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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00036
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 6, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00036
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text



LItRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611


Project

Promotes

National Anthem

Editorial, Page 4
II


Extension Agent

Offers Tips For

Preserving Food

Story, Page 7


Festival Committee

Seeking Site For

Jr. Miss Pageant

Story, Page 10
I I


13 Entrants

Vie For Little

King, Queen Titles

Story,PhotosPage 12


f Friday Morning





Montic


ilo


News


, Published Wednesdays & Fridays FRIDAY. MAY 6. 2fl


City Adopts Fees,



Rules For Parades


Adoption Follows Clash

With Melon Fest Group


ing of candies and other objects;
animals without an accompanying
cleanup crew; and floats higher than
20 feet or wider than 15 feet.
Approval of events will depend on


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Parades and other organized ac-
tivities requiring the closing of city
streets and police supervision have
now become more costly and com-
plicated affairs.
On Tuesday night, the City Coun-
cil adopted staff recommended rules
and regulations that will henceforth
govern all such events. The counsel


established as well permit fees and tiLy appi'iatin anu payment os
application forms. the appropriate fees. Considerations
The new approach aims to mini- that-will go into each approval in-
Theude: the activity's adjudged bene-
mize the city's liability, at the same lude: the activity's adjudged bene-
time that it allows the city to recoup fit to the community; its demand on
some of its costs for police city resources; and its impact on the
overtime, garbage pickup and street traffic flow.
cleanup, among other services. The police chief, city superinten-
Included among the items and dent and City Council will review
activities prohibited are: alcohol, and approve all applications.
firearms (fake or real, except those Authorization for permits, what's
carried by authorized law- more, will depend on the availability.
enforcement personnel); the throw- of qualified police and maintenance
personnel.
As for the fees, some will be re-
Squired and others optional. The, re-
Squired fees must be paid pripr to
issuance of a permit. These consist
of a law-enforcement fee (to be de-
termined by the chief of police
.. based on the anticipated lengrhl, ;1
..s'." .. the parade, the number of partici-'
:pants and the expected number of'
-- spectators); a $75 maintenance fee


EVENTS such as the Watermelon Festival be much more complicated and costlier in
and other community activities that require the future. (News Photo)
street closings and police supervision will


for cleanup of litter generated by the
event; and a $100 maintenance fee
for events that require roadblocks.
Parade and other participants must
sign a liability disclaimer, holding
the city blameless for any mishap
,that may occur. This applies espe-
cially to participants in the annual
bed races held on S. Mulberry St.


Adoption of the new rules and
fees followed the latest skirmish in
the evolving controversy between
event organizers and city officials,
particularly Police Chief David
Frisby.
This time the skirmish involved
organizers of the 55th Watermelon
Festival.


Frisby earlier had notified festival
organizers that the organization
would have to pay $1,200 for police
overtime during the festival.
In discussion at its meeting Mon-
day night, the Watermelon Festival
Committee apparently decided to
explore alternatives to paying the
(See Parades Page 12)


Monticello In-Town Shuttle Service Holds

Its Ribbon Cutting Ceremony On Monday


DIANNE WESTBROOK pins a Mother's Day Corsage on her
mother, Victoria Karnoupakis, during a visit with her at
Jefferson Nursing Center. (News Photo)



School Budget Shortfall

Remains Depite Increase


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


The increase of 2.28 percent over
the $7 million state funding the
school district receives, will gener-
ate about $150,000, Finance Direc-

tor Hal Wilson said Wednesday.



MN.
Pl gjH --*1

lld'lcj-b ^


I.-


HAL WILSON, school finance
officer examines budget
items. (News Photo)


"This is about the same dollar in-
crease as we received last year," he
explained.
Enrollment in the district for 2005
was 1,294 students.
Projected enrollment for 2006 is
1,223, a 5.5 percent decrease, Wil-
son said. This decrease is factored
into the percentage of increased
state funds districts receive.
Conversely, he said, if enroll-
ment increases, so does the percent-
age of increased funding.
"At best, we are still left with a
$950,000 shortfall, which has to be
addressed," he stated.
In addition, Wilson said that the
step raises which normally accrue to
teachers each year, will consume the
$150,000 state increase in funding.
Reiterating his earlier explanation
of the district budget situation, Wil-
so-n samd that in FY 2005, $1.1 mil-
lion %. as spent in excess of income.
The budget was balanced by trans-
ferring funds from the fund balance
diiricis are required to keep on
hand, as well as other non-
reoccutrng funds.
It is this fund balance which must
be replaced, in FY 2006, roughly
$700,000, which has been the sub-
ject of recent workshops.
Superintendent Phil Barker is ex-
pected to make specific recommen-
dations, concerning cuts to be made,
at the School Board meeting 6 p.m.,
Monday.


city council, county commission,
FRAN HUNT the Chamber, Attorney Briap
Staff Writer Hayes, and Transportation Disad-
vantage task Force member/ Ex-
Following a ribbon cutting cere- ecutive Director of Healthy Start
mony.at the Health Department, the George Hinchliffe.
first run of the Monticello In-Town Barnhill said that we live in a
Transit Shuttle took place Monday transportation disadvantaged com-
morning. munity and several months ago, she
Health Department Director Kim inquired as to why Monticello did-
Barnhill addressed the group of n't have a source of transportation
dignitaries representing the city, for those who needed it as Perry


RIBBON CUTTING for the City Shuttle Serv-
ice took place Monday. L-R: Patti Claiborne,
Friedl Bailar, Dick Bailar, Julie Conley,
Jerry Boatwright, Emily Anderson, Kim


and Madison does. She noted that
the city did have such a system in
the past.
"We want the elderly and the
pregnant women to have transpor-
tation to their, appointments, and to
be able to get to the grocery store
and wherever else they need to go,
without having to try and rely on
someone else to drive them," said
Barhill.


Barnhill, Brian Hayes, David Frisby, Mary
Frances Drawdy and Skeet Joyner. (News
Photo)


Hinchliffe added that the city has
approximately 145 Healthy Start
mothers per year. Many of these
have no means of transportation.
He estimated that between eight
and 10 women would use the serv-
ice each morning to arrive at their
Healthy Start appointments.
After the speeches, a purple rib-
bon was stretched in front of the
shuttle, driven for the first time by
Queen Pride.
The shuttle, a 10-seat handicap
equipped vehicle, inched forward,
driving through the ribbon and
starting out on it's first run with
two passengers on board.
One of the passengers said of the
shuttle, "This is an answer to
prayers."
The shuttle runs for ten hours a
day, six days a week, except for the
time slot of 12:30-1:30, beginning
at 7:30 a.m. and concluding at 5:30
p.m.
The route begins at the Jefferson
Place Apartments at 7:30 a.m.,
moves on to Tallahassec Memorial
Family Medical, the Courthouse,
Jefferson Arms Apartments, How-
ard Middle School, Jefferson Ele-
mentary School, Jefferson County
Head Start, Heritage Manor Apart-
ments, Jefferson Nursing Center,
Jefferson Senior Citizens Center.
Gerry Medical, Post Office, Court
House, Chamber of Commerce.
(See Shuttle Page 12)


Former Bank Teller Pleads To Grand Theft


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A former Capital City Bank teller
charged with stealing more than
$100,000 from the financial institu-
tion has plead no contest to the
charge and been sentenced.
Emily Jane Vinson plead no con-
test to grand theft on March 14. She
was given 15 years probation and
five months in the county jail, which
she began serving March 18.
Vinson must also pay the bank


$100,000 in restitution, to be paid in
monthly installments of $500 mini-
mum.
Circuit Court Judge L. Ralph
Smith withheld adjudication. Mean-
ing that the court defers a ruling un-
til all conditions are met and that
possibly the offense will not appear
on a criminal record.
Police arrested Vinson last Sep-
tember, after Capital City Bank offi-
cials in Tallahassee reported the
theft of $100,000 from the Monti-
cello branch.
Bank officials uncovered the theft,


which consisted of a series of trans-
actions over a period of time, while
investigating another irregularity.
According to the investigating re-
port, bank tellers are assigned indi-
vidual numbers that must be entered
with each transaction. Tellers also
are given individual pass codes that
permit them sole access to their
work.
In addition, tellers must keep run-
ning computerized records of all
their transactions in what is called a
journal.
In Vinson's case, she was able to


manipulate the balance at the end cfl
each business day so that the miss-
ing money never appeared on her
journal.
"In simple terms," explained then
Deputy Police Chief Bill Bullock,
the investigating officer, "Vinson
entered the false total into her jour-
nal and at the end of the business
day, she deleted it. This system af-
forded her the ability to mask the
shortage in her till."
The method, Bullock added par-
enthetically, "is akiin to sltaying
(See Teller Page 2)


137TH YEAR NO.36, 50 CENTS


V, "Uvo








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005


..... .... ,

CITY POLICE halted traffic briefly Friday
morning so this John Deere tractor and 20


Forum Planned T l
At Library
(Continued From
DEBBIE SNAPP ahead of a balar


foot cut harrow could manage to get around
the Courthouse Circle. (News Photo)


Staff Writer


A Community Access Partnership
Network" forum will take place 3
p.m. Tuesday, May 10 at the
Library.
Topics of discussion include en-
hanced public assistance services,
such as cash, food stamps, and
Medicaid, through technology, to in-
clude the new application capability
through the Internet.
Also, streamlined eligibility proc-
esses and an emphasis on commu-
nity partnerships will be discussed.
For more information contact
Terry Sherrard with the Department
of Children and Families at 448-
5070


Page 1)
nce deficit in a


checking account that is commonly
referred to as check 'kiting' for
those familiar with the system. It's
not readily apparent unless you look
for it."


VENDORS WANTED
Booths available
From $40 to $150 per month
Antiques, Collectibles, Art,
Used furniture, etc.
MONTICELLO TRADING
CO., LLC
1,75 W. Dogwood St.
509-3517


MlonticeCo Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


Democrats Sponsor


Library Book Sale


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Democratic
Party is sponsoring a Book Sale 9
a.m. to noon, Saturday.
The sale is planned on the side-
walk in front of the library.
An alternative site is available in
the event of rain.
All proceeds of the.Sale are for the
benefit of the Lib-ary, and all funds

Post TO Elect

New Officers

American Legion Post 49 will
hold its Election of Officers for the
coming year 7 p.m., Tuesday.
The agenda will include the final-
izing of plans for the Memorial Day
celebration, including the Flag Re-
tirement. Ceremony and the Post
Breakfast.
*It is imperative that the.member-
ship attend this important meeting.
The Ladies Auxiliary will prepare
and serve the evening meal, with a
homemade treat for dessert.


will be given to the Friends of the
Library for placement where most
needed.
The Library budget had to be dras-
tically reduced this year because of
the cut in State Aid funds from
$164,000 to $58,000.
These cuts were reflected in the
book budget and in salaries.
Also, the Library is moving this
year to a new site, and the staff is


cleaning out the collection.
Books have been donated from
members of the community, and
hundreds of books have been accu-
mulated for the Sale.
There are books for all ages, some
books-on-tape, new hardcovers,, pa-
perbacks, magazines, collectibles,
and some old and antique books.

There will be refreshments avail-
able for purchase.
Anyone desiring to donate books
to the Sale can deliver them to the
Library. For more information call
342-0205 or 997-2863.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 3


CPR Class
Set Saturday


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8 111i~~~"il
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MONTICELLO TRADING COMPANY held its
Grand Opening Saturday. Looking over pa-
perwork are L-R: Employee Casey Handley,


and Co-owner
Photo)


Rescued Canine, Law,

Adoptable Pet Of Week


And*


SLAW
LAW


The County Humane Society has
named "Law" as its adoptable ca-
nine pet of the week.
"Law" was rescued by the Soci-
ety, when Sheriffs deputies, re-
moved him from his owners, after
reports of severe neglect were filed.
Law has a brother who was in the
same situation, and has since been
adopted.
"They were in bad shape," said
Bautista. "They had no hair, were
literally skin draped over bone, sick
with parasite infestation and they
had mange," she added.
Law is a neutered male, with all
immunizations up to date, born in
Oct. 2003 and guessed to. be a
husky mix, but. Bautista refers to
him as,. "A good old fashioned
Monticello mutt".
Law gets along very well with
other dogs, adults and children and
is said to be a good watch dog.
He is an alert and very intelligent
animal who loves to play. Law is
also said to be slightly shy.
A fenced yard is not required,
but highly recommended for this
inside/outside animal.
To adopt Law or any other the
,other many pets at the shelter, call
342-0244.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Innovative Partners will host a
CPR Certification Renewal class 3
p.m., Saturday, at the Learning Cen-
ter, located at 490 South Marvin
Street.
There is no charge for this class.
Interested parties may call Cassaun-
dra Brockman at 339-9457 or Byron
Barnhart at 251-0386 to arrange to
take the class.
Recently, three local residents
took advantage of a similar class,
and completed the course success-
fully.


Margaret Levings. (News


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


lCp MEMBrE RON CICHON
i4 Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215.North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Project Promotes


National Anthem


SAn effort to restore respect and
appreciation for the national anthem
is striking the right chord with many
.people.
The National Anthem Project, a
,multi-year effort to reteach Ameri-
can's "The Start-Spangled Banner,"
is led by the National Association
for Music Education (MENC). Mrs.
Laura Bush serves as Honorary
Chairperson.
The- campaign launch comes on
the heels of a recent Harris Poll that
shows two out of three Americans
don't know the words to "The Star-
Spangled Banner" and many are un-
aware of the historical events that
inspired the penning of the song.
This finding prompted MENC, the
world's largest arts education asso-
ciation and the only one that ad-
dresses all facets of music
education, to spreadhead the project
and shine the spotlight on the impor-
tance of school music programs,
given that this is whereimost Ameri-
cans learn the national anthem and
others patriotic songs.
"Recent budget cuts to school mu-
sic programs have silenced our na-
tion, cutting off students from ac-
cess to learning about our country's
historical traditions," says John
Mahlmann, Executive Director,
MENC. "Music in schools provides
the platform for citizenship that
stays with us for a lifetime."
One goal of the campaign is to


change the practice of Americans
listening to a soloist perform the an-
them, particularly at special events,
and to encourage everyone to sing
the anthem together.
The nationwide initiative is sup-
ported by the Jeep brand, the pro-
ject's National Presenting Sponsor.
"As the Jeep brand is deeply
rooted in American traditions and
values, we are excited about the op-
portunity.to be apart.of the National
Anthem Project and to join the Na-
tional Association for Music Educa-
tion in this mission to restore
America's. voice," said Dieter Zet-
sche, President and Chief Executive
Officer of the Chrysler Group.
The project is led by the project's
official musical ambassadors, The
Oak Ridge Boys and is supported by
leading organizations across the
country, including The Girls Scouts
ofth&7U'S.A'. The American Legion
anid The' Hisi-l Ch-ann,
-"Today our country is calling on
our music educators to restore
America's voice," said Mahlmann.
"We want to remind all Americans
to cherish our national treasures and
to celebrate our unity and values in
song."
This multi-faceted campaign will
include curriculum efforts in schools
across the country, special perform-
ances and alliances with profes-
sional sporting events, public
service announcements and special
events in cities nationwide.


From Our Photo File


. V


(a


"h .... "





ATTENDING a meeting in Sept, 1988, to
discuss allowing Tri-County Electric to pro-
vide water to counties it serves were, L-R:
Commissioner Clifford Brown, Citizen Joe


./' -"

P..

'*
.I .


Whitson, Taylor County Coordinator Sam
Beach, CDC President Johnann Murdoch.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Short Takes & Other Notions


RON CICHON
Publisher

Spring weather is wonderful. Lots
ol folks out walking and others
working in their yards.
City crews do a great job for tis. In
the early hours each day you can see:
city workers out tidying up OuL
Town.
'Reila' for. Life here v. a eall', a
full cOiii ple_- I hundred -,'I I'ic-pl..
,:.niLcipiled in fundraising
activities... Big crowd at Secretary's
Luncheon last Thursday. It's always
a popular event.
How about the "Runaway Bride"
in Duluth, Georgia? I think Jennifer
Wilbanks, at the very least, ought to
reimburse the city for costs associ-
ated with police and firemen in-
volved in the 3-day search after she
disappeared.
Why should city taxpayers be bur-


dened with this expense because of
her whim?
Merry Ann Frisby is trying her
hand as a columnist writing Short
-Takes on occasion. Her column will
appear in this space next Friday.
Roofers busy at the Opera House.
It's costing some $50,000 to rerool
the 1890 structure. Fundraisers are
K inL planned to help with the ex-

Amniida OuniNs-holds- fdI' at the'
CLuiityaid Calte most days iih '-c-
,eral ladies in attendance. I notice
-when Ray Lane chooses to eat with
the gals, he has to sit at a separate
table.

Table of Knowledge still rocking.
Not much knowledge but a lot of
chatter... I haven't had time to check
on the Liar's Club to see what
they're up to these days.
The average family receives 20
bills a month... When Sonora Smart


conceived of Father's Day, nearly
100 years ago, she favored wearing
a red rose to honor a living father
and a white flower to honor a dis-
eased Dad.
Box office records say family
movies are more popular than ever,
drawing more viewers than R-rated
films.
Children, the elderly, and pets are
the most at risk for fire ant stings. In
fact, more children are stung each
year by fire ants than all other insect
species combined.
More than half of all prescriptions
filled in the United States last year
were generics. They offer the same
medicine and same results as brand
name prescriptions but at a price
that can be 30 percent to 80 percent
less expensive.
As a result of a new law, veterans'
purchasing power for a single fam-
ily home has been increased from


$240,000 to $359,650.
Somebody once said experience is
a hard teacher because she gives the
test first and the lesson afterwards.
Approximately 40 percent of
adults experience insomnia from
time to time.
Seems like only lower grade en-
listed personnel are being charged
with prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib
.pl isoi in Iraq. Surely there were
s6me lieutenants and captains who
were supposed to kngw.w:hat was
going on.

There have been 50,000 murders
.in our country since 9/11. Violent
crime including assaults, rape, rob-
bery, child abuse and domestic vio-
lence has topped two million since
9/11, says legal author Sammy Sor-
rell in his newly released book,
"Home Grown Terrorism, The Un-
declared War Against Crime In
America."


Travlers Need To -Take BOOst Summer Nutrition Plan


Precautions For Health,


Taking a few health precautions
when traveling could keep you from
taking an unwanted trip to the doc-
tor. That's the advice from experts
who say travelers can be at particu-
lar risk for a number of health prob-
lems. Try these tips:
Plan To Stay Healthy If you
will be traveling outside the U.S.
particularly to developing countries
in Africa, Asian and Latin America,
talk with a travel medicine specialist
before hitting the road.
The U.S. government also pro-
vides health information for people
traveling abroad.
SAsk about health conditions and
disease outbreaks in the country you
plan to visit and find out if any vac-
cinations are required before you
travel.
Watch Your Eyes- Time spent
on a plane or in the car can take its
toll on eyes, as can traveling be-
tween climates. Symptoms such as
scratchy, itchy or burning eyes due
to dry eye are not only uncomfort-
able, they can also interfere with vi-
sion and damage eye tissue if left
untreated.
Dry eye can be caused by many
factors, including a dry environment


(such as a cold and windy climate,
airplane cabin or dusty room),
aging, wearing contact lenses, ciga-
rette smoke and cold or allergy
medicines and pain relievers.
It may pay to pack lubricating eye
drops.
Pack Your Pills- If you are tak-
ing medication, be sure to take
enough with you to cover an ex-
tended trip. Doctors generally rec-
ommend bringing an extra week's
worth.
Also, if you are flying, pack the
medication in your carry-on
luggage. If you are driving or flying,
be sure to keep the medication in a
place that gives you easy access.
Drink Up- Travelers often be-
come dehydrated either due to the
nature of their travels or because
they simply forgot to drink water.
Pack a few extra bottles in your
bag and have a sip every half hour
or so.
If you are traveling with your fam-
ily, be sure kids stay hydrated as
well. Early warning signs of dehy-
dration include headache, nausea
and fatigue.
Remember, it may seem counter-
intuitive but you can be dehydrated
and not feel thirsty.


BY FRANK BROGAN

.Back in late 1996, when I was.
Florida's Commissioner of Educa-
tion, it came to my attention that
there were ample federal resources
to feed the state's children in the
summer when they no longer had
access to the free and reduced price
meals they enjoyed during the
school year.
And yet, at that time, less than 14
percent of those children were par-
ticipating in the Summer Food Serv-
ice Program, and there were several
counties in which tens of thousands
of hungry children had no access at
all.
Recognizing the important link
between year-round nutrition and
successful educational outcomes for
schoolchildren, I made increased ac-
cess to this program a priority of my
administration.


It is a rare occurrence when fund-
ing intersects need and all that re-
mains is an effective public-private
partnership to effectively apply its
'use. So we collected together the
school food service directors and
other leaders from communities
around the state in a forum to chart
the challenges of and successful
models for feeding children when
school was out.
In the first year of this effort, 14
new summer food sponsors stepped
up to help in communities around
this state, and average daily partici-
pation rates among children went up
26 percent.
For our efforts, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture recognized us
with a "Regional Sunshine Award,"
and the national Education Week
periodical featured Florida twice in
two years.
Since that time, the Florida De-
partment of Education has taken


other progressive steps towards in-
creasing availability of this nutri-
tional resources by serving as one of
two states to pilot the Seamless
Summer Food Waiver, a measure
designed to reduce the paperwork of
public schools that sponsor the pro-
gram.
By essentially making summer
food an extension of the National
School Lunch Program, public
schools can offer both programs
without two sets of federal forms.
Because of the successful piloting
of that program, Congress recently
opened up this option for the rest of
the states: and Florida has seen the
original three counties opting for the
Wavier grow to 36 as of last sum-
mer.
And now the DOE has worked co-
operatively with several private,
nonprofit and faith-based organiza-
tions that want to ensure that more
children have access to this impor-


tant community resource through
the Children's Summer Nutrition
proposal also known as the "Willie
Ann Glenn Act."
It provides that at least one sum-
mer food site in each district oper-
ates within five miles of a school
with 50 percent or more free and
reduced-price school meal eligibility
and stays open for 40 days of sum-
mer.
It also ensures that additional sum-
mer food sites are within 10 miles of
all elementary schools in low-
income areas.
The proposal does this while en-
suring local control through an ex-
emption that school boards can
place on their agendas for public
awareness and cooperative leader-
ship strategies between public and
private community organizations.
If approved, Florida would once
again lead the nation for its innova-

(See Boost Page 5)


Procrastination Wastes Time


Imagine a workplace where
there's always a full week's worth
of important tasks to do, but the em-
ployees can't get started until 10
a.m. Wednesday.
Although that may sound far-
fetched, it's similar to how workers
worldwide assessed their personal
productivity in a recent online sur-
vey sponsored by Microsoft Corp.
Responses to the Microsoft Office
Personal Productivity Challenge
(PPC) from more than 38,000 peo-
ple in 200 countries showed that, on
average, workers spend about 17
hours of their typical 45-hour work
week in unproductive activities.
The top time-waster among U.S.


workers is procrastination, cited by
42 percent of respondents, followed
by lack of team communication at
39 percent and ineffective meetings
at 34 percent. Other common strug-
gles include managing e-mail and
accessing important information
while away from the office, keeping
notes and other documents organ-
ized, and prioritizing demands on
employees' time.
Along with these challenges, the
survey responses also showed that
technology has a strong influence on
workers' productivity. That's no
surprise to Dr. Larry Baker, a 25-
year veteran in the time-
management field, who helped


Microsoft develop the PPC assess-
ment.
"Computer-based communication
has dramatically quickened the pace
of business," Baker said. "As work-
ers depend more and more heavily
on technology, their software use
also needs to evolve so they can
more effectively prioritize the infor-
mation coming at them, figure out
what to do with it, and minimize the
distractions that drag down their
productivity."
Baker offered some suggestions
for using technology to overcome
common time-wasting activities and
be more productive:


Block unwanted e-mail by us-
ing anti-spam filtering tools, and
prioritize other messages with the
help of software tools such as search
folders, quick flags, reminders and
alerts.
Reduce the number and length
of meeting spaces that enable co-
workers to communicate and col-
laborate without leaving their desks.
Stay connected while on the go
through the use of mobile comput-
ing devices and software that en-
ables remote access to e-mail, tasks.
contacts, calendar entries'and other
important information stored on
(See Procrastination Page 5)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include

phone number of writer


I II Il I I I


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m W w% mva Eo mwm no N w % IL VO


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Letters...


Writer Praises Community

Effort To Secure Shuttle


Dear Editor:
I think it is extraordinary when a
community pulls together to take a
big step forward.


The creation of the Monticello
Shuttle is such an event. I think we
should be proud of Mayor Julie
Conley, the City Council, and City


Boost Nutrition


(Continued From Page 4)
tion and aggressive strategies for
linkl:ig nutrition and education.
The challenge is getting the word
out. The Florida Legislature has be-
fore it now an opportunity to do just
that.
There is potentially $106 million
in federal funds waiting to be used
by our state for boosting children's
summer-long nutrition needs, so
they are ready to learn when fall


comes.
We can use this proposal to effec-
tively alert whole communities to
this resource and encourage their
partnering with the district school
boards in making hunger and under
nutrition a subject of history not cur-
rent events.
In one sweep, we could feed more
children, import more federal tax
dollars, and generate a positive im-
pact on our local communities' sum-
mer economies and still maintain
local autonomy.


staff for their efforts in making the
shuttle a reality, especially Commis-
sioner Brian Hayes, who chaired the
committee studying the project.
Also it is important not to miss
how other cornmunitv !icddrs, in-
cluding David Frisby, chief of Po-
lice; Kim Barnhill, County Health
Director; and Mary Frances
Drawdy, executive director of the
Chamber of Commerce pulled to-
gether with Big Bend Transit to
bring this before the City and iron
out operational details.
We ought to recognize the Florida
Department of Transportation, the
North Florida Workforce Develop-
menia Board, and the Jefferson
County Transportation Disadvan-
taged Task Force, for listening to
our citizens and making the funding
available.
The Monticello Shuttle will be a


Home Ownership Action Plan
(HOAP), Inc. became a new busi-
ness here in February, when Guy
and Sharon Garrett relocated the
business from North Carolina.
They report that they are really ex-
cited to. be here and they like the
Monticello "pace of living"
already.


The business is located at 150
West Washington Street (on court-
house circle next to Edenfield's).
HOAP, Inc. allows people to
build, buy or sell a home for less
than $1,000 down.
Guy Garrett said the market here
is drawing people from Tallahassee
and that the real estate values are
going up.


great advantage for our elderly, in-
cluding veterans, for our citizens
needing medical services, and just
anyone wishing to go to the grocery
store, library, or government offices.
It will be very special for the par-
ticipants in the Healthy Start Pro-
gram.
Transportation has been one of the
major barriers to effective prenatal
and infant health care.
I am proud to live in a community
such as Monticello, that truly cares
about its citizens and fashions crea-
tive solutions to community prob-
lems.
George Hinchliffe
Executive Director
Healthy Start



Procrastination
(Continued From Page 4)
company networks.
Capture and share notes more
effectively with the help of software
that provides flexibility to combine
handwritten, typed and spoken in-
formation in a centralized, electronic
environment rather than go through
the time-consuming chore of manu-
ally typing up notes from paper or a
cassette tape.


CASH NOI As seen
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 5

ACA To Host Art Exhibit


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Academy will
host an art exhibition 6-8 p.m.,
Monday, at the Opera House.
The exhibit will include the
works from approximately 30 stu-
dents in grades 9-12, from both the
high school art studio classes and
the dual enrollment art classes.


Instructor Linda Rose said that
more than 200 works of art will be
displayed.
A variety of mediums will be
used in the works, including: all as-
pects of drawing, painting, sculp-
ture, ceramics, fiber, metal and
photography.
The exhibit is free and open to
the pubic.
Donations will be accepted to
help support the arts.


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ginger glazed Salmon
Assorted Chicken'Dishes
ssorted'Breakfast'Items -Mashed'Potatoes & gravy
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Business Aims To Help

Potential Home Buyers












PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005


Lifestyle


City Fire Rescue Yard

Sale Raises $400


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment held a Yard, Sale fundraiser
Saturday raising more than $400 for
department expenses.
The crew arrived 7:30 a.m. to
carry boxes loaded with donated
items, out of the back storage
garage, and arranged items in front
of the building.


"The ladies will come later in the
morning to help with the selling of
yard sale items," said one of the vol-
unteer firemen as he carried out a
heavy box of books for the sale.
Everything from stuffed animals
to bedroom suites and living room
furniture was for sale. Items were
priced to sell quickly.
Unsold items were packed for
storage for use at future yard sales.
Another sale will be held in July,
at a time and date to be announced.


HMS Boys, Girls Club To
Offer African Dance Classes


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School Boys
and Girls Club is offering African
Dance classes to interested students,
instructed by FMU student Denise
Johnson.
She is instructing the lessons in
the traditional bare feet style. The
lessons will take place in the school
cafetorium.
Johnson is a member of the Afri-


can Caribbean Dance Theater, under
the leadership of Jewel and Marcus
Robinson. She grew up exposed to
their instruction, and speaks highly
of their works and is proud to be as-
sociated with them.
Johnson has also received instruc-
tion at Margo School of Dance in
Tallahassee.
"I enjoy teaching the kids and en-
joy teaching in the traditional Afri-
can ways of dress, and with the bare
feet style," she states.


MONTICELLO FIRE RESCUE held a yard
sale fundraiser Saturday towards depart-
mental expenses. L-R: Rick Hamrick, Joe


Lanclos, Mike Long, Lester Lawrance, Chuck
Springer. (News Photo)


Program Offers
Scholarships

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer,

Innovative Partners will offer a
scholarship through the Take Stock
In Children Program (TSIC) to stu-
dents grades six through nine. *
Student progress is then moni-
tored through high school to be sure
all criteria continues to be met.
The TSIC is a nonprofit program
which provides deserving low-
income children in the community
with scholarships to college or voca-
tional school, and guidance for car-
ing mentors.
The scholarship is offered to stu-
dents who are likely to further their
education only through scholarship
programs.
Applications for this 4-year tuition
free program are available now by
calling Cassaundra Brockman at
339-9457 or Byron Barnhart at 251-
0386.
The deadline date for the return of
applications in May 31, 2005.

II


Church News Notes


Salem AME Church celebrates
Mother's Day 11 a.m., Sunday.
Guest Speaker is Rev. Flavous John-
son, of Qunicy.

Greater Fellowship MB Church
will host a Pre-Anniversary
Program, 7 p.m., Saturday. A First
Emancipation Program, sponsored
by MLK will be held 6 p.m., Sun-
,;A '


THOMPSON


.

wi ;ei

r F


EDWARDS

IN MEMORY
Elizabeth Edwards
(Mama Lizzie- Nana)
9/26/23 5/4/04
It is hard to believe it has been a
year since God called you home to
rest.
You have truly been missed, but
kept deep in our hearts.
We love you, but God loves you
best.
Celia, Herbert, Shelton,
Grands, Great Grands,
Great Great Grand

American Heart &L
Association.lMy
xfhtfifgl H#aei Oeaa

A Call to Arms:
Check Blood
Pressure.


day, May 15, with Rev. Larry Hunt
of Tallahassee as guest speaker and
New Salem MB Church.
***
Union Branch AME celebrates its
church anniversary 2:30 p.m., Sun-
day, May 22. A guest speaker and
choir is planned. Dinner will be
served.
IN MEMORY
Scene% iv Thompson
'Just to hear your name and think
about the good days we had makes
me cheer up and not feel so bad.
To have had you in our life has
been such a great pleasure and just
to lose you seems like someone took
our buried treasure.
Yes, you were the one who said
never give up and in God we must
trust.
In God we did trust and were able
to stay strong and remember that
you were and still are the greatest
Mom.
Happy Mother's Day.
Your children,
grandchildren,
great grands
great, great grands,
nieces and nephews


DENISE JOHNSON instructs, members of African Dance. L-R: LaToya James, Johnson,
Howard Middle School Boys, Girls Club in Tamara Smith. (News Photo)


-MIistries Partner in

Tsunami Clothing Drive


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


to send clothing to Haiti, and Tsu-
nami victims.


The community and local
Tri-County Ministries will partner ,churches are asked to support this
with Compassion Alliance Ministry effort to help those in need.
~- rr-r r'l I1 I I I I., I I I I I .


r


THE EASY WAY TO SELL, PLACE YOUR AD IN
S THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF THE:
I MONTICELLO NEWS CALL
.997-3568
: i L i ---r-a -r .
In rC c f
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LIMITED TIME
OFFER


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S15.00i 6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas
LJ LI

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US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


EPILEPSY ASSOCIATION
of the Big Bend
Serving Persons with Epilepsy
Cormnnunity Education
Diagnosis and 'f(Tatirnilt

Case Management
Support Groups



1108-B East Park Ave.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-222-1777

FRDA DEPATMHT OF


Harvest ,Ce)t.er,,o,n ,Springhollpo.
Road, off highway 259, is the col-
lection site and of boxing up of the
donated items.
The Clothing Drive began Satur-
day, April 30 and will continue
through Saturday, May 14.
Harvest Center will be unloading
its clothes closet for this effort.
Clothing articles can be dropped
off at any time.
Volunteers are needed every eve-
ning, this week and next, after 4
p.m. to help box items for shipment.
For more information contact
Apostle Marvin Graham at 212-
7669 or Gloria Graham at 322-8737'
or 997-7381.


JAKE'S SUB & GRILL
(850)997-0388
Of TIE COURT HOUSE CIRCLE


Under New Management
Now Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner (Monday thru Saturday)
EAT-IN & TAKE OUT B UFFET & MENU ITEMS
LUNCH BUFFET EVERYDAY FROM ll:00am-2:00pm
Mashed Pototoes, Rice, Corn, Green Beans, Collard Greens, Black-eyed
Peas, Lasagna, Meatloaf, Ribs, Fried Chicken, Baked Chicken & Desserts
Dinner
Rib Eye Steak
All you can eat fri edorgried:Catfish, Grouper and Shrimp
With Choices of Two Sides:
Cheese Grits ..
SColeslaw
Potatoe-Salad
French Fries
FRIDAY & SATURDAY -.
All You can eat buffet
Breakfast
Patty Sausage,;Bacon, Eggs, Grits, Home Fries, Sausage Gravy,
Biscuits, French Toast
Lunch & Dinner
Mashed Potatoes, Rice, Gravy, Corn, Green Beans, Collard Greens,
Broccoli Chicken Casserole, Lasagna, CATFISH, GROUPER, Ribs, Fried
Chicken, Baked Chicken, Banana Pudding and Baklava

*We also serve: Hamburgers, Salads, Subs, Soup, Chili, Gyros, Ice Cream
Ice Cold Beer and Hotivings during lunch and dinner.

*SPECIAL GROUP RATES CALL FOR INFORMATION*
WE NOW ACCEPT: me~a


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166

Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
-'PM Evening 'Aorship '
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The fear of
the Lord
teaches a man
wisdom.
Proverbs 15:23


Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


S Emergency
Dial 911


I rl'


. I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 7


Extension Agent Tells


LARRY WATSON, Progress Energy Commu-
nity Relations Coordinator presents a check
for $2,500 to Phil Barker, superintendent,
to fund science and math mini-grants in the
elementary and high schools. L-R: Dick Bai-


lar, foundation.grants coordinator; Watson;
Barker; David Ward, educational foundation
vice-president; and Cynthia.Shrestha, direc-
tor of curriculum. (News Photo)


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Homes Of Mourning


00000 0 0 a 6 -" 0r"-8-6-6-0-6- n a G lrb a- 000 0 o 0 a 6-6T01' 0 V an0a 0vn 0 6 66--68680 b


Mary Louise Cook Bradley
Services for Mary Louise Bradley,
89, Thomasville, were held at 7pm,
Friday, April 29, 2005.
In the Chapel of Whidden Shiver
Funeral Home. Rev. Johnny Cooper
officiated and interment followed at
Salem Church Cemetery. Mrs. Brad-
ley died Sunday April 24 at the
Brain Center in Thomasville. Born
September 5, 1915 in Jefferson
Counr,. She '.-as married to Otis Ed-
v.ard Bi -Jie', dn February 13, 1939.
He preceded heroin death in 1982.
She was a housewife and former
owner and operator of Bradley's
Grocery at Five Forks.
SMrs. Bradley. was a Baptist and
loved her family very much. Survi-
vors include her daughter and son in
law Delores and Mike Draper of
Boston; two grandchildren Amanda
Sellers and bu1'Sand Richard of Tho-
masville. Brandy Burgess and hus-
band Allen of Ochlocknee; great
grandchildren Colby Lobbatha
McKenzie and Dallas Sellers,
Alexis Simpson and.,fou, sisters
Vr'ra Maan Merd-t jand lhubajdu.-L.-
ol, Inez Edwards' ,\7lie Mla Gia-
ger and husband Job6 Graingei'.
Rena Walker and husband Charles
Walker all of Jefferson County and
a number of nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by a sis-
ter Betty Gene Swilley.
Whidden and Shiver Funeral
Home was in charge of arrange-
ments.


Rosa Lee Cobb Butler
Rosa Lee Cobb Butler 71, a home-
maker died. Thursday, April 28,
2005 in Tallahassee.
The service will be at 2:00 p.m. on
Saturday, May 7, 2005 at New Zion
Missionary Baptist Church in.
Greenville with Bishop Gentle
Groover officiating with burial at
Bellamy Cemetery in Greenville.
Family will receive (viewing) from
3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Friday,
May 6, 2005 at Refuge Church of
Our Lord, Jesus Christ in Greenville
and at New Zion on Saturday from
noon until the service.
Mrs. Butler was a native and life
long resident of Greenville where
she was an active member of the
Refuge Church of Our Lord Jesus
Christ, serving as Treasure;, usher,
the Women's Council a.id a li-
censed Missionary.
Her love will live on forever with
her son the Elder Glen (Sonja) Rob-
inson of Tallahassee; her four
daughters Laverne (Tommie) Den-
nis of Greenville; Rosemary-(Larry)
Martin of Valdosta; LaFrenchee
(Stanley) McCreary of Madison and
Gloria (John) Green of Jacksonville;
her three brothers; Lee (Hattie)
Cobb, of Archer, FL, James (Alice)
Cobb, Herman (Betty) Cobb and a
special nephew Cecil Cobb all of
Greenville, FL; 16 grandchildren,
seven great-grandchildren and a host
of nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends.


J.C. Howard
J.C. Howard 74, a Nursery Plant La-
borer died, Monday May 2, 2005 in
Wacissa.
The service will be at 11:00am on
Saturday, May 7, 2005 at Beth Page
Missionary Baptist Church in Wa-
cissa with burial at Beth Page Ceme-
tery in Wacissa. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 2:00pm to
7:30pm on Friday, May 6, 2005 at
Tillman Funeral Home.


A native and lifelong resident of
the Wacissa Community, Mr. How-
ard was a laborer at Simpson Nurs-
eries in Monticello. He was a mem-
ber of and Deacon at Beth Page
Missionary Baptist Church.'
Among those mourning his sud-
den passing are his daughter Earline
Byrd, Evangelist Jeri Edwards,. Er-
ica Howard and Angela Howard
both of Monticello; Elouise
McKnight, Karen (Ronald) Mat-
thews and Bertha Howard all of Tal-
lahassee; his sons Joe Nathan
(Doris) Howard and Rodney How-
ard all 6f Wacissa, Dale (Melissa)
Howard, Marvin (Anita) Howard
and Gerald Howard all of Monti-
cello; his brother Sam (Lila) How-
ard, Herbert James and Tucker (the
Rev: Babara) Sutton, all of Wacissa
and Jerome Iowell of St.
Petersburg; his sisters Vida Stubbs,
Mary Robinson and Bernice Glover
all of Tampa, Betty Staten of St. Pe-
tersburg, Olivia Gail Fews, Gloria
Fiffa and Sandra Clayton all of
'Pen., Sheron Stephens and Ranita
-i..',ell j.l1 Thalahasee; along with
nunierous Lindclhidieii, great
grandchildren, other relatives' and
friends.
Milton Bruce Chase
Navy Frog Man

Milton Bruce Chase, age 80 of
Marietta, GA., a nfitive of Roanoke
Alabama died Wednesday May 4,
2005.
Funeral services will be held
11:00 a.m. Saturday, May 7, 2005 in
the Jonquil Chapel of Castellaw Fu-
neral Home.with Rev. Scotty Davis
officiating: Burial will be in Kenne-
saw Memorial Park with Military
Honors.
Survived by: wife Louise Chase,
Marietta, .GA; daughter Robyn
Chase, Marietta, GA; daughter and
son in law, Denise and Garland
Griffith, Woodstock; sons Mike
Chase, Matt Chase both of Marietta;
sister Dorothy Noles, Montgomery,
AL; brother Henry Ewell Chase,
San Francisco, CA. grandchildren
T-Jon Thompson, Cody Griffith,
Genny Chase, Dani Chase; several


-'U'


SIMPKINS

IN MEMORY
Carrie R. Simpkins
"Mama Carrie"
Aug. 15, 1904 Aug. 20, 1997
Life is but a working day; a time
to work, a time to pray; and then
comes death--Author Unknown.
We will forever cherish the pre-
cious memories you left us.
'..- i Lee
Deidra
Dora
Terry

nieces and nephews.
He was a life long deacon at King
Spring Baptist Church and Gideon.
He was a Mason, a Kiwanian, an a
WWII Navy U.D.T. Member vet-
eran, receiving the Bronze Star and
The Presidential Citation. He has a
Master Degree, B.A. and B.S., Jack-
sonyille State University in
Alabama. He was a football coach at
Jefferson County High School in
Monticello, FL and the first football
coach at Crossville High School. He
was a school teacher and also retired
from Lockheed.

Contributions may be made to:
The Gideons International, Cobb
West Camp 10055, P.O. Box 344,
Austell, GA. 30168. The family will
receive friends 6-8 p.m.. Thursday
and Friday at the funeral home.
Castellaw Funeral, Smyrna is in
charge of arrangements.


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans -- Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags cereal boxes, food boxes.
laundry detergent boxgs shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars, etc. (dear, brown & green),


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfiit
Sand saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong? -


: Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

) Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Certer)

Batteries

"White Goods (which consist of)- Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center) .

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
i chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
C clearly marked to identify contents)

I **The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.


SPlease take notice to all of the signage posted in the
V collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

C C

t The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
Sfor recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
Information on other items for disposal in the City, please cali
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



SPlease visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours ot
Operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
SSolid Waste Department at 342-0184.




S,. ,. Visit the www.E arU~,i9 ..org Recycling Information web page
S0 a 00ooo o 0 Ta00 r6To o o i a0 o oao 0B 0B a6 a( n o 00oeTT b 0 o o01 -n0 i00000 eo 8' aB oo o'


i;''
. ,


1


About Food

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sciences
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
offers information about home food
preservation.
"With the first crop of spring pro-
duce readying to be picked, ambi-
tious folks may want to consider
home food preservation for family
and friends," Copeland said.
"While canning might be the
most economical and practical
method of home food preservation,
especially when there is a large
amount of food to be preserved,
freezing foods at home is quick and
easy.
In addition, drying foods at home
produces a stable shelf product that
takes up little storage space."
Cost factors to consider while
pondering whether to preserve food


Preserving
include: the cost of produce, cost
of containers, both reusable and
one-time containers; cost of water
and fuel to wash, blanch, freeze,
and the like; cost of added ingredi-
ents such as sugar, spices, anti dis-
coloration treatments; and the cost
of equipment, including a canner,
freezer or dehydration device.
"There is no one best economical
and practical choice when it comes
to food preservation," said Cope-
land.
The decision should be based on
the family's preference for foods
she said.
"However, consideration should
also be given to the particular food
and the amount of food to be pre-
served and stored. If you only have
a small amount of food, freezing
might be your best option," said
Copeland.
"If you have limited storage
space, dehydrated foods do not take


up much room. And while the ini-
tial outlay of home canning mate-
rial can be rather costly, this
equipment can be used again and
again, except for the lids.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005
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Sports


Tigers Split 2 Of


4, End Season 7-7


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


After splitting their last four
games, the Tigers stand at 7-7 sea-
son record.
The game against Melody Chris-
tian was chalked up as a win by
forfeit for the Tigers.
When they faced off against
Branford the Tigers finished with
an 11-7 loss.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
that though they lost, some good
things did happen for the Tigers.
Thomas Lyles smashed out a
three-run home run; Markyce Larry
hit two doubles; and Scottie Norton
and Clark Latson each hit one dou-
ble.
Alex Pitts pitched the game,
striking out two batters, giving up
nine hits, three walks.
Hightower said the game was a
7:30 p.m. start and the Tigers hit
very well in the first and second in-
ning, but when the lights came on
in the third, it apparently threw
them off kilter.
"We played worse with the lights


and they seemed to be playing bet-
ter with them," said Hightower.
"We didn't have a lot of errors. It
was a pretty decent game, but we
just came up on the short end."
Hamilton County clobbered the
Tigers 9-0.
"We only had two errors, they
flat-out earned the runs," said
Hightower. "We kept hitting lazy
fly balls and they had a good out-
fielder who wasn't dropping them."
The Tigers only connected with
the ball twice, singles from Latson
and Alex Lingle.
Monday night, the Tigers came
out of the first round of the district
championship with a 4-0 win over
West Gadsden.
Lingle pitched, striking out eight
and giving up two hits and no
walks.
Dionte Hightower, Breon Parker
and Damell Brooks all hit singles
and scored a run.
"They wouldn't pitch to Markyce.
(Larry)" Hightower said. He was
walked three times and stole four
bases and Quantez Burke hit two
singles and scored one run.


BILL BROWN


In the last regular season game,
the Aucilla warriors won their
twenty-second game of the year, an
11-3 rout of Lafayette County
(Mayo).
The game was played on NFCC
Field on Friday with Chris Tuten
recording his third win of the year,
with no losses. He gave up three
tuns, five hits and struck out four.
Dustin Roberts pitched the sixth
inning, and Casey Gunnels worked


-.. '-

, -r -' .,.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


S The Babe Ruth League baseball
team beat Wakulla 11-4, Saturday.
SThe boys were given 10 walks
and used that advantage to steal 17
bases.
Randy Curtis pitched the game,
striking our hrlie bartte-asran*igiw..gr
Sup one hit and t o,%ialkp;.' : '
At the plate, he had one single,
one walk and scored one run.
Malcolm Norton had a single, one
hit by pitch and scored two runs;
Curtis Hightower had one single


FRAN HUNT
staff Writer

The Howard Middle School base-
ball team wrapped up their season
with a 2-6 record after losing five
of the final seven games.
When the Bees went up against
Trinity Catholic, they won 10-2.
Demontray Johnson hit one sin-
gle and struck out five at the plate;
D'Vonte Graham had two doubles;
Amez Ammons and Anthony
McDaniel each hit a single; Mar-
keys Leonard hit a double; and
Shayne Broxie hit a double, and
struck out four from the mound.
When the Bees played Florida
High, they were defeated 10-5.
Graham had a double and struck
out three; Broxie struck out four;
Ammons hit a double; and Johnson
had a single.
In the third game, the Bees
downed Taylor County, 13-3.
Curtis Hightower had a single
and one RBI; Broxie had a single
and struck out five; Ammons had a
single and a double; Johnson had
.ro singles and one double. Gra-
:-am had txio doubles, three RBI
and struck out four. Tel n Norton


and two runs; Michael Cox had one
single and scored one run.
Casey Wheeler laid down a bunt
for a single, smashed a double that
went all the way to the fence, and
scored one run.
Mitchell Eure had a single, and
Telvin Norton, AJ Murphy, Josh
Reams, and Mason Shiver each
scored one run.
,-;--- -a- -..- .,---- V-
Coach Bobb\ Co\ concluded,
"And they're just having fun." He'
quipped about how he and other
coaches have to practically make
the boys leave the field each day
following practice.


had one single and an RBI; and
Leonard and McDaniel each had
one single.
The Bees suffered an 8-10 loss to
Trinity Catholic in a hard-fought
game.
Johnson had a single and struck
out six; Broxie, Hightower, Gra-
ham and Norton each had one sin-
gle; and Ammons had one single
and one double.
HMS fell to Florida high for a
15-10 loss.
Ammons had a single and a dou-
ble; Broxie had two singles and
struck out two; Norton and Leon-
ard each hit two singles; Graham
had one single, and struck out two;
and Hightower struck out two bat-
ters.
SThe Bees fell to Holy Comforter
for a 6-3 loss.

Hightower had two singles;
Broxie had, one single, one double
and struck out six; Graham had two
singles and struck out three; and
Norton hit one single.
In their final game of the season,
the Bees suffered their \worst defeat
or the Near. 31-15 to Holy Com-
forter.


resulted from 11 hits,.the big blows
off the bat of Drew Sherrod. .He
had a double, triple, stolen base and
an RBI in two at-bats.
Gunnels delivered-two singles,
three"RBI and a stolen base; Ridg-
ely Plaines had three hits, .twg RBI
and a stolen base to go three for
four.
SOther Aucilla batters hitting
safely were Josh Carswell, Jason.
Holton, Roberts and Kyle Peters. -
The district playoff had Aucilla
facing Apalachicola, Tuesday. A
win would place the Warriors in a


the seventh, neither gave up a run district title game,
or a hit. Thursday. All gan
Offensively, the 11 Warrior runs played on R. F. Munroe


- -- simply Smashing Drops 2

7-- Matches In Final Games


DIONTE HIGHTOWER at bat during a JCHS practice ses-
sion, hit a single, and scored a run against Hamilton.
(News Photo)



Lady Demons wallop

Greenville 12-4


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Demons softball team
won their season opener against
Greenville Sunday, 12-4.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said the
Lady Demons jumped out to a 4-0
lead and never looked back.
Valerie Robertson went four for
four; Tasha Samuels, Nikki Cooks,,
Felice McDaniel and Sharice Par-
rish all went two for three; Tanya
Young, Keandra Seabrooks and
Si. .. RI.'..i;. s all went two for
.t,. l ,,irie Robertson went one

Kidra Thompson and Kista Hills
both went one for three; Shonda
Parker and Alanna Anderson went
one for one; and Chandra Tucker
went one for three.
The Lady Demons play against
Mayo 4:30 p.m., Sunday, there.
Other opponents include
Quitman, May 15, here,


Greenvil,:, May 22, there and a
home ga-.,; against Quitman, May
29. All gan.e time are at 4:30 p.m.

Babe Ruth

Tells Schedule
Action continues May 9, 13 and
16, all against Perry. here at 5:30
p.m., and counties May 22, also
against Perry, there at 5:30 p.m.
June 3 carries a double-header for
the leaguers, both games against
Perry, here. The first game is at
5:30 p.m. and the second at 7:30.
p m I 1 I -:. 1 11 '
On the team this year are: Mal-
colm Norton, Curtis Hightower,
Michael Cox, Randy Curtis, Telvin
Norton, Jimmy Tillman, AJ Mur-
phy, Josh Reams, Mason Shiver,
Mitchell Eure and Casey Wheeler.
Coaches for the team are Bobby
Cox, John Tillman and Randy Cur-
tis.


J M FORESTRY INC.


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Office 912-367-6043
Home 913-632-2755


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

"Simply Smashing" took two of
six matches in their final games of
the season last week over the
Golden Eagle Talons.
"I'm proud of how we played our
first year in the league," said Cap-
tain Patty Hardy.
"Our goal was to try our best not
to finish last and we finished above
several other teams who have been
playing in the league for a while."
Team #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie
Brock, lost the first set, 3-6, won


nes will be
SField.


the second, 6-3 and took the tie
breaker, 7-5.
Team #2, Maxi Miller and
Hardy, lost its sets, 3-6 and 1-6.
Team #3, Paula Joiner and Cindy
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lost the second, 3-6 and came back
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Team #4, Trisha Wirick and
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sets 3-6 and a close, 67-7.
Team #5, Judy Faircloth and
Jennifer Ellis, lots its sets, 2-6 and
1-6.
Team #6, Angie Delvecchio and
Susan Scarboro, lost its sets, 1-6
and 3-6.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 9



* warrior Boys Rout


Mayo 11-3, Friday


Wakulla Falls 11-4

To Babe Ruth Team


HMS Baseball Team


Ends Season 2-6


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005

Festival Committee Searches

For Site For Jr. Miss Pageant


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Among the major discussion top-
ics of the Watermelon Festival
Meeting, Monday, were the location
of the Jr. Miss and Little King and
Queen Pageant, and the lack of an
affordable stage.
The committee learned that the
JCHS Auditorium is unavailable
June 4 for the Jr. Miss Pageant be-
cause of an earlier booking.
Hence the scramble is on to find a
suitable locale to hold the pageant,
along with space for the dress re-
hearsal.
Thprp 1 'I nnntjctnntQ i thp


Little King and Queen Pageant and
six contestants in the Jr. Miss Pag-
eant.
The committee learned earlier that
the Lotto Van was being refurbished
and thus is not available, and looked
into acquiring a stage elsewhere.
It was discovered that stage renal
fees are prohibitive.
Thus is the committee decided to
seek out a flatbed truck which can
be decorated and used as a stage for
the Platform Events and otherwise
as needed.
Event Chair Bobbie Krebs re-
ported that 100 applications have
gone out for the Arts and Crafts
Event, and 17 have been returned,


cords indicate.
The committee will encourage
businesses to decorate their win-
dows with a '50's theme, and to
dress in the same style, during the
festival.
Brett Kelly and his 19 South band
will play for the kickoff dinner, and
also after the bed race, which follow
the dinner.
Festival T-shirts are expected to
arrive May 16. The shirts are yel-
low, with a watermelon theme and a
silhouette of a couple in a 50's'style
dance.
A sock hop to recorded music
will replace the Street Dance and
f^ni.mB bl, Pntnr,, r.r,,r


Demons Clobber Lamont


18-8 In Softball

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Monticello Demons beat La-
mont in' softball action Sunday, 18-
8.
Lament jumped out to a 3-0 lead
came back to take the lead, 4-3 and
never looked back.
Montrell Rivers went four for
four; Kevin Jones and Johnny Riv-
ers both went three for three; Wilbo
Ellis, Jr. and E. Jennings both went
three for four.
Warren Allen went two for four
and smacked two home runs; and
Darron Young, Nick Russell and
Cedric Smith all went two for four.
Joe Andrews went two for two;


Action
Michael Meeks went one for four;
0. J. Sloan went 0 for two.
The Demons will face off against
Mayo Sunday and go up against
Quitman the following week. Both
game times are at 4:30 p.m.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said he is
still in need of an assistant coach
and a scorekeeper.
To volunteer for these positions,
contact Jones at 342-1209.


n Case Of Emergency

Dial 911


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 11


HOME





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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005



Parade Regulations


(Continuea from rage 1)
$1,200, including having volunteer
auxiliary officers from Leon County
and Sheriffs Department deputies
assume some of law enforcement
duties.
Meanwhile, the committee pre-
sented a request that Frisby provide
a breakdown of the $1,200, showing
exactly how the money was being
used.
Frisby took issue with the request,
saying that such an analysis had
been available all along. He recom-
mended against issuing the permit,
if the waterinelon committee refused
to pay the $1,200.
"We haven't let others do this,"
Frisby said, referring to the recent
'brouhaha over the coming Emanci-
pation Day celebration.
Police supervision for that event
was assured only in the Ilth hour,
when the Jefferson County Republi-
can Party stepped forward and of-
fered to ante up the $500 needed for
the police overtime.
Betsy Gray, chairperson of the
Watermelon Festival Committee,
apologized for her ignorance of the
recently dran regulations affecting
parades and street closings.
Her point, she: said, was that the
Watermelon Festival Committee
could ill afford to pay $1,200, given
the liability insurance and other ex-
penses it was required to pay.
She wondered why volunteer
auxiliary officers from Leon County
or deputies from the Sheriffs De-
partment here couldn't take over
some of the duties.


"Sheriff David Hobbs said he was
willing to supply eight or 10 depu-
ties," Gray said. "We are facing a
real strained budget because we're
having to pay for liability and other
things. We had no crowd control
last year. We had civilians trying to
control the situation and it wasn't
working. We are concerned with
more than just the road closing. We
want to utilize all resources so that
we can maximize our budget."
Frisby responded that sheriffs
deputies had provided assistance in
the past and that the assistance was
appreciated. But he doubted that the
Sheriffs Department was going to
substitute deputies for police and do
it at no cost.
"If David wants to replace the po-
lice officers with deputies, that's
news to me," Frisby said.
Councilman Luther Pickles offered
that it would be difficult to overturn
the parade rules and regulations, es-
pecially since the council had
drafted these after much considera-
tion.
"We need to be strict," Council-
man Brian Hayes said in support.
Both he and Pickles expressed, a
willing to contribute toward the
needed $1,200; as did City Attorney
Bruce Lienback.
The councilmen's advice to Gray
was that she seek contributions from
the community to pay the $1,200.
They were sure the contributions
would be forthcoming, they said.
With that the council adopted the
rules and regulations that had been
under consideration since several
months earlier.


Shuttle Service


(Continued From Page 1)
Health Department, Adult School,
City Hall, U-Save IGA, Winn
Dixie, Brynwood Center, and starts
from the beginning.
The cycle then repeats a total of
nine times before the 5:30 p.m.
conclusion of the shuttle runs for
the day.
)k When safety permits, the shuttle
will also pick up and drop off at the
nearside of most intersections.
The rides are free for the first
three months. Thereafter trips are
50 cents per one way trip.
The route was strategically
planned to benefit residents
throughout the city and the pro-


County Realtors.

To Hold Meeting
City and county residents are cor-
dially invited to attend what is being
billed as a get-together and'network-
ing opportunity for the county's real
estate community.
David Ward, property appraiser,
will be the guest speaker: Ward will
.be sharing his views on property
. values, development and associated
topics.
The event will be held 7- 8 a.m.
Tuesday, May 10, in the Opera
House. Coffee, juices and Danish
will be served.
The Attorneys'.Title of North Flor-
ida, Inc., is sponsoring the affair.
For more information, call
342-3216.



Opening

the door

to hope I

Call our
lifeline.
It's toll-free.

1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org Muscular Dystrophy
Association


gram is funded by the Florida De-
partment of Transportation and the
North Florida Workforce Develop-
ment Board.
The shuttle was provided by Big
Bend Transit.
Barnhill stated that the City, City
Clerk Dale ,Boatwright and Mayor
Julie Conley were very instrumen-
tal in getting the program off the
.ground .....
She added that she would very
much like to thank Big Bend transit
for the donation of refreshments,
for those attending the ceremony.
For further i;,;lirmation on the
shuttle, or route. cal Big Bend tran-
sit at 997-1323.


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fii^sHSE S^ SS^-S-- ~


LEGAL NOTICE

SECTION 00100 ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BID PROJECT: Jefferson County
NRCS Eroison Repairs Project No.
04100-669-01 OWNER: Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners 1 Court
House Circle, Room 10 Monticello,
Florida 32344-1900 ENGINEER: Darabi
and Associates, Inc. 730 NE Waldo Road
Gainesville, Florida 32641 Telephone:
(352) 376-6533 1.0 WORK
DESCRIPTION The Projects are located
in Jefferson County, Florida, and consist
of erosion repairs, channel debris removal,
embankment restoration, and protection.
Refer to NRCS Project Worksheets, and
details at the end of technical
specifications and contract documents. A
contract will be awarded based on Lump
Sum prices. 2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS All
Bidders shall be roadway contractors
pre-qualified with the Florida Department
of Transportation in Tallahassee, Florida.
Bidding and contract documents may be
examined at the Jefferson County Board
of Commissioners Office. Copies of the
documents may be obtained at Engineer's
office for $100.00 dollars per set; which
constitutes the cost for reproduction and
handling. Checks shall be payable to


LEGAL NOTICE
Engineer. Payment is nonrefundable. Bids
shall be completed on the enclosed Bid
form as set forth in the Instructions to
Bidders and otherwise be in compliance
with the Bidding Documents. Sealed bids
will be received at the Jefferson County
Board of Commissioners, 1 Court House
Circle, Room 10, Mbnticello, Florida
32344-1900 until 11:00 am. (local time) on
May 23, 2005. Any bids received after the
specified time and date will not be consid-
ered. The bids will be opened on May 23,
2005, at 11:30 am. (local time) in the Jef-
ferson County Board of Commissioners
Office, 1 Courthouse Circle, Room 10. For
further information or clarification, con-
tact Frank A. Darabi, P.E., at Engineer's
office.
5/6, 11, c
Notice Auction to the Highest Bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been seized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit
.#27 Darrell Broxsie- Household goods;
Unit #50 Don Martin Household goods:
Unit #8 Mary McCullin Household goods;
Auction Date: May 14, 2005; Time: 10
a.m. Place: Monticello Mini Storage,
corner of York & Railroad Streets,
Monticell), FL.


I'T YTor AdStatewIde t


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1471 Timberlane Road, Suite 124
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The Hiring Of A Lawyer Is An Important Decision That Should Not Be Based Soley Upon Advertise
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Summer I)ai Camp 2.11.4 at

Atlantis Academy

Tallahassee


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-..- I


LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF. THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-88-CA: JULIE K. NIX
BARRON; Plaintiff, vs. PAUL
LASTOWSKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
PAUL LASTOWSKI; JOHN RODGERS;
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN
RODGERS; STEVE LASTOWSKI;
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
PAUL LASTOWKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF PAUL LAS'TOWKI; IOHN
RODGERS YOU APF NOTIFIES that a
Complaint for Quiet Title has been filed
against you and others, and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E.
MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH THOMP-
SON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A., Plain-
tiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road,
4th Floor, Tallahassee. Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this
notice of action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED this 28th day April, 2005 Carl D.
Boatwright.
5/6.13, c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL Division. 05-18;
Deutsche Bank National Trust Company
formerly known as Bankers Trust
Company of California, N.A., as Trustee
for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Trust
2000-1, PLAINTIFF. vs. Evelyn Johnson
Thomas, et al., DEFENDANTS. NOTICE
OF FORECLOSURE SALE. Notice is
hereby given that, pursuant to that Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 26th,
2005 and entered in civil case number
05-18, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd
Judicial Circuit in and for Jefferson
County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY
FORMERLY KNOWN AS BANKERS
TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA.
N.A.. AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN
STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I TRUST
2000-1, is Plaintiff and Evelyn Johnson
Thomas; Jennings B. Williams: Mary L.
Johnson Grant; Earnestine Johnson Price:
ements Jefferson County, a political subdivision ol
erence. the State of Florida; State of Florida
Department of Revenue, is/are
Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello, Florida.
Jefferson County, Florida, at 11:00 am on


LEGAL NOTICE

the 26th day of May, 2005, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE IN THE NORTHWEST
PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER (SE 'A OF NW 1/4) OF
SECTION TWENTY-ONE (21),
TOWNSHIP ONE (1) NORTH, RANGE
FIVE (5) EAST WHICH IS ENCLOSED
WITHIN THE FOLLOWING
BOUNDARY LINES, TO. WIT:-
BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION
OF THE SOUTH BORDER OF THE
OLD PUBLIC ROAD RUNNING
EASTERLY AND WESTERLY ACROSS
THE NORTH SIDE OF SAID FORTY OF
LAND WITH THE EAST LINE OF
THAT CERTAIN ONE ACRE TRACT
OF LAND CONVEYED BY DAVID
MCKINNEY AND WIFE TO J.B.
SCURRY ET AL AS TRUSTEES OF THE
THOMPSON VALLEY BAPTIST
CHURCH BY DEED DATED OCTOBER
29, 1892 AND OF RECORD IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK "X" PAGE
164 AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE AND RUNNING
THENCE SOUTH TWO HUNDRED TEN
(210) FEET, THENCE RUNNING
SOUTHEASTERLY AND PARALLEL
WITH SAID OLD PUBLIC ROAD A
DISTANCE FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY
FEET (420), THENCE RUNNING
NORTH TWO HUNDRED TEN FEET
(210), MORE LESS AND TO THE
SOUTH BORDER OF SAID OLD
PUBLIC ROAD, AND THENCE
RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY ALONG
THE SOUTH BORDER OF SAID OLD
PUBLIC ROAD A DISTANCE OF FOUR
HUNDRED TWENTY (420) FEET
MORE OR LESS, AND TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; SAID LAND HEREIN

CONVEYED CONTAINING TWO (2)
ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND BEING
A PART OF THE LANDS CONVEYED
TO SAID BEN EDWARDS, JR. OF THE
FIRST PART BY JOHN H. SHUMAN BY
DEED DATED JUNE 13, 1927 AND OF
RECORD IN SAID CLERK'S OFFICE IN
DEED BOOK "UU" PAGE 256 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
MADE; TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE
HOME VIN# 10126577u. NOTE: Pursuant
to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
you are advised that this law firm is
deemed to be a debt collector attempting
to collect a debt and. any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
Dated the 26th day of April 2005. DALE
BOATWRIGHT, Clerk of Circuit Court;
4/29. 5/6, t


i,'.I 1- a' I ... L t: i r: ,r ,: !,:,:'. ,. "' T. ... 1'.. .. rH iNFLUJ ENCL E OF C.S
,',H fl|.).I .L Llr *Il l, ,: I.il : h .' I : '. t H ilr lai.f *:l[ iHL I., "' 1 : ,hD l. .,l .,', J ii Ut Y =.' "J:'..'. : ;

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TIME: Full Day 8:00 am 5:00 pm
Half Day 8:00 am 12:30 pm
COST: $95.00 per week for our full day program
or $60.00 per week half day
Morning & afternoon snack provided
Participants responsiblefor his/her own lunch
Call (850) 893-4692
Or \isiu us at 15UI.l Microsukee Rd.. TaUahassee.


Atlantis Academy I, also offering:
HIGH SCHOOL COURSE CREDIT
5i4C(s .ccredited
We are offering iU d accredited acadermi course tredi. lfor
r igh l Pre- g. 'bre- i lg a It. ,.n ,clr
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To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005 PAGE 13


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for \ ednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
S Call-Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


NOTICE

Notice: The Street Committee of the
Monticello City Council will meet on
Tuesday, May 17, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. to
discuss a proposal for a downtown
business circle and/or rerouting of one or
more city streets to add parking and/or
eliminate safety hazards. The meeting will
take place at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida. For More
Information, Contact City Clerk Emily
Anderson at 342-0153.
5/6, c
BOOK SALE at the Jefferson County
Library 9-12 Saturday, May 7. 2005
ktmeoefit Go To Library)
5/6, pd

HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MORE PAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
5/6, fcan
Need live in caregiver for my mother.
Light housekeeping, meal preparation,
shopping. Call 863-632-1377.
5/4. 6, rd

Local Pnsiness now hiring Ft/Pt, weekends
re,pFnd to' PO Box 691, Monticello.
4 :7, s/d tfi

Director of Nursing : Nature Coast
Regional Surgery Center Immediate
management position opening for a
licensed RN with current ACLS & BLS.
Medicare-certified ASC that enhances
quality of life through improved vision.
Strong managerial, human relations and
organizational skills are preferred. Salary
commensurate with-experience. Excellent
benefits. Fax resume to Human Resources
(850) 838-3937 or call (850) 584-2778, Ext.
639. Closing date: 05/31/05 EOE.
4/20, 22, 27, 29, 5/4, ), c

Director of Music Ministries position
available First United Methodist Church
of Monticello. Applicants must have
experience in choral direction,
responsibilities include directing and
rehearsing the Chancel Choir for the 11
am Sunday Service. Participation in other
services as appropriate. Fax resume to
997-6121 or send to FUMC 324 W. Walnut
St. Monticello, Fl 32344 attn.: Dean
Jerry r.
5/4 6,pd .-.

ASAP Part-time Data Entry Operator
Monticello: 4 hrs a day, M-F must have
computer knowledge and easily trainable
on Senior Citizens Records. Needs
organizational and phone skills. High
school diploma or equivalent Pay rate: $8.
Applications may be picked up at
Jefferson Senior Citizens Center 1155 N.
Jefferson St. Monticello.
5/4 o, c


HELP WANTED


EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg

AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn
Dad's Auto Sales LLC
'93 Dodge Dakota $2495
'90 Olds Cutlas $1795
'89 T-Bird $1995
2685 South Jefferson St. 997-3245
tfni 4/15,c

GARAGE SALE
8:30 West Lake Rd. Fri. & Sat. (6,7) 8-4
p.m.
Garage Sale: Sat. 8:00 'til 1:00 at ROYAL
MINI STORAGE. U.S. Hwy. #19 South
King Size Bed Set $75.00, Triple Dresser.
$45 ,;iilel furn. h/h misc. Books.
5/4, 6, c
Fri. & Sat. May 6,& 7. Starting 8am until.
2510 St. Augustine Rd. St. Phillip off Hwy.
27.
5/6, pd
YARD SALE: Monticello Saturday, May
7th 8am 12 noon 148 Coopers Pond
knald.
5/6, pd

FOR SALE
Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn


Queen Double Pillow top mattress set. 5/6, fcan
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374 Mobile I
3/11 tfn room 2 I


Electric Fridgerdaire Stove $25,
Microwave Oven, Kenmore $50 (good), 2
bar stool chairs $40, ARABIAN more
horse, western pleasure, $1,000 call
997-8453 after 6pm
5/4, 6, pd

Couch & Love seat:, Brand new, still
packaged, w/. warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn


FOR SALE

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE 50+ Premium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limited time offer.
S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
5/6 fcan

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn

Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
5/6, fcan


METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
5/6, fcan

20 ft. Pontoon with Mercury 70 HP Eng.
Trailer included. Great condition $7500
obo. 997-4562.
5/6, 11, 13 pd

MOBILE HOME with land. Enhanced
4Bi/2Ba, 2200 sq. ft. on 1.56 ac.,
outbuilding. Financing avail. $115,000.
997-1093.
4/29, 5/6, 13, 20, pd

REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of Western
NC Mountains. Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy Call
for Free Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com


lome with land. Enhanced 4 bed-
bath 2200 sq. ft. on 1.56 ac, out-
Financing available. $115.000.


building.
997-1093


FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1-777 ext. 1299.
5/6, fcan f

Your RE/MAX Connection for Jefferson
& Leon Pam Bowling, Broker Associate.
S'o-38:"-6685 x20 or 1-888-701-2205 x20
.,/I, tfn


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


Southern Division


WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding, Read welding symbols
and measuring. Standard AWS Welding Test in Flat Position.

FITTER TRAINEES:
Math skills and measuring ability required. Blue Print reading and fitting
experience helpful, but not required.

Applications available

Georgia Department ofLabor

Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


Dental Coverage
Retirement
Disability Insurance
Educational Assistance


IMS


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
5/6, fcan

SERVICES

Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfln
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
" message.
2/11-tfn
CAREGIVER, willing to work weekdays
and weekends. Call 342-1486 or 510-0998.
5/4. 6, I1, 13, 18, 20, 24. 27, pd
Lawn Mowing Maintenance and Pressure
Washing services now available. Please
Call 997-8635 anytime for estimates.
5/6, 13, 20, 27,c
EARN YOUR DEGREE Online from
home. Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance. and
computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.
5/6 flan
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug'Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfl
Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
yard work. cleanup, home repairs. By day
Sor week.'342-1486, 510-0998.

LOST

Perry Ellis Handbag. Black oblong, 2
strips, and contains personal items. Call
997-2~'94.
5/1. ., pl

GREAT OPPORTUNITY

JOIN OUR
TEAM TODAY!


Seeking Technician
candidates to fill immediate
openings in the Tallahassee
and surrounding areas.
We offer competitive
compensation, paid training, a
'great benefits package, flexible
schedule and more!
Please apply at any of our
Super-Lube locations in
Tallahassee or fax your resume
resume to 850/222-5152.
Valid Drivers License Required.
.Applicants must pass a drug test.


Professionals Realty
t Independently Owned and Operated
Pamr Bowling
Broker Associate


Toll Free: (888) '. '* F ., -'
Residence: (8o0) 997.4789
ElI y'' '1


Real Flstate...

Always a Great Investment


Pure Elegance!
3,556 sq ft Must
See Stately Brick
House, 5BR 2BA,
Tennis Court, Fire-
place, Gazebo,
Wet Bar, Sunroom
& More On 10
Beautiful Acres!
$547,900


KELL.Y &r KELL..Y
PR OP EKRTIsII
,)I qT Vi....


512 N. Jeffermsn
.ww.cbkk.coi 997-
*Lamont: 4BR/2BA 1,654 sq ft Cedar House on
2.20 AC, Convenient to Tallahassee... $84,900
*LOG CABIN: 2BR/2BA 1,330 Sq Ft, on 6.05
Acres, Wood Floors, Spiral Staircase, Spanish
Tile & More! ..............................$169,900
*Horses? 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, 14 AC,
Fenced, Cross Fenced & Riding Ring!$192,500
*Real Florida Setting- 3,759 Sq Ft House,
Barn & Guest House on 10+Acres. ......$429,000


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com




King of the Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath
yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine on a hilltop near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field all in
the fastest growing part of Jefferson County
for only $1,200,000
Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre
Check this Out Like new home, built in :
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screenedporch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295,000
High on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
high land in deed restricted neighborhood
$10,000 per acre
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Desoto Road 2.39 wooded acres near St.
Augustine Rd $18,500

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best
We have good buyers looking for acreage
between Monticello and Lloyd can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
,MClr-IIB-I CI~P-ICB--W-e-t-I'-C-B'Bt~^SBSl^HS~lP'BS'


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides &
Double Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @
$895, $50 dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571


Uniforms

BENEFITS THAT STABILIZE YOUR FUTURE

Equal Opportunity Employer

MAIL: P.O. BOX 7750 THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA 31758-7750
PHONE: (229) 228-9780 -- FAX: (229) 226-2718


~C~CI~I~~RI~II


I NOMMEME


Jr=r=


WMEMMMMA
MMENOMEMOMM











13 Contestants Vie For


Little King, Queen Crowns


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Watermelon Festival Little
S King and Queen Contest takes place
in conjunction with the Junior Miss
Pageant 7 p.m., Saturday, June 4, at
a location to be determined.
Five boys will compete for the ti-
tle of Little King, and eight girls
will compete for the title of Little
Queen.
In alphabetical order, contestants
are:
James Harp is the son of Becky
and Tom Harp. JT, as he is known,
is six years old, and in grade K-5 at
Aucilla Christian Academy.

Jenny Jackson is the daughter of
Lisa and Danny Jackson. She is six
years old, and in grade K-5 at Au-
cilla Christian Academy.
Carly Joiner is the daughter of
Paula and Carl Joiner. She is five
years old, and in Pre-K at Aucilla
Christian Academy.


Sara Joiner is the daughter of
Sonja and Henry Joiner. Sissy, as
she is known, is six years old and in
the first grade at Sovereign Grace
Academy.
Donnie Kinsey is the son of Ed-
win and Melissa Kinsey. He is five
years old and in kindergarten at Au-
cilla Christian Academy.
Emily Knowles is the daughter of
Tracey and Granville Knowles. She
is five years old and in grade K-5 at
Aucilla Christian Academy.
Sara McElveen is the daughter of
Jack McElveen. She is five years
old and in kindergarten at Jefferson
Elementary School.
Brooklyn McGlamory is the
daughter of Ana and Steve
McGlamory. She is seven years old
and in the second grade at Aucilla
Christian Academy.
Rafael Rosas is the son of Helen
and Gustavo Rosas. He is seven
years old and in the first grade at
Jefferson Elementary School.
Chelsea Scarborough is the daugh-
ter of Valerie and John


Scarborough. She is five years old
and in preschool at the Little Uni-
versity.
Tomas Swickley is the son of Eve
and Brian Swickley. He is seven
years old and in the first grade at
Aucilla Christian Academy.
Quinton Thomas is the son of
Shanna and Stephen Thomas. He is
five years old and in Pre K-4 at Au-
cilla Christian Academy.
Ria Wheeler is the daughter of
Guadalupe Wheeler and Randy
Wheeler. She is five years old and in
K-4 at Aucilla Christian Academy.


',



tii*~ "P8


Edward Jones Firm Ranked

First In Customer Survey


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The financial-services firm Ed-
ward Jones has been ranked first in
J.D. Power and Associates' annual
survey of. customer satisfaction
among full service investors, re-
ports Monticello investment repre-
sentative Robert Davison.
The ranking released as the 2005
Full-Service Investor Satisfaction
Study, ranked Edward Jones ahead


of 19 other firms.
"I'm thrilled about our placement
on the J.D. Power and Associates
ranking," said Davison. "We are
committed to providing the highest
level of service to our clients.
"Everything we do is focused on
building and maintaining strong re-
lationships."
In the study, six key factors were
considered: integrity of the broker-
age firm; information/resourses; ac-
count management; cost; investment
representative/advisor; and customer
service.


Jazz Concert Set On Lawn


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


the music.
The event is sponsored by the Op-
'era House and the Monticello News.


SCARBOROUGH


C efZ~Vie


4*


: ,
S ,, ,- a..-. .




.S


THOMAS


McELVEEN McGLAMORY


A Florida State Jazz Ensemble
Concert will take place 6 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday on the front lawn of the
Jefferson. Elementary School Boys
and Girls Club.

City Officials will give the wel-
come of this "Eleventh on the
Tenth" Concert, in honor of the 1 Ith
anniversary of the local Boys. and
Girls Club, on the 10th day of the
month.

This is bag lunch concert, with at-
tendees encouraged to come pre-
pared with snacks, and a lawn
chair, or blanket, to relax and enjoy


THE ROTARY CLUB OF MONTICELLO
PRESENTS.


MONTICELLO'S OWN

ROBERT OLEN BUTLER

AUTHOR
AND PULITZER PRIZE WINNER


WITH LOCAL MUSICAL LEGEND
AND GREAT VETERINARIAN

MICHAEL PURVIS


IN


AMERICAN HOURS D'OEUVRES

FOR THE BRAIN & SOUL
(A READING WITH MUSICAL INTERACTION)


Heavy Hors D'oeuvres
Cash Bar
6:30PM Saturday, May 21, 2005
'Monticello Opera House
$25 / person* Reservations Required
Call Monticello's Chamber of Commerce 997-5552
Or Monticello Opera House 997-4242

*Proceeds to benefit local community and international projects of the Monticello Rotary Club


Come in for a FREE


Screening!


During May
-Better Hearing Month-
your local Beltone hearing
care center is holding a Spring Open House.
Now's the best time to stop
in for a FREE hearing screening
and experience the .Beltone
Difference. For sixty-five years
Beltone has helped America hear
better. Let us show you what we
can do for you.


@it'"og, Beltone
Helping the world hear better
Benefits of hearing aids vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment accuracy of hearing evaluabton and proper fit 2005 Belltone Beclonics


Beltone Hearing Center
Desloge Bldg.
2510 Miccosukee Rd. Ste. 110
Tallahassee, FL 32308
M-F 9:00-5:00

222-1231


- - - --- -
I rl. -Mir d -goes


Exirs My1,20


Digital Hearing Aids

starting at $695
Many styles and sizes
to choose from.
No other coupons or previous
fittings apply.
Based on hearing loss.

Expires: May 13, 2005
Beltone
--- -- ------ -j


PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 6, 2005


JACKSON

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HARP


ROSAS


-. INER
JOINER


JOINER


SWICKLEY


KINSEY KNOWLES


WHEELER


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