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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00035
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 4, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00035
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILE, FL. 32611


VFW Head

Rips Budget

For Vets

Editorial, Page 4


JES

Career Fair

Held Recently

Story, Photo, Page 5
I


Secretary's

Luncheon

Sold Out Event

Story, Photos, Page 7


17 Students

Participate In

Parent/Student Day

Story, Photo, Page 12
,Imm


Wednesday Morning


Montic


II


ws


137TH YEAR NO.35, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2005


State Awards City $1.5 Million


Money Will Go To Repair


Problematic

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

After years of trying for the fund-
ing, the city has finally been
awarded $1.5.million from the De-
partment of Environmental Protec-
tion (DEP) for upgrade of its sani-
tary sewer system.
The funding is specifically ear-
marked for the identification and
correction of the inflow and infiltra-
tion problems that have plagued the
wastewater treatment plant for
years.
As consultant engineer Robert
George, of George and Hutcheson
Engineering, Inc., explains it, the
first step in the process entails the
formulation of a wastewater facili-
ties plan. His firm, in fact, is pres-
ently engaged in this activity.
'This is a pretty inclusive docu-
ment that the DEP requires you to


Sewer Lines
do to show that you went through all
the appropriate investigative proce-
dures to determine exactly what
needs to be done," George says.
Among other things, the study
must identify wetlands and other en-
*vironmentally sensitive areas and
show how the cited problem impacts
on these and on the treatment plant
itself.
Once the wastewater facilities
plan is formulated and accepted by
the DEP, the engineering phase
kicks in. This is where the engineer
flows a television camera down the
sewer system and pinpoints the lo-
cation of problem areas, .such as
cracks or breaks in the pipes.
The engineer also evaluates the
existing pipe sizes to make sure that
these are adequate to carry the nec-
essary flows and that they are not
inadvertently contributing to the
problem.
DEP stipulations, meanwhile,


]




ENGINEER ROBERT GEORGEt'Ileft, has been working with
City Superintendent Don Anre'son on the upgrade of the
city's- infrastructure for years:f lews' Photo) : -.....,-


limit the construction or repairs to
$750,000 per year, according to
George.
The problem of excess storm-
water flowing into or infiltrating the
city's sewer system has been going
on for years. It is particularly nota-
ble during heavy storms.
These water surges ultimately en-
ter the city's wastewater treatment.
plant, which is then forced to work
harder and longer to handle the in-
creased volume.
Notwithstanding- these periodic
surges, George maintains that the
treatment plant has never operated
over capacity. That's because, al-
though designed for a million gallon
capacity, it averages about half a
million gallons daily, he says.
He offers that a redundancy factor
built into the plant diverts the extra
water into a lined pond for a while.
Why then the urgency to correct
the inflow and infiltration problem?
"The urgency is that you're intro-
ducing an additional flow into the
system that doesn't need to be
there," George says. "So the system
is .working- longer and-harder .than


you want it to... The water is also
having to be re-circulated and re-
circulated. It's not efficient. It's us-
ing more energy. And the, long-term
effect is that you're wearing out the
equipment."
Additionally, George explains, a
treatment plant is like a living or-
ganism is some respects. Meaning
that certain microorganisms that live
in different areas of the plant ac-
count for the breakup of the waste.
"These microorganisms live by
having a constant steady flow,"
George explains. "When you in-
crease or decrease that flow, you af-
fect how these microorganisms
work. An influx of water disrupts
that environment."
The sewer system upgrade is part
of a comprehensive effort underway
by the city to modernize and make
more efficient its infrastructure.
Other aspects of the project include
an upgrade of the water delivery
system and installation of new read-
ing meters citywide.
Tied to the changes will be
changes in the rates that the city
charge: f;,:r the various services.


2005 District Writing


Scores Up Over 2004


-. .. -' ,-_ .- ,__ee!! ws .. .
PROPONENTS argue that a bypass not only opening it up to more pedestrian traffic. The
would relief traffic congestion in the city, it DOT's present stance is that a bypass won't
would also revive the downtown district by be needed until 2030. (News Photo)


County Will Ask For Money


TO Do Second Bypass Study


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Prodded by the Chamber of Com-
merce, county commissioners have
agreed to pursue the second phase
of the US 19 bypass study.
Commissioners recently voted 5-0
to approach the Department of
Transportation (DOT) in the coming
weeks and request that the latter ini-
tiate a second engineering study.
This second study, which is ex-
pected to cost between $300,000
and $500,000, is supposed to iden-
tify and recommend a specific by-
pass route.
Dick Bailar carried the ball for the
chamber. Bailar approached com-
missioners about a month ago, then
again three weeks ago, and on April
21, to ask the board that it press the
DOT on the bypass issue.
Bailar expressed concern that if
the county did not maintain pressure
on the DOT to keep the momentum
going, the project would simply slip
through the cracks.
He pointed out that it had been


four years since the community had
first met with the DOT secretary and
the latter had promised that he
would initiate a study. It had then
taken almost three years for the
study to be funded, Bailar said.
And the study, which cost in the
vicinity of $250,000, had barely
scratched the surface, he said.
"My reaction was, 'Wow, what
have you told us that we didn't al-
ready know," Bailar said of the
study's results.
In fact, all the first study had done
was to establish that a second study
was necessary, he said.
At the rate the process was pro-
ceeding, it would be decades -- un-
der the best of circumstances --
before a bypass was ever built, Bai-
lar said. And if the community did-
n't actively pursue the matter, it
would never come to fruition, he
said.
"Unless a formal request is made,
it will never happen," Bailar said.
"And if it isn't started now and fol-
lowed consecutively, it will take 20
years or more."
The first time that Bailar brought


up the issue, commissioners asked
him to hold off on it, until they
could resolve another matter that
was pending with the DOT. That
matter concerned the funding for a
county road that commissioners
wanted to resurface
Several of the commissioners ex-
pressed concern that pressing the
DOT on the bypass issue might
jeopardize the road resurfacing
money.
Three weeks ago, when Commis-
sioner Junior Tuten reported that the
other pending issue had been re-.
solved, Bailar immediately brought
up the bypass again.
Now that the road paving was no
longer an issue, would commis-
sioner consider approaching the
DOT on the bypass? he wanted to
know.
Commissioners finally answered
yes to that question April 21. It was
not the most enthusiastic of re-
sponses, however.
The issue of a bypass has been
floating about for more than 20
years. The last bypass study, in fact,
(See Bypass Page 10)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Howard Middle School grade
eight student, Ireshia Denson, re-
ceived a pefect score of 6 on the
Florida Writes Achievement Test.
(See related story in the News)
Principal Juliet Jackson reports
this is the first time a student at
Howard, ever achieved a perfect
score.
Average scores at the schools are:
Jefferson Elementary School 2.9,
Howard Middle School 3.4, Jeffer-
son County High School 3.5
The score indicating students are
performing at grade level is 3.5.
In 2004 the District scores on
Florida Writes were JES 3.0, HMS
.3.3, JCHS, 3.4.
This reflects a drop of one point
at JES, and a rise of one point each
at HMS, and JCHS.
Average of the three schools is
3.3, which places the district aver-
age at 8th of the 12 districts cited in
the Tallahassee Democrat,
Thursday. (Madison's average was
:reported at 3)
Florida Writes is but a portion of
the FCAT test. Scores for the
FCAT test are expected by the end
of the month.
DOE reports that school grades
will be out much later this year, be-
cause counties whose schools were
affected by the 2004 hurricanes
were tested later than other counties.
Since school grades are compiled
for the entire state, they won't be
done until all FCAT scores are in,
DOE reports.
Florida Writes is given in grades
4, 8, and 10.
In grade 4, students were asked to
choose an activity they enjoy, and to
explain why they enjoy it.
They were also asked to write a
story about a teacher surprising a
class.
In grade 8, Students were asked
to choose a time of year and explain
why they liked that time.
They were also asked to persuade
a newspaper editor whether teens


waste too much time watching tele-
vision. .
In grade 10, students were asked
to choose a personal' quality they
think is important and explain why
this quality is important.


They were also asked to persuade
the school board whether students
should have study hall.
Superintendent Phil Barker said he
was pleased with the increase in
(See District Writing Page 6)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
During a ceremony in the cafete-
ria at Howard Middle School, last
week, eighth grade student Ireshia
Denson was honored as the first
student at the school to receive a
perfect score of six on the Florida
Writes Achievement Test.
The test is graded on a scale from
one to six.
In the event, designed to cele-
brate the school's average of 3.4 on
the test, which was administered
to grade eight students, no com-
ment was initially made to Denson.
"I didn't know what the big deal
was," said Denson. "The News


was taking my picture and people
were congratulating me, but no one
would tell me why.
"It wasn't until the very end of the
event that my name was called and
I was congratulated for scoring a
perfect score of six. They told me I
was the first HMS student to do it.
She was awarded with a trophy
and balloons along with the recog-
nition of the school.
"It was then I knew that all my
hard work had paid off."
She explained that every morn-
ing during her language class,
Brenda Kelly would have the stu-
dents working on paragraphs.
"Normally I would score a three
(See Denson Page 6)


IRESHIA DENSON, left, scored a perfect 6 on the Florida
Writes Test. Shown with her mother, Fazie, Denson was
lured outside by our photographer to keep the announce-
ment a surprise until the proper time during the ceremony.
(News Photo)


Denson Earns Perfect

Florida Writes Score


CO


-- Ysrr4~g~a~e
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PAGE 2. MONTICELLO. (FLL NEWS, WED., MAY 4,

^

Monticelfo Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


LOIS HUNTER arrives to the Benefit Car trucks and motorcycles, with proceeds Lu
Show on her bike. The show included cars, benefit a nine year old cancer patient.




--'
... -^ ,' i ^-.


DALE BOATWRIGHT was
among entrants in benefit
show.


I may live just down
the street, but I've
got instant access to
Wall Street. I can give
you up-to-the-second
information on more
than 5,000' stocks.
Call or stop by today
for details.
Robert J. Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


MISTY SCARBERRY admires one of the Show Saturday in Buddy's parking lot at Jef-
many cars on display at the Benefit Car ferson Square. (News Photos)


Benefit Car Show Well


Attended, Despite Rain


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Despite the gray skies, heavy
drizzle and rain Saturday, at-
tendees turned out in full force for
the Benefit Car Show held in the
parking lot in front of Buddy's
Home Furnishings and Advance
Discount Auto.
Many vehicles were on display,
including classic cars and trucks,
sports cars, and motorcycles.
.Those who had their vehicles en-
tered in the show, continually
wiped the rain off of them, wring-
ing out towels and starting all over
again, always glad to stop and pro-
vide onlookers with a peek under
the hood.

The car show was held to benefit
nine year-old Hayley Grantham, an
only child, diagnosed with inoier-
able brain cancer and preset y at
Shands Hospital undergoing itdia-
tion treatment and chemotherapy


All funds raised will go toward
paying for that treatment: Hayley
is the daughter of Perry and Tracey
Grantham.
Events on tap included awarding
door prizes, naming raffle and si-
lent auction winners, and provid-
ing music, games and food.
Trophies and specialty prizes
were awarded for Top 40 Cars and
Trucks, Top Ten Bikes and awards
were given for Best Paint, Best En-
gine and Best Interior.
Discount Advance Auto hosted a
variety of giveaways similar to a
grand opening special occasion.
There were also several ongoing
raffles, one of which was for a 43
inch big screen color TV, donated
by Buddy's.
Other raffle items included such
prizes as a TV, stereo, DVD play-
ers and 18-volt tool sets, all do-
nated by Buddy's.
Spokesperson Cindy Lambert said
before the event that they have a lot
of sponsors and contributors in the
event and they would most defi-


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nitely be thanked and recognized'
when all the inform tion is avail-
able following the eveitt.
This information v s to include
winners and funds raise('.
At press time, calls to Lambert
were not returned, but the informa-
tion is expected to be forthcoming.


THE ROTARY CLUB OF MONTICELLO
PRESENTS



MONTICELLO' SOWN


ROBERT OLEN BUTLER

AUTHOR

AND PULITZER PRIZE WINNER


WITH LOCAL MUSICAL LEGEND

AND GREAT VETERINARIAN

MICHAEL PURVIS


IN



AMERICAN HOURS D OEUVRESS

FOR THE BRAIN & SOUL
(A READING WITH MUSICAL INTERACTION)



Heavy Hors D'oeuvres
Cash Bar
6:30PM Saturday, May 21, 2005
Monticello Opera House
$25 / person* Reservations Required
Call Monticello's Chamber of Commerce 997-5552
Or Monticello Opera House 997-4242

*Proceeds to benefit local community and international projects of the Monticello Rotary Club.


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD


Announces the regular school board meeting to which
the public is invited. The meeting will be held at the
Desmond M. Bishop Administration Building on
Monday, May 9, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district office at
1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL.
Monday through Friday between the hours of ,:;/
8:00 a.m. and"4:00 p.m. A copy of the school board packet
will be available for review at the district office.


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Summer Youth Progran

County Planned In June


LOCAL SERVICEMEN Maj. Ben Ervin, left, and Maj.
rence Farmer crossed paths by accident in Baghdad,
Farmer was in the area briefly. The two had lunch
talked about Monticello. Farmer is married to the fo
Voncile Connor, of Monticello. The couple, along wit
vin's wife Jeanie all graduated from JCHS in 1982. P
were taken, April 27, outside of a palace reported
longing to Saddam.


-~,~J- -
Ui~


New Police Officer Brings


Much Experience To Post


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello's newest Police Offi-
cer, 40 year old Michael Moore,
brings sixteen and a half years of
experience to the position.


zure, supervising'and dealt with the
public on complaints about
officers.
When he left his former job, he
was the highest ranking Lieutenant
there.
Moore said he enjoys Monticello,
"People here are nice, friendly and
very. helpful, I really enjoy it."
Moore and his wife, Aimee, live
in Tallahassee with their four chil-
dren and are looking to relocate
here.


Moore added that his hobby is his
family. "I used to play golf but my
family is my hobby now, I spend
all the time with them that I can,"
said Moore.
He said that both he and his wife
enjoy horseback riding and often
ride together, "We have a very big
love for horses."
Moore concluded that he planned
to serve the people of Monticello
until he retired from law enforce-
ment.


week. The participants will be in-
sured with Workers Comp by the
service provider, The Paxen Group


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The County Summer Youth Em-
ployment Program will operate June
13-24, 2005.
This is a two week paid work ex-
perience opportunity offering bene-
fits for both the student and
employer.
The Program will provide high~i
school students work experience op-
portunities in the local community.
It also offers.employers the op-
portunity to play a role in shaping
Ter- the future of students.
when Sponsored by Employment Con-5
San nections, which has an office at the
library, high school students are
armer paid for a two week work
1h Er-. internship.
hotos They will work up to 6 hours each
y be- day for a maximum of 30 hours per


term emplo
The hope
these stude


MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED., MAY 4, 2005 PAGE 3
their company.
S Fo r To take advantage of the opportu-
nity to mentor to a young person
and introduce them to the working
world, contact Tonya McNealy with
yment. Employment Connections, for an
e is for businesses to give Employer Information Application,
nts a chance to excel in 264-7332.


GO


Lwt


Employers will provide job shad-
owing and work experience sites for
participants, who will work in a
field of interest to them, allowing
them to experience the requirements
of the working world.
Participants performance and pro-
gress will be monitored and evalu-
ated by the employer and an
Employment Connections staff
member.
This Program is designed to offer
students a glimpse into the working
world which often evolves into long


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S-il


MOORE


Moore served as an MP in the Air
Force for three years and then
served 14.5 years as a deputy in
Franklin County.
His assignments included: a
road officer, investigator, narcotics
task force member, and internal af-
fairs staff member.
When he left the drug task force
as a lieutenant he became a road
supervisor for the next two years.
Moore has studied breathalyzer
administration, scuba diving,
search and rescue, radar, and aerial
spotter for cannabis.
He has performed drug investi-
gations, criminal investigations,
murder investigations and sexual
battery investigations.
He added that he worked a fa-
mous double homicide in Alligator
Point back in 1990 or 1991. Moore
worked in Johnson County law en-
forcement for awhile as a police of-
ficer for parks and recreation,
handling wildlife and game pre-
serves, much the same as what is
done in this area by the FWC.
Moore said that he put on educa-
tional programs for kids and adults,
often dressed in costumes and per-
forming skits to educate people
about the various kinds of plants
and wildlife in the area.
Moore said his reason for coming
to work in Monticello was that he
was still certified in the state of
Florida and he saw a job opening
advertised in the paper, so he ap-
plied here and was hired.
He added that being in Monti-
cello was not any different than be-
ing in Franklin County, both being
small rural communities. "I'm used
to being in a community where
everybody knows everybody on a
first-name basis," he said.
Moore has also trained with the
Drug Enforcement Administration,
the US Customs Service, the US
Coast Guard in helicopter and
search boats drug interdiction.
He has performed search and sei-


USDA

United States Department of Agriculture
S' ,




The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (aiso called "Tobacco Buyout").



You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA~S new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


) Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

) Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

I Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4.2005.



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello,'FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




VFW Head Rips


Budget For Vets


"I am here to make military veter-
ans the number one priority of this
nation," said John Furgess, the
coinmmander-in-chief of the 2.4
million-member Veteran of Foreign
Wars, before a joint hearing of the
U.S. Senate and House of Represen-
tatives' Committees on Veterans Af-
fairs.
Furgess, .of Nashville, leads the
nation's largest organization of
combat veterans. He was in Wash-
ington recently to respond to the
Administration's fiscal year 2006
budget proposal for veterans' health
care.
His message was clear and to the
poiit, calling the budget proposal an
"obvious attempt to balance part of
the country's deficit on the backs of
a disabled and aging military vet-
eran population."
In his testimony, Furgess said the
Administration's proposal to in-
crease VA health care funding by an
amount that doesn't cover inflation
or uncontrollable expenses sends the
wrong message' to the .2.2 million
Americans currently serving in uni-
form, and does a disservice to the
nation's 25 million veterans.
He also expressed concern about
recommendations that would elimi-'
nate' thousands of VA employees
and' slash money from programs


ranging from long-term care facili-
ties for an aging veteran population
to reducing the budget for prosthetic:
research ata time when better body.
armor is saving more lives but often:
at the expense of arms and legs.
"When our nation called, we an-
swered, and in return, the only thing
we ever asked for was to be given a
square deal afterwards. How are we
to take this?" Furgess asked, while
making it clear that the budget was
an obvious attempt to make the need
fit the budget instead of making the
budget fit the need.
"We are a nation at war," he said
"and just as we hold our military
personnel accountable to do their
duty, so, too, should our nation be
held accountable to care for their
minds and bodies if they are injured,
or care for their families if they die."
Furgess pledged that the VFW will
work side-by-side with congress to
develop' a 'VA Ahealth 'care budget
and system that is both affordable
and meets the needs of all veterans
who want to use the system.
"We can't make positive changes
to the system using a band-aid ap-
proach that leaves problems to be
addressed by the next Congress or
the one after that," he said. "We
must work together if we're to make
a VA that fully fits the need."


From Our Files


STEN YEARS AGO
May 3, 1995
30ne of four defendants involved
in;he robbery of Smith's Seed and
Feed Store in Drifton on Feb. 23
plead to a lesser charge on
Thursday.
:A battle is brewing between the
North and the South, and the Su-
wainee River could become a casu-
alty of what may be an impending
"water war" within the state, this is
what panelists predicted at recent re-
giobal water conference in Lake
City attended by several residents
frotn this county.
The south half of Big Joe Road
may yet be paved.

TWENTY YEARS
May 1, 1985
Fourteen young women will be vy-
ing this year for the title 1985 Wa-
termelon Queen.
'Pink Hightower will be the princi-
pal of Howard Middle School effec-
tive July 1. Hightower presently
serves as assistant principal of the
high school.
-Jefferson County Kiwanis Club is
one of the oldest clubs in the nation,
according to President Gary Wright.
They will have their sixtieth anni-
versary on May 5.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 1, 1975
Sondra Couver, Jefferson County
Watermelon Queen rode on her float
in the Thomasville Rose Festival Pa-
rade.

In the past two weeks the Jeffer-
son County Sheriffs Department
has received a number of complaints
from irate pet owners who have re-
ported the poisoning of animals.
These poisonings haven't been con-


centrated in any one area, but scat-
tered throughout the county.
April L. Wimberly of Monticello
celebrated her birthday on May 8.
Sally Simpson, of Jacksonville
visited her mother, Mrs. Irene Simp-
son.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 30, 1965
Miss Judy Harris, 1963 Water-
melon Queen, represented Jefferson
County in the 1965 Rose Festival
Parade in Thomasville.
Mrs. George Wirick and daughter,
Gail and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wirick
and son, Mark, visited relatives in
Central Florida over the weekend.
Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Smith and son
Darrell, visited with her parents,
Rev. and Mrs. H.L. Boyd, in
Gainesville, Sunday.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
April 29 1955
Mrs. Katie B. Holmes had been
working in the Jefferson County
Abstract office in the courthouse for
27 years.
Carolyn Ward completed business
school in Jacksonville and was em-
ployed in Tallahassee.
B. Aubrey Smith was recuperating
nicely following two weeks in Arch-
bold Hospital.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
April 27, 1945
Lt. T. C. McDonald Jr. was direc-
tor of communications at the Navel
base at a Key West.
Mrs. Mollie Yon returned home
after visiting her daughter in Merid-
ian Miss.
Marine First Lieutenant William
R. Hancock was a bomber pilot
against the Jap bases in the Marshall
Islands.


From Our Photo File


J -,


-- .




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0-^

'4


.
.:: !^
-: sat^


l~L'i *'';

wi ii~slO I
*em ,


IN SEPT, 1988, Health Department Admin-
istrator Roger McCollum shows his appre-
ciation with a hug for Lilly "Granny" Rich,


who retired after 33 years. At Left is Dr.
Landis Crockett; at right husband Arthur
Rich. (News file photo)


Opinion & Comment


Bill Found Love, New Lifestyle


There was Bill with his mouth full
and a half eaten doughnut in his
hand bemoaning his expanding
waistline.
"My belly keeps getting bigger,"
he said as staffers rolled their eyes
and stifled chuckles.
Bill was funny like that. He never
seemed to grasp that there were con-
sequences to his actions.
Like the time he parked in a re-
stricted parking area and then
gripped because he'got a ticket.
Try as they would, none of his
colleagues could get him to admit he
was his worst enemy.
Bill was furious with the IRS
when he was penalized for paying
his ta\es late.' '
"Why didn't you just pay on time
or request an extension?" somebody
asked.
Bill couldn't stop berating the IRS
long enough to hear such a reason-
able question.
Everything was always somebody
else's fault, at least in Bill's mind.


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Ciclion


I used to work beside him and
wonder what in the world would
ever become of this fellow. I imag-
ined he'd screw up real good one
day and wind up in prison "~till'
blaming others for his problems.
I was wrong, Bill wound up rich!
How is this possible, you ask?
Bill married well.
It was never clear to me why any
woman would want a guy like Bill
given his propensity to shoot him-
self in the foot time after time.


But, I guess there is somebody for
everybody and Annie was for Bill.
Annie used to come around the
newspaper office bringing in club
news and when she met Bill itf as
love at first sight.
You could almost feel the sparks'
in the newsroom when those two
met.
I was knocking out a story and
concentrating on my notes when I
looked up and saw Annie in front of
Bill's desk. Something's goin' on


Get Kids 'Up TO The Plate'


"Play ball" is one of the most joy-
ous phrases any boy or girl hears. It
means the excitement and fun of ex-
periencing our national pastime is
about to begin. Added to the mix,
the outdoor fun of baseball and soft-.
ball also hold valuable benefits and
can teach life lessons to children.
.Television remains the number-
one enemy to exercise. The average
American child spends more than
three times as much time in front of
the TV or computer as he or she
spends being active, according to
the Journal of the American Heart
Association.
The Wisk Laundry Detergent Ac-
tive Play Survey reported that moms
voted TV as the number-one reason
why children today spend less time
playing outdoors.


"There is no doubt in my mind
that parents need help inspiring their
children to hit the dirt versus the
couch," stated Major League Base-
ball icon Cal Ripken, Jr.
"As a parent and sports profes-
sional, I see how excited kids get
when they play baseball, and the life
lessons they gain when they slide
into home and win a game together
with teammates. The challenge
comes back to the parents to just put
down the remote and pick up a
glove."
Youngsters do not have to be star
athletes to enjoy sports and benefit
from the game.
Baseball combines personal per-
formance and group interaction.
While players hit, catch and throw,
they also have to learn to work with


teammates. Bunting and hitting the
ball behind a runner, so he or she
can advance to the next base, shows
how one sacrifice can help the
greater team win.
Also, the simple act of practice
helps create a more physical mental-
ity in children. In addition, it's an
outdoor activity by which they can
burn off energy and learn that some-
times the game is about the process,
not just the prize.
Americans spend 90 percent of
their lives indoors, according to the
American Psychological
Association. The Journal of Person-
ality and Social Psychology reports
that parents 'only spend 40 minutes a
week playing with their kids. Try
these tips to bring some outdoor
family time to the home front:


here, I thought.
Bill was kind of stammering
around, she was gazing at him with
big eyes and sounding ever so
sweet. "Come back" Bill said. She
nodded "Often," Bill said. She
flashed a megawatt smile and said
she would.
"You like her I asked Bill when
Annie left?" "She's. gorgeous," he
said.
I returned to my story 'and. won-
dered what the next chapter in Bill's
life would be like.
A whirlwind 30-day courtship was
followed by a trip to the judge's of-
fice to get married.
Then Bill resigned.
"Wahatv.ill;you do now?" I asked
Bill.
"Annie wants me to travel with
her," he said.
It turned out Annie had a substan-
tial inheritance and was more than
happy to pay the bills.;
Last time I heard Bill and Annie
were living in Paris.


Plan and play: Encourage your
children to enjoy each day to the
fullest, exploring and enjoying new
outdoor activities. Arrange for more
than a play day; schedule a game
outside with children of varying
ages from around the neighborhood.
This also provides ways for your
kids to make new friends.
Be a hero: Parents can enter a
national contest, the Wisk Laundry
Detergent "Win a Ball Field -Make-
over," and have a chance to win a
local ball field refurbishment and a
visit from sports hero Cal Ripken,
Jr. There are also multiple prizes
available, including gifts toward
new apparel and equipment for your
youngster's team.
Lead by example: Take 15 min-
(See Get Kids Page 5)


DNA Locates Tiger Species


BY TOM LOCKETTE
University of Florida

An international group of re-
searchers has found a new subspe-
cies of tiger -- and they did it by
delving into DNA rather than plung-
ing into the jungle.
A genetic analysis of tigers from
across Asia revealed that tigers
roaming the wilds of the Malaysian
Peninsula are substantially different
from those in the rest of the conti-


nent-- different enough to be consid-
ered a new subspecies. The findings,
published today in the journal Pub-
lic Library of. Science Biology,
could affect efforts to save the en-
dangered cats.
"This adds a new wrinkle to tiger
conservation," said Mel Sunquist,
professor of wildlife ecology at
UF's Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences and a co-author of the
study. "We found that a single en-
dangered subspecies, the Indochi-
nese tiger, is actually two


subspecies."
"Each of those subspecies proba-
bly has a population that numbers in
the hundreds, and each needs to be
protected," he said.
Suniluist was one of more than a
dozen researchers who participated
in the study, which examined blood
and tissue samples from 134 tigers
captured in locations across Asia.
The study, led by geneticists at the
National Cancer Institute, aimed to
settle the question of'how many sub-
species of tiger exist in the wild.


Biologists traditionally have rec-
ognized eight subspecies of tiger, in-
cluding three that were wiped out
by hunting and habitat destruction in
the 20th century. Among those tra-
ditionally identified species was the
Indochinese tiger, believed to be a
single group of about 1,700 cats
found in Southeast Asia.
The new study splits that subspe-
cies into two: Malayan tiger found
on the Malaysian Peninsula, and the
northern Indochinese tiger, found in
(See DNA Page 5)


Relay Committee Thanks Supporters


Dear Editor:
On behalf of the American Cancer
Society, we would like to thank the
residents of Jefferson County and all
of the corporate sponsors and teams
who generously contributed to the
2005 Relay for Life.
This year's event was a huge suc-
cess, thanks to each of you.


We appreciate your continued
support and thoughtfulness to help
the American Cancer Society in the
fight against Cancer.
It is so uplifting to see our com-
munity come together for this wor-
thy cause.
We encourage each of you to be-
gin thinking about the 2006 Relay


for Life.
There are so many different ways
to contribute to this event, so this is
a call for all our community mem-
bers to become involved.
With your help, we can pull to-
gether to fight this dreadful disease,
and truly make a difference.
We look forward to hearing from,


and working with each of you in the
coming months.
For more information, contact Jua-
nice Hagan, at 997-2570; or Nancy
Floyd Richardson, at the American
Cancer Society at (850) 297-0588.
Lisa Reasoner
Steering Committee
2005 Relay for Life


I


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4, 2005 PAGE 5


AT THE JES Career Fair, Alicia Pleas was
one of the many students who were happy


TICKET OUTLETS:
Blue Ribbon Cleaners
1102 E. Lafayette St.
1660 N. Monroe St.
2107 Capital Circle N.E.
Bernina Connection
3185 Capital Circle N.E.
The Quilting Patch
S 2957 Capital Park Dr.


to visit with sheriff David Hobbs as he dis-
tributed crayons and related materials.


Jefferson Elementary


Hosts Career Fair


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Jefferson Elementary School
hosted a Career Fair last week for
second through fifth grade students.


DNA Species
(Continued From Page 4)
areas ranging from Myanmar to ex-
treme southwest China. The re-
searchers say a long period of
geographic isolation likely led to
Malayan tigers developing genetic
distinctness from their northern
cousins.
Biologists traditionally use physi-
cal characteristics such as skull size,
coloration and stripe pattern to dis-
tinguish one tiger subspecies from
another, but the Malayan and north-
ern Indochinese subspecies are
nearly identical in appearance, Sun-
quist said.
Estimates of tiger population vary
widely, but Sunquist said there
likely are 800 to 1,000 Malayan ti-
gers and a roughly similar number
of northern Indochinese tigers left in
the wild. .
"The finding will affect future, re-
covery efforts for both subspecies,"
Sunquist said, "Because wildlife of-
ficials will now have to consider
managing each subspecies as a
unique and smaller population."


Get Kids UP
(Continued From Page 4)
utes every day to walk, play or be
active with your child outside.
For younger children, this will
seem like a long time and for older
children, it will appear like a short
amount of time and leave them less
reason to resist.
You will notice that you will not
only enjoy the bonding time, but
they will ask for more.


During their enrichment class, stu-
dents filed into the Media Center,
moving from booth to booth, exam-
ining the many displays, receiving
gift items, asking questions and
gathering the informative materials.
The purpose fair, Sponsor Bev-
erly Remland, assistant principal,
said was to expand student's aware-
ness of different career fields and
.help them understand the connection
between school and work.
The goals of the event were to
help student learn about various oc-
cupations, to learn the benefits of
educational achievement, to under-
stand the relationship between work
and learning, to identify personal
strengths and weaknesses in subject
areas, to develop career planning
skills and to identify personal inter-
ests.
Activities included students draw-
ing a list of questions to ask present-
ers.
After the fair students were asked
to identify three things they were
impressed with, and to identify their
own strengths and how these apply
to their interest in a particular
career.
Among presenters were the US
Army, County Sheriffs Department,
Archbold Hospital, Monticello Fire
Department, Farmers and Merchants
Bank, Glorious Mane, Health De-
partment, nurses and EMT's from
North Florida Community College.
"The students loved it," said Rem-
land. "They enjoyed meeting peo-
ple in the different fields, especially
the police and fire personell.
"They also enjoyed the nurse from
Archbold who brought some of the
rehabilitative equipment and let stu-
dents try it and learn about it."
Students were also very interested
in touring and learning about the
different equipment on both the fire
truck and ambulance which was pre-
sent at the fair.
Student Lenorris Footman said, "I
liked meeting the Sheriff and the


*






*


fireman, I especially liked the
banker (Betsy Gray of 'FMB) be-
cause I like math and I like money."
Brooke Bumbalough added, "My
favorite was the hospital because I
want to be a doctor. I liked the
nurses. They're really friendly and
she let us play with some of the dif-
ferent stuff they use, that was inter-
esting."
Remland added that Gladys Roann
was instrumental in getting the
many presenters at the fair. "I
would also like to thank every one
who was there from the community
showing support of the elementary
school. It is greatly appreciated."


Feline Pair

Seeks Home

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Humane Society has
named the feline pair of Jack and
Jim as their adoptable pets of the
week, born in June, 2003.
Jack is gray and white and Jim is a
brown tabby.
They are described as being \ery,
loving and playful, and are believed
to be brothers.

They must be adopted together,
and carry a special adoption fee of
$100.

"They are two awesome cats,"
said Bautista. "They get,along ex-
ceptionally well with everybody,
adults, children, other cats and they
even love dogs."

Anyone interested in adopting
Jack and Jim or any of the many
other loving animals at the shelter,
call 342-0244.


*








*


Stitches Galore
1699 N. Monroe St.
Girl Scout Council Office
250 Pinewood Dr.
386-2131
Monticello: -A
Milady's Shop
Great Adventure Outfitters


AND SPONSORED
IN PART BY: : .




Lite Rock. Less Talk.


The Jefferson County
Utility Coordinating
Committee will meet
at 9:00 a.m.
May 11, 2005,
at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street



'FI ria
r i KidCare
Free or Low
Cost Health
insurance i
for Kids


Ag A54 -KD (53


ww '.floridakidcare.org
TTY 1.877-316-8748


-8-o oa a aoab Orb-060o-0-6- o" "oo 0-o-o 00o 0 0 r 6 o0 o00 o 0 0 0 o -O 0-or o o o o0 0 0 6 o r 0-b o r 6 "







o
a









) The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
r-'r



C







the following items for recycling:

Io All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
p, laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
etc.


News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars, etc. (cear,'brown & green)

Residents canbring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfiii
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
o Household garbage ,

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
A *White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
S machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
A toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
0 clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

S Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
: chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
Clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.
--


oThe City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please cali
SDon Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


S .. Visit the www. artI, 9.;,..org Recycling Information web page
o bSnnnCnn nnnrnr o o- -"-a- 0-o- .... 0- O- o0 B O -0B 'B0 0T-VO -0'.


Come Join the Fun & Support Your Local Girl Scouts at

C'udiin TM nligt AWu.

Thursday, May 19, 2005 at the
North Florida Fairgrounds Doors Open at 7:30 pm
Music by: A reunion performance by Tallahassee's original Rock and Roll Band

STHE CHAOTIC & THE EMBERS OF NORTH CAROLINA


Casual or 50's 60's era attire.
Benefiting the Girl Scout Council of the Apalachee Bend. Inc.


-- -- -- ---=-~-- ----~ -- -- -- -


,












PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (F).N NWS. WED.. MAY 4.2005


Lifestyle


I V ZU V NI1J' ,IJJI NZVV0 VZ". t U A-'N '


County Coalition Focuses On


Concerns Of Community


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Among the highlights of the April
meeting of the County Community
Coalition was the focus on cessation
of smoking for pregnant women.
Healthy Start distributed lollipops
with the "no smoking" message to
reinforce the campaign.
Donna Hagan, of Healthy Start,
reported the results of the recent sur-
vey by the Coalition concerning
meeting days and times indicated
that the majority favored the current
9:30 a.m. slot, at the Library.
The only change would be to
have the meeting every other month,
in odd numbered months, instead of


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monthly.
Hagan said that the July meeting
will be set for a Tuesday and the
next meeting in September would be
scheduled on a Friday to accommo-
date the evenly divided voters.
The May 13 meeting will not be
rescheduled, as the guest speaker
has been booked for some time.
Stephanie Shepherd, of the Talla-
hassee Coalition for the Homeless,
reported that she would continue to
network with the outlying counties
to determine homeless needs in the
Big Bend area.
Aimee Holland reported that she
is one of three Adult Prevention
Counselors who work with Big
Bend Regional Prevention


New Arrival
Abby Grace Washington was
born Tuesday, April 12, 2005, at
Capital Regional Medical Center.
She was 7 lbs. 14 oz. and 20 inches
long.
Lindsey and Steve Washington, of
Pinetta are the proud parents.
Her grandparents are Linda and
James McDaniel, of Monticello,
Sam and Robbie Washington, and
Pat and Joe Crafton, of Pinetta.
Great grandmother is Jeanette
Key, of Monticello.


Center/Disc Village Agency to pro-
mote awareness and provide educa-
tion on any prevention-related topic
as well as health related
information.
Gloria Heath reported that the Ele-
mentary School had recently com-
pleted its standardized testing for
the year, and activities are winding
down for the school year. She also
reminded members of the dire need
in Jefferson for parent involvement
and mentors.
Tommie Johnson, supervisor ,at
the Department of Children and
Families, reminded members that an
outpost of services was available
each Tuesday at the Health Depart-
ment.
Debra Herman reported that her
agency, Light Invisible Inc./ Renais-
sance Institute was working to open
a Holistic Women's Center on July
1, in Gadsden County. The Renais-
sance Institute offers a program for
licensure of Doulas and midwives
and has recently partnered with the
Healthy Start Coalition to provide
doula services for Healthy Start and
non-Healthy Start participants in
Jefferson and Madison Counties.
Angela Mitchell reported that
Kids, Inc. is in search of a Family
Advocate to staff the Jefferson and
Madison Centers.
Phyllis Clemons added that the
Center, formerly known as the Dick
Howser Center, will be undergoing
major renovations to expand the
Center, adding more classrooms and
a parent resource center.
Beverly Harrison reported that
Head. Start accepts'referrals from
Early Head Start and has the capac-
ity for 50 slots at the Jefferson cen-,
ter.
Applications will be completed,
and screenings will be conducted at
the Opera House, next month for
fall enrollment.
She will presents flyers to the
Coalition for distribution detailing
the exact dates of the screenings.
Head Start is also negotiating
with the Jefferson County School
Board to provide transportation
services for Head Start.
Much discussion ensued as to the
need for transportation, citing droo-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Mereth. Curtis and Brooke Rod-
denberrv. both local FSU students,
helped bring about a donation for
the Senior Citizens Center, from Pa-
risian. Inc.
SThe donation had not yet been re-
ceived at press time, and the dollar
amount was unknown.

The two girls sold tickets for the
special event, which in turn allowed
purchasers to receive a discount
equal to the cost of the ticket, on
Whatever merchandise they pur-
chased..


On a specific day, the Center also
received a percentage of the store's
receipts from 6 to 10 a.m.
Bobbie Krebs, executive director
of the Senior Center, noted that
funding for the Center comresi.from
grants the Center applies for, and
donations from the community.
Krebs expressed her appreciation
to the volunteers on behalf of the
Center.
Curtis reported over 100 tickets
sold. They worked as greeters at the
door for the 4-hours of the special
event.
Curtis has been a volunteer at the
Center since the age of 15. The Cen-
ter is in great need of volunteers
such as her.


out rates and the related regression-
of the child's learning capacity as a
direct result of the lack of transpor-
tation.
George Hinchliffe added a note in
regards to transportation, announc-
ing that the City Shuttle Service, op-
erated by Big Bend Transit, is
expected to begin its continuous 11-
mile route through the city around
May 1. The service would initially
be free, to encourage ridership and
would somewhat lessen the burden
of inner-city transportation.
He then informed the consortium
that the Healthy Start Coalition has
recently applied for a grant to pro-
vide care services for teen parents,
the Adolescent Family Life Demon-
stration Care Project.
The grant will provide services for
teen moms, teen fathers, and the im-
mediate family of the parents in a
group setting in each county served.
The grant will fund a licensed
Clinical Social Worker, from Disc
Village, who will work with the
adolescents on substance abuse and
mental health issues.
There will also be a full-time Vo-
cational Counselor dedicated to the
groups, provided by the North Flor-
ida Workforce Development Board.
All three County School Boards
have agreed to partner for the pro-
gram as well. He recognized Jim
Norton for his efforts in advocating
for the program at the Jefferson
County School Board.
Curtisha Randolph, Fair Housing
Specialist for Big Bend Fair Hous-
ing, stated that the agency provides
community education and outreach
as it seeks to eliminate housing dis-
crimination.
She then explained the testing
program in which volunteers are
training, paid a stipend and sent to
selected sites to test for Sales, Rent-
als, or Design and Accessibility dis-
crimination.
The training for testers is a four-
hour session for sales and rentals;
four to five tests are conducted
. eekl.
Design and Accessibilir) training..
a hands-on assessment of building
measurements to accommodate
handicapped persons, is also a four-
hour training. Testers are paid dif-
ferent amounts, depending on which
test they perform.
Her agency has also been very
visible at new home buyer (SHIP)
classes, and at real estate profession-
als meetings.


RE TA ILMAN AG EMENT


Book Sale Set At Library


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A Book Sale, 'Browse and Buy', to -
benefit the Library, is scheduled to
take place in front of the Library, 9
a.m to noon Saturday.
There is a good selection of hard-


covers, paperbacks, magazines, old
and some antique books, for buyers
to peruse.
All proceeds from this Sale will
benefit the Library and its programs.
This event is sponsored by the Jef-
ferson County Democratic Commit-
tee.
For more information call 997-


District Writing Scores


(Continued From Page 1)
scores.
"We plan to continue to improve
our scores each year," he said.
Supporting this statement are
these facts:
In 1993, the first year Florida
writes was given, JES scored at 1.8.
In 2005, it scored 2.9, 11 points
higher.

Denson
(Continued From Page 1)
or a four on the class work, and
twice, I scored a six, but it took a
lot of hard work," said Denson.
She admitted that she doesn't
really like writing but she knew
that she had to do a good job in or-
der to graduate to the ninth grade.
"I'm going to keep working hard
to maintain a 3.0 grade point aver-
age or higher so when I graduate I
can be in a scholarship program,"
she said.
She concluded that once in col-
lege, she would like to study to be a
doctor, though she was unsure of
what specialty she would choose.
If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


In 1993 HMS scored 2.4. In 2005
it scored 3.4, a gain of 10 points.
In 1994 JCHS scored.2.8, and in
2005 scored 3.5, an increase of 7
points.
The increase in scores this year
from 2.9 at JES to 3.5 at JCHS indi-
cates the progress students have
made as they advance through the
grades.


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Barnes Named Director

Of Boys, Girls Clubs Here


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Priscilla Barnes is the new Area
Director and 21 Century Project Di-
rector, for the Boys and Girls Club
of the Big Bend in Jefferson
County.


BARNES


She holds a Bachelor of Science in
Communications from Georgia
Southern University, and is cur-


rently in the Florida State University
Graduate program, pursuing her
Masters in Social Work.
She has more than 14 years of ad-
ministrative, managerial and coun-
seling experience, and is a native
of Thomasville.
Director of the JES Club Gerrold
-Austin notes that Barnes has chil-
dren of her own and is very com-
passionate and understanding of
children and their needs.
She is pleased to have the oppor-
tunity to work with the Jefferson
County Community, and, invites
parents and community members to
contact her at 528-5799 for more
information about the Boys and
Girls Club.


Business Community
Prayer Breakfast
The Business Community Prayer
Breakfast will be held 7 a.m., Thurs-
day at Elizabeth Baptist Church,
4124 Bassett Dairy Road.
Guest speaker is Roger Champion.
All are encouraged to attend and
to bring a guest.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4 2005 PAGE 7


GUESTS at Secretary's Luncheon Thursday Gwen Reshard, Jeri Pearson, Pam Cooksey,
included: Front, L-R: Rita Knecht, Carole Bobby Plaines, and Joyce Alpine.
Donovan and Dale Boatwright. Back, L-R:


AMANDA OUZTS, president of the Woman's
Club, awaiting the arrival of her co-workers
to help serve the Secretary's Luncheon,


DAVID FRISBY, Police Chief, and Paula
Pierce, dispatcher at the Police Station,


greets Mallory Kinsey of Chancy-Stoutamire
Insurance.


were among the attendees at the Secre-
tary's Luncheon. (News Photos)


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RECEIVING door prizes from Woman's Club
Member Cindy Lee, at the Secretary's
Luncheon Thursday, are Jeri Pearson and


the lunch.


Secretary's Luncheon

Draws Sellout Crowd


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The annual Secretary's Luncheon,
hosted by the Monticello Woman's
Club, was a sellout with 71 tickets
sold before the event, in addition to
a few tickets sold at the door.
Funds raised by the event will be
used for the Club's scholarship pro-
gram and also for clubhouse up-
grades and repairs.
Among attendees were employees
of State Farm Insurance, Farmers
and Merchants Bank, Chancy-
Stoutamire Insurance, the Sheriffs
Department, the City of Monticello,
and the Monticello Police Depart-
ment, the County, and the Chamber
of Commerce.
This event was designed to pro-
vide an opportunity for employers to
recognize employees at the lunch-
eon.

Correction
The parents of Bryan Tharpe, JES
Boys, Girls Club Student of the
Month, as printed in Friday's paper,
were reported incorrectly to the
News.
Tharpe is the son of Melisa.and
Sheriffs Deputy Kevin Tharpe.

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Roast loin of pork was prepared
by the Woman's Club, and served
with side vegetables of peas,
mashed potatoes, and spiced apples.
Complimenting the meal was apple.
pie and iced tea.
Diners were given door prize tick-
ets upon arrival. Everyone received
a token of appreciation from the
Woman's Club and local services.


A gift was at each place setting.
There were so many gift donation-
that everyone attending received i,
door prize.
Door prizes and donations were
provided by: Malloy's Nursery;'
Simpson Nurseries, Great Adven-
ture Outfitters, Creative Stitches and
More, Farmers and Merchants Bank,
Gelling's Florist, Monticello Garden
Club, and the Monticello Woman's
Club.
Club President Amanda Ouzts and
members of the Woman's Club
thank all for their donations.


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4, 2005 PAGE 9


. ACA Downs Altha


-In Double Header


*--w BILL BROWN


-* *j- :iP


~ ~ -''
....~-


Jonathan Dady and Jamar Parrish. (Ne
Photo)


Pole Vaulting Equipment


Arriving At Jefferson High


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


After more than 23 years, the.
Jefferson County High School
track and field team will once again
have pole vaulting on their list of
events next year.
JCHS Principal Michael Bryan
said that officials had been explor-
ing the idea since about February to
determine where the more than
$7,000 would come from to pay for
the equipment. He added that the
Sounds were derived from capital
'outlay funds which are categoricals
especially allocated for school im-
provements.
The school has already received
Some of the required equipment,
the remainder expected to arrive
soon, Bryan explained.
AIssistnt Principal and Trackand
Field head Coach Harry Jacobs said
pole vaulting was last offered at
JCHS when he coached it years
ago.
When he left to work at FAMU,


FRAN HUNT
Staff'Writer

The Jefferson County High
School track team took third-place
overall during the State competi-
tion held in Coral Springs over the
weekend.
Head Coach Harry Jacobs said
the Tigers led the way until they
couldn't qualify in either the 4 x
400 and the shot put.
"If it wasn't for those two events,
we would have won it," said
Jacobs. "We got disqualified in the
4 x 400 in Regional, and that really
hurt us."
He added, "But finishing third,
that was groovy" Jacobs recalled
that the Tigers had won the state
championship on four occasions,


and could no longer coach, the
event was dropped and the equip-
ment eventually fell into disrepair
over the years.
Bryan added that the reason for
wanting to. bring pole vaulting back
to Track and Field was that it
would draw more athletes into the
sport.
"A lot of kids are interested," said
Bryan. "I think it's wonderful to be
able to have it again. It attracts
kids not otherwise interested in-
Track and Field because they con-
sider it to be 4 unique, on the edge
kind of event. It's unfortunate that
the equipment didn't arrive in time
to have it this year."
The funds were used to purchase
the pit, pads, safety gear, poles,
crossbars, helmets, the box contain-
ing the pit and the standards (up-
rights). *
It was shipped from a company
in Ann Arbor, MI and will have to
be professionally installed to meet
the code.
The equipment will be set up at


the old high school in the ce
the track where the old one.
be.
Jacobs said he had neve
peted in pole vaulting, but
read up and studied Trac
Field, including pole vault
both high school and in colle
"I know how, and I'm wil
show them," said Jacobs. "V
least up to six feet."
He concluded that he wi
the team to specialized traini
that there are trainers availa
help them on an individual le
both FAMU and FSU.


getting his sixth win of the year. He_
has one loss.


S The Aucilla Warriors now stand at- The lone Altha run was unearned
a 21-3. season after winning a and kept Sherrod from throwing a
double-header last week. shutout no-hitter. Only one Altha
Because of the weather and sched- runner reached second base. Sher-
ule conflicts, the double header be- rod struck out four.
S tween Aucilla and Altha, scheduled
for Tuesday, was played
Wednesday. Other restraints re-
quired that each game be a five-
inning contest.
Ridgely Plaines pitched the first
game for the Warriors. He was
credited with an 8-2 win on four hits
and seven strikeouts. His record for
?ws the year is 7-2.
Offensively, the Warriors banged
out nine hits, all singles. Players hit-
ting safely were Casey Gunnels, two
for two with two stolen bases;
Plaines, two for two; Chris Tuten
one for two and one RBI; Josh, Car-
swell, two for two; Kyle peters; one
for one; and Daniel Roccanti, one
fbr three. i
This is the twentieth win of the
enter of year against three losses.
used to The second game, pitched by
Drew Sherod resulted in a 6-1 win
r cor- for the home team, with Sherrod .


he had
k and
ing, in
ge.
Ailing to
Vell, at

11 send
ng and
able to
level, at


three of which were back to back
and no school has ever won three
meets back to back before, he said.
Jonathan Dady took first place in
the 300 hurdles with 40.03
seconds, and he took second place
in the high hurdles with a'time'of
15.03 seconds.
J. R. Sloan took third in the 100
meter with 10.08. He took fifth
place in the 200 meter with 22.08,
and he took sixth place in the long
jump with a distance of 21 feet,
nine inches.
In the 4 x 100 relay, the team of
Dady, Sloan, Desrick Jones and
Lucious Wade took second place
with a time of 43.03 seconds.
"We'll definitely win state next
year," vowed Jacobs. "It usually
takes three years to build a good
strong team and next year we'll be a
strong as we need to be."


With a multitude of hits in the first
game, Warrior bats were relatively
quiet producing only five hits, all
singles.
Kyle Peters led the Warriors with
two hits in two trips to the plate.
Gunnels followed, one for two with
two stolen bases, and Tuten went
one for two with one stolen base and
one RBI.
The only other Aucilla batter to hit
safely was Glen Bishop with one for
two.


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TIGER
meter
Sloan,


Track Team takes off for this 100
run practice. L-R: Daryl Young, JR.
Tremaine Parker, Brandon Grice,


JCHS Track Team

Places 3rd At State


AMEICN CAEM
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4, 2005

Reams To Graduate


From Law School


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Kirk Bradley Reams, son of
Laurie and Carolyn Reams, of
Lamont, will graduate as with a law
degree from the Florida State
College of Law, Saturday.
Reams is a 1995 graduate of
Aucilla Christian Academy, where
he was class Salutatorian.
Upon graduation from high
school, he received a BS with a
double major in Marketing and Real
Estate from FSU in 1998,
graduating summa cum laude.
During his senior year, he was the
president of the Real Estate Society
at FSU. He then returned to ACA,
where he was Math Department
Chair and Varsity Basketball Coach
from 1998 to 2001.
After his teaching stint, he joined
the graduate business program at
Florida State, where he received his
MBA with an emphasis in Supply
Chain Management in 2002.
While in the MBA program. he
was the Vice President of the MBA
Society, where among his duties
was organizing and teaching study
sessions for his classmates.
He received an assistantship and
worked under Supply Chain
Management Professor Larry
Giunipero.
After receiving his MBA, Reams
was accepted to the Florida State
University College of Law. During
his first year, he and a fellow stu-
dent were victorious in a schoolwide
competition involving Negotiations
and Alternative Dispute Resolution.


As a result, they were rewarded
with representing FSU at the re-
gional competition in Chapel Hill,
NC., where they placed in the Top
Ten.
Reams later became Vice Presi-
dent of the Dispute Resolution Soci-
ety, where among his duties was
being in charge of conducting the
Negotiations Competition.
Also during his first year, he re-
ceived the highest grade in his sec-
tion for Legal Research and Writing.
This helped assure him a spot on the
staff of the Florida State Business
Review and the Journal of Transna-
tional Law, where he was an articles
editor.
During his law school career he
was a member of the Dispute Reso-
lution Society, the Student Bar As-
sociation, the Tallahassee Bar
Association, and the Sports Law As-
sociation.
He also completed his Pro Bono
requirement at the Family Law As-
sistance Program of Leon County.
Reams recently received a passing
score on the Multistate professional
Responsibility portion of the bar
exam in March and will take the
Florida Bar on July 26-27, planning
to remain in the area.
His interests in the legal realm in-
clude Real Estate Law and other
property issues, as well as
Labor/Employment, Mediation/Ar-
bitration, and Entertainment/Sports
Law.
His family and friends will be
honoring him with a reception at the
Monticello Opera House on Satur-
day, May 28, 2005.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


For the second year inqa row, the
Lady Warriors earned the title of
District Champions with a 7-0 win
over Munroe in the District 3, Class-
2A game.
Going into the game as the num-
ber one seed in the district, the Lady
Warriors had 10 hits and committed
two errors, Munroe had four hits
and no errors.
Bethany Saunders pitched five in-
nings, striking out five batters and
giving up one walk; and Brittany
Hobbs pitched two innings, striking
out one and walking one.
Keri Brasington went two for
three with one double, two RBI and
two stolen bases; Kayla Gebhard


went one for two with a triple; Lisa
Bailey hit a triple; and Hobbs an in
in-the-park home run.
Lady Warriors will face the
-runnel-up of District 4' from Jack-
sonville, 4 p.m., Thtifdsday, here.
for the Regional Quarterfinal.
They now stand at a 16-5 season.


I


Bypass
(Continued From Page 1)
was the third such study to be con-
ducted here since the mid 80s.
Advocates see a bypass as a way
to revive the downtown area, at the
same time that it reduces the volume
of truck traffic traveling through the
city.
Opponents, on the other hand, say
a bypass is unwarranted and will
only hasten the death of the down-
town area.


LEGAL NOTICE


REAMS


Horseshoe

Tournament

Postponed

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Because of the rain Saturday, the
Boy Scout Troop 803 fundraising
horseshoe tournament has been re-'
scheduled for 9:30 a.m, Saturday,
at the Eagle's Nest Scout Hut, on:
Water Street.

Troop Leader "Bear" Register
said the scouts will be selling ham-
burgers, hot dogs and drinks during
the event to raise funds for both
their annual, summer trip and a
chest freezer for the scouts.

The cost is $20 per team and tro-
phies will be awarded for first, sec-
ond and third place winning teams.
"Everybody is invited to come on
out and have a good time along
with some good food," said Regis-
ter.

' or fui.iiei information contact
Register at 997-2617 or Ira West at
997-8701.


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LEGAL NOTICE
] I -


Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer
The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


LEGAL NOTICE
... .


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND USE
CHANGE


AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA,
PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY
AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP; RE-
DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 73 ACRES FROM AGRICULTURAL 5
TO RESIDENTIAL 1 ON THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


Jefferson County proposes to adopt the following land use change by
ordinance Comprehensive Plan Amendment 95-01. The land use map
change proposed is from Agriculture 5 to Residential 1 for the area on the
map below.


A public hearing on the ordinance will be held on
at the courtroom of the county courthouse located
Highways 90 and 19.


News Without Fear or Favor

Monticello News


May 19, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.
at the intersection of U.S.


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-88-CA: JULIE k. NIX
BARRON; Plaintiff, vs. PAUL
LASTOWSKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
PAUL LASTOWSKI; JOHN RODGERS;


BUSINESS Ca,, ,99





___ DIRECTORY _r_
I I I


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
SWELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All!
^ "Call Andy" j


S997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


II


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT



0 850-997-5808

850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
(850) 997-4577
30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


IEALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPea ry.com


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE |


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots



I For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Licensed & Insured
CAC 058274


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


John A. Kuhn
Owner


I Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


1


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Mr. Merchant

This Space Can Be

Yours For Only

$10 Per Week


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE


Norman L. Barfi
Exclusive Agent
Barloot Insurance Gro


Allstate Insurance Company
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

oot 878-8077
O()'lN Monlday-llday 8.30.5 .)
)up I:nail:NUO MANHA\lRI-(oX I'. allstatlin, c.


Lady Warriors District

Champs Second Year


T~9h~~rqrl


Curtis Morgan's Garage, Inc.


>1


-v


'


Coke











To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


IONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4, 2005 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesda. and Frida3...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for W\ednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOHN
RODGERS; STEVE LASTOWSKI;
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
PAUL LASTOWKI; UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF PAUL LASTOWKI; JOHN
RODGERS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint for Quiet Title has been filed
against you and others, and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DANIEL E.
MANAUSA, ESQUIRE, SMITH
THOMPSON, SHAW & MANAUSA, P.A.,
Plaintiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville
Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this
notice of action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED this 28th day April, 2005
Carl D. Boatwright.
5/4, 11, 18, 25, c


HELP WANTED

Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn
DIRECTOR OF NURSING: Immediate
management position opening for a
licensed RN with current ACLS & BLS.
Medicare-certified ASC that enhances
quality of life through improved vision.
Strong managerial, human relations and
organizational skills are preferred. Salary
commensurate with experience. Excellent
benefits. Fax resume to Human Resources
(850)838-3937 or call (850)585-2778 ext.
639. Closing Date: 05/21/05 -EOE
Part-Time Data Entry Operator-
Monticello: 4 hours a day M F, must
have computer knowledge and easily
trainable on Senior Citizens Records.
Needs organizational and phone skills.
High school diploma or equivalent. Pay
rate: $8.00. Applications may be picked up
at Jefferson Senior Citizens Center 1155
N. Jefferson St. Monticello.
5/4, 6, c


Notice of Public Hearing: The Jefferson WANTED: l
County Commission will review and make ministries po
its decision regarding a proposed major Methodist
residential subdivision. The subdivision is Applicants m
to be located on State Road 59 direction, res
approximately 251 acres and includes and rehearsi]
about 65 single family lots. Interested 11 am Sund
parties maylpresent their concerns at the other service:
Jefferson County Commission meeting on to 997-6121
May 19, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. in the Walnut St.
courtroom of the Jefferson County Dean Jerger.
Courthouse located at the intersection of 5/4, 6, c
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in A Behavior:
Monticello, Florida 32344. The meeting currently see
may be continued from time to time as School Dip
necessary. From the Florida "Government secretarial/Of
in the Sunshine Manual", page 36, Typing score
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or salary $6.43
agency of this state or of any political through Fric
subdivision thereof shall include in the and a com
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice positions:
of meeting or hearing is required, of such 523-3217 oi
board, commission, or agency, Resources 2
conspicuously on such notice, the advice Tallahassee,
that, if a person decides to appeal any FDLE back
decision made by the board, agency, or opportunity/a
commission with respect to any matter Drug-free wo
considered at such purpose, he or she may 5/4, c
need to ensure that a verbatim record of He
HealthCare
ythe proceedings, is made, which record
Your Skills!
includes the testimony and evidence upon Yoeath Servi
which the appeal is to be based. Prior to uni
-the meeting interested persons may you the opp
contact the Jefferson County planning and behind. oin
Building Department at 850-342-0223 or, Correctional
write the Department at P.O. Box 1069,, immediate
Monticello, FL 32345 and provide Administrato
comments. The development proposal may
be reviewed during business hours at the corrections
Department office located at 277 North LPNs :full
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida LPs :
32344.are ready to
4 environment
5/4, c ._...,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 05-31
PR IN 'RE: ESTATE OF JUSTIN
KENDELL TUCKER, Deceased. NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION; The
administration of the estate of JUSTIN
KENDELL TUCKER, deceased, File
Number 05-31 PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, FL 32340. The name and
address of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below. All interested persons are
required to file with this Court, WITHIN
HREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1)
II claims against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person on
vhom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the WILL, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of
the Court. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this
Notice has begun on April 27, 2005.
i IICHAEL A. REICHMAN Post Office
Box 41 Monticello, Florida, 32345 (850)
97-5100 FL. BAR NO: 183518;
EORGIA ANN COSPER 1701 B Noel
lonticello, FL 32344
/27, 5/4, c

HELP WANTED

'eed Live in caregiver for my mother
Light housekeeping, meal preparation,
-hopping. Call 863-632-1377.
-/4,6, 11, 13, pd
Local business now hiring. FT/PT,
weekends. Respond to: P.O. Box 691,
lonticello, Fla. 32345.
/27s/d, tfn,
Part Time Stock/ Customer Service Clerk:
must be available to work all day


benefits, ct
850-838-406!
85-8384081.
www.prisonh
5/4, c


Part-time Director of music
sition available, First United
Church of Monticello.
rust have experience in choral
ponsibilities include directing
ng the Chancel Choir for the
ay Service. Participation in
s as appropriate. Fax resume
or send to FUMC 324 W.
Monticello, FL 32344 attn.:


al Health Care Center is
eking: Secretary #2173 High
ploma + 1 year of
office Clerical Experience.
of at least 35 cwpm. Starting
Shift: 8am 5pm Monday
lay. For more information
iplete listing of available
'ww.aplachecenter.org (850)
r 1-800-226-2931 Humane
634-J Capital Circle N.E.
FL Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
:ground check. An equal
affirmative action employer.
rkplace.

Explore a New Place For
When you join the Prison
ices team, you will experience
reer environment that offers
ortunity to leave the ordinary
our team today at the Taylor
Institution in one of these'-
openings: Health Services
or: Must be an RN with 3+
visory experience. BSN and
experience preferred. RNs and
time days and nights: If you
work in a very secure, safe
and enjoy great rate and
contact Norma Crum at:
9 or forward resume via fax:
EEO/AA
lealth.com


ENGLISH INSTRUCTOR: North Florida
Community College,Madison, FL: English
instructor to teach composition and
developing writing/reading at small, rural
community college in Madison, FL. Begins
8/1/05. MA in English required. Graduate
work in composition and/or development
writing/reading strongly preferred.
Community college teaching experience
preferred. Will teach 15
credit-hours/semester, establish office
hours; participate in department, college
activities. May teach day/night classes
both on/off campus. Interviews will
include presentation using instructional
technology. Application to Director HR,
North Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Only complete application packets
considered (letter of interest, resume,
application, copy of transcripts unofficial
OK). Application, job description online:
www.nfcc.edu. Questions, call
850-973-9487. Deadline 05/20/05. EOE
Part Time Lumberyard Customer
Service/Grounds Maintenance person.
Must be available to work Saturdays,
additional hours flexible. Apply in person
at Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn


VENDORS WANTED
Booths available
From $40 to $150 per month
Antiques, Collectibles, Art,
Used furniture, etc.
MONTICELLO TRADING
CO., LLC
1,75 W. Dogwood St.
509-3517


HELP WANTED

Experienced painter. Full time position,
transportation required. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.
Child Care: "Our Blessings" Now hiring
for full and part time Teachers.
Requirements: 40 hr., CPR ,First Aid.
Please Call 342-1111 Wed. Sat.
5/4, 6, pd

AUTOMOTIVE

1991 Buick Regal. Very good condition,
$2000 obo, 997-6664.
4/27, 29, pd

LOST 1'

Perry Ellis Handbag, Black, oblong, 2
straps, and contains personal items. Call
997-2894.
5/4,6, pd

GARAGE SALE
W\VREHOUSE SALE: Factor) Oerruns
and Seconds Decorator Print Fabrics,
Comforter Sets, Bedspreads, Window
Coverings, Pillows, Decorator Chairpads,
and Placemats: Saturday, May, 7th Door
Open 8am 12 noon, 1701 West Gordon
St. Valdosta, GA. Call for Directions
800-633-2215.
5/4, 6, c
830 West Lake Rd. Fri. & Sat. (6 & 7) 8 4
p.m.
5/4, 6, pd

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hw) 14. Madison. lUse
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd

FOR RENT
1 Bedroom 1 Bath House with Pasture
$500 month Call: 997-6653
4/29-5/25, pd



Prime Downtown


OFFICE SPACE
Cherry Street Commons Bldg.

Available in June


Call: 997-1980


FOR SALE

Electric Frigedaire Stove $75, Microwave
Oven, Kenmore $50 (Good), 2 bar stool
chairs $40, ARABIAN more horse,
western pleasure, $1,000 Call 997-8453
after 6 pm
5/4, 6, pd

SERVICES

CAREGIVER, willing to work weekdays
and weekends. Call 342-1486 or 510-0998.
5/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 24, 27, pd
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29
chg
The Episcopal Church celebrates its
diversity. Tolerance is not a weakness, but
our strength. Christ Episcopal Church
three blocks N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
5/4, c
Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn

Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn




GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

JOIN OUR I
TEAM TODAY!


Seeking Technician
candidates for our Perry
Florida location.
SWe offer competitive
compensation, paid training,
a great benefits package,
flexible schedule and more!
Please apply at Super-Lube-
1631 S. Byron Butler Pkwy.
In Perry or fax your
resume to 850/222-5152.
Valid Drivers License Required.
Applicants must pass a drug test.
-=-==e -- -I


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides &
Double Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @
$895, $50 dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571











Southern Division

WELDERS:
Experienced in 7018 and Gas Metal Arc Welding, Read welding symbols
and measuring. Standard AWS Welding Test in Flat Position.

FITTER TRAINEES:
Math skills and measuring ability required. Blue Print reading and fitting
experience helpful, but not required.

Applications available

Georgia Department ofLabor

Excellent Fringe Benefit Package


Vacations
Holidays
Hospitalization
Life Insurance


Dental Coverage
Retirement
Disability Insurance
Educational Assistance


Uniforms


BENEFITS THAT STABILIZE YOUR FUTURE

Equal Opportunity Employer

MAIL: P.O. BOX 7750 THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA 31758-7750
PHONE: (229) 228-9780 FAX: (229) 226-2718


Real E state...

Always a Great Investment


Pure Elegance!
3,556 sq ft Must
See Stately Brick
House, 5BR 2BA,
Tennis Court, Fire-
place, Gazebo,
Wet Bar, Sunroom
& More On 10
Beautiful Acres!
$547,900


KELLY &fr KELI.lY
PROPEKR1 11S


11.i-m.aciersun
Www.cbkk.co "-ss"i
sLamont: 4BR/2BA 1,654 sq ft Cedar House on
2.20 AC, Convenient to Tallahassee... $84,900
*LOG CABIN: 2BR/2BA 1,330 Sq Ft, on 6.05
Acres, Wood Floors, Spiral Staircase; Spanish
Tile & More! ............................$.. 169,900
*Horses? 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, 14 AC,
Fenced, Cross Fenced & Riding Ring!$192,500
*Real Florida Setting- 3,759 Sq Ft House,
Bar & Guest House on 10+Acres.......$429,000


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

1


King of the Hill Lovely 3 bedroom 2.5 bath
yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine on a hilltop near US 90 and SR
59, 50 acres in planted pines, swimming
pool, detached garage, barn nice field all in
the fastest growing part of Jefferson County
for only $1,200,000
Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000
Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high, I
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre 1
Check this Out Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened porch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home ]
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and 1
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295,000
High on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly E
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line 2
$76,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7 .
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000 .
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space: $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
high land in deed restricted neighborhood 1
$10,000 per acre
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Desoto Road 2.39 wooded acres near St.
Augustine Rd $18,500

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings with maps at
www.TimPeary.com I
Simply the Best
We have good buyers looking for acreage
between Monticello and Lloyd can you help?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate H


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
IkLlhllh~Lh'~1F'B1G~IC~=~=l=!


r~~~~~~lr~lr~~~lr~~LIlr~~~~~~~TU


I--~~--r-~r~~9i~191-ll~~-~~919i








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 4, 2005


tary School, were Letricia Hamm, who in-




















Student/Parent Work Dayl
.J . ..'....








PARTICIPATING in the Take your Daughters structs her daughter Shikarri, how to
or Sons to Work Day, at Jefferson Elemen- properly fill out a bus pass. (News Photos)
tary School, were Letricia Hamm, who in-

17 Students Take Part In



Student/Parent Work Day


SDeputies Arrest
Three On Drug-
Related Charges
Two deputies who went to a
county residence last week to serve
a search warrant ended up making a
drug bust.
According to Major Bill Bullock
of the Sheriffs Department, when
S the resident, Vernon E. Brock,
opened the door to his home, the.
deputies were assailed with a cloud
of smoke and the strong odor of
Marijuana.
r| "The deputies entered the resi-
dence and found marijuana and co-
caine inside," Bullock reports.
"They also found two other people
inside, Peter Henry and Glenda Tho-
mas."
The deputies charged all three in-
dividuals with possession of mari-
juana, cocaine and drug
Paraphernalia. This in addition to
the warranted charges that brought
Sthe deputies to Brock's door in the
I', first place.
The warranted charges were for
two counts of aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

During last week's first county
"Bring Your Daughters and Sons
To Work Day", 17 students ages 8-
12, in grades three through seven,
along with their parents and/or
mentors, participated in the pro-
gram.
Before actually attending work
with the adults, students were ad-
dressed by Chamber of Commerce
President Police Chief David
Frisby on the importance of the day
and how it would work toward
strengthening both the family and
community.
Also addressing the group was
County Commission Chairman
Skeet Joyner, Mayor Julie Conley
and School Superintendent Phil
Barker who told the youth that
what they do now helps to deter-
mine what they will become in the


Phil Cook of the local Natural Re-
sources Conservation Service
(NRCS) Office, reports that the sign
up period for the Small Scale
Farm/Limited Resource Producer
Initiative is.May 2-20, 2005.

The initiative is designed to help
farmers overcome barriers they face
in reaching their conservation goals.
It focuses on revising guidelines
on conservation practices and poli-
cies that have caused small farmers
and ranchers not to participate in the
Farm Bill Programs, or prohibited
them from ranking high enough to
be enrolled in a program.

Priority issues addressed include:
fencing requirements, irrigation of
small acreages, and improvement of
soil health through use of specific
practices.


future.
Barker explained the ABCs of
both the program, and of being in
the workplace. These are: attitude,
behavior, commitment and citizen-
ship. He stressed the importance of
thinking ahead and planning a ca-
reer.
Students attending the program
were given school credit for the
day, but had to complete some as-
signments during the day.
Students kept a journal of what
they did and what they learned over
the. course of the work day, and
filled out a questionnaire.
Questions included the name of
the business the student went to,
the kind of business, how many
people are employed there, and
what they enjoyed the most.
Students were also asked what
kind of education was required for
the job, and what kinds of skills it
demanded.


The cost share rate is 75 percent
from NCRS, with 25 percent due
from the producer.
If the applicant qualifies as a Lim-
ited Resource Producer, the rate is
90 percent from NCRS and 10 per-
cent from the producer.
To assist this initiative in reaching
its objectives, both acreage and Ad-
justed Gross Income (AGI) caps are
set for the state.
The acreage cap is less than 179
acres, and the AGI cap is set at a
range from $1,000 to $70,000.
Individuals interested in this pro-
gram should contact the local NCRS
office, at 1250 North Jefferson
Street.

Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Telephone is 997-4058.

GET OUT OF LINE
....and go online for government
services and information.
FirstGov.gov
The official web portal
of the Federal Government
U.S. General Services Administration


Linda Hewitt, assistant superin-
tendent, said the students were very
excited to talk about what they had
learned during the day.
"Many of them said they would
like to go into that particular field
and said that they wanted to par-
ticipate in the program again next
year, she said.
At the conclusion of the program,
the students were given an opportu-
nity to draw for door prizes and
they were each awarded with a cer-
tificate of completion signed by
Conley, Frisby, Joyner and Barker.


SGT. MACK NORTON, and his daughter Amber, took part
in Take your Daughters and Sons to Work Day, where she
learned about the duties of a school resource officer.


Keeping You Informed In Our Growing Community

Monticello News


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES









Eat a small meal, luldUe


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
fbod choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:
Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301


Take Your First Step Today. For more io an
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and a.'
for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"


stffall .stX.p .............
big rewards
Prevent 2Diabetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


A message from the National Diabetes Education Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.


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Sign Up For Small

Scale Farm Initiative


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Sunday'Brunch 'Buffet
10am 4pm
'Baked 'Honey 'Ham
'Roast'Beef, A9u Jus Carving Station
ginger glazed Salmon
Assorted Chicken 'Dishes

assorted Breakfast Items 9Mashed Potatoes & gravy
gulie's jice 'ilaf 'Baked SMacaroni & Cheese
Assorted'Veggies Assorted'Dinner 'Rolls
'Fresh Salad 'Bar assorted'Pies & Cakes
~ RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED FOR PARTIES OF 6 OR MORE ~
A Tallahassee Tradition for Over 26 Years. Est. 1978


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