALE
YARD SALE: Saturday 8-4, 184 Cardinal
Lane Lloyd Acres furniture, mowers,
tools, household items, picnic table, bikes.

GIANT RV SUPERSALE: May l1th -
14th Old Wal-Mart, 11640 U.S. Hwy
1-Sebastian. Free Admission. Free
Parking. Nation's #1 Selling Brands.
Low-Supersale Prices!
5/13, fcan


AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn

FOR SALE
S- \
FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE 50+ Premium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limited time offer. SH.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.

Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn
2 -3 Rib Front tires for 8 in Ford or
Furgeson Tractor $50.00 4 P225/60R 16
16in' Mich. Tires $40 997-0135
tfn
Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn
Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Electric Fridgerdaire Stove $25,
Microwave Oven, Kenmore $50 (good), 2
bar stool chairs $40, ARABIAN more
horse, western pleasure, $1,000 call
997-8453 after 6pm
5/4, 6, pd
Lift Chair for Handicapped Excellent
condition. Moving must sell. 997-2438.
5/13, 18, 20, pd
Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn
DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn


FOR SALE

1987 Suzuki Samurai JX 4wd convertible
190k mi., runs OK, CD player, fiberglass
top, toolbox, new 8" suspension (Rancho),
new 33" mud tires, new 15x10 steel wheels,
LOW gears, rear Lock-Right locker, other
goodies. Needs some work, but
unbelievable off-road! $1800 obo. Call
997-4253 between 6 pm-9pm M-F,
9am-9pm Sat-Sun.
3/25 tfn
Malland Travel Trailer 8'x24'. New AC,
Tires. Excellent condition. Perfect for
traveling, camping, for hunters. Asking
$1,500 obo. Call 997-4723. After 4pm 7
days a week.
5/13, 18, 20, c
Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
5/13, fcan

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser; mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn
20 ft. Pontoon with Mercury 70 HP Eng.
Trailer included. Great condition $7500
obo. 997-4562.
5/6, 11, 13 pd
MOBILE HOME with land. Enhanced
4Br/2Ba, 2200 sq. ft. on 1.56 ac.,
outbuilding. Financing avail. $115,000.
997-1093.
4/29, 5/6, 13, 20, pd

FOR RENT

3 bedroom/office/ 1 '/ bath. In city limit.
Very-Nice $700 first month and deposit
required. 933-8167.
5/11, i3, 18, 20, c
Lake Front Home 2br/2ba. Madison FL.
no pets, one yr. lease 700 month, 700
deposit. 850-973-3025.
5/13,18, 20, 25, pd


REAL ESTATE
1 Down Payment of $649 buys a 3BR/2BA
home w/2 acres in a wooded Subdivision in
Monticello. By Owner. For details, maps,
pics, & to preQualify online:
www.649down.com/PP
5/11, 13, c

Lovely Home & Neighborhood. 3
bedroom, 2 bath and much more. 251-
0760, or www.blueradish.biz for details.
5/13, c
Enhanced 4 bedroom/2 bath 2200 Sq. Ft.
on 1.56ac, outbuilding. Financing avail.
$115,00.997-1093
4/15, 22, 29, 5/6, pd

FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext.1299.
5/13, fcan


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strips, and contains personal items. Call
997-2894.
5/4, 6, pd


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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Kina of the Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5
bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine on a hilltop near US i
90 and SR 59, 50 acres in planted pines, 1
swimming pool, detached garage, barn 1
nice field all in the fastest growing part of
Jefferson County for only $1,200,000 '
Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Mor- ]
ris Road call for details $10,000 to I
$40,000
Great Buvl Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway easy access to Tallahassee
high, dry, fenced and ready to graze '
$8,500 per acre
Check this Out Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened I
porch, tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fire-
place on one acre in the country
$175,000
CVery Nice 29 acres neartown with big .
oaks, fields and forest asking $10,000 ,
per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big I
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on a hill way out
in the country, new carpet, with 2 acres
asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lament
$40,000
Fulford Road Under Contract 4 bed-
room 2 bath home with garage, out build- '
ing, and kennel on 1.55 acres in the
Country near the Georgia line 1
$76,500 U
Apartment House currently 5 could be
7 init apartment building great potential I.
as a bed and breakfast with suites
$240,000
Cheapl! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded i
acres in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with addi-
tions 12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On
US 90 in town Retail space, warehouse
and residential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson
Builders 6+ ac sewer and water
$240,000 I
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest
& Meadows $10,000
Desoto Road 2.39 wooded acres near
St. Augustine Rd $18,500
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best -



Buyers lookinQ for Homes and Land
.? r


. BLOW
ealtor
Dr
perties
344









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 13, 2005

JCHS Valedictorian Brown


Will Study Pre-Law At FSU


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Shaundala Brown is the Valedic-
torian of the Jefferson County High


School Class of 2005. tional Business Management.
She is the daughter of Mary and
James Brown. She will begin her studies in June
Brown will attend Florida State and live on campus, moving to an
University where she will study pre- apartment off campus for the fall
law, concentrating on Multi Na- semester.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jefferson County High School-
Class of 2005 Salutatorian is Re-
becca Redmond.
She is the daughter of Steve and
Bonita Redmond.
She will matriculate at Florida
State University, where she will
study engineering, though she re-
mains undecided as to the kind of
engineering.
Redmond is a Florida Academic
Scholar.
While at JCHS, she was active in
the Key Club, Science Club, Na-
tional Honor Society, Co-Captain of
the Academic Team, Editor of the
Yearbook, and a member of the Fire
Explorer Club.
Redmond will share housing off
campus with older girls who are
FSU students, including 2003 JCHS
Graduate Sarah Halsey, who will
help her learn the art of independent
living, she said.


She credits Science Teacher Mike
Starling and Math Teacher Eliza-
beth Coon for encouraging her to
study engineering, given her apti-
tude for math and science.
Her advice for one striving to be--
come a salutatorian is to care about
your work, maintain interest, and
concentrate on quality.


She explained that rather than be
spread too thin, she would rather
take a reasonable number of classes
and give them all the effort required
to do well.
"Time management and learning
to become a well rounded person is
an important part of growing up,"
she believes.


4-H Council Spends Work Day

Improving JES Nature Trail


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 4-H County Council worked
on improving the Nature Trail at
Jefferson Elementary School, re-
cently.
Council members spent most of
the day clearing bush, cutting down
trees, putting down mulch, and pick-
ing up paper and trash.
The trail is designed to provide
-hands-on activities for youth to par-


ticipate in environmental education
programs, such as tree
identification, orienteering, forest
ecology, nature photography, study-
-ing invasive .plants, and wildlife
identification.
Participaing teams include: Che-
varra Ulee, Michelle Keaton, Char-
les Taylor, Kelly Hill, Kevin Hill,
Alana Chambers, and Alex Farmer.
"These 4-Hers did an outstanding
job preserving the nature trail," re-
marked John Lilly, county 4-H co-
ordinator.


Brown is a Bright Futures Scholar
and has accrued some 30 dual en-
rollment credits at NFCC.
While at JCHS, she was active in
cheerleading, FBLA, 4-H, a county
representative for SWAT, Boys,
Girls Club, and Student
Government.
She was also active in CROP, Co-
captain of the Academic Team, Sci-
ence Club, National Honor Society,
and Phi Theta Kappa.
Brown was Vice-president of her
Jr. and Sr. classes and Class Presi-
dent her freshman and sophomore
years.
While at JCHS, Brown was influ-
enced by Instructor Howard Marx,
whom she said "adopted" her in
grade 9.
His is a teacher and a friend, and it
was his Law Studies class that .in-
spired her to become an attorney.
"He is honest, and knows how to
relate to young people. He will tell
you the truth, even when you don't
want to hear it," she said.
Her hobbies include: reading,
writing in her journal and poetry,
dance talking on the phone, and
shopping.
She has done modeling since the
eight grade for Barbison and other
agencies.
Become an American Red
Cross Disaster Services
Volunteer


The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Seivices Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
850/878-6080 or visit our website
at www.tallytown.com/redcross.

+ American
Red Cross


Statistics Show
We Remember
85 percent of what we read
15 percent of what we hear

That's Why Advertising In
Monticello News
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Take Advantage of Membership in

State Employees Credit Union












We're here on

your account!


Residents of Jefferson County can now take advantage
of membership in State Employees Credit Union!


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Mortgage and Home Equity Loans
On-Line Banking
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And much more


In Tallahassee:

2711 Blair Stone Rd or 2770 Capital Circle SE







State Employees Credit Union

850-488-5387

www.secufl.org


My granddaughter means the
world to me. So I'm controlling
my diabetes. That means I
keep my blood sugar close to
normal by watching what I eat
and walking every day. I
always take my medicine and
test my blood sugar.

With my diabetes under
control, I feel a lot better
and have more energy. Best
of all, I'm going to be
around for my family...
for my friends... for life.

<, Call 1-800-438-5383 to
learn more. Or visit us
at our website:
http://ndep.nih.gov


YOUARE INVITED to participate in these FREEservices if you
have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
1 3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
2 Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register:
342-0170, extension 218


Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
> Monthly meetings
> Call Jefferson County Health Department
for more information at 342-0170, extension 218


Individual Diabetes Counseling
> Contact your doctor for a referral to the r
Jefferson County Health Department
> Call the Jefferson County Health Department
for more information at 342-0170, extension 1301


NATIONAL
ITI \ L; T E S
I OL' % I F.
PROGRAM


Control your


A joint program
of the National
Institutes of
Health and the
Centers for
Disease Control
and Prevention.


..qj f%.


A P BLC ERVCEOFTHS .PBLCAIO


Salutatorian At JCHS Will


Study Pre-Law At FSU


Uniforms


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