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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00037
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 11, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00037
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text




L ,TBARY OF FLCRIDA I1ISO-RY
404 LIBRARY WEST
TI!TVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GAI NE


Drive Safely

In Construction

Areas

Editorial, Page 4

'INOF


'ILLE, 1L. oll


Mobile Home

Fires Cause

Two Fatalities

Story, Page 5


Share The Fun

4-H Talent

Show Winners

Story, Photos, Page 6
I


Warriors Win

District Title

3rd Year Straight

Story, Page 9
II


cO. WWednesday Morning





Montic


Ilo


137TH YEARNO.37,50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY, MAY 11,2005


Nine To Compete For



Crown Of Festival Queen


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

T'he annual Watermelon Festival
Queen Pageant takes place 7 p.m.,
Saturday, June 11, at Jefferson
County High School Auditorium on
Water Street.
This year, nine contestants will vie
for the crown as Queen of the 55th
Watermelon Festival.
Contestants will be judged in eve-
ning gowns, on question and answer
events, as well as on the talent they
choose to showcase during the pag-
eant.
In addition to choosing the festival
queen, the pageant is designed to
provide the audience with entertain-
ment, music, and drama.
SCompeting in an atmosphere of
friendship, fun and enjoyment, the
contestants are judged 'b, out-of-
county judges, on their beauty^
poise, and personality.
A production tnimber will demori2
state the ensemble talents of the
contestants, and talent presentations
will include singing and dramatic
presentations, as each girl performs
individually her chosen talent.
The 2005 Queen will be crowned
by reigning Queen Jesslyn Joyner.
During her reign, the festival


queen is expected to attend sched-
uled events, including the Perry For-
est Festival, Springtime Tallahassee,
and the next Watermelon Festival
Pageant.
Failure to participate in scheduled
events, results in forfeiture of the ti-
tle.
Competing in this year's pageant
in alphabetical order are:
Charlsie Boyatt is the daughter of
Robert Boyatt and Nigel Brock.
She is a junior at Florida High,
and is employed at Publix in South-
wood.
Her career goal is to seek a degree
in criminology. Her hobbies


She is sponsored by Boland Tim-
ber Company.
Alana Chambers is the daughter of
Hisako and Chuck Chambers.
She is a sophomore at Jefferson
County High School.
Her career possibilities include:
a dental hygienist, psychologist, ac-
tress or model.
Her hobbies include singing,
dancing, writing poetry, chee.rlead-
ing, sewing, swimming, hanging out
with friends, talking on the phone,
and shopping.
She enjoys tennis and golf.
For her talent, she will sing.
Her sponsors are Big Bend Eu-


reer in cosmetology.
She works as a baby sitter.
Her hobbies include: dancing,
singing, swimming, and spending
time with family and friends.
Her sponsor, is C&F Fencing.
Amber Lee is the daughter of
Danny and Sherise Lee. She is a
sophomore at Lincoln High School.
She is employed by Winn Dixie
and plans to become a registered
nurse.
Her hobbies include: fishing,
shopping, and hanging out with
friends.
She has had dance training and
used to play soccer.


include: singing, working, talking,
and spending time with family and
friends. She has played softball in
the past, and has had special training
in voice.
For her talent, she will sing.


ULEE


Randi Brannan, second runner-up. (News
Photo)


banks Pest Control and Capital City
Garage Doors.
Casey Handley is the daughter of
Mary Pate and Randall Handley.
She is a junior at Aucilla Christian
Academy and plans to pursue a ca-


For her talent, she will sing.
Her sponsor is Danny's Collision
and Custom Auto.
Kimberly Prime is the daughter of
Leona and Alan Prime. She is a
(See Festival Queen Page 12)


City Subdivision Gets Green Light


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


,61,
.*.*Id
-~-


SKIPWORTH THOMPSON


Youth Killed In Crash Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

An ATV crash 6:30 p.m,
Sunday, on Ashland Highlands
Drive caused the death of a 15
year-old Tallahassee youth.
Florida Highway Patrol reports
Douglas B. Stetson, Jr., was riding
a Honda ATV, traveling south on


Ashville Highlands Drive
a curve.
Because of the condition
road and the speed of th
Stetson lost control and
onto the west shoulder of t
way.
The ATV hit a small po:
ing the edge of a private dri
The ATV continued to trz
(See Youth Page 12)


The City Council last week ap-
proved a revised preliminary plat for
the Pecan Hills Subdivision, effec-
tively opening the way for startup of
construction on phase one of that
S project.
The council months earlier had ap-
proved the original preliminary plat
for the subdivision, which is slated
for a 12-acre parcel east of South
S. Waukeenah Street and south of
S Chase Street.
But changes to the development
brought about by a Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP) re-
view forced the council to revisit the
project.
entering As developer representative Alan
Saucier explained it, the DEP re-
n of the quired the addition of a stormwater
e ATV, facility, which necessitated increas-
traveled ing the number of acres for phase
he road- one of the project.
Phase one is supposed to consist
st mark- of the construction of 30 single-
ve. family houses.
avel in a Ultimately, the developer's plan is
to construct at least 200 houses on


the property. But that will require a
zoning change and a Department of
Community Affairs review, among
other things. The expectation is that
phase two won't kick in for at least
another year.
The development is supposed to
be "upscale, yet affordable", with a
minimum footage of 1,200 sq. feet
per house and prices ranging from
$125,000 to $250,000.


Some council members ques-
tioned the affordability of the
houses, given the affordable housing
designation ascribed to the develop-
ment.

Saucier and the project's other
representatives assured the council
members that that the prices were
reasonable and quite affordable,
given the market and the housing
situation in Leon County.


"This is affordable housing," one
representative said.
As for the concern that persons
might purchase the properties for
speculative purposes, a representa-
tive said nothing could be done to
prevent such a practice. The indi-
viduals, however, would have to
purchase a house rather than a lot,
she said.
"We're not selling lots, we're sell-
ing houses," Virginia Blow.


Business Circle Back On Agenda


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The proposed business circle that
would reverse the flow of traffic on
certain city streets and increase the
number of parking spaces in the
downtown area is back on the
agenda.
Margaret Levings, owner of Great
Adventure Outfitters on N. Jefferson
Street, raised the issue again last
week. Levings and other business
people in the area, it seems, had un-
dertaken a survey of the present


parking situation on behalf of the
city's street committee.
Levings presented the City Coun-
cil with the group's findings last
Tuesday night. She gave the present
number of parking 'spaces in the
downtown area as 70, including E.
Dogwood Street. Depending on the
width of the new parking spaces cre-
ated, she said the city could increase
the number to 123.
Levings recommended that the
city begin the program on a limited
basis, turning W. Dogwood Street
into a one-way going west and cre-
ating 24 diagonal parking spaces


there.
Councilman Brian Hayes, chair-
man of the street committee, thought
the proposal had merit. He sched-
uled a street committee meeting for
7 p.m. Tuesday, May 17, to discuss
the issue further.
The proposed business circle is
being pushed by the Chamber of
Commerce. The idea is to create a
secondary circle around the down-
town district. This secondary circle
would consist of Cherry, Pearl, Mul-
berry and Palmer streets.
As part of the original proposal,
(See Circle Page 12)


BOYATT CHAMBERS



HANDLE


LEE


-.
4


PRIME


2004 WATERMELON FESTIVAL Queen and
Court includes: from left, Casey Handley,
first runner-up; Jessyin Joyner, queen;


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005
i mf


LISA REASONER, left, as Ariadne Storm,
created quite a storm at the Opera House
Dinner Theatre when the past she tried to


SBarker Attends NFCC

Education Summit

S RAY CICHON
Managing Editor 8 m ril
T r. I


escape was revealed. Ever so cool Sara Per-
sons, as Kat Foster, plays a career woman.
(News Photo)


Opera House Production


Of 'Dash' Well Done


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

"Dash of Death" Murder Mystery-
Dinner Theatre, at the Opera House,
closed Sunday, after two successful
weekends of gourmet food, comedy,
and drama.
Hats off to Judi Persons who
wrote and directed the play. This
lady's talents know no bounds, as
audiences have seen her sing, dance,
direct, and perform in comedic and
dramatic roles, to mention just a few
of her talents.
She can be so sweet as to melt the
hardest of hearts, and conversely,
possess a tongue that can clip a
hedge.
Audiences will remember Persons
most recently from her role as Rev.
Mother in "Nunsense."
In "Dash," Persons includes a
wide cast of characters, from the
young, to the not so young, the very
experienced, to the novice, and the
accompanying varied personalities.
When a renown food critic col-
lapses at .the dinner table, during a
celebration dinner, he is subse-
quently found to have been poi-
soned.
There's some cause for trepida-
tion here on the part of audiences, as
the Quite Contrary Caterers, Denise
Vogelgesang and Carrie Ann Tellef-
sen, both characters in the play, just
happen to be catering this very din-
ner theatre.
So much for interactive theatre!
Without a doubt, Don Nations as
Food Critic Edwin Eugene Ponsoby,
wins the Critic's Award for best per-
formance.
In his role, Nations is the man
everyone loves to hate.
He is caustic, insulting, and
spews the same venom his poison
pen puts on paper.
He is the type of food critic who


will rave about the delicious salad,
and conclude with a line: "Too bad
the dressing was so vile."
In short, he is a pompous ass, and
- a heavy drinker to boot.
Nations is superb in his nastiness.
Just the right degree of raised eye-
brow, elevated nose, or lip curled in
a sneer, add much to the already
perfect dialog written for his part.
When he has too much to drink,
he does so with aplomb, even to his
demand that the bar be reopened for
him, after he was shut off.
He raises viciousness to the level
of art, and one cannot help but
think: Good! when he collapses at
dinner, which he always attacks
with gusto.
The Critics Award for Best Sup-
porting Actress goes to Lisa Rea-
soner, who in just a few short weeks
took the plunge from Mistress of
Novices in "Nunsense," to the role
of one who earned her fame in
Adult Movies, and is now attempt-
ing to be a lady.
Her malapropos alone are price-
less, when she mispronounces
words or uses similar, but different
words, always incorrect, to express
herself.
Add this to the affectation of her
porn star voice, and her trampy out-
fit, and there you have Ariadne
Storm.


Reasoner's outfit alone delineates
her character well: A near platinum
blonde wig, high necked black se-
quined dress, barely reaching mid
thigh, hot pink fishnet stockings,
and gold spike heeled sandals, are
what Ariadne considers "classy."
Reasoner has demonstrated her
theatrical versatility many times,
and this is a lady who can do.it all:
sing, dance, and play comedy and
drama equally well.
Perhaps her most demanding role.
was a few years back, in the Opera
House production of the musical "I
Do, I Do," which requires the prin-
cipals to be on stage throughout,
singing and dancing.
While the number of characters in
the show, precludes individual com-
ments, suffice it to say that all
played their parts as directed.
All the same, it would not be pos-
sible to omit Tom Vogelgesang,
who comes out of a too long retire-
ment, to play Richard White, the son
of a local farmer.
In many ways, his role is some
what analogous to the narrator in
"Our Town," who keeps the audi-
ences in formed of the action.
As a farmer, he carries the role
well; with his down home folksy hu- '
mor and comments.
Kudos the caterers who presented
a gourmet dinner


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Come Join the Fun & Support Your Local Girl Scouts at

Cudin! Z&e tgAht Aw1 wy

Thursday, May 19, 2005 at the
North Florida Fairgrounds Doors Open at 7:30 pm
Music by: A reunion performance by Tallahassee's original Rock and Roll Band

STHE CHAOTICS & THE EMBERS OF NORTH CAROLINA


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Benefiting the Girl Scout Council of the Apalachee Bend. Inc.


TICKET OUTLETS: *
TjE Monticello: Blue Ribbon Cleaners AND SPONSORED
Milady's Shop 1102 E. Lafayette St. IN PART BY:
fjjifet1t shop 1102 E. Lafayette St.
Great Adventure Outfitters 1660 N. Monroe St.

j Girl Scout Council Office _, I
250 Pinewood Dr. LiteRock.Less Talk
386-2131


Superintendent Phil Barker was-
among area superintendents who
met at North Florida Community
College for a district wide Educa-
tion Summit, April 25.
"It was a very worthwhile
meeting," said Barker. "We were de-
lighted to have North Florida reach
out again to assist the rural school
districts."
NFCC Vice-P resident Doug
Brown, explained that the Education
Summit was designed as a venue to
discuss issues common to the K-12,
and community college systems,
with the hope of strengthening suc-
cessful partnerships between those
institutions.
As published recently in the Mon- ,
ticello News, NFCC is planning to
offer a Building Construction Tech-
nology vocational program at Jeffer-
son County High School.
The purpose of this program is to
prepare students for employment or
advanced training in the building
construction industry.


Muscular
Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis,
National Chairmarn
\1-800-572-1717


Barker said earlier it was uncer-
tain whether the program would be
in place for the reopening of school
in August, but noted if not then, the
program would begin in January.


rsaMmiCin


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world to me. So I'm controlling
my diabetes. That means I
keep my blood sugar close to
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and walking every day. I
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With my diabetes under
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YOU/ARE INVITED to participate in these FREEservices if you
have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
1 3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
2 Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register:
342-0170, extension 218


Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
> Monthly meetings
> Call Jefferson County Health Department
for mort information at 342-0170, extension 218


Individual Diabetes Counseling
> Contact your doctor for a referral to the
Jefferson County Health Department
> Call the Jefferson County Health Department
for mori information at 342-0170, extension 1301


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005 PAGE 3


OPERA HOUSE is in the process of receiv-
ing a much needed new roof. The project is
nearing completion, as shown in the aer-


Blow, Walton Named To

Bank Community Board


ial photograph take by Colin Rolfe of Coli-
naire, Inc.


Society Reports Adoption

Event Resounding Success


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Humane Society members were
elated to hear that 22 animals. 16
canines and six-. felines, were
adopted during the recent Adopt-a-
thon, and they were pleased to ac-
cept ,a new board member to the
team.
Mary' Ellen Ringe, who has been
conducting the WCTV Channel 6
presentation of adoptables for the
shelter; volunteered; to be on the
board.
Kennel Operations Director Tina
Ames, said many of the canines
placed were harder to adopt ani-
mals because of their ages.
There pets included Flower,
Bambi, Pete and Gill.' .
"It ~~ as a raging success," 'said
Ames. "I'm not sure, but I think it.
was the best booth we ever had."
She added that one gentleman
from Dillan, AL drove to the
Adopt-a-thon, arriving early Friday
morning, specifically to adopt,


Bonnie and Bunnie, the adoptable
pair of feline calicos.
Ames also said that she was
pleased \ ith the volunteerss 0\ho
stepped up to the plate to help pre-
pare for the event, including Bob-
bie Golden and.,her' son and
daughter-in-law .from California.
who volunteered to bathe the ca-
nines before hand.
.She said that. people .were \ er
generous with their donatiios dur-
ing the Adopt-a-thon, and that the
shelter received a large quantity of'
cat litter, monetary donations, pet
food and toys for the animals. She'
.said that information concerning
the volunteers and donors would be
forthcoming, that they are greatly
appreciated.
SFoster Chair Martha Jean Martin
advised that there were not\ 17 ani-
mals in foster homes, including, six
dogs, four cats and se\ en kinens.
"We're doing better but "e still
need so many more foster homes,"
she added. There are currently 14


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Monticello City Council will meet on
Tuesday, May 17, 2005 at 6:45 p.m. to
discuss approval of a parade permit for the
2005 Jefferson County
Watermelon Festival Parade.

The meeting will take place at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida.


-Il ~~ ZE I~.IIENU ~~LunL CR1


foster homes in operation, and one
for felines has just been added.
The next regular meeting is set 7
p.m.. M%'nd&;,, at the Shelter. ..


ij-


to meeting the needs of local busi-
nesses."
Founded in 1895, Capital City
Bank has 60 banking offices, five
mortgage lending offices, 74 ATMs
and 11 Bank 'N Shop locations in
Florida, Georgia, and Alabama.


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25

Sports


Hstar He s


Capital City Bank has selected
two directors to serve on the Capital
City Bank Community Board In Jef-
ferson County.
Frank Blow is the owner of Fanta-
sia Jewelry and Radio Shack. He is
the past president of the
Monticello/Jefferson County Cham-
ber of Commerce, a past president
of the Monticello Kiwanis Club, an
active member of the Jefferson
County Economic Development
Council, and the Tourism Develop-
ment Council.
He is a graduate of The Citadel
and is married to Virginia.
Jay Walton currently serves as
vice-president of Big Bend Timber,
LLC.
-A graduate of the University of
Florida, he is married to Katrina and
they have two children.
He is very active in the local tim-
ber industry.
Blow and Walton join an existing
board of business and community
leaders who will help guide Capital
City Bank into the future.
They each bring an abundance of
talent and a wealth of knowledge of
the local market to Capital City
Bank.
"Our local community board is in-
strumental to our success.in Monti-
cello," said Bill Gunnels,
community president for Capital
City Bank.
"The expertise of these two men
-will only enhance our commitment
to being a super community bank in
the relationship banking business,
and will strengthen our commitment


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


SeMEMS RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
mm.' ... WO. :


From Our Photo File


RESIDENTS of Meadowbrook Manor, now
Brynwood Center, raised $1,400 for Muscu-


1988. L-R: Rene Tate, Luella Rogers, Nellie
Mae Van, Ollie Clark. (News File Photo)


Drive Safelyar Dystrophy, with a rock-a-thon, in Sept,



Construction Area pinion & Comment


Drivers are conditioned to respond
to colors. Red brake lights, traffic
-lights and octagons tell drivers to
:stop.
Yellow flashing lights and road
signs caution drivers of conditions
ahead. And everyone knows what
green means.
However, many drivers need to be
:reminded of the fourth, and possibly
.the most important, color they'll en-
counter on the road: construction or-
-ange.
*Spring and summer months prom-
ise construction zones along Amer-
ica's highways, byways, side streets
Sand main drags.
SWhile beneficial in the long run,
roadway construction can be incon-
.venient and quite dangerous unless
'drivers remember a few basic guide-
:lines. Below are some tips to help
:ensure safe driving no matter how
much orange you see:
*'Follow the Signs Signs posted
in work zones provide important in-
Sformation designed to protect mo-
torists and construction crews.
Construction signs indicate every-
thing from traffic lane changes to
speed limit reductions. Remember, a
construction zone speed limit ap-
:plies regardless of the presence of
Workers and fines are doubled.
Be Alert Not everyone is well
Sversed in construction zone driving
,etiquette, so pay extra attention to
'your surroundings while in these 'ar-
Seas.
Continuously scan the roadway
for rubberneck drivers, moving
;equipment, vehicles and workers.
For increased concentration, avoid


distractions such as eating and talk-
ing on a cell phone.
Plan Ahead When making
travel plans, take time to research a tn
where construction zones will be
and use an alternate route if Time was we had a healthy na-
Time was we had a healthy na-
possible. Construction zones can d o -
tiomal debate over government poli-;
cause delays, so give yourself extra
time if you know you have to drive es and direction. Now we've got a
street fight!
through a work zone.
through a work zone. Gone is the promise that other
Maintain adequate fuel to ensure
inta adequate ful to ensure points of view are to be respected
you don't run out of gas, and bring
"and considered.
drinks and snacks to keep you and a o ed
We've moved from dealing With
your passengers satisfied as well. ee oe o dealing Wit
Remain Calm Never allow worthy opponents" to demonizing
speeding and impatient drivers toopponents.
modify the way you drive. We don't elevate the debate, we
Keeping cool in heavy slowdowns dumb it down.
will make your drive safer and help Arguments are framed in the sim-
keep traffic flowing. plest of terms with an emotional
Be aware of tailgaters and motor- twist designed to elicit a knee-jerk
ists creating their own lane on the reaction.
shoulder, but calmly focus on your Too bad this works and people of-
driving, always leaving yourself ten wind up voting against their own
enough space between you and he interests.
vehicles around-you .::; "* r:, : ':. oA ond example of this is support-
Give Trucks Room Because of ers of the military who laud the pre-
the length and weight of trucks, they sent administration apparently are
need more room to stop and change unaware that this same administra-
lanes, especially in the narrow lanes tion is cutting health benefits for
construction zones often render, veterans.
If a truck has its turn signal on, as- Recently, the Commander-in-
sist the driver by moving over or Chief of the Veterans of Foreign
slowing down. Wars John Furgess told Congress,
While you should increase follow- the administrations recommenda-
ing distance for all vehicles when tions would slash money from pro-
driving through a construction zone,
remember trucks need nearly twice
the time and room to stop as cars. e d i
The color orange on the road
means construction zones enterM edica u
these zones using extra concentra-
tion, caution and common sense. As BY MARIE SMITH
always, think safety first. (NAPS) President, AARP


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
May 10, 1995
The Senior Citizens Center will
have to find a new home a lot
sooner than anticipated.
Were it not for the quick thinking
and lightning reaction of an 18-year-
old county youth, a Greenville sen-
ior might not be alive today.
What started as a traffic violation
in Lloyd during the weekend ended
with a. Miccosukee man being
charged with four counts, including
escape.
The issue of churches in the
county being subjected to costly
regulations governing the quality of
their drinking water has raised the
ire of the Macedonia Free Will Bap-
tist Church congregation.
TWENTY YEARS
May 8, 1985
Job hunting will be much easier for
Jefferson County residents because
a computer linked up with the State
computer System will soon be in-
stalled at the grants office.
Acting Fire Chief Wesley Howell
was appointed Monticello Fire Chief
at Tuesday night's City Council
meeting. Council also raised How-
ell's salary from $11,500 yearly to
. $12,992.
The Florida Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) will open bids May
28 on a landscaping project for Ma-
han Drive (U.S. 90) between Buck
Lake Road and Lake Miccosukee in
'Leon'County, according to District
,Engineer, Alien Potter.


Pearl Street residents were up in
arms at Tuesday's City Council
meeting about speed bumps recently
installed along their boulevard.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 8, 1975
Robert L. Fountain was honored
at a dinner at the Brahman Restau-
rant last week. It marked the end of
a 30 year career with the Florida
Power Corporation.
Great interest is being shown in
The Doll Show Benefit for the Res-
toration Fund of the Monticello Op-
era House, according to the local
committee. This will be held May
16, 17, and 18.
Miss Amy Martin has been se-
lected Valedictorian of Jefferson
County High School. She holds a
4.43 grade point average. Amy is
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Tommy Martin of Monticello.
FORTY YEARS AGO
May 7, 1965
Mrs. James Ward returned Sunday
from a three week visit with her
niece, Mrs. Emmalee Taylor in Lake
Alfred.
Greg Waldron of Kissimmee vis-
ited Monday with his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. J.C. Waldon.
Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence Meyer of
Portage, Wisconsinm spent several
days last week with Mr. and Mrs.
Art Barden at Lloyd.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
May 6, 1955
Harrell Hamilton and Martin Clay-
.-- (See From Files Page 5)


What image would come to mind-
if I asked you to picture the type of
person who at some point in his or
her life receives Medicaid? You
don't need to look far, perhaps just
in a mirror. Any of us you, your
family, or your neighbors might
well turn to your state for health or
long term care someday.
In fact,. Medicaid is our nation's
largest healthcare program serving
over 53 million of our most vulner-
able poor citizens. More people de-
pend on Medicaid to pay for long-
term care than on any other source.
Two-thirds of those in nursing
-homes rely on it, in addition to a
growing number of elderly who are
cared for at home.
A typical case is the 96-year-old
grandmother of an AARP associate.
As her health declined, "nana"


I Debate Is Street Fight


Publisher's

Notebook


L-,
~-
*.

,,,.
:.


Ron Cic/,on


grams ranging from long term care
facilities for an aging veteran popu-
lation to reducing the budget for
prosthetic research at a time when
better body armor is saving more
lives but ofte at the 'expense of
arms and legs.
Conservatives call those who dis-
agree with them flaming liberals and
liberals call conservatives who dis-
agree with them right wing kooks.
Surely we can do better than this!
What about the herd-mentality?
You know, going along with a can-
didate or party even when their ac-


tions fly in the face of long-held be-
liefs.
Many fiscal conservatives are
turning a blind eye to :he huge debt
\'ashington is piling up for fturure
generations to pay.
Why are those voices strangely si-
lent?
Polls show the majority of Ameri-
cans think the Iraq war was a mis-
take. That number keeps climbing.
Did you hear many voices raised
in opposition to the Iraq adventure
at the outset?
Even when the rationalization for


the war kept changing as claims
kept falling apart under the weight
of evidence, there was no hue and
cry.
We went from Sadaam's a threat
to the United States because he has
weapons of mass destruction to Sa-
daam's a bad guy and the world is
better off without him.
Then there are the claims that ter-
rorist attacks are down, thanks to
our going to war in Iraq.
Well, that hasn't held up either.
There has been a significant uptick
in terrorist attacks all over the world
in the last two years.
Those who have been bold enough
to speak out against the war in Iraq
have been attacked for failing to
support our military\ personnel
IHT' about hati for r.isted logic?
Seems to me those who want to
keep military out of harm's way in
an 'unnecessary war very much care
about the well being of our brave
forces.
And, I think failing to honor those
who come home in flag-draped cas-
kets by keeping their arrival on'
American soil from the public is un-
conscionable.


d Cuts Hurt Vulnerable


needed round-the-clock care. Her
family pooled, their resources to pay
for homecare and took turns looking
after her on weekends. But with full-
time jobs and other family responsi-
bilities they couldn't keep carrying
the burden.
Ultimately, she needed round the
clock care, which in their commu-
nity costs on average $60,000 a
year. The family was reassured
when they learned that Medicaid
would pay the cost of her nursing
home.
For this grandmother, as for mil-
lions of others, a lifetime of fiscal
responsibility and a loving family
weren't enough she needed the
safety net Medicaid provides.
In addition to the elderly, Medi-
caid assists the disabled and low-
income children 53 million
Americans in all. It is the nation's
largest health insurance program,
and like all health care institutions,
its costs have been rising (although


at a much lower rate per recipient
than private health insurance premi-
ums).
Because of this, it has become a
prime target for budget cuts. In re-
cent years, all 50 states have re-
duced the rates at which their Medi-
caid programs reimburse health pro-
viders, and the majority has reduced
eligibility and benefits. Now, Presi-
dent Bush has proposed slashing
Federal Medicaid funding by $43.5
billion.
Reducing spending for Medicaid
has become the focal point in the
current budget debate. AARP be-
lieves that sound policy, not arbi-
trary budget cuts, should drive any
changes to this critical safety net
program.
Many experts believe that the sav-
ings they produce may be largely an
illusion, because they will force
more people to join the ranks of the
uninsured.
With the poor elderly, children


and disabled turning to emergency
rooms for treatment, more of the
care dispensed by doctors and hos-
pitals will be uncompensated, and
the costs will be passed on to em-
ployees and employers in the form
of higher health insurance
premiums.
There are ways to reduce Medi-
caid costs without jeopardizing care.
For example, states are looking at
ways to buy prescription drugs more
cheaply, and are reaching people
like "nana" earlier, and providing
assistance in their homes and com-
munity rather than relying only on
more expensive nursing home care.
AARP thinks that sound policy,
not arbitrary budget targets, should
be the driving force for strengthen-
ing and improving the nation's larg-
est healthcare program.
The wrong thing to do is to attack
Medicaid with such a blunt budget-
ary instrument that we abandon our
(See Medicaid Page 5)


Shock Treatment Aids Horses


BY SARAH CAREY
University of Florida

Borrowing from a Canadian vet-
erinarian's unique expertise, Univer-
sity of Florida veterinarians recently
became the first in the United States
believed to have successfully per-
formed intracardiac electrical con-
version of a common arrhythmia in
horses that causes irregular and fast
heartbeats.
Two horses received the proce-
dure in March 2005, including an
Ocala thoroughbred named Captain
who was part of a training exercise
-conducted for UF veterinarians by


the individual who developed the
technique, Canadian veterinarian
Kim McGurrin, D.V.M. McGruirrn
developed the cutting-edge tech-
nique over the last four years along
with her mentor, Peter Physick-
Sheard, B.V. Sc., at the University
of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.
Captain's arrhythmia had been
treated medically several times but
without success, said Mel Valley
Farm owner-caretaker Carl Stump,
Now, however, Captain appears to
be doing well, Stump said.
"He is now training at a local
place here in Ocala, so he is back to
work," Stump said.
McGurrin said the intracardiac


electrical conversion techniques was
developed to offer new treatment
options for atrial fibrillation.
"It is excellent that UF is now ca-
pable of performing this procedure,"
McGurrin said. "We have applied
this technique on more than 50
horses, including 44 client-owned
horses referred from the states. Most
horses have returned to performance
and we now consider this procedure
routine."
Amara Estrada, D.V.M., an assis-
tant professor of veterinary cardiol-
ogy at UF's College of Veterinary
Medicine, and her colleague, Darcy
Adin, D.V.M., were both involved
in the recent UF procedure. Estrada


said the cardiac abnormality for
which the procedure is used is "an
important arrhythmia for many rea-
sons.
"Probably it is most important to
horse owners and trainers of race
horses because it causes poor per-
formance and poor racing," Estrada
said. "But certainly pet horses de-
velop the condition as well."
It is also the most common ar-
rhythmia in horses, occurring in 1 to
2 percent.
Estrada said irregular or fast heart-
beat, also known as atrial
fibrillation, causes a decrease in car-
(See Horses Page 5)


I


i ~1l


I II


........






























S '--= '. SBK^^^ty j,]sis '2.

HMS BOYS, GIRLS CLUB, director shouts Shaundala Brown, as State Boys, Girls,
"Shaundala" after a song played in honor of Club's Youth of the Year. (News Photo)


~ii-. .
d,, ; i: v" ".- :



:; I

RAMEZ NEALY, grade 5 student at JES Boys and Girls
Club, is a proud member of the STARS Educational pro-
gram (News Photo)


Mobile Home Fires


Cause 2 Fatalities


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Firefighters were kept busy Sat-
urday morning with three unrelated
fires that resulted in the death of
two people.
Fire Rescue, assisted by the Mon-
ticello Volunteer Fire Department,
responded to the first call at 1:15
a.m. and firefighters were enroute
to the scene at 489 Oetinger Rd at
1:28 a.m.
Responding deputies were Tony
Champion and Mike Fillyaw.
The State Fire Marshall's Office
was also notified, and is investigat-
ing with the assistance of Jefferson
County Sheriffs Office (JCSO) In-
vestigator Sally Cole.
When firefighters arrived, a
large, self-ventilated fire was burn-
ing through the roof of the mobile
home.
According to a press release
from the JCSO, the wife, escaped
the structure unharmed, but was
very concerned that her husband
was trapped inside the burning
home. She didn't know what had'
happened to him and she couldn't
find him.
In the course of fighting the fire,
one of the firefighters discovered
the body of a male on the ground,
just outside the house.
Preliminary investigation indi-
cated that the male died as a result


of inhaling the smoke and toxic
fumes generated by the fire.
Chief Larry Bates said the fire
was believed to be a couch fire,
which totally destroyed the struc-
ture.
While investigating that fire, Fire
Rescue and JCSO received a 911
call on a second fire.
At the scene, the fire was a
shed at the rear of the Mack Shiver
residence on Lake Road. The shed
was almost completely destroyed,
but there were no deaths or injuries,
While engaged with these two
situations, a third 911 call came in
at 7:07 a.m. about a fire at 271
Johnson Road.
Fire Rescue immediately re-
sponded to that scene, as well as
JCSO Deputy Sheriff William Pitt-
man.
Upon arrival, the mobile home
roof had already burned to the
ground.
Pittman learned that an elderly
woman was apparently inside the
home when it had caught fire and
had died in the fire.
The State Marshall's Office, and
JCSO Investigator Bill Massey are
investigating the fires.
The causes of the three fires are
still being investigated, however,
Fire Rescue Chief Larry Bates said
nothing appears suspicious at the
time.
The identities of the two victims
are being withheld pending proper
identification of the bodies.


Horses
(Continued From Page 4)

diac output, negatively impacting a
horse's performance.
The disease is said to be frustrat-
ing to both horse owners and veteri-
narians because medical therapy
frequently has to be administered
many times and often has serious
side effects.
"Typical medical treatment has
consisted of antiarrythmic drugs
given orally or intravenously, but
the drugs can have fairly significant
side effects, including toxicity," said
Steeve Giguere, D.V.M., Ph.D., an
associate professor of equine medi-
cine at UF.
The UF veterinarians had heard of
McGurrin and were aware that in-
tracardiac electrical conversion tech-
nology was now being performed in
horses at the University of Guelph
routinely with "great success,"
Giguere said.
The procedure, which takes about
two hours, involves surgically
threading two catheters through
veins in the horse's neck into the
heart's right atrium and the pulmo-
nary artery. Echocardiography is
used to guide the placement of the
catheters.
"Once the catheters are ip the cor-
rect location, a short shock is deliv-
ered to 'reset' the atria and
terminate the fibrillation, thus estab-
lishing a normal rhythm," Estrada
said.
The equipment used to administer
the shock is a biphasic defibrillator,
the same technology used in human
emergency medicine to treat cardiac
arrhythmia's.
"Most horses with atrial fibrilla-
tion do not have underlying heart
disease," Giguere said. "So if you
can restore their normal sinus
rhythm, they usually return to their
previous level of performance."




Medicaid
(Continued From Page 4)
most vulnerable citizens and swell
the ranks of the uninsured. We can
reform Medicaid and protect it at the
.same time by adopting policies that
are fiscally sound, provide real help
for all of us when we are in need,
and promote fairness across all gen-
erations.


Driving under

the influence

doesn't lust

mean alcohol.
Driving while impaired is a
leading cause of car accidents, but
alcohol is not the only culprit.
Drugs, including prescription
and over-the-counter drugs, can
also impair your driving.
Some medications, such as
antihistamines and anti-anxiety
medications for example, may
affect your driving skills.
For more information about
how some drugs may impair
your ability to drive safely, visit
rht Nationdl Sifery C:ouncil's
website'atwww.nsc.org. .
.-F ~ .~: .r~~a~~-* :i~


From Files
(Continued From Page 4)
ton were chosen to represent the
county at Boys State. The name of
added to those of Polly Clarke and
Dorothy Mathers from Girls State.
The City Council voted to have
the City water tank, which was lo-
cated in the center of the intersec-
tion of Cherry and Pearl Streets
removed.
The Young Adult Sunday School
Class of the Presbyterian Church,
Mrs. T.S. Braswell, teacher, held an
outdoor party at the home of Wilmer
Bassett. There were about 30 enjoy-
ing the party.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
May 4, 1945
Beverly Patterson and Joe Tread-
well were crowned Queen and King
of May in colorful exercise on the
school grounds.
D.H. Barrows purchased the serv-.
ice station from J.R. Cooksey Jr.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005 PAGE 5


The Home Tutor
This summer, help your little campers
catch up on reading and math.
Mrs. Hartung $30/hour 222-5656

Exquisite Waterfront Mansion and
Personal Property to be Sold "Piece byJPiece"

Trustee's Atiction
2349 Foxworth Drive
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11AM Saturday May 14
IPM* Sunday* May 15
Mansion I, of .-
7 Bedrooms 7 Bathrooms 8,000+
Sq.Ft Gunite Pool p 1.64+ Acres
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lt'orao LA mp,+ ,11. ..F eaturei-
I)esigner Aexsesories. Original Works of
Art by Picasso,Picot, Agam, Chagall,
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Memorabilia. Bronze Statuarv. I)iamond
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1 0






9 The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:
6

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles,, etc.

S All type cans -- Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,

SAluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags,. cereal boxes, food boxes,
6 laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, ete.

All glass bottles, jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfili
o and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?
I0 0


SAdditional items accepted at the collection sites:
o Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters



1 clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


SThe City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further

Don Anderson at 342-0154.
I
-0





















SPlease visit the Jefferson County web page
Shttp://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the .
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.



She Visit the www.Eartn9 .org Recycling Information web page
,int a"n emp ol ao o th e o-oa ilto "anoo o jus"t idroppedo- mnoff.n-nnr-n












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Lifestyle


WINNERS in their division, in the 4-H Share
the Fun Talent show, held at the JCHS Audi-
torium, recently, are: L-R: Stephanie


Brignoni, 1st place; Alana Chambers, 2nd
place; and Michelle Ward, 3rd place.


JACOB GRAY played tunes on his guitar at the 4-H SharE
the Fun Talent Show.


'Share The Fun' Talent

1 Show Winners Told


;SHARE THE FUN 4-H talent show winners in
their division are from left, Jacob Gray, first


place, Heny Patel, second place, and
Samantha Hamilton, third place.


1 f/- : g;

--' -
i~~ Cr'.


HENY PATEL demonstrates her dancing
abiltiy at the 4-H Share the Fun Talent


Club Members Ready

For Essay Contest


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Fourth grade students of the Boys
and Girls Club of the Big Bend are
busy preparing for the Statewide Es-
say Contest.
The students were to write an es-
say telling how to make a good de-.
cision, using the theme 'This is How
I Stay Safe All Day'.
They were given scenarios they
could ,work from to write their
essay.
SThese included questions such as:
If I were walking to a friend's house
and someone I do not know asked if
I wanted a ride, what would I do?
If someone I do not know asks
me if I can help him find a pet, what
would I do?
If my parents were unable to pick
me up and someone else I do not
know offered me a ride, what would
I do?
If I were separated from my par-


ents in a public place, what would I
do?
The grand prize includes a trip to
Tallahassee to read the winning es-
say at the Capitol during the formal
Florida Missing Children's Day
Ceremony, Sept. 12, a $250 cash
award, a trophy, and a Universal
Studios VIP Package.
The contest is open to all Florida
fourth grade students. The level of
winners are: school, regional, and
state.
The essays are to focus on abduc-
tion safety tips. Suggested topics in-
cluded, but were not limited to:
personal experiences of overcoming
a dangerous situation; a report on in-
terviews held with people who can
help in a dangerous situation; and a
research report about safety prac-
tices that all students can use.
The essays must be grammatically
correct, and free of spelling errors.
They should demonstrate clear
thought processes and be based on
realistic scenarios.


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Show, held recently at the JCHS
Auditorium, on Water Street.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

"Share-the-Fun" 4-H talent show
was held at the Jefferson Elemen-
tary School media center, recently.
Youths participating and their
presentations include:
In the Junior Divison: Cydney
Hastings, played "Ode To Joy" on
the piano.
Heny Patel, performed an Indian.
dance.
Hannah Eby, sang "Colors of the
Wild."
SSamantha Hamilton, performed a
dance routine; and Payal Chaudhari
sang "Bingo."
Sarah B,:oland ang ''Was .It ..
'Morning Like This;"' Jacob Gray
played the guitar; and Kadijeah
Hayes and Lynedra Huggins sang
"Baby Mama."
In the Senior Division: Alana
Chambers sang "Gonna Getcha
Good;" Stephanie Brignoni played
"Via Dialorosa" on the piano.
Michele Ward sang "the Greatest
Love Of All;" and Alyssa Brignoni
'played "Into The West" on the pi-
ano.
Winners in the Junior Division
were: Jacob Gray, first place; Henry


p., *p P A


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NFCC Honors
Four Locals
Four local residents were honored
recently by North Florida Commu-
nity College for professional
achievement.
These include: Kathleen Ander-
sen, Rebecca Burkart, John
Grosskopf, and Cathy Simcox.
Professional Achievement Awards
are given for publishing articles,
speaking at conferences, and earn-
ing recognition at the state or na-
tional level for professional
excellence.


New Arrival
Taylor Knecht announces the
birth of her sister, Caidence Jesslyn
Knecht.
SCaidence was born at Capital Re-
gional Medical Center on Monday,
April 4, 2005. She weighed 6
pounds and 15 ounces, and was 18
3/4 inches long.
e The girls are the daughters of Ash-
ley and Erik Knecht, of Monticello.
Maternal grandparents are Bonnie
and Randy Brannan, of Monticello.
Paternal grandparents are Diane
and Bob Knecht, also of Monticello.
Godparents are Timothy (Timbo)
Holland and Allison Key.


Patel, second place; and Samantha AMERICAN HEART
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005 PAGE 7

4-H Fashion Revue, Clothing


Selection Winners Told


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 4-H Fashion Revue and
Clothing Selection, held at the Jef-
ferson County High School audito-
rium, saw 25 participants.
Clothing participants in the Junior
Division were: Jacob Gray, Abby
Starling, Brandon Whitfield, Mich-
ele Ward, Kelly Hill, Alana Cham-
bers, and Arsenio Bright.
The Junior Division Clothing Se-
lection winners were: Jacob Gray,
First Place in "My Choice," and
Abby Starling, Second Place in "My
Choice."
Brandon Whitfield, First Place in
"Active Sports Wear."
The Senior Division Clothing Se-


ABBY STARLING models a garment she cre-
ated for the Fashion Revue.


AT THE 4-H Fashion Revue, Delysia Davis
models a garment she made to be evaluated
for Fashion Construction by judges, L-R: Re-


MODELING a garment she made for the
,Fashion Revue, is Michelle Ward.


tired Home Extension Agent, Phyllis
Kennedy, and Dorothy Barnhairt.


election winners were: Kelly Hill,
First Place in "School Wear;" Ar-
senio Bright, First Place in "Dress
for Work;" Alana Chambers, First
Place in "Special Occasion;" Mich-
ele Ward, Second Place in "Special
Occasion."
Five participants will represent
Jefferson County in Clothing Selec-
tion and Construction at the District
Events.
Clover Buds were: AnnaBelle
Bowling and Brooke Sanders.
The participants in the Beginners
Sewing Junior Division were: Nor-
tory Mack, Delysia Davis, Paige
Sanders, Deion Siplin, Kyyah Mas-
sey, Brandi Massey, Cydney Hast-
ings, and Jasmine Graham.
Winners include: Jasmine
Graham, First Place; Brandi
-Massey, Second Place; Cydney


Deposits Due Now For

4-H Summer Camp


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Annual 4-H Summer Camp-
has been set for June 27 through
July 1, with the theme of "Step Up
The Fun."

The cost of camp this year is $65
per child. The actual cost for camp
this year was set at $123, but dona-
tions from Funders, Inc. and private
donors allowed the cost reduction.

There is only room for 100 chil-
dren from this county to attend sum-
mer camp this year.
The first 100 children signing up,
and paying a $20 deposit will be al-
lowed to go. The $20 is nonrefund-
able. A spot will not be reserved
until the $20 is paid up front.

Subscribe Today!
Monticello News
In State: $45.00 (yr.)
SOut of State: $52.00 (yr.)


The deadline to pay the deposit is
Monday, June 6. Deadline to pay all
camp fees is Monday, June 20.
John Lilly, county 4-H coordina-
tor can be reached at 342-0187 for
more information.
Activities included in the summer
camp program this year are centered
around "Fitness and Nutrition."
Summer camp will provide an op-
portunity for Jefferson County
youth to learn and explore.


Hastings and Kyyah Massey, Third
Place for a tie.
Delysia Davis, Fourth Place; Nor- "
tory Mack, Fifth Place; and Paige
Sanders, Sixth Place.
In the Intermediate Sewing Junior
Division the winners were: Simone
Williams, First Place; Emily
Howell, Second Place; Abby Star-
ling and Ya'Trya Howard, Third
Place for a tie; Gabe Starling,
Fourth Place and Michael Starling,
Jr., Fifth Place.
The Junior Advance Sewing Class
First Place winner was Lena Odom.
The Clothing Construction Overall
winners in the Junior Division were:
Jasmine Graham, First Place; Si-
mone Williams, Second Place;
Brandi Massey,.Third Place; Cyd-
ney Hastings, Fourth Place; and
Kyyah Massey, Fifth Place.
In the Beginner's Sewing Senior
Division Arsenio Bright took First
Place, and Shaumese Massey took
Second Place.
The participants of the Advanced
Sewing Senior Division were: Alana
Chambers, Kelly Hill, Kevin Hill,
Alex.Farmer, and Michele Ward.
Michele Ward won First Place;
Alana Chambers, Second Place;
Alex Farmer, Third Place; Kevin
Hill, Fourth Place; and Kelly Hill,
Fifth Place.
The Senior Construction Overall
winners were: Michele Ward, First
Place; Alana Chambers, Second
Place; Alex Farmer, Third Place;
Kevin Hill, Fourth Place; and Ar-
senio Bright, Fifth Place.


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Club Members Win

At State Games


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the local Boys and
Girls Clubs won first places and
honorable mentions in the recent
State Educational Games, held in
Tampa.
First Place winners from the How-
ard Middle School Club were: Cin-
drilla Wade, for States and Capitals;
Benjamin Hudson, for Public
Speaking; and Jacorey Dixon, for
Sports Trivia.
Honorable Mentions went to Ti-
arra Smith, for Florida Trivia.
First Place winners at the Jeffer-
son Elementary School Boys and


Girls Club were: Emily Howell, for
Public Speaking and Simone Wil-
liams, for State Essay.
These students first won in Dis-
-trict Competition, which included
the Big Bend counties of Jefferson,
Leon, and Franklin.
These district winners then com-
peted with other district winners
statewide.
This is the second year of compe-
tition for these Clubs, and with the
smallest group in the competition,
the Big Bend Clubs took Second
Place in the state.
Gerrold Austin, director of the
JES Club, states the next year they
will come home with First Place.


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WINNING First Place in the State Educational Games are
JES Boys and Girls Club members Emily Howell, left, and
Simone Williams. (News Photo)

Post Fish Fry Successful


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The recent Grouper Fry fundraiser.
held by the American Legion Post
49 served 80 meals at $8 a plate,
with the funds to be used for Post
projects.


The grouper was fried to perfec-
tion by Post members with the side
condiments prepared by members of
the Ladies Auxiliary. The grouper
was picked up by John Hrynciw,
who also helped with the cooking.
"We had a great time and made a
little money too," said President Ron
Slik.







PAGE 8. MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005 PAGE 9


FRAN HUNT
staff Writer

After reaching the final round-of-
district play, the Tigers fell 11-2 to
North Florida Christian.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
that NFC was a really tough team
and that the Tigers had a couple of
good key plays, but just couldn't
execute them properly, costing
them the win.
Scottie Norton led the batting
with a two-run double; Markyce
Larry hit a single and Hightower
said NFC walked him three times.
Dionte Hightower and Breon
Parker each had one single and a
walk.
Thomas Lyles started the pitching
and according to Hightower, had a
good hitless first two innings. "He
had a couple of strikeouts and then
in the third inning, he had a mas-
sive control problem," he added.
Jason Kirkpatrick wound up the
pitching effort for the Tigers, strik-
ing out two and giving up one
walk.
The Tigers completed their sea-
son with a 7-10 record.


Straight
Dustin Roberts pitched the first
five and two-thirds innings, to re-
cord his fourth win of the year. He
gave up one unearned run on two
hits and struck out seven.
The 12-hit Aucilla attack was led
by Drew Sherrod with a double, a
triple and three RBI.
Chris Tuten had a single, a dou-
ble and one RBI; Ridgely Plaines
had two singles, a stolen base and
three RBI; Josh Carswell, one hit


KIRKPATRICK


Church League Softball


League Sets

FRAN HUNT
staff Writer

The Church Softball League is
gearing up for another season, to
begin shortly.
An organizational meeting will
be held 7 p.m., Thursday, at Wen-
dys, on US 19 south.
"We would love to have more
churches come down and join us on
the field," said Coach Nick Flynt.
"The more churches involved, the
more fun we have.
The league is coed and interde-
nominational, and everyone is wel-
come to play.
Flynt added that if there was
enough interest, a men's church
softball league would also be
formed.
"Anyone, male or female, young
or not so young is welcome to play
as long as they are over 13 years
old," said Flynt.
"Softball is a great, low-cost way
of sharing fellowship with church


Meeting
members, and those around the
community, and it is also a great
way to get and stay in shape," he
said.
The league plays a 10-12 game
season, depending on the. number
-of teams in the-league.
Last year, the league began with
13 teams and dwindled to 10.
Flynt is hoping for greater num-
bers this year, and dues will have to
be paid .before playing in the
league.
For those who attend smaller
churches, a free agent pool of play-
ers, or even a separate team, will
be formed, depending on the inter-
est.
Topics of discussion during the
meeting include any new format,
rules, regulations and costs, as well
as any other topics raised during
the meeting.
Teams do not have to register
now, but if they wish to do so, or
wish to attend the meeting and seek
additional information, may con-
tact Flynt at 251-0183.


For Third

BILL BROWN

The Aucilla Warriors won the
first round of district play, and
went on to conquer the district fi-
nals, tying a school record for most
wins in a season.
The Warriors defeated Apalachi-
cola 11-1 to advance to the district
finals and bring the record for the
season to 23-3.


FRAN HUIT"
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman reports latest scores in spring
sports.
In T-ball, Bishop Farms slid past
Jefferson Builders Mart for a 22-21
victory.
Rotary edged Capital City Bank
for a 15-14 win.
In Coach Pitch action, Kiwanis
beat Hiram Masonic Lodge, 17-7.
State Farm Insurance downed
Chicken Delite 13-9.
Kiwanis beat Chicken Delite 17-
11.
State Farm Insurance beat C & F
Fencing, 12-7.
In Little League action, Farmers
and Merchants Bank blanked Wil-
liams Timber, 17-0.
Monticello Milling defeated Jef-
ferson Farmers Market 8-4.
In Softball action, Jackson's Drug
Store won over Joyner's Travel
Center, 9-5.

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Year
and two RBI; Daniel Roccanti, a
double and one RBI.
Kyle Peters, a perfect day at the
plate with two singles in two trips
to the plate; and Glen Bishop and
Jason Holton closed out the hitting
onslaught with one single each.
In the district final, the Warriors
defeated R. F. Munroe 9-3 to ad-
vance to the regional playoffs.
The first game was to be played
Tuesday on Aucilla's Finlayson
Field, Tuesday with First Coast
Christian of Jacksonville, the most
likely opponent.
With this win, the team earns its
third consecutive title, a school re-
cord.
This was the 24th win of the year,'
which ties the school record for
most wins in a season.
Plaines pitched the first four in-
nings, for his eighth win against
two losses. He gave up three runs
on four hits and struck out four.
Sherrod finished and got the save,
allowing no runs, one hit and strik-
ing out two.
The nine Aucilla runs resulted, in
part, from 10 hits and four Munroe
errors.
The "Hot" Warrior bats were
wielded by Sherrod and Plaines.
Sherrod was three for four with a
double and three RBI; and Plaines
followed with two for three and
two RBI.
Other Warriors hitting safely
were Holton, two for three with one
RBI; Tuten, a double and one RBI. :
Roccanti completed the barrage
with a single and one run scored.


Park Director

Reports

Game Scores


Warriors Win District


American Heart
Association;ro
F ,.- 7.'..-
and Stroke

It keeps
more than
memories
alive.

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIALS & TRIBUTES
MKOSAW IOVT


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Mayo Downs

Demons 13-11

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Monticello Demons softball
team fell to Mayo over the week-
end, 13-11.
Mayo jumped out to an 11-1 lead
and never looked back.
Nick Russell went three for three.
Kevin Jones, James Huggins,
Warren Allen, James Edward, and
Joe Andrews all went two for four.
Allen hit a home run for the De-
-mons..
Frankie Steen and Darron Young
went three for four, Monterious
Rivers went one for four, James
Wester went one for three, Cedric
Smith, Zeke Gillyard, Ned Thomp-
son, Johnny Rivers, E. Jennings
and Vincent Gentle didn't play in
the game.
The Demons now stand at a 2-1
season. They are scheduled to face
off against Quitman, 4:30 p.m.,
Sunday, there.

to efiifflect i1vwilifenU




IaWokinwtbo g
U ..ep hteal n


GOING for the bunt during an ACA practice session is Glen
Bishop. He scored a single in the Apalachicola game.
(News Photo)


Tigers Fall TO NFC

7-10 In District Play


WEDNESDAY


0 Is cBody
Jamie Wo rks


Il










Lady Demons Fall To

Mayo 18-13, Sunday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Lady Demons
softball team lost to Mayo, 18-13
over the weekend.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said that
with three of his starting players
out, the Lady Demons got off to a
slow start.
Tonya Young and Tasha Samuel
both went four for four.
Kista Hills and Letitia Fead both


";,J ,..95V
gg(I
'n.-U~
-I--i"


vivors, at the Survivor's Dinner held at the
Opera House recently. (News Photo)


Warriors Continue TO Top


Big Bend Leaders List


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Male and female athletes from-
Aucilla Christian Academy continue
to rally for position on the list of Big
Bend Leaders this week, and an ath-
lete from Jefferson County High
School has been added.
In baseball, the Warriors moved to
the number one spot.
ACA leads the way with a 21-3
season, followed by Port St. Joe in
second with an 18-4 and Florida
High with an 18-6.
Pitcher Drew Sherrod was men-
tioned for pitching a five inning no-
hitter against Altha Wednesday, for
a 21-3 win.
In batting average, Tiger Markyce
Larry topped the list at number one
with 23 hits out of 36 times at bat,
with an average of .639.
Casey Gunnels stands at number
seven with 27 hits out of 55 times at
bat, and an average of .491.
Chris Tuten and Sherrod stand at
a.number 10 tie, with 26 hits out of


56 times at bat, averaging .464.
In RBI, Sherrod is tied at number
two with 37 for the season, and he
is tied at number three for home
runs with six.
In pitching, Ridgely Plaines stands
at number six with a 6-2 record; and
Sherrod is tied at number nine with
a 5-0 season.
Sherrod is also number four in
earned run average, with a 1.14 and
in strikeouts.
Plaines is tied at number seven,
with 46.
In softball action, Cassi Anderson
stands at number three, in batting
average with 22 hits out of 39 times
at bat, averaging.564.
Lisa Bailey is at number 14,
down from number 12, with 21 hits
out of 46 times at bat, and an aver-
age of .457.
Kayla Gebhard is at number 15,
down from 14, with 19 hits out of
44 times at bat, averaging .432
Brittany Hobbs is in at number
23, with 18 hits out of 48 times at
bat, averaging .375.


In pitching, Hobbs stands at num-
ber seven, with a 9-4 season record,
in earned run average.
Bethany Saunders is in at number
three, added to the list, with 0.81, in
strikeouts.
Hobbs was added to the list, in at
number nine with 58 for the season.
She was added in innings pitched, in
at number 10, also with 58.


went three for four.
Nikki Cooks went three for
three; and Shonda Parker, Kidra
Thompson and Alanne Anderson
all went two for four.
Felecia McDaniel went two for
three; Cynthia Steen went one for


three; and Keandra Seabrooks went
one for four.
Shanise brooks, Lisa Fead, Vale-
rie Robertson, Chandra Tucker, Di-
ane Robertson, Keneshia Coates,
Sherrick Parrish and Tasha Smiley
didn't play in the game.
Jones said that Thompson pitched
a good game.
The Lady Demons are scheduled
to face off against Quitman, 4:30
p.m., Sunday, there.


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Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


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Clean Up Debris
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Maintenance
Feed Plots


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1/4 Mile off US 19 South

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J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
(850) 997-4577
30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


... COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

Complete Automotive Repair Allstate Insurance Compa
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Exclusive Agent O1 N M: N dayL ruLa. 8 30-5 3
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with Albert and Bonnie Jerauld, cancer sur-


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To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS, WED.. MAY 11. 2005 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-88-CA: JULIE K. NIX
BARRON; Plaintiff, vs. PAUL
LASTOWSKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
PAUL LASTOWSKI; JOHN RODGERS;
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN
RODGERS; STEVE LASTOWSKI;
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
PAUL LASTOWKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF PAUL LASTOWKI; JOHN
RODGERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint for Quiet Title has been filed
against you and others, and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E.
MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH
THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A.,
Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasville
Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this
notice of action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you for the


DIVE


LEGAL NOTICE
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED this 28th day April, 2005
Carl D. Boatwright.
5/4, 11, 18, 25, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday, May
17, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student

NURSING PRN
RN $25/hr LPN $19/hr
RN Qtrly bonus-to $500
LPN Qtrly bonus up to
$250
State-of-the-art facility
Professionals that care
Pre-op Post-op or O.R
Day Shift
No Weekends/Holidays
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Surgery Center Perry, FL
Call (850)584-2778 ext. 639
or fax resume (850)838-3937
al.lB~~amBBBCu--TB r-


IN!


Dive into MDA, and learn more about
summer kids' camps, family support
groups, and life-saving research.


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1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org

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For SixY(


LEGAL NOTICE
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 1000
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of
the agenda may be obtained by writing:
NFCC, Office of the President, 1000
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations,
contact the NFCC Office of College
Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an
equal access/equal opportunity employer.
5/11, c

LOST

Perry Ellis Purse. Black,ablong, 2 straps,
contains personal items. Call 997-2894.
5/11, 13,pd

HELP WANTED)
Experienced painter. Full time position,
transportation required. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.
Need Live in caregiver for my mother.
Light housekeeping, meal preparation,
shopping. Call 863-632-1377.
5/4, 6, 11, 13, pd


Come, join our growing team. If you want down. Ea
to be challenged in a busy newspaper
office and want above average earnings ,s
and have the drive to be a positive team 1 Down
player, we'd like to talk to you. No home w/l
slackers, dunderheads, dopers, drama Monticel
queens, please. Call Ron Cichon 997-3568. pics, &


Local business now hiring. FT/PT,
Weekends. Respond to: P.O. Box 691,
Monticello, Fla. 32345.
4/27s/d, tfn,
A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: Secretary #2173 High
School Diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/Office Clerical Experience.
Typing score of at least 35 cwpm. Starting
salary $6.43 Shift: 8am 5pm Monday
through Friday. For more information
and a complete listing of available
positions: www.apalachecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or 1-800-226-2931 Humane
Resources 2634-J Capital Circle N.E.
Tallahassee, FL Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check. An equal
opportunity/affirmative action employer.
Drug-free workplace.
5/11, nc
ENGLISH INSTRUCTOR: North Florida
Community College Madison, FL: English
instructor to teach composition and
developing writing/reading at small, rural
community college..in.Madison, FL. Begins
8/1/05. MA in English required. Graduate'
work in composition and/or development
writing/reading strongly preferred.
Community college teaching experience
preferred. Will teach 15
credit-hours/semester, establish office
hours; participate in department, college
activities. May teach day/night classes
both on/off campus. Interviews will
include presentation using instructional
technology. Application to Director HR,
North Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Only complete application packets
considered (letter of interest, resume,
application, copy of transcripts unofficial
OK). Application, job description online:
www.nfcc.edu. Questions, call
850-973-9487. Deadline 05/20/05. EOE


www.649
5/11, 13,


FOR RENT
1 Bedroom 1 Bath House with Pasture
$500 month Call: 997-6653
4/29-5/25, pd
1 bedroom house in city. 997-0950.
5/11, c
3 bedroom, 1 V/ bath, office for rent in city
limit. Very nice $700 First month rent and
deposit required. 933-8167
5/11, 13, 18, 20, c

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00


asy terms 997-4000.

Payment of $649 buys a 3br/2ba
acres in a wooded Subdivision in
lo. By Owner. For details, maps,
i to Pre Qualify online:
9down.com/PP
c


SERVICES
CAREGIVER, willing to work weekdays
and weekends. Call 342-1486 or 510-0998.
5/4,6; 11, 13, 18, 20, 24, 27, pd

Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29
chg

Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn
Combining Faith and Reason, Tradition
and Tolerance. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocs N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:00 AM 997-4116.
5/11, c

Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn


Southern Division


WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding, Read welding symbols
and measuring. Standard AWS Welding Test in Flat Position.

FITTER TRAINEES:
Math skills and measuring ability required. Blue Print reading and fitting
experience helpful, but not required.

Applications available

Georgia Department of Labor

Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


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Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


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jrIC5LenL 215 N. Jefferson
m= WW.Cbkk.C (850) 997-5516
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Buying-Selling
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r1 997-5516
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Honest Professional Service

i ,m rtsuitakjrii taiiE'x ii*: ttitx a we m:mTK n ia ac i 3
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(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com




Kinq of the Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath
yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine on a hilltop near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field all in
the fastest growing part of Jefferson County
for only $1,200,000
Choice Buildina Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre
Check this Out Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened porch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lament
$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
high land in deed restricted neighborhood
$10,000 per acre
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Desoto Road 2.39 wooded acres near St.
Augustine Rd $18,500

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best
We have good buyers looking for acreage
between Monticello and Lloyd can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
-rai --XK-.-B-*-'-'r- r ir-lf-'-wr- vr-n---'e ---B=.B=B= ==


Housing Vouchers

WE ACCEPT ALL VOUCHERS NEW & REMOLDED HOMES
2/2 $599 ~ 3/2 $699 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool, Free Lawn Care, Youth Activities, Courtesy Officers on site

575-6571


university Hfomes

nomes onM PB de


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ears in a Row! N


Clayton Industries has been Manufacturer of the Year!
lenord Bembry, GM
and his staff .


University Jomes s' 4 :"
and see f or
yourself why.'


r.- I







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 11, 2005

Postal Workers To

collect Donated Food


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Both City and County Letter Car-
riers will be collecting non perish-
able foods Saturday, as part of their
annual "Stamp Out Hunger Day."
Last year approximately 246
pounds of food were collected and
presented to Christ Episcopal
Church food pantry, to be distrib-
uted to those in need throughout the
county.
Again this year, the food will be
donated to the church and postal
workers hope to exceed the amount
collected last year.
Letter Carrier James McDaniel
said that this worthwhile effort helps
the needy homeless, sick, elderly
and low income families in the com-
munity.
The National Association of Letter
Carriers in conjunction with the
United States Postal Service, is col-
lecting non-perishables, such as


soup, juice, pasta, canned vegetables
and fruits, cereal, and rice to help
needy families throughout the
nation.
Residents can assist in this effort
by placing food donations at the
mailboxes Saturday, before the let-
ter carriers arrive.
The carriers will pick up the food
and take it back to the Post Office so
it can all be collated.
Food may also be taken directly
to the Post Office, on or before Sat-
urday.
Established more than 20 years
ago by the Brotherhood of St. An-
drew, the operation of the Food Pan-
try was taken church women in
1993.
The pantry is operated on a volun-
teer basis and serves about 100 per-
sons monthly, exclusive of special
occasions, such as Christmas and
Thanksgiving.
Last year spokesperson Merry
Ann Frisby stated: "The church is
merely following Christ's dictate to
feed the poor."


Festival Queens


(Continued From Page 1)
junior at Jefferson County High
School.
She is employed by Chicken Del-
ite, and her career goal is to become
a forensic scientist.
Her hobbies include riding horses,
reading, and playing softball.
She has been trained in voice and
dance.
For her talent, she will sing.
Her sponsor is Chicken Delite.
Lindsey Scott is the daughter of
Linda and Bruce Leinback and
Chuck Scott.
She is a senior at Brookwood, and
her career goal is to major in politi-
cal science and to attend law school.
Her hobbies include: softball,
track, soccer, water sports, snow
skiing, photography, knitting, golf,
and music.
She plays the flute, piano, and has
studied ballet and voice.
She will present a vocal selection
for her talent.
SHer sponsor is Bird & Leinback
Attorneys at Law.
Carmen Skipworth is the daughter
of Dwanda Skipworth and James
Skipworth.
She is a sophomore at Jefferson
County High School, and plans to
become a dentist.



Circle
(Continued From Page 1)
'W. Dogwood Street would be
closed to vehicular traffic and con-
verted into a pedestrian plaza.
- E. Dogwood Street, meanwhile,
might or might not be closed off to
-US 19 vehicular traffic. And angle
parking, of either 30 or 45 degrees
(the angle is one of the issues to be
decided), would be installed along
one side of each of the one-way
.streets.
According to the chamber, the
.proposal would accomplish several
things: It would create much-needed
additional parking in the downtown
.district; it would better define the
-area; and it would spur capital im-
provement projects in adjacent
streets.
The last time the committee con-
sidered the matter was in February.



5 Hurt In

1-10 Crash

A one-car crash Friday on I-10 in
Jefferson County caused five Mi-
ami residents to be transported to
Tallahassee Medical Memorial
Center.
Four of the victims sustained se-
rious injuries.
Florida Highway Patrol reports
Joanne Noel, age 20, was driving a
1996 Ford Utility Truck east on I-
10 in the right lane, towing another
car on a U-Haul dolly.
She lost control of the vehicle for
unknown reason and slid sideways,
overturning three times in the me-
dian.
Noel, along with Cierra Mitchell,
age 19, David Aguire, age un-
known, and McFarland Noel, age
unknown, were transported for se-
rious injuries.
Reginald Ford, Jr., age 21, was
transported with minor injuries.


Her hobbies include: reading,
writing, and 'hanging out with
friends, softball and cheerleading.
For her talent she will present a
poem, or a musical selection.
Her sponsor is Brown's Construc-
tion Company.
Tierra Thompson is the daughter
of Shirley Reddick.
She is a sophomore at Jefferson
County High School and will be-
come either a pharmacist or a law-
yer.
Her hobbies include: reading, talk-
ing on the phone, listening to music,
hanging out with friends, playing
volleyball and softball.
She will recite a poem for her tal-
ent.
Her sponsors are Keaton's Tire
Repair and M&LK Limo Service.
Chevarra Ulee is the daughter of
Michelle Mays and Ernest Ulee.
She is a sophomore at Jefferson
County High School. She plans to
study criminal justice and become a
lawyer.
Her hobbies include reciting po-
ems, talking on the phone, hanging
out with friends, watching TV, play-
ing volleyball and softball.
For her talent she will recite a
poem.
Her sponsors are Elizabeth AME
Church and Union Bethel Circuit.




YOUR WORLD.

YOUR CHANCE

TO MAKE IT BETTER.


F_


www.AMERICORPS.ORG
1.800.942.2677
(1.800.833.3722 TOO]


AMERICORPS.
GIVE BACK FOR A YEAR.
SERVE YOUR COMMUNITY.
CHANGE YOUR LIFE.


dELi


Commission Will Revisit


Issue Of Logging Trucks


V








WCTV Meteorologist Rob Nu.
catola broadcast the weather
from the Palmer House, re-
cently, as part of WCTV's
tribute to area communities.
(News Photo)



Youth
(Continued From Page 1)
southerly direction until it entered
the tree line, where it hit a small
tree and rolled down a slight hill,
and according to the witness, rolled
onto Stetson.
He was transported by Air Medic
One to Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital, where he expired at 7:30 p.m.
from injuries sustained in the crash.
The crash was not alcohol related
and is still under investigation.
FHP estimates the damage to the
ATV at $4,000.







Creating SAVINGS
New Century
oat is n ,BONDS


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Loggers -- and the alleged damage
the latter cause to county dirt roads
-- have once again come to commis-
sioners' attention.
This time it was Road Department
Superintendent David Harvey who
brought up the issue.
Harvey last Thursday mentioned a
recent incident where logging
trucks, operating in a heavy rain,
tore up a county- dirt road so badly
that the residents living on the road
were barely able to use it.
"That's an unproved method of
operating as far as I'm concerned,"
Harvey said. "When you're getting
2-1/2 inch of rain on a dirt road, out
of common courtesy to people, you
don't make ruts on the road."
The remark provided an opening
for Commissioner Jerry Sutphin,
who several months ago voiced
similar concerns.
Sutphin, in fact, suggested at that
time that loggers be made to put up
some kind of performance bond.
This money would be redeemable
upon the termination of the logging
job, provided no damage was done
to county roads, he said.
The proposal went nowhere, as
none of the other commissioners
would support it. Not'one to give
up, Sutphin suggested Thursday that
in situations where loggers were
making roads impassable for citi-
zens, the road superintendent should
have the authority to issue a 'stop
order'.
"Why can't he stop loggers from
tearing up dirt roads when it's rain-
ing, as a courtesy to the county?"
Sutphin asked.
This time Sutphin received limited
support from Commissioner Danny
Monroe, a self-avowed supporter of
loggers.
"I'm in favor of logging trucks
and timbering," Monroe said. "But
logging needs to cease when it's
raining. It makes sense that if they
are tearing up the roads in a bad
way, then the activity needs to cease
until the weather gets better."
If an ordinance was needed to that
effect, he was willing to propose it,


Monroe said.
Harvey suggested a more benign
approach. It was a given, he said,
that timbering operations were here
stay. What's more, unlike other ag-
ricultural activities, timbering was a
year-round activity. It was therefore
his recommendation that everyone
learn to get along as best as
possible.
"My suggestion is to send out a
pleasant request to loggers asking
them to make a plan of action," Har-
vey said.
That way, he said, the Road De-
partment could better handle the
situation, acting in a proactive man-
ner, rather than merely reacting to
the problem.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner scheduled the issue for a work-
shop 9 a.m. Tuesday in the
Emergency Management Center.
For the record, Joyner and Com-
mission Junior Tuten voiced their
opposition to the stop order
proposal.
"I don't have a problem with the
loggers notifying the Road Depart-
ment where they're going to harvest
so that the Road Department can in-
spect the condition of the road,"
Joyner said. "But stopping the op-
eration, I'm against."
Tuten expressed like sentiments.
"Every time I've gone to the log-
gers,, they've been agreeable and
willing to work with the county,"
Tuten said. "But they've got million
of dollars worth of equipment and
50 employees. You can't just ask
them to shut down.
"With a 2-/2 inch rain, yes, but if
we talk to the loggers, you'd be sur-
prised how reasonable they are. Peo-
ple in the agriculture business have


to travel roads before and after a
rain and I: don't see how you can
signal out one industry."
Sutphin disagreed on the reason-
ableness of loggers.
"Mr. Tuten says if you contact
them, they'll be good citizens," Sut-
phin said. "A couple of months ago
when I brought up the issue, all the
loggers that contacted me said I was
a bad guy. They were not nice citi-
zens.
"The construction industry doesn't
work in the rain. Let the loggers cut
tree during the rain and then truck
them out when it stops raining. If
Mother Nature interferes with an
operation, then have people do
something else."
"I don't think the county needs to
get involved with the logging indus-
try," Joyner reiterated.
"That's just what the logging in-
dustry told me," Sutphin retorted.
Commissioner Gene Hall then re-
introduced the idea of a perform-
ance bond.
"Perhaps we need to set up a
mechanism where the county can
levy a fee for county crews having
to respond to an emergency situa-
tion," Hall suggested. "They have
the right to harvest the trees, but we
have a responsibility to maintain the
roads for everyone."


The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


CASH O As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


THE ROTARY CLUB OF MONTICELLO

PRESENTS



MONTICELLO' SOWN


ROBERT OLEN BUTLER

AUTHOR

AND PULITZER PRIZE WINNER



WITH LOCAL MUSICAL LEGEND

AND GREAT VETERINARIAN

MICHAEL PURVIS



IN



AMERICAN HOURS D OEUVRESS

FOR THE BRAIN & SOUL
(A READING WITH MUSICAL INTERACTION)



Heavy Hors D'oeuvres
Cash Bar
6:30PM Saturday, May 21, 2005
Monticello Opera House
$25 / person* Reservations Required
Call Monticello's Chamber of Commerce 997-5552
Or Monticello Opera House 997-4242

*Proceeds to benefit local community and international projects of the Monticello Rotary Club.


0 mmi