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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00034
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 29, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00034
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
    2005 Progress Report
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
        page 24
Full Text




U T V P"Iqiy OF FLORIDA
Gi;,ALJ~'diLZ, FL. 32611


Scam Of

Inmates Bilks

Taxpayers

Editorial, Page 4


voces Angel

Choir To Sin

First Presbyt


Story, Page


C Friday Morning )





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.34,50 CENTS


Confederate

Memorial Day

Observed

Story, Page 12


11eo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


See Annual

Progress

Edition

Page 1A


ws
FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2005


School Board Workshop



Examines Proposed


Budget Cuts For '06,


'07


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Faced with the necessity of cutting
$700,000 from the budget for fiscal
2006, and $400,000 from fiscal
2007, the School Board held a
workshop Tuesday.
Finance Director Hal Wilson pre-
sented to the Board 10 cost saving
suggestions made by staff and ad-
ministrators, during the week fol-
lowing the budget workshop held
last week.
It now remains for Superintendent
Phil Barker to make specific recom-
mefidations and identify which staff
positions will be eliminated.
He is expected to make his recom-
mendatiions at a Board Meeting set
for 6 p.m., Monday, May 9.
Among the suggestions' made by
staff and the dollar amount adopting
each measure would save in fiscal
2006 are:


$700,000 In FY 2006;

$400,000 In Fy 2007


*Eliminate seven teacher aide po-
sitions half year in 2006. ($67, 362)
*Eliminate 16 non instructional
positions. ($331,869)
*Eliminate two administrative po-
sitions, one for the full year; one
mid year. ($72, 637)
*Reduce teacher aide contract from
191 to 180 days. ($17,684)
*Reduce teacher aide work day
from 7.5 to 6.5 hours. ($56,142)
*Bill non required student trans-
portation such as field trips, athletic
trips, activity bus, to internal ac-
counts of schools. ($100,000)
*Reduce General FunJ travel.
($10,000)
*Eliminate or reduce summer em-
ployment for instructors. ($5,569)
*Eliminate or reduce summer em-
ployment for non instructional per-


COMMISSIONER JUNIOR TUTEN, left, and
Planning Commission Attorney Scott Shirley


sonnel. ($1,631)
*Eliminate General Fund Paid
Uniforms for bus drivers and other
personnel. ($20,672)
Total projected savings for fiscal
2006 equals $662,893.
Cost saving measures proposed
for fiscal year 2007 include the con-
solidation of the high school and
middle school at the new high
school site. ($442,534)
In addition, another three admin-'
istrative positions are planned to be
cut, with the savings reflected in the
total above.
Wilson said at best, the proposed'
cuts wdufd help create a balanced
budget, but cautioned that legisla-
tive funding for schools was as yet
undetermined for the coming year.
Projected declining enrollment


I *^ -t*, -. :


P.M.


V"


discuss a land-use matter following a recent
conimission meeting. (News Photo)


Relocation Of Tag Office Here

Concerns Tax Collector Hunter


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff WHiter

County commissioners have inad-
vertently gotten themselves mixed
up in a matter that rightfully falls to
Tax Collector Lois Hunter to decide.
The matter involves the request of
former Tax Collector Frances
Walker to relocate her tag business
-- presently in Taylor County -- to
Jefferson County.
The sticking point in the reloca-
tion appears to be the state's re-
quirement that Hunter approve the
move, and the latter's unwillingness
to do so. At least not without a letter
of approval from the commission.
The situation is a tad confusing at
this point, given it has been pre-
sented to commissioners in bits and
pieces and that what little discussion


it has generated has been incomplete
and contradictory.
Commissioners' first encounter
with the issue occurred three weeks
ago, when Walker appeared before
them to ask for permission to relo-
cate her business here.
Walker told commissioners that
their approval was necessary before
Hunter would sign off on the deal.
She told commissioners that the
business would employ three
people, besides herself; and that it
would continue to do business with
Taylor County, same as it was doing
now.
Walker mentioned that her con-
tractual agreement with Taylor
County meant that fees from the
business would continue to go to
that county. If commissioners took
note of the fact, however, they did-
n't comment on it.


Commissioners approved the re-
quest almost out of hand, giving it
scant consideration.
Last week, Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin -- who had missed the ear-
lier meeting because of medical rea-
sons -- raised the issue again. He
wanted to revisit the matter, he said,
given the lack of discussion previ-
ously.
Sutphin took it upon himself to in-
vite Hunter and Walker to the meet-
ing, so both sides could present their
cases.
Hunter was in attendance Thurs-
day. For whatever reason, however,
Walker either failed to get the mes-
sage or decided to forego the meet-
ing.
"I don't think we can give Mrs.
Hunter a letter of approval when
Mrs. Walker didn't show up to de-
(See Tag Office, Page 7)


portends declining revenue, he said.
Chair Beverly Sloan said that cost
savings were by no means limited to,
the items identified at the workshop.
At the earlier budget workshop
last week, Sloan said the Board was
planning to consider selling surplus
properties scattered around the
county.
Tuesday Sloan said that the Board
needed to create a policy concerning
employees in DROP.
Issues to be considered include:
*Though the State allows a five
year DROP period, it allows an ad-
ditional three years if requested.
The Board needs a policy to de-
termine if these extra years should
be approved, and if so under what
conditions.
' *Also, policy needs to be set about
how personnel in DROP who subse-
quently return to work, are paid.
Currently they are paid at the rate
they earned when last working.
(See School Board, Page, 12)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Brushing aside the expressed mis-
givings of several citizens, commis-
sioners last week approved a
Comprehensive Plan amendment
that specifically allows special ex-
ceptions in agricultural areas.
Although not quite a case of clos-
ing the gate after the cow escapes
(the action was prompted by a citi-
zens lawsuit against the Go-Kart
Racetrack approval last year) the
amendment is intended to avoid any
such lawsuits in future.
It attempts to do this by "clarify-
ing" the language, or more specifi-
cally, by naming all the special
exceptions permitted in agriculture
areas. These include uses such as
bed-and-breakfast inns, hunting
lodges and clubs, and agricultural-
related activities such as welding
shops.
As explained by Planning Com-
mission Attorney Scott Shirley, who
helped draft the language, the com-
mission's approval of the racetrack
is legally defensible under the old
rules. But the change, he said,
would make any such future approv-
als even more defensible, by making
the Comprehensive Plan consistent
with the Development Code.
"The genesis of the lawsuit was
that the commission's approval of
the racetrack was inconsistent with
the Comprehensive Plan's desig-
nated uses in agriculture-5 zones,"
Shirley said.
The change, he said, would cure
that problem.
"I hesitate to call this a curative
amendment, because these uses are
currently allowed by the Land De-
velopment Code and they are cer-
tainly occurring in different areas of
the county," Shirley said. "But we
thought it a good idea to go ahead
and amend the Comp Plan to clarify


PHIL BARKER, superintendent Studies proposed cutbacks
for fiscal years 2006, 2007. He is expected to make spe-
cific recommendations, and identify personnel at the May
9 Meeting. (News Photo)


the county's intent with regard to
these areas."
"We want to make sure there's no
argument," Shirley added. "We're
not including any thing in the
amendment that's not already being
allowed right now."
Moreover, he said, if the activity
is a, commercial outdoors recrea-
tional use, such as the Go-Kart
Racetrack, it will still require a spe-
cial review and approval by plan-
ners and commissioners.
Santa Hokanson expressed con-
cern about the practice of allowing
commercial activities such as firing
ranges in agricultural lands.
"I don't think we would consider
a welding shop an agricultural use,"
Hokanson said. "I'm against the
whole special exceptions. I think the
special exceptions are actually
changing agriculture into a mixed-
use category, because this is allow-
ing commercial ventures into
agricultural areas."
She also had concern about the
vagueness of the newspaper ad ad-
vertising the meeting. But Shirley,
assured her that the advertisement
was legally sufficient.
"The county is not required to ad-
vertise the text in its entirety," Shir-
ley said. "It only has to give fair


Judge Dismisse

Charges Agains
Circuit Court Judge L. Ralph
Smith on Tuesday dismissed the fel-
ony battery charges against eight-
year-old Johnnie Lee Morris.
Smith based his ruling on the tes-
timony of two psychologists who in-
terviewed Morris. The two found
Morris to be too young and imma-
ture to understand the charges
against him.
Morris made statewide news last
year when he was briefly arrested,
after punching a classmate and kick-


notice."
Realtor Tim Peary expressed
similar concerns.
"It's troublesome to me that peo-
ple who buy land in Jefferson
County don't have assurance that:
the land they buy that is zoned agri-
culture will be for agriculture use,"
Peary said. "If we want repair shops,
we ought to zone places for repair
shops. If we want outdoor recrea-
tional areas, we ought to put these
near interchanges, where there's al-
ready a lot of lights and noise and
activity. And when we have ag land,
we ought to protect it for ag use and
agricultural densities."
Peary said he recognized that his
proposal was a complete reversal of
past practices, when development
was a non issue. But development
was coming, he said.
"I'm asking that you seriously
consider having agricultural land
principally for agricultural use,"
Peary said.
Commissioner Danny Monroe
took issue with Peary's request. Al-
though in the agriculture business,
Monroe didn't think a person should
control the use of adjacent land.
"I believe in property, rights,"
Monnroe said.
(See Comp Plan, Page 3)


s All Battery

t 8-Year-Old
ing or striking several school offi-
cials, including the school resource
officer.
Ever since, Morris has been at-
tending an alternative school, where
he is reported to be doing well. It
has been reported that tests show the
boy is emotionally handicapped and
needs an individual learning plan.
Attorneys for the family have indi-
cated that the family is considering a
lawsuit against the Sheriff's Depart-
ment for the Aug. 30 arrest.


Commissioners Approve


Comp Plan Amendment


I


'I


I


I I I I I --








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005




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FMB Breaks Ground

On New Branch Site
Farmers & Merchants Bank broke a three story brick facility. FMB will
ground on its sixth Tallahassee of- only occupy the first floor. Remain-
fice Monday. ing floors will be leased to a select
The new full service branch office group of tenants.
will be located on Thomasville "Our new facility will contain a
Road, near I-10, across from the in- large number of safe deposit boxes
tersection of Metropolitan Boule-
vard and Thomasville Road.
L. Gary Wright, president and
CEO said: "Our new location will be
s*~rCrHKs H


and a four person teller line.
"In addition, there will be both a
walkup and drive-up ATM on site.
"We think this new location will
also provide easy access and egress
for our northeast Tallahassee cus-
tomers."
Presently, Farmers & Merchants
Bank operated eight branch offices.
serving Monticello, Tallahassee,-
Greenville, and Thomasville.


~. ,.:.
I.. -.


AT groundbreaking ceremonies Monday for
the new Thomasville Road branch of Farm-
ers and Merchants Bank are: L-R: Mike
Sims, executive vice-president; Bill Carra-


Trading Company

Sets Grand Openir


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Trading Company,
located at 175 W. Dogwood St.,
which housed the former News Of-
fice, will celebrate its Grand Open-
ing 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday.
Co-owners are Pam and Barry
Kelly of Coldwell Banker/ Kelly &
Kelly Properties, and Margaret
Levings of Great Adventure Outfit-
ters.
'Barry Kelly said there were a va-
riety of items for sale in the Trad-
ng Company, everything from


collectibles to anti
tery and used fun
glass window piece
"We try to
selection," said K
that after removing
from the building,
for 23 vendor bo
also rented for $40
depending on the si
"The building
fectly for us. We
three or four ver
we're looking to
Kelly. "We also d
ments."
He said that the)


JCHS Posts Honor Roll


Jefferson County High School
Principal Michael Bryan announces
the Fifth Six Weeks Honor Roll at
the school.
SStudents appearing on the roll and
their grade levels follow:
On the A Honor Roll are: Crystal
rmnson, grade 11; anhd Rebecca
Redmond and Brittani Stiff, grade
A2.
Appearing on the A/B Honor Roll


way, chairman; Gary Wright, president; and
Wilson Carraway, vice-chairman. (News
Photo)



ing around the idea for a while be-
fore they decided to go into
g business. "We had a lot of stuff in
g storage, and Margaret had a lot of
stuff. We felt that it was a good
ques, art to pot-
nluesar to spot- time to open it up and see, what
niture to stained
would come of it."
es.
The Trading Company is open
keep a broad six days a week, Monday through
:elly. He added
Stel. Hner wals Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Sthe iner walls and Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 3
there.was space
>oths which are p.m.
0 pr Kelly said the Grand Opening
Sper would be a meet and greet affair,
ize.
worked out per- getting the community familiar
red ot er with them. Refreshments including
currently have sodas, juice and snacks will be
ndors now, but available.
get more," said available.
et more" sai "We invite everyone to come on
o some consign- out and check it out," he concluded.


y had been kick-


are.
In ride 9. Takedrjl Gdlle,.
T.kja, l Mcrinstiosh. .iand Breierrica
White.
In grade l'., Alana Chambers,
Brann,, Harxe\. Richelle Keaton.
Catherine Reichert
: In graide 12, Sheila Blake..
Belinda Campbell. Siaj, Campbell.
.Kat.e : r,.:cl:e RP,:.Jdci ..ne
A .l lh ',l\ ani-., jnd Kr',,.tj! V>il-
son.


K


Neuromuscular disease can say no running, walking,
standing even breathing. Help MDA help millions
say yes to healthy lives.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


The Jefferson County
Utility Coordinating
Committee will meet
at 9:00 a.m.
May 11, 2005,
at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street




D

Muscular
Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis,
National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES



.Eat.a., smal ea ucil #5




Eat a small meal, luclle

"I 'I. ,I 311L I I I


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals J began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now T'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new womnanand I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301


Take Your First Step Today. For more; i m a.'
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and ask
for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"


big rewards
Prevent v Diabetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


A message from the National Diabetes Education Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.


Ij
. y^ *


JI 'f*am







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 3


United Way Raises


$22,853 In County


DEBBIE SNAPP
- Staff Writer
The County United Way has
-raised $22,853 in the local 2004
campaign, towards its goal of
$25,000.
This was nearly twice the $12,096,
raised in 2003.
The United Way of the Big Bend
(UWBB) held its 2004 Campaign
Finale and Awards Luncheon, Tues-
day, April 19, at the Tallahassee-
Leon County Civic Center.
Ken Boutwell, 2004 UWBB.
Chair, volunteers and UWBB staff
recognized and thanked scores of lo-
cal heroes and contributors who
helped UWBB and the Big Bend
community surpass its $6.1 million
goal for the 2004 campaign, with a
final total of $6,156,485.
"As the chair, I want to personally
thank everyone for their hard work
and dedication," Boutwell said.
"With the four hurricanes at the
beginning of the campaign season
and the recent tsunami disaster, this
community stepped up to help those
victims but didn't forget about local
people in need. We still reached our
campaign goal, which is simply
amazing and a true testament to the
people of the Big Bend," he said.
The 37 UWBB certified agencies


Comp Pla
(Continued From Page 1)
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin also
took issue with Peary, noting that
there were "always two sides to
every coin."
The other side of the argument, he
said, was that Peary's proposal
would result in a county full of five-
acre residences that would grow
only "houses, kids and pets."
Neil Fleckenstein, a land-use plan-
ner with Tall Timbers Research Sta-
tion, offered Grady County in Geor-
gia as an example of what could
happen here, if commissioners pro-
ceeded w tth the amendment.
Several y ears ago, Fleckenseinn


were delighted to hear that UWBB
surpassed its goal of $6.1 million, a
record for UWBB. The campaign
total is $146,185 more than raised
last year and once again established
this local United Way as one of the
best in the nation.
Awards presented to entities in
Jefferson County include: Progress
Energy Services, Silver Award;
Capital City Bank and Farmers &
Merchants Bank each received a
Bronze Award.
Also receiving a Bronze Award
were Jefferson County Schools, Jef-
ferson County Senior Center, and
Riley Palmer Construction.
The Monticello News received the
In-Kind Media & Communications
Contributions Award.
The 2004 Campaign Team for Jef-
ferson County includes: Carol
Barker, Senior Citizen Center; Nan
Baughman, Steve Baughman & As-
sociates; Buck Bird, Bird & Lein-
back; Hines and Janegale Boyd,
Florida Association of Homes for
the Aging; Jana Grubbs, Adminis-
trative Healthyways; David Hobbs,
Florida Highway Patrol; and Bobbie
Krebs, Senior Citizens Center.
Jacqueline P. Langford, Retired;
Betty Messer, Retired; Gladys Ro-
ann, Jefferson Elementary School;
Fred Shofner, Jefferson County
School Board; and Debbie Snapp,
Monticello News.


n
said, the Grady County Commission
had approved a motor cross track
there. Now the county had six such
tracks and a seventh was being pro-
posed, he said.
Meanwhile, neighboring property
owners were complaining about the
noise, the devaluation of their prop-
erty values, and the adverse effects
on their quality of life.
Not only had the Grady County
Commission been mired in racetrack
related, controversies for the last
three years, but.the dispute was sure
to end in litigation one way or the
other, he said.
- (See Comp Plan Page 5)


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w0 to


I AM LOST!
Photo)


'9


Please claim me and take me home.


Lost Dog

Awaits Owner

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A lost dog, found Tuesday, waits
,to be claimed by his owner at Vet-
erinary Associates.
He was found late Tuesday eve-
ning on 257 (South Salt Rd.) in Au-
cilla, in an area apparently
harvested for trees, with no resi-
dences in sight, running up the
middle of the highway as traffic
dodged around him.
He is a tri-colored Beagle mix
with a short and stocky frame, ap-
parently three months old and was
wearing a flea collar.


GRAND OPENING

MONTICELLO TRADING
CO, LLC
Sat. April 30th
Hours: 9:00-3:00
175 W. Dogwood St.
509-3517


The animal is apparently well:
taken care of, calm, lovable, obedi-
ent, rides well in a car and is house-
broken.
To claim your pet, contact Veteri-



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MonticeCCo Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
1- Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


KEEP THE GREEN LIGHT SHINING
Thanks to MDA research, the future
S ..looks brighter than ever.

S1-800-572-1717


.Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org


Now you don't need
one of these to get your
Federal payment.


Now, even if you don't qualify for a checking
or savings account, you can have your
Federal payment automatically deposited
to a low-cost, federally insured ETASM.

Call 1-888-382-3311 (TDD: 1-877-326-5833)
to learn where you can open an ETA. Or
visit our Web site at
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N Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.





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& Residential Service


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Sam AGa, we
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ask,. .








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

IE MEMBER RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
-----.------


Scams Of Inmates


Bilk Taxpayers


The IRS estimates that' some 50 Florida U.S. Sen. B
million Americans scramble in the U.S. Reps. Jim Da'
first weeks of this month to meet the and Tom Feeney, wa
April 15 deadline to file their tax re- to this tax scam. The
mrns. But among those mailing last investigative arm o
minute returns may be inmates get- find out how widesp
ng refunds for work they didn't do lem is and to identify
because they're behind bars. ers could safeguard l
H Recent published accounts found prisoners who aim to
hat with the help of a few outsiders, ernment.
jwo inmates serving long sentences "Convicts should
a Florida prisons for murder filed pay their debts to so
faudulent tax returns and received off American taxpa
funds of around $5,000 from the said.
FS for wages they never earned. "It is outrageous t
I And as it turns out their scam isn't of law-abiding citiz
unique to Florida. For example, gling to pay their tax
Ionald Sanders was indicted last prisons across the nat
ear for filing a fake tax return for receiving thousands
Ilimself and 65 other inmates while from fraudulent cl
serving time at the Missouri Eastern added. "This scam n
correctionall Center in 2002. investigated immediate
Prosecutors believe the scheme can put a stop to this
jost taxpayers over $''3.00n' 1Andm-n ".W'e.need the, TRSi
:003, two inmates' at the i-a lsnin tth'hght da. ',
aity Correctional Facility in Michi- they can't crack dow
gan were sentenced to an additional tant fraud by prisoner
S months in prison when authori- ler.
t es discovered their plans to file "American taxpay
flse tax returns on behalf of fellow know the full extent
isoners for refunds totaling more are being swindled
an $46,000. mates. A GAO inqu
Congress gather mor
,According to the IRS itself, bogus about this scheme se
turns from prison inmates is a it from happening i
owing problem. Inmates long said:Fenney.
have been among those filing multi-. Nelson, Davis, Kell
le returns for illegal refunds, IRS are concerned that
officialss say. Though the scope of Internet in U.S. corn
t~e problem is unknown. -ties may make it easi
That's why four legislators from to file phony returns.



mall Changes Can

improve Organizat
SAny time of year can be the right Begin every mor
Jine to get motivated and organized. flying the single mos'
often making small constructive tivity for that day.
changes in the way you work can At-A-Glance desk
lad to big rewards. help prioritize tasks
S"Get More Organized" and "Man- what's really import
going the Day More Effectively" who prefer to go dig
tvere the top two workplace resolu- PDA such as the HP i
ons made this year, according to a Color code your
survey by Office Depot. priority level.
I However, survey results reveal For example, mak
only 13 percent keep their resolu-
gent color, yellow yc
fons until the end of the year. rity and blue your ty
SThere are a few easy steps that
an help reduce the chance that 'Plenty of sticky no
workplace goals will be tossed aside sizes and colors are
Iis year," said Alex Hiam, best- make it easy to tag
lling author of Motivating & Re- color the minute it
warding Employees and Office De- your desk. Colored f
eots organization and productivity sorted Rollerball pen
pert. you started.
Here are some of Hiam's tips:
Set clear goals. A clear, chal- ~ Increase the store
nging but achievable goal can be a options for your pape
powerful motivator, respondents said sto
Identify the three most important are what they need to
things you need to do to meet your desk in order. Stackab
business objectives. Match systems age boxes can help or
to success factors. Once you have paperwork.
three clear goals, you can rethink Get better techn
your systems.
your systems. everyone more prodi
*Recognize effort by acknowledg- ganized. (NAPS)
:ing people. Thanking people for ex-
tra effort can be a powerful way to
encourage a positive atmosphere in Letters to the
ihe office. Welcome
S* Ask what you can do to help 500 o
others succeed. Do they need more
formation, training, tools or sup- Letters must be s
lies? According to Hiam, employ- include phone ni
wes reveal they see their boss as a re- writer
(ote, unconcerned delegator.


Bill Nelson and
vis, Ric Keller
nt to put a stop
ey've asked the
f Congress to
read the prob-
Sways lawmak-
he system from
Scheat the gov-

go to prison to.
city not to rip
ayers," Nelson

hat as millions
ens are strug-
es, criminals in
ion are already
in IRS refunds,
claims Davis
eeds to be full
tely so that we
activity."
o explain to us
h -, fn fh't' ,brld
in on this bla-
-s," stated Kel-

'ers deserve to
to which they
by prison in-
uiry will help
re information
we can prevent
n the future,"

ler and Fenney
access to the
sectional facili-
er for inmates


Opinion & Comment


1.4


RON CICHON
Publisher

There's a book sale set for next
Saturday morning outside the Li-
brary. Hardcovers, paperbacks,;
magazines and even some antique
books will be available. Proceeds
will benefit the library.
Kim Barhill has increased serv-
ices bf the. Health Department since
taking over as Director a few years
ago. Prevention is stressed with a
variety of educational efforts.
Murder Mystery Dinner Theater
on tap this weekend and next at the
Opera House... Watermelon Festival
Committee is meeting regularly to
plan the June 2-18 event.
Rotary Club planning an evening
with Pulitzer Prize winner Robert
Olen Butler on May 21. Music will.
be provided by Mike Purvis. Reser-
vations can be made by calling the
Chamber or Opera House.


I I .j


Short Takes & Other Notions


John Lilly says a donation of $123
will sponsor a child for five days
and four nights at the Cherry Lake
4-H camp. Call him at the Extension
Office if you can sponsor a young-
ster.
A friend of mine was in town with
the bicyclists recently and he said
the Monticello folks were "wonder-
ful." Several groups and churches
-,went plalout,.tq welcome our bicy-
'lhng visitors
Tallahassee Memorial CEO Mark
O'Bryant and a team of hospital ex-
ecutives met with local leaders
Tuesday to discuss TMH's service
to the community.
There are currently more than
760,000 franchised small businesses
in this country which create jobs for
more than 18 million people. Fran-
chising now spans 75 different in-
dustries and generates more than:
$1.5 trillion annually.
I'm told Brian Hayes met an alli-
gator on the 7th hole while golfing


recently.
The American Heart Association
reports one American dies every 34
seconds from heart disease. Diet is
an important factor in improving
one's heart health.
Auto manufacturers are making
more advanced safety technologies
available. Some 75 percent of 2005
models ar available with head pro-
tection side air bags, up from'50
percent in 2004. More than 70 per-
cent of ne\ mnodqls hjae. chesi. .tde
air bags, up 11 percent from 20Q4
and a whopping 145 percent 'from
2003.
Superstition: It was once custom-
ary to bake a cake with a bean in it
on January 6th. Whoever got the
slice with the bean was believed to
have good luck all the rest of the
year.
A recent study found 57 percent of
retirees vacation for at least 35 days
a year. In addition, 37 percent of re-
tirees say traveling is their favorite


activity.
Didja know the Boy Scout move-
ment was founded by Lord Baden-
Powell of England? His army
experiences convinced him that
British boys needed more physical
training and experiences in outdoor
life.
Traveling at more than 180 miles
an hour the high speed Eurostar
a.1nu 1iu r, ,p >i .
tr [ls j horsr35minutps to:
go from dov.hnto' n. London to
downtown Pais The train is so
popular that 65 percent of the people
traveling between the two cities ride
the train instead of flying.
The most influential innovation of
the past 75 years wasn't the cell
phone. It wasn't the personal com-
puter. It wasn't even television. It
was air conditioning.
Older Americans are one of the
fastest-growing age groups using the
Internet. They are generally seeking
health information.


Liberty Dying in America?


;ion

ning by identi-
t important ac-
Tools such as
calendars can
Sand identify
:ant. For those
ital, consider a
PAQ.
pape.-work by

e 'red your ur-
our second pri-
lird.

tes in different
e available to
everything by
comes across
holders and as-
s can help get

rage and filing
rwdrk. Survey
rage products
help get their
le plastic stor-
rganize current


ology to keep
active and or-


Editor
ed
r Less
signed and
umber of


BY TOM DEWEESE
Columnist

I have been an activist for the
cause of freedom for 37 years. I
have always worked to preserve and
defend the ideals of our Founding
Fathers, including individual liberty,
limited government, and free mar-
kets.
I have worked both inside and out-
side of political parties and as an ac-
tivist in the grassroots. I have suf-
fered defeat and celebrated a few
victories.
Throughout the battles I have al-
ways been the optimist, urging on
battle-weary troops, believing that in
the end the fight for right will win.
However, in November of last




Forest I

BY CHUCK WOODS
University of Florida


In a new study that reveals the
changing face of Florida agriculture,
University of Florida researchers
say the forestry industry now has the
biggest economic impact on the
state eclipsing citrus, vegetables
and ornamentals in terms of output.
Annual output or sales impacts in
the forest products industry exceed
$16.6 billion, creating 133,475 jobs,
with $7.5 billion in value-added per-
sonal and business income, and gen-
erating more than $581 million in
local, state and federal taxes (ex-
cluding .income taxes), said Alan
Hodges, an economist in UF's Insti-


year. I watched with horror while,
the lame duck session of the 108th
Congress passed one assault on lib-
erty after another; bills that we had
fought to derail during the regular
session.
First, Congress passed a 3,000
page bill, which most Representa-
tives didn't even read, to implement
a national identification card and
stengthen the already horrendous
Patriot Act.
Then Congress passed a manda-
tory and universal mental health
screening bill that will force our
children to take mind-altering psy-
chotropic drugs.
In the heat of the session, we again
stopped the "new civics" bill that
would indoctrinate our children to
accept globalism rather than Ameri-



ndustry
_tute of Food and Agriculture Sci-
ences, or UF/IFAS.
"Citrus is the crop most people as-
sociate with Florida, and the state
still leads the nation in citrus pro-
duction, but our study indicates for-
estry is now the economic
heavyweight in the state's $67 bil-
lion agricultural and natural re-
sources industry," he said.
SBy comparison, the output in the
fruit and vegetable industry is ap-
proximately $12.8 billion, generat-
ing 125,000 jobs and $437 million
in taxes, according to the most re-
cent data source. The environment
horticulture or "ornamentals" indus-
try which includes production of
landscape plants, flowers, foliage,
turfgrass and associated landscaping


can ideals.
However after we won that fight
for the second time, Congress sim-
ply changed the name of the bill and
passed it anyway. All of these were
bills Congress didn't have the guts
to pass until they were safely ree-
lected and covered by- the dark of
night.
Of course, the lame duck session
was only the icing on the cake.
We've all watched over the past
several years as one liberty after an-
other has disappeared.
Our once free nation, where indi-
viduals were protected as they made
their own decisions about how to
live life, now finds almost every as-
pect of American life controlled by
government.
We have become a nation ruled by


food police, smoking police, gov-
ernment medical care, energy czars,
education czars, immigration czars,
and intelligence czars.
Soon, in the name of "election re-
form," our system of selecting our
local representatives may be con-
trolled by a federal election czar.
We aren't allowed to close our
borders because that wouldn't be
fair to people who want to ignore
our laws.
We are told that English is just
one language spoken in this country.
Our religion is no longer permitted
on public lands that our tax dollars
pay for.
Now we are to have a National ID
card that we must show to open a
bank account, get on a plane, or but
(See Liberty Page 5)


Is Growing
services generates $8.9 billion in the UF/IFAS School of Forestry Re-
-output impacts in Florida. sources and Conservation.
While forestry has a bigger eco- The forestry industry is concen-
nomic impact on the state, environ- treated mainly in North and Central
mental horticulture still generates Florida, with more than 16 million
more jobs 154,205 than forestry acres or 25,000 square miles of for-
in Florida, he said. Environmental ests, representing nearly half of the
horticulture also is the fastest grow- state's land are, Hodges said. For-
ing segment of agriculture in the ests in Florida are managed to pro-
United States, and Florida is ranked duce a variety of wood and fiber
as the second largest production products, with about 650 million cu-
state in the nation, bic feet of wood harvested annually.
Hodges, who studies the econom- Forests also support outdoor rec-
ics of Florida agriculture with David rational opportunities for residents
Mukey, a professor in the UF/IFAS and million of visitors to the state,
food and resource economics de- providing important nonmarket en-
partment, said other faculty contrib- vironmental services such as biodi-
uted to the report on forestry. They versity, water recharge and mitiga-
include Janaki Alavalapti and Doug- (See Forest Page 5)
las Carter, associate professors in


From Our Photo File








'4..






c ; "I



P ii i ---M ll




A DRUG BUST in August, 1988, produced 'with cocaine. L-R Sheriff's deputies: David
substantial reason for the then rising incar- Hobbs, Ike Grant, seated, Mike Joyner.
ceration rate here. The table was covered (News File Photo)


____







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 5

11


Forest

Industry
(Continued From Page 4)
tion of global climate change by ab-
sorbing carbon dioxide from the at-
mosphere Hodges said.
The growth of the Florida forestry
industry mirrors that of other states
in the southern United States, where
forestry is now the leading agricul-
ture commodity.
"The success of the industry in
Florida and the Southeast is also
driven by the fact that large tracts of
forest land are privately owned,
while forests in the western part of
the nation are largely on public
lands," Hodges said. "In many
cases, state and federal restrictions
on publicly owned lands govern the
amount of logging that can take
place, particularly in old-growth for-
ests, which accounts for the decline
of the industry in the West."
Hodges and Mulkey also, esti-
mated the values of recreation and
tourism in their study on the Florida
forestry industry.
While tourism is the largest and
most well known sector of the Flor-
ida economy, forested landscapes
provide environmental amenities
that support this industry, particu-
larly for the growing eco-tourism
market, Hodges said. Visitors spend
about $47 billion annually, which
translates into an overall economic
impact of $177 billion.

Various surveys indicate that more
than half of Florida visitors engage
in some type of nature-based activ-
ity during their visit, and 19 to 33
percent of all travel and tourism in
the southern United States is linked
to outdoor recreation, he said. "Us-
ing the more conservative 19 per-
cent figure, we estimate that outdoor
recreation in Florida has a total eco-
nomic impact of at least $22.3 bil-
lion annually, creating 332,000
jobs," Hodges said. "And some
share this can be attributed to forest-
ecosystems."

He cited U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service data showing that ". ljl.ri-
related recreatnonal' acivitdes i?- m
cluding hLnnng, fishing anda wiliife
viewing account for total expendi-
tures in Florida of an estimated
$6.05 billion. He said the figure in-
cludes money spent on fuel,
lodging, and meals as well as recrea-
tional equipment such as boats and
guns. "While not all wildlife-related
recreational activity is directly at-.
tributed to forest resources, most of
the recreation, hunting and wildlife-
watching takes place in forested
ecosystems," he said.

In addition to these commercial
and recreational' use values associ-
ated with forests in Florida, there is
an array of nonmarket environ--
mental services that are important to
recognize, although they may be dif-
ficult to measure, he said.

These nonmarket environmental
services include: surface and ground
water storage, purification of air and
water, mitigation of droughts and
floods, stabilization of climate, gen-
eration and preservation of soils, de-
composition of wastes, cycling and
movement of nutrients, provision of
wildlife habitat and maintenance of
biodiveristy. Hodges said Florida
forests absorb or "sequester" about
5.8 million tons of carbon from the
atmosphere every year, which helps
reduce the effects of global
warming. Using the figure of $5 per
ton, this positive environmental im-
pact is worth about $29 million an-
nually, he said.



Liberty
(Continued From Page 4)
a gun.
Government at all levels no longer
serves to protect our liberties and


property. Rather, government's only
purpose is to rule, regulate, restrict,
license, tax, assess, confiscate, and
redistribute our possessions to some
unnamed stakeholder.
No longer can our nation call itself
the beacon of freedom in the world.
In fact, the Heritage Foundation has
just released its 2005 Index of Eco-
nomic Freedom, and for the very
first time, the United States isn't
even in the top ten free nations. We
are tied with Switzerland for 12th
place. Clearly, American liberty is
dying.


SHIRLEY WASHINGTON instructs students
at the JES Boys and Girls Club. L-R: Damian


Boland Timber Named

Outstanding Logger


The Forest Resources Associa-
tion's Southeastern Technical Divi-
sion (SETD) and Stihl Incorporated
recognized Boland Timber Com-
pany of Perry, FL. as the region's
2005 Outstanding Logger.
Tony Undieme with Stihl South-
east congratulated the Boland family
and presented company President
Jeffrey Boland with a Stihl MS460
chain saw, and a $250 check.
Stihl serves as sponsor for the Re-
gional and National Outstanding
Logger Awards.
Boland.Timber Company is a four
generation family logging business.
Grandfather James Boland has
been logging since the 1930's, and
continues to be active in the day to
day business.
His son, Jeffrey, is now the com-
pany President. He is a Master Log-
ger and his wife Connie assists with
the company administrative man-
agement.
Jeffrey's sons Jamie and John, re-
cent graduates of the University of
Florida have also achieved Master

Troop 803 Sets
Horseshoe
Fundraiser


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Boy Scout Troop 803 will host a--
fundraising horseshoe tournament
9:30 a.m., Saturday at the Eagles'
Nest Scout Hut, on Water Street.
Troop Leader "Bear" Register
said the scouts will also sell ham-
burgers, hot dogs and soft drinks
during the event to raise funds for
both their annual summer trip, and
a chest freezer for the scouts.
The cost is $20 per team and tro-
phies will be awarded for first, sec-
ond and third place winning teams.
"Everybody is invited to come on
out and have a good time along
with some good food," said
Register.
For further information contact
Register at 997-2617 or Ira West at
997-8701.

comp Plan
(Continued From Page 3)
"I ask you to learn from the mis-
ta us of some of the other communi-
ties in the area," Fleckenstein said.
Lloyd resident Tom LaMott
warned of potential problems. Hav-
ing experienced similar situations in
other counties, LaMott said the pro-
posed amendment would open the
county to Leon County's rejected
projects.
"With this kind of rule, you don't
know what you're going to get, and
this will affect us for the next 100
years or end up in litigation," La-
Mott said.
Under the rule, he said, citizens
would have to depend more than
ever on the leadership of planners
and elected officials for protection
against unwanted developments.
"Once we open the floodgate, it
will be difficult to hold to a very
good residential agricultural com-
munity," LaMott said. "That's my
concern."
Commissioners assured him they
would be vigilant in assuring quality
developments.
With that,' the board voted unani-
mously to approve the amendment.


Logger Status.
Boland Timber purchases most of
its own timer, and the Bolands man-
age three company logging crews,
and two contract logging crews.


Mathis, Washington, Lkeriah Haire. In back
is Cheyenne Akers. (News Photo)


They harvest timber in a variety of-
management applications, following.
management plans that are in place
:.or helping landowners develop man-
agement plans for their forests.
Boland Timber Company is
blessed with a stable and conscien-
tious workforce. Several employees
have more than 10 years in service,
and others have 25 to 40 years of
service.


DIVE


IN!


Dive into MDA, and learn more about
summer kids' camps, family support
groups, and life-saving research.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


People Help MDA ... Because MDA Helps People
a-


- -j


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


Lifestyle


U 7W'


Voces Angelorum Choir At


:First Presbyterian Sunday


'DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


by Daniel Pinkham.
The choir will also perform works
by Paul Ayres, G.F. Handel, W.A.
XAT----f -I-- 1XI0l'i-- --_Ai


Voizart, and william yru.
FitQt Presbyterian Church will Conductor Charles '
:,iiust a concert by Voces Angelorum founded the group five year
..(Voices of Angels) at 7 p.m. on He enjoys being teased abo
Sunday. choir, Charlie's Angels.
., The concert is free and open to the Witmer holds a bachelor's
public. in music from the Univers
Voces Angelorum, an auditioned Michigan and a master's deg
women's chamber choir, hails from music from Wittenburg Unive
.;Tallahassee, but the singers actually
., come from all around the region, in- He serves as the organist and
-,cluding Waukeenah and Bainbridge. director at Grace Lutheran C
3, These volunteer musicians range and directs the Bach Parley O
,in age from college students to retir- tra and Chorus in Tallahassee.
Iees and come from various religious For several years, Witmer
denominations and walks of life.
Their repertoire consists of sacred
"'music, much of which is rarely per- ':
formed. Their sound is unique and .
'-langelic, thus, the name Voices of
J-'Angels.
S' The selections chosen for this con-
cert include songs by classical com-
,posers as well as modem, "living,
-,breathing composers," as Director
Charles Witmer likes to say. He as-
'-sures the listeners that this is "not
your typical sacred music," but it is
!o both challenging and lovely.
-., The choir will sing such pieces as
r'Exsultate Justi" by John Williams,
o who directed the Boston Pops and '
i- ,composed the score for many major
A.films. This song is from the movie
-,,Empire of the Son."
, Other pieces include the haunt- "- ~
ingly beautiful "Lux Aetema" by ..
Michele Roueche, a contemporary I;:: --:
"Ave Maria" by Joan Szymko, and :
"Lauda Sion," a rhythmic praise '.,. .'-:,.
song by Gyorgy Qrban.
Concert attendees will also hear: .
"Dancing"'by Scott Tucker, the i:
spiritual "Poor Man Lazrus" ar-
ranged by Jester Hairston and an un- THARPE
forgettable song cycle about angels .- i "
I), "


Homes Of
Wilbur Owen Futch
Futch, Wilbur Owen, 77, of Sun
City Center, Florida, passed away
Sunday, April 24, 2005. He was a
fourth generation Floridian born in
SMulberry, Florida, January 6, 1928,
and resided in Brandon most of his
life. He was a past member, presi-
dent and one of the first organizers
of the Brandon Chamber of Com-
merce, member of the Brandon Li-
ons Club, Brandon Jaycees, Bran-
don Elks Club, and the U.S. Naval
Reserve, and a stockholder of Bran-
don Commercial Centers, which
helped to fuel early commercial de-
velopment of downtown Brandon
including founding of the Brandon
Hospital. He was one of the original
organizers and stockholders of
Brandon State Bank and owner of
-Futch Appliance Company in Bran-
"-don, Plant City, and Tampa, which
hailed Brandon's first outdoor
lighted business sign in 1957. He
was also a member of the Brandon
and Tampa S.P.E.B.S.Q.S.A. Bar-
bershop Chorus, St. John the Divine
Episcopal Church of Sun City Cen-
ter, and Brandon High School Old
-~ Times Alumni Association.
S He was preceded in death by his
wife of 56 years, Lanelle Chancey
Futch, his parents Hugh and Vera
Futch, sister Zelda Futch, cousin
SMaurice Raybon, and mother-in-
Slaw Lena Chancey.
S He is survived by his sisters, Freda
SAman and Glenda Lentz; five chil-
Sdren Sharon Greer and husband
SDon, Larry Futch and wife Nancy,
SGary Futch and wife Sharon, Mar-
tha Bennett and husband Jan, and
Mary Bea Maddox and husband
rian; sister-in-law Virginia Lear
Ind Marian Harris; brothers-in-law
Bruce Aman and Charles Chancey;
Seven grandchildren Tyler, Kellen,
and Kyle Greer, Bradley and Hunter
Futch, and Ally and A.J. Maddox.
j He is also survived by many other
relatives, some most special to him
Being cousins Wilmer Raybon, Mar-
Silyn Roberts, Jim Brack Simmons,
Sand Bobby Aman, and nephew Phil
Aman. Other survivors include spe-
Scial friends Gary Lentz, Barbara
SMcCollough, and many more
friends among them, those from


Witmer
*s ago.
)ut his

degree
ity of
;ree in
rsity.
Choir
Church
rches-


trained a successful career in opera,
but yielded to the call to conduct
choruses and direct church music.
Accompanist Helen Falb has'-,
served the choir for three years. She
earned a degree in music from Flor-
ida State University and is minister
of music at the Unitarian Universal-
ist Church in Tallahassee.
Voces Angelorum is a nonprofit
organization sustained by tax de-
ductible financial contributions from
its audiences and its members.
The choir also dedicates itstime
and talents to community service by
providing music to shut-ins at retire-
ments and nursing homes and juve-


main-- nile detention centers.


Tharpe Named

Club Student-

Of Month

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


i"1



.I.


Mourning
Monticello, Florida, where he and
Lanelle lived' for several years. Fu-
neral services will be held 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 27, 2005 at
the Stowers Brandon Chapel. The
family will receive friends from 4
p.m. until 6 p.m. at the funeral
home. Graveside services will be
held 11 a.m. Thursday, April 28,
2005 at Mt. Enon Cemetery, Plant
City. His grandchildren will serve as
pallbearers. In lieu of flowers, those
who wish may contribute to Mt.
Enon Cemetery Memorial, P.O. Box
326, Plant City, FL 33573 or to St.
John the Divine Episcopal Church,
Building Fund, P.O. Box 87,
Ruskin, FL 33575.

Minerva Lillian James
Minerva Lillian James age 58,
died Wednesday, April 20, 2005 in
Riviera Beach, Fl.
The service will be at 1:00 pm. on
Saturday, April 3.0, 2005 at Allen
Chapel AME Church in Greenville,
FL with burial at New Zion Ceme-
tery in Greenville. Family will re-
ceive friends (viewing) from 2:00
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April
29 at Tillman Funeral Home.
Ms. James was a native of Green-
ville, FL where she graduated in
1965 from Greenville Training
School. She received her A.A. de-
gree in Art from the former Su-
wanee River Junior College in
Madison, FL. She graduated from
UCLA in Los Angeles with a B.S.
degree in Engineering.. She returned
to Floridain 1991 and lived in
Riviera Beach until her passing.
Survivors include five sisters Josie
Stokes of Riviera Beach; Mary E.
Conner of Monticello; Ethel M.
Dennis of Greenville; Fanita Nor-
man, of Orlando; Ardrenia Smith of
Miami; her four brothers; Allen
James, Jr. Phenix, AZ; Roscoe
James, Riviera Beach; Herman
Bradley of Miami and the Reverend
Marvin Jackson of Orlando along
with numerous aunts, uncles, other
relatives and friends.
Among those preceding her in
death were her parents Allen James,
Sr. and Jimmie Lee Crawford James
(See Homes Page 7)


Bryan Tharpe ha
Student of the Month
Jefferson Boys and G
Big Bend.
He has been attend
and Girls Club for t
has outstanding condi
in the community, and
He is in Judy Jon
class at Jefferson
School.
Tharpe plays baseba
sports program at t
Park.
His hobbies are
games, baseball, and
vision
He is the son of
Winn.


-Jn i
Church N

John White Chap
ofthe Eastern Sar, \\


~4~1

",.'.'



Cassaundra Brockman

rdination Service Set
Brockman is a native of
DEBBIE SNAPP FL., and, the eldest of four
4''" Staff Writer born to Martha L. and
1. Walker.
"r. Ordination services will be held at- She is married to Deacon
S5 p.m. Sunday for Minister Cas- Brockman and together the


saundra L. Brockman, at Mt. Pleas-
ant M.B. Church in Capps, FL.
Brockman, will then'join with
Pastor Byron Barnhart, at Friend-
ship M.B. Church and serve as Co-
Pastor. She will participate in
outreach ministry and other commu-
nity initiatives.


Quincy,
children
Leroy

Quinton
ey have


six children and one grandchild.
In May 1998, she accepted her
calling into the ministry. Since ac-
cepting her calling, she has received
spiritual mentoring under the leader-
ship of Reverend Isaac Manning, Jr.
and Elder James Leonard, Sr. at
Pleasant M.B. Church.


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DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Saint Margaret's Catholic Church.
will be host a Pampered Chef "Help
Whip Cancer fundraiser 1 p.m. on
Saturday, May 14, at the Parish
Hall.


s.een named to At in-home cooking demonstra-
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for the Mont- see products and recipes in action,
girls Club of the learn;quick and easy food prepara-
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ding the Boys Chow to entertain with style and ease,
wo years, and, transforming the simple to the spec-
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playing video The Pampered Chef created the
watching tele- Receive BA Help Whip Cancer campaign in
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Tanishia LaShay Barnhart)WiilleWr'] as3 r. ei:,.l, ov
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Education. the cause: Mini Stainless steel
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; '7,


Spiritual CaKerrograif, / p.m, Sat-
urday, at Greater Fellowship MB
Church.
**.*
Springfield AME Church will host
an appreciation program for Rev.
Lucille Graham, 4 p.m. Sunday..
Speaker is Pastor Norman Clary.
***
Calvary Baptist Church celebrates
65 years at Homecoming. 11 a.m.,
Sunday. Guest speaker is Preacher
Floyd Nelson from Thomastown,
GA. Dinner follows the service.


dium.
Upon graduation, Barnhart plans
, to attend graduate school while pur-
suing her teaching career.
She is a 2000 graduate of Jeffer-
son County High School.
Barnhart is the mother of Tyren
Lachard Dasher and the daughter of
Gwen Keys and David Barnhart of
Monticello.
Her maternal grandparents are
Classie Keys and the late Johnny
Keys. Her paternal grandparents are
Dorothy and Willard Barnhart, all of
"Monticello.


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Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Listen, my son, to
your father's
instruction and do
, not forsake your
mother's
teaching.
Proverbs 1:8

Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


INTRDUCORYA


--MM 9


f7







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 7


NORMA MARTIN, volunteer, receives a cer- rector Voncell Edwards at the tenth annual
tificate of appreciation from Activities Di- Volunteers' Banquet.



Volunteers Honored At


Nursing Center Banquet


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson Nursing Center held -
its tenth annual Volunteer Banquet
Friday, at the Center.
Theme of the event was "Volun-
teers Take Time To Care."
Members of the community were
invited to attend and were out in full
force, as the banquet room was
filled to capacity, with standing
room only.
The Banquet was orchestrated by
Social Service Director Mae Eva
Kyler, with Activities Director Von-
cell Edwards assisting.
Presiding over the banquet was
Edna Henry, Director of the JES
Mentoring Program, who kept the
program running smoothly and in a
timely manner.
S Speaker for the evening was Joy
Zak, M.S., M.A., with Department
of Elder Affairs, State of Florida.
She spoke about what it takes to be
a volunteer.
She stated that volunteers .\ ~:.:
lot of need just in 'his past year dur-
ing the hurricane season.
The only question a volunteers ask
is "Where do you want me?" They
recognized the need, and they were
there. They knew it could have eas-
ily been them needing the help. So,
the volunteers stepped out of their
comfort zones, Zak said.
"What a blessing it is to give of
oneself," she added "It's not how
much we do, it's how much we can
accomplish when we all do it."
She talked about the stumbling
blocks that get in the way and how
to overcome them. "We are all im-
portant and unique. We have our
own individual gifts and talents and
we need to share them with those
-who need and will appreciate them.
The rewards are simple but worth so
much more."
She concluded with a quote from
Winston Churchill: "We make a liv-
ing by what we get, we make a life
by what we give."
Piano music was played and songs
were sung throughout the evening
by Jane and Robert Freeland, re-
spectively. An inspirational solo
"His Eye is on the Sparrow," was


Tag Office
(Continued From Page 1)
fend h.-r: :I'." Sutphin said.
i untcr, for her part, said she
would not sign off on the deal so
long as V. al{:i:cr s business continued
to give its fees to Taylor County.
"I will not sign to take money
from this county and for it to go to
another county," Hunter said. "I told
Mrs. Walker if she canceled her
contract with Taylor County and
brought the fees to Jefferson
County, I would sign."
Hunter said it was unfair to allow
Walker to send her fees to Taylor
County when the other tag office in
town paid between $25,000 and
$30,000 in fees annually. What's
more, she said, Walker's operation
would be in competition with the of-
fice, essentially taking business
away from the county.
In the end, Commission Chairman
Skeet Joyner decided the issue was-
n't really a board matter.
"This is Hunter's call," he said.
But Attorney Buck Bird re-
minded commissioners that they had
made it a board matter when they
had voted to grant Walker the ap-
proval.


performed by Lindsay, Zak.
Administrator Paul Kovary wel-
come the attendees and introduced
the JNC Department Heads and staff
with great admiration.
Rev. John Jones offered the Invo-
cation and Blessing before the meal,
consisting entrees of Cornish hens
and baked ham, with all the comple-
ments.
Wendy Futch called out the win-
ning .numbers for the door prize
drawings.
Certificates of appreciation were
presented by Edwards and Futch.
Edna Henry closed with remarks
on behalf of the staff: "We want the
volunteers to know that the fruits of
their labor are lives filled with hope,
and hearts filled with joy.
We are thankful for all the volun-
teers do to make a difference in the
lives of others. We are thankful for
everything you do to bring joy to
our residents days. Please accept out
appreciation, our respect, and grate-
ful praise."
Volunteers include: Baptist
Ladies;.,,House to; House Prayer
,Band; Norma Martin; Vivian.Miles;.
Mt. Ararat AME Church, and Rev.
Hudson; Rev. John Isom; Destin
Dubose and First Baptist Choir;
Rev. John Jones; Corine Hudson;
Oliver Flowers; Edna Henry and
Group; ARC; and Lilla Anderson.
Also, Elizabeth Baptist Church,
and Rev. Howard Adams; Dr. John
Ward; Polly Brown; Judge Bobby
Plaines; Vonice O'Quinn; Ethel-
Strickland; Diane and Buddy West-
brook; Barbra Jarrett; Union Hill
Youth Group and Shirley Huggins;
Evelyn Murphy; American Legion
Auxiliary, Mary Reihert and Jane
Cox.
Also, New Bethel AME Church,
and John Peck; VFW Post 251 and
John Nelson; VFW Post 251 and the
Ladies Auxiliary; Tallahassee De-
partment of Corrections and Carol
Butler; Monticello Fire and Rescue,
and Larry Bates, Sr.; Madison De-
partment of Corrections and Sgt.
Brock and Lt. J. Bryan; Second
Presbyterian Church and Mary
Moody;. County 4-H and John


Lilly; Mt. Olive Youth Group and
Mozell Hawkins; Opportunity
School and Wanda Bailey.
Also Joyce Sabree; Mary Whatley;
JCounty Boys and Girls Clubs and
Gerrold Austin; Head Start and Ms.
Mutch; Evangelists Barbra Fraizer
and Hazel Mills; Daniel Myers and
Christian Friends from Thomasville;
Tillman Funeral Home and Al Hall;
Branch Street Funeral Home; Sallie
and Sam Worley; and Bruce Merrill.
Also, Monticello Country Band
and Curtis Morgan; Sofia and Otis
Garmon; Sandra Boltz; Waukeenah
United Methodist Church, and Betty
Monroe; Jane and Robert Freeland;
Martha White; Line Dancers of
Monticello; Ebenezer Baptist
Church and Cherry Wisham; Dea-
con Johnnie Wilson and St. Paul
PBC; Lilly of the Valley; St. James
Church of God; and Rev. Eddie Lee
and wife.
Also, Rev. Artis Johnson; Marise
Estime from WCTV Channel 6; and
Al Dixon; St. Rilla MB Church and
Rev. James Mack.
D'"~'DOtPrizes ere donated by the
following: Buddy's ,Furnirure,-Bad-
cock, Bari's Liquor, Winn Dixie,
Gelling's Florist, Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank, SubWay, Chicken Del-
ite, Courtyard Cafe, Rare Door,
Monticello Printers, Designe Divine
Skeet Joyner, Barrington's Florist,
Tillman Funeral Home, and Branch
Street Funeral Home; Dunn Furni-
ture.
Also, Therapy Team of JNC, U.S.
Foods, Bassett Dairy, Builder's
'Mart, Johnson Locket, C&W Foods,
Nutritious Lifestyles and Jessica
Miller, Florida Coffee, Pat
Williams, and D.J.Snapp Trucking.


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-- ..... L


POSING for our camera at the Jefferson Nursing Center
Volunteers' Banquet are L-R: Mae Kyler, Joy Zak, and sing-
ing soloist, Lindsay Zak. (News Photos)



Chief Gives Personnel

Update At City Police


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Several promotions and one
new hire took place recently at the
City Police Department.
Chief David Frisby reports that
Roger Murphy has been promoted
from Patrol Sergeant to Sergeant of
the Criminal Investigation
Division. He has one full time staff
person working with him, Investi-
gator Chris Eades..
City Police are currently adver-
tising for the position of Patrol
Lieutenant, which will create an
opening for Patrol Sergeant.








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LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


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from Corporal to Sergeant.
The newly hired officer is Mi-
chael Moore. He brings with him
16 years of experience with the
Jackson County Sheriffs Depart-
ment.
Frisby added that the duties that
Deputy Chief Bill Bullock had,
prior to his resignation to become
the number two man at the Sheriffs
Department, are being. distributed
throughout the department.
Since the department is in the
middle of the promotion cycle,
Frisby said that two more promo-
tions will be made within the next
two weeks.


LLI
1698 Village Square Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32309


Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page 6)
and her adopted parents, Felix and
Elzada Jackson.

W.C. Holley Jr.
W.C. Holley Jr., 90 of Jefferson
County, was the founder of Holley
Inc., died Tuesday, April 26, 2005.
He is survived by his wife, Essie
Wilson Holley.
The graveside service will be at 11
a.m. EDT Friday at Roselawn
Cemetery. Family will receive
friends from 5 to 7 p.m. EDT today
at Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahas-
see (850-385-2193). Memorial con-
tributions may be made to a favorite
charity.
A native of Southport and a long-
time resident of Tallahassee, he
founded Holley Inc., an industrial-
mills supply company, in 1955. He
was a member of BPOE Lodge No.
937 and also was a member of First
BaptistChurch of Monticello.
Other survivors include two sons,
W.C. "Buddy" Holley III (and wife
Nancy) of Tallahassee and Kenneth
Holley of Crawfordville; a daughter,
Sharon Bitters (and husband Bob) of
Mount Dora; a sister, Kathleen H.
Marinetti of Maine; three grandsons,
William Holley IV of Panama City,
John Holley (and wife Lorena) of
Tallahassee and K.B. Holley Jr.' of
Crawfordville; five granddaughters,
Dqle Orr (and husband Scott) of
Jacksonville, Traci Chapman (hus-
band Steve) of Lawrencevillle, Ga.,
Mandi Dyal (and husband Trey) of
Tallahassee, Kim Mansfield (and
husband Peter) of Aptos, Calif., and
Nicole Christoff of Carona Del Mar,
Calif.; and seven great-
grandchildren.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


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- m


Lady Warrior JVs Split


Games, End Season 15-3


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady warrior JVs wrapped-
up their season with a 15-3 record
after splitting their final two games,
last week.
When ACA went up against
Hamilton in a makeup game, they
suffered their worst defeat of the
season, 7-20.
Coach Frank Brown said both the
Lady Warriors' defensive plays and
offensive plays were way off kilter.
They didn't have the hits that they
normally do and they were only
able to steal four bases, much be-
low their average.
Also, pitcher Paige Thurman was
out and third baseman Lindsey Day


pitched the entire game.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat three
times, scored one run, had two sin-
gles and one walk; Nicole Mathis
went to bat three times, scored one
run, stole one base and flied out
once; and Mallory Plaines went to
be batters box three times, scored
two runs, one single and one dou-
ble, two RBI, and one fly-out.
Day went to bat three times, had
one single got put out once at first,
and put out once on a fly-out; Mi-
chaela Roccanti went to bat twice,
got put out on a sacrifice bunt and
had one strikeout; Miranda Wider
went to bat once and struck out;
and Tristen Sorensen went to bat
twice, scored one run, had one sin-
gle and one put out at first.


ACA Tennis Team


Blanks T'ville 5-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team climbed to a 7-8
season after winning their two final
regular matches of the season.
The Lady Warriors blanked Tho-
masville, 5-0.
In singles action, Amanda Sapp
beat Carmen Ellis 8-5; Courtney
Connell beat Jessica Oglesby 8-2;
Kaitlin Jackson was victorious over
Mary Poole, 8-0; Rebekah Aman
won 8-3 over Sarah Rice; Eliza-
beth Shirley beat Laura Lilly, 8-3;
and Ramsey Revell was victorious
over Oglesby, 8-6.
Doubles were called for rain
when the team of Jackson and
Caroline Mueller had a 1-0 lead on


Rice and Lilly.
The Lady JV's began their final
match of the season and in singles.
Dana Jane Watt was in a 7-7 tie
with Poole and in doubles, Re-
bekah Falk and Alfa Hunt suffered
a quick 1-8 loss.
When the varsity ladies faced off
against NFC, they came out with a
6-1 victory.
In singles action, Sapp lost to Al-
lison Harte, 4-6 and 5-7; Connell
beat Alex Harte, 6-2 and 6-1; Jack-
son was victorious over Lune Rho,
6-0 and 6-1; Aman beat Kirn
McClure, 6-2 and 6-4; Shirley
downed Courtney Black, 6-0 and 6-
0; and Revell beat Black, 8-0.
In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell beat the sisters Harte, 8-4; and
Jackson and Mueller were victori-
,ous over Rho and McClure, 8-1.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Tigers wrapped up
their season with a 7-12 record af-
ter suffering a 5-4 loss to Maclay in
the first round of District play this
week.
Coach Earline Knight said the
Lady Tigers allowed Maclay to
score three runs in the second in-
ning, one run in the seventh and
one run in the eighth.
JCHS scored all four of their runs



Demons

Play Sunday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Lady Demons-
softball team plays its first game of
the season against Greenville, 4
p.m. Sunday, here.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said his
Lady Demons consist of 17 young
ladies, six returning from last year's
team.
Lady Demons include: Kista Hill,
Tonya Young, Lisa Fead, Kidra
Thompson, Shonda Parker, Tasha
Samuel, Nikki Cooks, Letitia Fead,
Tasha Smiley, Felecia McDaniel,
Diane Robertson, Shanise Brooks,
Chandra Tucker, Lana Anderson,
Ceata Crumity and Nacarra
Howell.
Thompson will play pitcher,
Cooks plays first base. Young will
play second base. Samuel will play
short stop. Smiley will play third
base, and Hill, Lisa and Letita Fead
and Howell will be playing the out-
field.
Jones added that he is also look-
ing for an assistant coach. Inter-
ested parties can contact him at
342-1209.


If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


in the sixth inning. The Lady Ti-
gers had three hits to Maclay's four.
"Errors in routine plays were the
difference in the game," said
- Knight.
Ashli Washington gunned down
one runner trying to steal third and
she went one for four at the plate,
scored one run and stole one base.
Nikidra Thompson went one for
three with one RBI, scored one run
and stole one base; and Samantha
Pohle hit a triple going one for
three with two RBI and two stolen
bases.


Sports


Kalyn Owens went to bat once
and struck out; Hannah Sorensen
went to bat three times, scored one
run, had one single, one RBI, one.
strikeout, stole one base and had
one fly-out; Katelyn Levine went to -1
bat twice, scored one run had two ,
singles and stole two bases; and ;,, -
Erin Kelly went to bat twice, had J1
one single, one RBI and one i ,l ', .
fly-out.
When the Lady Warriors faced
Maclay in another makeup game, "' l ':
they didn't want to lose again and t,
were hungry for a victory in their
final game of the season. They
blanked Maclay 17-0. TUTEN
The game went five innings be-
fore being called for the .10 run-- -
rule. "We were pumped and Tiger Track
played lean and mean," said
Brown.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat five COm pete At
times, scored three runs, hit two
singles, one home run, two, RBI,
had one walk and was put out at FRAN HUNT
first once.. Staff Writer
Mathis went to bat four times,
scored two runs, had one single,
two walks and was put out at first After placing second in district,
two s and was put out at ft for the first time in anyone's recall,
once; and Angela McCune went to the Jefferson County High School
bat once and struck out.
bat once and struck out. went to the regional meet and won
Plaines went to bat three times,
scored two runs, hit two singles, first place.
had two RBI and one fly-out; Nikki Tigers then departed Thursday to
Kisamore went to bat once and Coral Springs to compete in the
flied out; Day went to bat three State finals, Friday.
times, scored three runs, had two When asked how it felt to win re-
gional for the first time, Head
singles, one triple, two RBI and gional for the first time, Head
stole one base; and Wider ent to Coach Harry Jacobs responded,
bat once and was walked. "Pretty darn good. It's quite an ac-
Thurman went to bat four times, complishment. They have been
scored three runs, hit one single, working real hard and we hope to
one triple, smack a home run, had do something good at State."
three RBI and one walk; Tristen At regional, Jonathan Dady quali-
fied for State with 21 feet, three
Sorensen went to bat three times, fled for State with 21 feet, three
S w t ba he inches in the long jump, 42 feet, six
scored one run, had one RBI, one inches in the triple jump, 15 sec-
walk and was put out twice at first;
and Owens went to bat once and
al'.-. d. i ri
Haninah Sorenseh went to bat. u r.a
three tihes, scored'one run, walked' KidCare
once, stole one base, had one fly- Free or Low
out and one put out at first; Roc-
canti went to bat once and
flied-out; and Levine went to bat insurance
three times, scored one run, had for Kids
one single, one strikeout ard one : I ,ST/ ,
put out at first. wwW.floridakidcare.org
Jodie Bradford went to bat once, TTY 1-877-316-8748
was walked and stole two bases; sponsored by theFlprida Department of Health
Kelly went to bat three times,
scored one run, hit two singles, one
RBI and stole one base; and Savan-
nah Williams went to bat once and'
flied-out.
Thurman pitched the entire game,
striking out five batters and giving
up one hit and two walks.
The Lady Warriors did improve
their season record over last year's
13-4 season.


J M FORESTRY INC.


1231 EAST PARKER STREET ~ P.O. Box

249 BAXLEY, GEORGIA 31515


Office 912-367-6043
Home 913-632-2755


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877-249-8885 229-249-8484


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 9


Warriors Rout Bell 13-1

For 19th Win Of Season


I


BILL BROWN

The Aucilla Warriors recorded
their 19th win of the season on
Monday with a 13-1 rout of the
Bell Bulldogs.
The lone run was unearned, re-
sulting in a walk and two errors af-
ter two were out in the top of the
fifth inning.
Casey Gunnels was on the mound
for the first four innings. He gave
up two hits and struck out five.
Glen Bishop finished allowing
one run on no hits. He struck out
three.
Gunnels led the 14 hit Warrior at-



Team To

State

onds flat in the 110 hurdles, 40.5
seconds in the 300 hurdles and 43.7
seconds in the 4 x 100 meters. He
will compete in each of these
events at state.
Jimmy Sloan qualified with 21
Sfeet, eight inches in the long jump,
42 feet, eight inches in the triple
jump, 22.05 seconds in the 200 me-
ter and 10.08 seconds in the 100
meter and the 4 x 100 with 43.7


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The Hiring 01 A Lawyer Is An Important Decision That Should Not Be Based Soley Upon Advertisements.
Before You Decide, Ask Us To Send You Free Written Information About Our Qualifications And Experience.


Group Fitness Schedule




wo '


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


3:30-4:15PM
3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
3 to 5 yr. olds (Pifates 'Pifates


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
(Fitness Coom60 Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


JCHS Lady Tigers Wrap Up

Season With 7-12 Record


tack with a single, a triple, and two
RBI.
Josh Carswell had a single, a
double and three RBI; Chris Tuten,
Ridgely Plaines, and Jason Holton
each had two hits.
Tuten also had two stolen bases
with Plaines and Holton accounting
for one RBI each.
Dustin Roberts, Kyle peters and
Daniel Roccanti each had singles;
Justin Payne was the other Warrior
to hit safely, with a double and one
RBI.
Gunnels recorded his third win of
the year. The team record is 19-3
with three regular games remaining
before the district tournament.


seconds. He will compete in each
of these events at state.
Desrick Jones, Lucious Wade and
Dondre Tyson will be participating
in the 4 x 100 meter.
Irene Hamilton qualified for state
in the 200 meters with 26.04 sec-
onds and 51.05 seconds in the 4 x
100 meter.
The Lady Tigers on the 4 x 100
meter team at state are: Hamilton,
Shaumese Massey, Krystal Wilson
and Alexia Huggins.
Darrell Young and Shanice
Brooks will go to State as alternates
for the Tigers.









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005

Take Steps TO Get Organized


According to a recent survey, 78
percent of Americans clean their
liome and get organized in spring.
SAs a mom, businesswoman and
founder of
www.executivemoms.com, Marisa
Thalberg has had to become an or-
tanizational expert. Thalberg offers
tiese tips to help you get started:
Get Into the Groove. Getting or-
ganized required a routine. If you
work in an office or have a home
business with a filing system that
works, use those same principals to
manage your personal paperwork.
Immediately open and sort mail as
you remove it from the mailbox, pay
all bills at the same time everv
month and, contact companies you
in longer with to receive correspron-


onr Lucal. roi/csshUi i ELt rs'i
Interior Exterior


dence from, asking to be removed
from their mailing lists.
By eliminating the pileup you
eliminate the disorganization.
Tally-Ho! Kitchens can quickly
become one of the most disorderly
rooms in the home.
Without a kitchen pantry system,
you may end up buying items you
already have.
Keep a running tally on a dry
erase board or tacked to the'refrig-
erator to inventory groceries, toilet-
ries and other household supplies.
When supplies run out, write it
down.
Become A "Click" Chick. The
Internet has evolved into a valuable
timesaving and organizational tool,
New free services such as Personal


Shopper
(www.PersonalShopper.com) offer
the luxury of a personal shopper at
your fingertips 24/7. The service
searches through millions of prod-
ucts online and selects deals and gift
ideas tailored to your unique inter-
ests, favorite brands, personal style,
gift-giving needs and budget..

The site offers helpful tools, in-
cluding a virtual desktop shopping
assistant and a stress-saving gift
planner. You never need miss a
great deal and can avoid that last-
minute scramble to find the right
gift.
Make It Motivating. Organizing
can be a lot more fun if you "treat"


yourself to funky boxes, drawer di.
viders, desk helpers and other tools -
available in an increasing number of
shapes, sizes and styles.
They create a visual harmony that
makes a space look more organized.
Call in the Troops. No reason to
go it alone; organization can be a
family affair.
Develop a shoe drop-off area at
the front door. Set a loose-change
bottle out on the counter and when
ifs full, take everyone out for a
treat.
Place clutter buckets in each room
where kids can toss toys, coloring
books and games. These buckets
and jars are easily 'moved out of
sioht when cnmnanv nrrives


INIP
Iffl EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF
THEAGUAD ANDAN D SElV


BUSI ESS




DIRE STORY


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296
Mobile 508-2383
Lic. #' CGC #1507547


*Limerock
*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil
Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337
997-6788


All yn Si kes.
Owner


1.830.Thomasville Road
TIT llhassee, FL 32303
/ (850) *224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
S Funeral Homes:


.Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lic.
#SR09 71265


I


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE: The Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners .will hold a
Workshop at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May
3, 2005, at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, Monticello,
Florida, to discuss the operations of the
Grants Office. Felix "Skeet" Joyner,
Chairman
4/29, c


SEPTIC TANK

LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing
THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. I Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


.. I


Appliance

Service
of lonticello ''"\
THE NME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
)wned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
' ;' STATE


S
V
I Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


il40 Chevron
rii+ Tax pk. 3 pks ct.

305 $1.59 $4.47 $14.00
2ct+ $13.30 each
DTC $1.70 $4.80 $15.20
2ct+ $14.40 each
Marlborb $3.00 $8.69 $27.65
Another Delivery Ladies Leather Purses $5.99 $18.99
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all
manufacturer's coupon


1400 S Jefferson Sireel Monlicello, Florida 32344
Phone (850) 997-2519 FAX (850) 997-0692


*Tractors *Ditch WJitch *Backhoe *Construction
Canisters *Pressure IW'ashers *Power Tool
*Mullch more
AU THIZII' 'I O1E I


Browln'ling *
S'nakP RnnBos- Work,


Carolina
RBnoo- Ca suIIal


,
DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
u SERVICE ;
-*-Trimmitng-* Mowin*g ......r"-
*Removal -,
*Maintenance
*Stump Grindqg
S*Aerial Device
*BushH.I'gging

99740039
Licensed & Insured


SCREENPRINTING
& EMBROIDERY
ALL OCCASIONS


Register's
Mini-Storage


315 Waiikeetih
H- wy.
1/ Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
O lt. ,:? 'i'f /: !i'- :-' .jr;." **",*,

850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


Thurman
Tractor
Service
i.Mowing

'lHarrowing
Food Plots

Licensed & I/ns/furdc
James ThurrnanILLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


__ __ __ U


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY


(850) 997-1389 99
Fax: (850) 997-7450


COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Timn& Dixie Thompson
S TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Got an idea?


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Lbans:
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682


0 6


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NEtL 1O SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UPGRADES
INSTALLATIONS CON'SUL1ATIONS
CUSTOM COMPUTERS IUIORIA! S
REMOVAL OF VIRUSES, AWARE, SPYWAKE


Have a concern?


Gene Hall

County Commissioner


(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or
ghallboard@yahoo.com


I U -u


*


REAL GOOD PAINT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
15 Gallon Minimum)

342-3288


Border 2 Border


Lawn & Landscaping


r Mention TThis
Ad & Receive
A 10%
SDiscount

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE

Rough-sawn Oaks.
Cherry, Pecan, and
Pine available.
Also Plainning A\ailable


dI---m t 9


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-5808
850-545-9964
850-251-2911
155 JOHN
COLLINS R)D.


COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR
SPRING SPECIAL!! $15 OFF
ANY REPAIR BILL OVER $75
(Not Valid With Any Other Offer)



85-99-279
158 othJefrsn0 t


I


--I


FM


I


I I I I1 I Ill


I JI fW .LL11 -FFL I flL LJ U I J -%_ L(,) I E I I I-


M,


m w











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE


Notice Auction to the Highest Bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been seized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit
#27 Darrell Broxsie Household goods;
Unit #50 Don Martin Household goods;
Unit #8 Mary McCullin Household goods;
Auction Date: May 14, 2005; Time: 10
a.m. Place: Monticello Mini Storage,
corner of York & Railroad Streets,
Monticello, FL.
4/29, 5/6, c

The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold a regular meeting
on May 12, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting
will be held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of US Highway 19 and
U.S. Highway 90 in Monticello, FL. The
meeting may be continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency of this
state or of any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice, of such board,
commission, or agency, conspicuously on
such notice, the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the
board, agency or commission with respect
to any matter considered at such meeting
or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need a record of
the proceedings, and that for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
4/29, c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL Division. 05-18;
Deutsche Bank National Trust Company
formerly known as Bankers Trust
Company of California, N.A., as Trustee
for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Trust
2000-1, PLAINTIFF. vs. Evelyn Johnson
Thomas, et al., DEFENDANTS. NOTICE
OF FORECLOSURE SALE. Notice is
hereby given that, pursuant to that Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 26th,
2005, and entered in civil case number
05-i8. of the Circuit Court of [he 2nd
Judicial Circuit in and for .JIcler-.n
County, Fri d urJ. slihrn DLL I-' IIL
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPN\
FORMERLY KNO\\ N -S BANKERS
TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN
STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I TRUST
2000-1, is Plaintiff and Evelyn Johnson
Thomas; Jennings B. Williams; Mary L.
Johnson Grant; Earnestine Johnson Price;
Jefferson County, a political subdivision of
the State of Florida; State of Florida
Department of Revenue, .is/are
Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello, Florida,
Jefferson County, Florida, at 11:00 am on
the 26th day of May, 2005, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE IN THE NORTHWEST
PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER (SE '/. OF NW 1/4) OF
SECTION TWENTY-ONE (21),
TOWNSHIP ONE (1) NORTH, RANGE
FIVE (5) EAST WHICH IS ENCLOSED
WITHIN THE FOLLOWING
BOUNDARY LINES, TO WIT:-
BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION
OF THE SOUTH BORDER OF THE
OLD PUBLIC ROAD RUNNING
EASTERLY AND WESTERLY ACROSS
THE NORTH SIDE.OF SAID FORTY OF
LAND WITH THE EAST LINE OF
THAT CERTAIN ONE ACRE TRACT
OF LAND CONVEYED BY DAVID
MCKINNEY AND WIFE TO J.B.
SCURRY ET AL AS TRUSTEES OF THE
THOMPSON VALLEY / BAPTIST
CHURCH BY DEED DATED OCTOBER
29, 1892 AND OF RECORD IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK "X" PAGE
164 AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE AND RUNNING
THENCE SOUTH TWO HUNDRED TEN
(210) FEET, THENCE RUNNING
SOUTHEASTERLY AND PARALLEL
WITH SAID OLD PUBLIC ROAD A
DISTANCE FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY
FEET (420), THENCE RUNNING
NORTH TWO HUNDRED TEN FEET
(210), MORE LESS AND TO THE
SOUTH BORDER OF SAID OLD
PUBLIC ROAD, AND THENCE
RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY ALONG
THE SOUTH BORDER OF SAID OLD
PUBLIC ROAD A DISTANCE OF FOUR
HUNDRED TWENTY (420) FEET
MORE OR LESS,.AND TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; SAID LAND HEREIN
CONVEYED CONTAINING TWO (2)
ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND BEING
A PART OF THE LANDS CONVEYED
TO SAID BEN EDWARDS, JR. OF THE
FIRST PART BY JOHN H. SHUMAN BY
DEED DATED JUNE 13, 1927 AND OF
RECORD IN SAID CLERK'S OFFICE IN
DEED BOOK "UU" PAGE 256 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
MADE; TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE
HOME VIN# 10126577u. NOTE: Pursuant
to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
you are advised that this law firm is
deemed to be a debt collector attempting
to collect a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
Dated the 26th day of April 2005. DALE
BOATWRIGHT, Clerk of Circuit Court;
4/29, 5/6, c


HELP WANTED

Local Business now hiring FT/PT week-
ends. Respond to: P.O. Box 691, Monti-
cello.
Director of Nursing : Nature Coast
Regional Surgery Center Immediate
management position opening for a
licensed RN with current ACLS & BLS.
Medicare-certified ASC that enhances
quality of life through improved vision.
Strong managerial, human relations and
organizational skills are preferred. Salary
commensurate with experience. Excellent
benefits. Fax resume to Human Resources
(850) 838-3937 or call (850) 584-2778, Ext.
639. Closing date: 05/31/05 EOE.
4/20, 22, 27, 29, 5/4, 6, c
Looking for licensed Jefferson County
Real Estate Rep for our firm. College
Degree preferred. Excellent training;
scholarship for the right individual. Fax
resume to 850-421-0027 or call

850-421-0020/www.premierpropertiessold.
net
4.'13, tfn, c

Part-time Stock / Customer Service Clerk:
Must be available to work all day
Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com.
4/29, fcan
Part time Lumber Yard Customer Service
/ Grounds Maintenance person. Must be
available to work Saturdays, additional
hours flexible. Apply in person at
Jcierson Builders Mart.
4/8 tfn.
Child Care Providers Needed "Our
Blessings'. Now taking applications for full
and part time teachers. Requirements: 40
hour, CPR & First Aid.
4/8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd


EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg

AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
S'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible;$4,400
'96 Mercedes.220 $5,800,
1/28, tfn
Dad's Auto Sales LLC
'93 Dodge Dakota $2495
'90 Olds Cutlas $1795
'89 T-Bird $1995
2685 South Jefferson St. 997-3245
tfn, 4/15,c
1991 Buick Regal. Very good condition,
$2,000 obo 997-6664.
4/22, 27, 29 pd
'86 Toyota Small Pickup. Dependable
work truck. 2nd Engine. Fair body. $1000
obo. 997-5771.
4/27, 29, c

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold'

GARAGE SALE

COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET:
Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage
Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Road from 8am 4pm on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
997-1754. Do.:ait:ns appreciated.
4/1, 8, 15, 2:. 29, pd
Monticello Volunteer Fire Department N.
Jefferson St. Saturday 8-2
4:29, pd
Moving Sale, 3 families, Friday and
Saturday New Refrigerator. Everything
Must Go. 1205 E. Pearl St.
pd

FOR RENT


1 bedroom, 1 bath house with
$500 month call: 997-6653
4 29-5/25, pd


Pasture
4


GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

JOIN OUR i'
TEAM TODAY!


Seeking Technician
candidates for our Perry
Florida location.
We offer competitive
compensation, paid training,
a great benefits package,
flexible schedule and more!
Please apply at Super-Lube-
1631 S. Byron Butler Pkwy.
In Perry or fax your
resume to 850/222-5152.
Valid Drivers License Required.
Applicants must pass a drug test.
- l -. .. .


REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of Western
NC Mountains. Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy Call
for Free Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
429, fcan

Enhanced 4 bedroom/2 bath 2200 Sq. Ft.
on 1.56ac, outbuilding. Financing avail.
$115,00.
4/15, 22, 29, 5/6, pd


FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext.1299.
4/29, fcan


COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I
sold out. Now offering new home sites in
Phase II at Shine Landing, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner
in this upscale community with boating
access to the Neuse River, Pamlico Sound
and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness
center, tennis, swimming pool and private
marina. Homesites as low as $29,900.
Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC
(800)566-5263, www.shinelanding.com..
4/29, fcan

Your RE/MAX Connection for Jefferson
& Leon. Pam Bowling Broker Associate.
850-385-6685 x20 or 1-888-701-2205 x20
4/1, tfn

FOR SALE
II


METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
4/29, fcan


20 ft. Pontoon with Mercury 70 HP Eng.
Trailer included. Great condition $7500
obo. 997-4562. -
4/20, 22, 27, 29, pd

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn

!GE Range Good Condition, white. 48
incheiv.jd$100 997-3947.
4/27, 29, pd

MOBILE HOME with land. Enhanced
4Br/2Ba, 2200 sq. ft. on 1.56 ac.,
outbuilding. Financing avail. $115,000.
997-1093.
4/29, 5/6, 13, 20, pd

Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.,
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn

Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine Steel
Master Buildings factory direct at HUGE
Savings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50, Perfect
Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. ww.SteelMasterUSA.com.
4/29 fcan


Remember,

one mall fee

from man,

one great gift for

manatee-kind.


FOR SALE

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
to sale $1, $2, $5, $10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m. @ 342-3246.
4/1,8,15, 22, 29,pd

1987 Suzuki Samurai JX 4wd convertible
190k mi., runs OK, CD player, fiberglass
top,.toolbox, new 8" suspension (Rancho),
new 33" mud tires, new 15x10 steel wheels,
LOW gears, rear Lock-Right locker, other
goodies. Needs some work, but
unbelievable off-road! $1800 obo. Call
997-4253 between 6 pm-9pm M-F,
9am-9pm Sat-Sun.
3/25 tfn

Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
4/22, fcan



SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
yard work, cleanup, home repairs. By day
or week. 342-1486, 510-0998.
4/22, 29, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves,, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn


EARN YOUR DEGREE Online from
home. Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance, and
computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.
4/29, fcan


D & S Repair small engines, tractors,.
outboards, ATV's etc. 997-4015.
4/6, 8, 15, 22. 29
Get Your Ficrida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
S1958. Call for a free Brochure!
1-800-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
3/2,4,9,11,16.18,23,25,30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15,
20, 22, 27, 19 chg
Do you wanw to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names,: -"Creeds- ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


VENDORS WANTED
Booths available
From $40 to $150 per month.
Antiques, Collectibles, Art,
Used furniture, etc.
MONTICELLO TRADING
CO., LLC
1,75 W. Dogwood St.
509-3517



CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


:'N FLORIDA
,--.... -, F 'W l* / "






Buy your manatee

license plate today.


There are approximately 2,000 manatees left in Florida.
Florida residents can do their part to help these manatees survive.
By purchasing a manatee license plate, you contribute to the
rescue and recovery efforts, research, management, and public
education programs for the manatees.


(Contactyour xbcaltag of/ke
formon insfourmL)


For current manatee information, please
write or call the Florida Department of
Evirornmentl Protection, Bureau of
Protected Species Management .. MS
245, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000
(904) 922-4330
http://www.dep.state.fl.us


.1111111 1111~111~~2 ~l~U


Real Estate...

Always a Great Investment

Www.cbkk.cot


Pure Elegance!
3,556 sq ft Must
See Stately Brick
House, 5BR 2BA,
Tennis Court, Fire-
place, Gazebo,
Wet Bar, Sunroom
& More On 10
Beautiful Acres!
$547,900


KELLY & KEllY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jeffersn
(850) 997-5516


eLamont: 4BR/2BA 1,654 sq ft Cedar House on
2.20 AC, Convenient to Tallahassee... $84,900
*LOG CABIN: 2BR/2BA 1,330 Sq Ft, on 6.05
Acres, Wood Floors, Spiral Staircase, Spanish
Tile & More! .............................$169,900
*Horses? 3BR/2BAMobile Home, 14 AC,
Fenced, Cross Fenced & Riding Ring!$192,500
*Real Florida Setting- 3,759 Sq Ft House,
Barn & Guest House on 10+Acres.......$429,000


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Choice Building Lots in Town call for de-
tails $10,000 to $40,000 '
Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah i
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre !
Nice Home Under Contract 3 bedroom 2
bath home on Virginia Street with deck,
fenced backyard and single car garage i
priced to sell $87,500
Sweetfield Forest under contract 5
wooded acres between Monticello and Lloyd 1
$47,500
Check this Out Like new home, built in 1
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened porch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice i
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295;000
High on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $55,000
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lament
$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$76,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000 1
Cheapll 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
high land in deed restricted neighborhood
$10,000 per acre
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo Leased new insurance
agency coming soon!
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Shady Lane 2.39 wooded acres near St.
Augustine Rd $18,500 i


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!




Buyers looking for Homes and Land
-11In li I-.Ji- ---r-iMrl*-r"-ag*i-n-a"rltr--'-.--=r----^I


-------~------~---~-------t----3
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


PRESENTING the Colors at the Old City Cemetery on Con-
federate Memorial Day are: L-R: Jim Bard, Halsey
Beshears, Jack Bullock and Jim Yaun.


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a 20 30 years old
o 30 40 years old
o 40 50 years old
a 50 60 years old
a 60 years or older


2. .If a YMCA Branch is opened in Jefferson County, I would be willing to join as:


Family
Married Couple
Single Parent
Single Adult


o Senior (over age 60)
o Senior Couple.
a Teen
o I am not interested in joining.


3. I am interested in the following YMCA programs (please check all that apply):


Health and Fitness
Sports
Youth In
Government
Aquatics
Leaders Club


o Adventure Guides
a Resident Camps
o Day Camps

o Senior Programs


o Qther

4. The best time of day for me to exercise is:


Early morning (6 A.M.)
Mid Morning (9 A.M.)
Noon


a Afternoon (4:30 P.M.)
o Evening (5:30 P.M.)


5. I would use the following services if offered (please check all that apply):


ANNA WEEKS places flowers on
Confederate and Union Soldiers
Memorial Day. (News Photo)


the unmarked graves of
Sunday, on Confederate


0
0
[]
[]


Personal Traihing
Nutritional Counseling
Massage Therapy


Towel Service
Fitness Evaluations
Workshops on health topics


Confederate Memorial


Ceremony Held Sunday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Kate Dilworth Scott Chapter-
of the United Daughters of the Con-
federacy (UDC), held its annual
Confederate Memorial Day.Cere-
mony at the Old City Cemetery Sun-
day.
This local memorial service began
more than 100 years ago, when wid-
ows and children decorated the
graves of soldiers, both Confederate
and Union, killed in the War Be-
tween the States.
Local UDC members held a short
program assisted by Pickens Bird
Camp of Sons of Confederate Veter-
ans.
Presenting the colors and the sa-
lute to the Flag were Jim Bard,
Halsey Bashears, Jack Bulloch, and
Jim Yaun. After which Bard fired
one shot from his rifle.


School Boar
(Continued From Page 1)
Should this be the same pay
step? Or some other step? ,
Sloan also requested that a meet-
ing with DOE officials concerning
the construction of a middle school,
be arranged.
To backtrack: When special fa-
cility funding for the new high
school was obtained, the plan sug-
gested by the state was to build the
high school with a design that would
allow a middle school wing.
After the required three years of
millage assessment for this purpose
were completed, the plan was to re-
quest special facility funding to
build the middle school.
Subsequently Barker told the
Board that DOE has informed him
that until the new high school is at
capacity, no further funds would be
allocated for a middle school:
In the years since the special fa-
c2lity funds were granted, and the
aeove mentioned plan was devised,
enrollment has declined annually.


Eleanor Hawkins welcomed those
in attendance and explained the rea-
son for this special tribute and
thanked them for sharing their time.
Juanice Hagan offered words of
prayer.
Mary Ann Van Kleunen intro-
duced Gary Wright, guest speaker,
who spoke about soldiers. He noted
their courage, strength, and com-
mitment to their beliefs.
Wright brought an old, and very
detailed soldiers manual to share
with those present.
After his enlightening talk and re-
cess of the colors, Cary Wheeler
brought the event to a close with a
shot from the cannon.
Flowers were then placed on
the graves of the soldiers, both Con-
federate and Union, some of which
are in a small, fenced in section of
the cemetery and unmarked.
Refreshments were served as
guests mingled after the ceremony.


d

Barker said that the five year fore-
cast from DOE projects continued
decline in enrollment.
At Sloan's request, Barker said
he would arrange a preliminary
meeting with DOE officials, with
Sloan, Wilson and himself to see
what if anything can be done about
future funding for a middle school.
"They promised it to us," Sloan
stated.


Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit outr web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.



+
American
Red Cross


o Other

6. I would enjoy taking the following group exercise classes (please check all that apply):


a Step
o Kickboxing
o Pilates


a Yoga

o Parent/Child Yoga

o Body Sculpting
o Abs and Back
Class


Group Cycling
Circuit Training
Boot Camp


o Resist-a-Ball Class

o Stroller Exercise

a Tai Chi
o Organized Walking
Groups


VWe auid sW &w ids, 6s g". d.lipes, and







Dear Jefferson County residents,

To better meet the needs of the residents of Jefferson County, we are exploring
opening a branch of the Leon County YMCA in our wonderful county. In order to
ensure our residents receive quality services offered by the YMCA, we will need
your input by completing this survey.
Please answer the following questions and return this survey to one of the
designated sites listed below. Your prompt response is appreciated.

1. Please check the appropriate box that best represents the ages of the people living in your
house (please check all that apply).


o Prenatal Exercise
o Mom and Tot Exercise
o Youth Group Exercise
Classes
o Trekking (Group
Treadmill Classes)
a Belly
Dancing/Polynesian
Dance/Salsa


If swimming lessons would be of interest to you, please answer the following questions.

7. Which type of swim lesson would interest you?


a Parent/Child
o Preschool


Youth
Adult


8. Which class schedule would you prefer?

a 4 week'class that meets two times per week
o 2 week class that meets four times per week
o 8 week class that meets one time per week

9. What time of day would you prefer to attend swim lessons?


a Morning
Comments:


a Afternoon


o Evening


Thank you for taking the time to fill out this survey. We are looking forward to the opportunity to
build healthy spirit, mind and body.in our community.

Yours in spirit, mind and body,

Jamie Rogers, Chair
Jefferson County YMCA Steering Committee

Drop Sites: Jefferson County Health Department, City Hall, Jackson Drug Store, The
Learning Center, Union Hill AME Church


Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs
that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.
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o Infant
o 1 -4 years old
o 5- 9 years old
o 10 -12 years old
o 13 -15 years old
a 16 -19 years old


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 1A


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.......................................................
*-.i 5 -
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CLOCKWISE, from top: FWC fisheries biologist Michael Hill
examines the dam repairs; the city's sidewalk extension
project is completed: townhouses going ip near the down-
town area; the Letchworth Mounds are drawing more state
attention ant attracting tourists: the long- wwaited con-
struction of the higfschool was completed; and dignitar-
ies break ground for Florida SafeRider, Inc.


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April 2004 Ap il 2005


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PAGE 2A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005




Community




Celebrates




New School



SOpening


.LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Fifteen months after breaking
ground for the new high school,
about 200 people gathered at the site
in August to celebrate the official
opening of the $17.2 million
facility.
It was a momentous occasion in-
deed, complete with the posting of
the colors, the presence of national,
state and local elected officials, and
high-blown rhetoric intended to
convey a new sense of mission, if
not a new beginning.
New beginnings, in fact, was the
theme of the day's thought, pre-
sented by School Board Vice Chair
Beverly Sloan.
"If there was ever a day for new
beginnings, this is it," Sloan said,
going on to extoll the virtues of
achievement, learning from experi-


ence; and never giving up in the face
of difficulties and adversity.
"A new day is in front of us,"
Sloan concluded. "Let us make of it
the best possible that is imaginable."
Congressman Allen Boyd, a 1963
of Jefferson County High School,
used his turn at the podium to chal-
lenge the students to create a better
tomorrow.
This country had become great be-
cause each succeeding generation
built upon the accomplishments and
efforts of the previous generation,
Boyd said. He noted the progress
this community had made in the en-
suing years since his high school
graduation.
"In 41 years, this community has
come a long ways," Boyd said. "It
doesn't mean we've reached the top,
but we've made much progress. My
challenge to the young people is that
you take this opportunity and run
with it, so that 41 years from now
this community will be a better


place because of your efforts."
Other speakers included high
school Principal Michael Bryan,
School Board Chairwoman Harriett
Cuyler, and high school student
Shaundala Brown.
Bryan remarked on the 152 years
of accumulated history and radi-
tions at the old high school and
noted that it was now up to the stu-
dents and faculty to make up the
new school's history. He vowel to
make student achievement the
school's first priority.
Brown pleaded for patience, -n-
derstanding and support from he
community, no matter what the tu-
dents' achievements or attitudes--
although strive for excellence the
students would certainly do, she
said.
And Cuyler reminded the commu-
nity that while its effort to built the
new school on firm and solid founf
dation was deservedly laudable, the
job was far from done.
It would require the continued in-
volvement and commitment of each
and every person present to ensure
the students' success, she said.
"It won't be completed until every
child is as solidly built as these
structures," Cuyler said.
Following the presentation, offi-
cials and members of the public
were invited to partake of refresh-
ments and tour the facility, which
opens for classes next week.
The completion of the school and
the expressed hopes of school offi-
cials for a better tomorrow, in terrims
of students' academic achievements,
comes amidst a failing grade as-
signed the school in the latest FCAT
test scores and a dwindling enroll-
ment.
Indeed, although the new school
can accommodate 541 students,
about 325 are expected to attend in
the coming semester.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Residents who regularly travel the
Waukeenah Highway know the road
underwent repairs during the sum-
mer.
But for those who don't travel the
road as frequently, it may come as
welcomed surprise to learn that the
section between US Highways 19
and 27 was resurfaced, the shoul-
ders restored, and the striping re-
done.
After numerous delays and almost
two years of planning, the contract
was awarded to the low bidder,
Mitchell Brothers, in July. The con-
tractor began resurfacing the road
almost two weeks later, with the
completion date expected in August.
The total cost of the project, which
the Department of Transportation
(DOT) funded through one of its
Small Counties Road Assistance
Programs, was $715,801.83.
Commissioners can't say enough
about the Small Counties Road As-
sistance Program, or retired engi-
neer John Gerran, who has donated
his services to the county on several
projects.
The Small Counties Road Assis-
tance Program, which the Legisla-


ture abolished in 2003 and then
partly restored in 2004, is consid-
ered godsend to counties such Jef-
ferson. Absent such program,
commissioners say, this county
would not be able to resurface many
of its deteriorating roads.
Gerran, meanwhile, has been do-
nating his engineering service to the
county ever since County
Coordinator/Engineer Richard Mus-
grove was let go because of budget-
ary problems in late 2003;
Or so commissioners represented
at the time. More and more, how-
ever, commissioners are expressing
their dissatisfaction with the job per-
formance of the former coordinator,
as more and more problems come to
light.
The Waukeenah Road project is a
good example. Although the fund-
ing was awarded to the county in
2003, it was nearly lost a couple of
times because of missed deadlines,
incomplete paperwork and alleged
foot-dragging on Musgrove's part.,
Subsequent to Musgrove's depar-
ture, Commissioner Gene Cooksey
got the DOT to grant an extension.
Gerran then reworked the plans and
made sure that all the appropriate
steps were taken to ensure the pro-
ject could go out for bids.


DIGNITARIES attend the ribbon-cutting
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From left, State Representative Loranne


Ausley, State Representative Will Kendrick,
Commissioner Junior Tuten and School
Board Member Fred Shofner. (News Photo)


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 3A

Library Sees Growth Despite Budget Cuts
cessed by the patrons at home or high speed connections. Patrons also program continues to be to encour- good location. But we are hurting "It is our goal to continue offering-
rLAZARO ALEMAN other locations included 16,000 have the opportunity to improve age children in the county to be- for more space and less good book selection, after school
'Senior Staff Writer hits." their computer skills via free work- come lifelong readers." maintenance." help for all students, offer courses to
SPut another way, the number of shops offered by the library. And Hamedani attributed the suc- assist patrons in building web sites
Despite budgetary constraints that registered library patrons increased the library is in the process of in- cesses to the many friends and sup- Her second goal, she said, was to and provide other computer training
forced the curtailment of certain from about 3,900 in 2003 to nearly stalling remote access in other parts porters of the library, including the reorganize the Friends of the Li- as needed," Hamedani said. "It we
services, the library experienced a 4,600 in 2004. of the library for patrons using their County Commission and the Library brary and the Library Foundation, get more space, we also want to ini-
urge of growth during the last year. During the same period, the fre- laptops. Advisory Board. which would allow the generation of tiate more literacy and community
"The 2004 fiscal year at the Jeffer- quency of people visiting the library In addritinn th e hildrpn's nro- "We received many donations in more local funds. education programs."


:son County Public Library can be
described in one word -- busy," Di-
rector Linda Hamedani reported in
the annual report, which she submit-
ted to the County Commission in
mid November.
"We have had record-breaking at-
tendance in every aspect of the serv-
ices provided by the library,"
Hamedani wrote. "Usage of materi-
als is up about 9 percent, the number
of patrons registered grew by 18
percent, and the number of patrons
using the library facility increased 8
percent.
"This does not tell the whole
story, however. Computer usage ac-


rose from 45,000 to about 47,750
and the circulation of materials in-
creased from nearly 31,000 to al-
most 35,000.
In addition, Hamedani said, the li-
brary was able to make a number of
technological improvements, thanks
to the assistance of the Wilderness
Coast Public Library staff.
"A new server was installed to ac-
commodate easier control over the
maintenance of the network and the
connections between the Teen Cen-
ter Branch, the main library and
Wilderness Coast Library," she said:
Meaning that patrons now have
access to 19 Internet terminals with


gram reportedly exceeded all expec-
tations last year.
"We had eight outreach programs
with 1,241 children attending and
19 in-house library programs with
252 children attending," Hamedani
said.
Program activities included a
book reading club, a Christmas in
July craft fair, and a voter education
initiative.
"We continue to work well with
the Boys and Girls Club, the Jeffer-
son County School System, local
private schools, home-school groups
and the Monticello Opera House,"
Hamedani said. "The goal of the


books and materials, as well as
$4000 in donations and contribu-
tions and used books sales from our
many friends in Jefferson County,"
Hamedani said. "We also received
$164,000 in state aid."
Hamedani cited the relocation of
the library to a larger building as
one of two priorities for the coming
year.
"The present building in only
7,000 sq. feet, with an upstairs and
downstairs arrangement," she noted.
"The cost of elevator maintenance
and the age of the building both
drain the budget. Our present build-
ing has served us well. It has been a


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PAGE 4A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


Housing Development



TO Have Historic Look


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city's Local Planning Agency-
(LPA) in December gave the green
light to a residential development
that is slated for the 400 block of N.
Cherry Street.
Normally, the LPA recommends
approval and the City Council acts
on the recommendation. But in this
instance, the council approved the
project prior to the LPA, contingent
on the latter finding the site plan ac-
ceptable.
Developer Riley Palmer plans to
construct eight upscale single-
family townhouses on the city block
opposite the Christ Episcopal


j r
tef ^ "Mi


Church Office.
Palmer told the council that the
new buildings will conform as much
as possible in design to the historical
architecture of the area. He said the
one-story houses will sport gables,
porches and brick facades to make
them more compatible with the his-
toric district.
The one minor sticking point was
the white PVC fence that will sur-
round the development. Mayor Julie
Conley expressed disappointment
with the feature and expressed her
hope that it could be replaced with a
more historically accurate wooden
fence.
She "respectfully disagreed" with
Palmer's assessment that the fence
would appear wood-like from 30
, t'lS g^^


feet away.
"It just doesn't look right in the
historic district," Conley said. "I
have some real concerns."
That might be, Palmer countered.
But he had already pushed the limits
of what the market could bear, he
said.
"It's not 100 percent historic, but
I've got to build what sells," Palmer
said. "Otherwise, I won't be here
long."
As for the historic Dunn-Rainey
house that currently occupies the
property, Palmer had good news. He
said more than 60 people had re-
sponded to the News story. As a re-
sult, it appeared that the structure
would be saved.


I


MEMBERS of the Visioning Committee
brainstorm during one of their many meet-
ings. The group produced a document that


Jamie Cichon Rogers

Opens 'Body Works'


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

-..Jami'eCichon Rogers opened her-
new business 'Jamie's Body Works'
on Cherry Street in June.
The business offers an array of
services, including fitness classes
and personal training.
Sessions are designed for both
male and female, adults and
students.
Classes and sessions will also ca-
ter to individuals, partners and small
groups.
Individuals are encouraged to train
and exercise at their own pace.
Whether working out at the studio


seeKS TO inTluence tne luure a
of the community. (News Photo)


held at local daycare facilities.
"Jumping Jack's and Jill's,' a chil-
dren's fitness program, began in the
fall. Classes accommodate children
ages 3-10 years,
The classes promote exercise,.
good nutrition and tumbling in a
noncompetitive atmosphere
For more.m-foQrmanttonrabout class .
times and dates and for scheduling
appointments, call 997-4253.


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MONTICELLO
NEWS
L__


or at other locations, one's own spe-
cific abilities and preferences are
taken into account in the overall
plan.
Roge r -s, 3 c 'ri'iedC er:-'Ic in-
structor and personal trainer, is also
certified in CPR and First Aid.
She is the former owner and op-
erator of Jamie's Dance Works.
She felt there was a need for better
health and fitness in the Jefferson
County community, and is dedicated
to her clients.
Her goal is to provide clients the
motivation they need to work with a
program best suited to help them
reach their goals.
At this time, children's classes in
tumbling and exercise are being


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The bad news, he said, was that
the people who wanted the 1850s
house were from Sopchoppy. Mean-
ing that the historic structure would
be moved out of the county.
Palmer said that although numer-
ous local residents had responded to
the free house offer, all had backed
out when they realized the cost of
moving and restoring the structure.
He estimated it would cost $10,000
to move the structure and another
$150,000 to restore it.
Palmer said his preference re-
mained for the house to stay in the
county, if at all possible. Conse-
quently, if some local property
owner wanted the house, there was a
possibility that he or she could still
get it.


"We're under no obligation (to the.
Sopchoppy people), if another deal
comes up," Palmer said.
He said he was also looking for a
new home for the 1850s
commissary/store that also sits on
the property. He said members of
the historical society had expressed
an interest in the building, but didn't
know if the organization could af-
-ford the moving expenses.
Barring the relocation of the two
buildings, Palmer said they would
have to be demolished as a last re-


sort.
In other action, the LPA approved
for recommendation to the City
Council the site plan for a mini-
storage facility on N. Jefferson Stl
The action came almost a yearlaf-
ter the applicant asked for the ap-
proval. In the interim, the city had to
change its rules to allow for .the
placement mini-storage facilities in
its business zoned areas.
The new facilities will have 2cli-
mate control, allowing for the stor-
age of papers and other perishable
items.


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Bypass Projected



200 May
,,fo~r 2030, Maybe


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A bypass is a possible alternative
for the correction of the traffic prob-
lems on US Highway 19, but it's not
the first choice.
The first choice is either to leave
the road as is, or make
"operational/geometric improve-
ments" to it. "
Meaning the expansion of the ra-
'iius of the courthouse circle (by re-
1"ducuon of the courthouse island
etc.) and other such short-term ad-
justments to allow for the easier
-.flow of traffic, particularly '18-
1 wheeler traffic.
SA bypass is the long-range solu-









0 M

" i-


tion. Say for 2030 or beyond.
And although the LPA Group, the
consultant engineering firm hired by
the state to do the feasibility study,
depicts three possible bypass routes
as a result of their $250,000 study,
the routes are only conceptual at this
point.
It will require another study -- es-
timated at between $300,000 and
$500,000 -- for the group to be able
to identify a specific bypass route,
complete with the engineering and
environmental documentation to
support the choice.
That essentially was the gist of the
LPA's presentation to a joint meet-
ing of the city and county's plan-
ning agencies mid December.


MIKE LONG, longtime owner of Edenfield
Hardv are Store, turns the keys over to new
S.


Jerry Oshesky, LPA Group project
manager, and Ralph Bove, a sub-
consultant to the LPA Group, made
the presentation.
Some salient findings of the
study, which began in February and
was completed and submitted to the
Department of Transportation
(DOT) in early 2005:
The traffic demands on US
Highway 19 at present are consid-
ered relatively low by DOT stan-
dards, notwithstanding the common
perception.

Future traffic projections will
not exceed the minimum require-
ments for a long time.
* Truck traffic is significant, es-


owners Trisha and Mark Wirick in August of
last year, (News Photo)


SEdenfield Hardware

SSold To Wirick Couple
F ship and niall loL'ing crei'.
..JP-kAN HUINT HIe 'id the btii,-s '.. ill [mu aI l
_ Stal'l' riter _b-i._:,.l!. i e ml e i t ,ei their -.v. ln-
j l SiS p. BuLt ji LI[JL 4ll i 1 O..0i.l, iC., J|L
Trisha and Mark Wnrick becane- looking to expand the gaidenul and
the new owners of Edenfield Hard- outdooil porting equipment, he said.
ware m July.
Mark Wirick said that he and his "I don't know what really at-
wife were prompted to buy.the hard- traced me to hardware," Wirick
ware store because they wanted to said. "I guess it's just being able to
deal with the public. deal with a wide variety of individu-
Although he had never worked in als everyday and the diversity of'the
retail before, he said they had been business."
considering the purchase for the past "We like to serve the community
two. to three years and were just and will do our best to better serve
waiting until "the time v. a right." them," he added/ "We are open to
Wirick had worked in the past ideas for ways to.better serve the
with a major corporation and has corinuinir, and we're looking for-
been the majll busi'tess owner for ward to many happy years in the
ithe past six years of a wood dealer- store."

I


Serving Jefferson

County for IThe


years.


pecially around the courthouse cir--
cle, which is expected to reach
critical mass, or gridlock, about
2030.
Pedestrian traffic also is sigriifi-
cant around the courthouse circle,
with 285 crossings recorded during
an eight-hour count.
Oshesky and Bove said that based
on the collected data, the group con-
sidered five project alternatives and
rejected two as nonviable.
The two rejected alternatives in-
volved widening the existing corri-
dor or diverting the traffic around
the downtown area via side streets
such as Waukeenah and Water
streets.
The r. o said the non-viability of
the ~ o rejected alternatives rested
on their costs and social and envi-
ronmental impacts, among other
factors.
That left the three recommended
alternatives: leave US Highway 19
as is: make some minor adjustments
to alleviate the present traffic prob-
lems, especially around the court-
house circle; or work toward the
realization of a bypass by initiating
phase 2 of the study.
Planning Commissiorer Bud'
Wheeler asked the question:' If traf-
fic at the courthouse circle is pres-
ently at 66 to 81 percent capacity
and the DOT considers these levels
below the minimum threshold, "at
what point do we get attention?"
A good.question, Oshesky said,.
adding that "it depends on your abil-
ity to make it a priority."
"In other words, the squeaky


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 5A


wheel gets the grease," Wheeler in-
terpreted.
Yes, essentially, Oshesky said.
"Our recommendation would be
that you improve the circle for the
next five or six years and continue
to pursue the bypass," Bove said.
Planning Commissioner Bill Tel-
lefsen wondered if the community
shouldn't be pushing harder for the
bypass, given that property values
were bound to escalate dramatically
as more and more development oc-
curred along any of the potential by-
pass corridors.
"If we're planners, we need to
plan the route," Tellefsen said, "so
that we're buying land, instead of
buying homes later."
Phase 2 of the study would do ex-
actly that, Bove said. It would iden-
tify a specific bypass route, and
provide the appropriate engineering
and environmental justification for
the choice.
"This is just a basic concept now,"
Bove said of the possible routes de-
picted in the bound booklets the
group distributed to planners and


members of the public. "We're not
recommending one corridor over
another. The recommendation of a
corridor would come in phase two."
At present, no time frame existed
for the funding of phase two, Bove
said. It would be up to the commu-
nity to make that happen, by lobby-
ing the DOT and appropriate
legislators.
Remember too, he added, that the
bypass and associated costs were
spiraling ever upwards every year.
Planning Commission Chairman
Bill Counts noted that the group
kept talking about a bypass, as op-
posed to the truck route the commu-
nity had requested. It was a matter
of semantics, Counts said, but se-
mantics counted.
A limited access road was a possi-
bility, Bove responded, but it would
be a very expensive proposition, re-
quiring the state to buy all the ac-
cess points. As presently envisioned,
the bypass would have at least three
access points, one of them at US
Highway 90, either east or west of
town, he said.


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PAGE 6A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


I v
la


Restaurant Offers Cuban


Style Food A La Key West


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Dam repairs undertaken by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) at the
north end of Lake Miccosukee were
expected to add up to about a $1
million when completed.
The repairs, which were still un-
derway in March, entailed the re-
placement of a 50-year-old, 84-inch
diameter pipe that sprung a leak in
recent years. The pipe allows for
controlled drainage of the lake.


iLAZ.RO ALEMAN
,Senior Staff Writer

Residents who have driven past-
6ny of the three interchanges lately
have probably noticed the new trees
,and shrubs planted alongside the en-
trance and exit ramps to the inter-
Fstate.
SThe landscaping (which consists
,of sable palm, magnolia and crepe
-myrtle) was accomplished with a
S34,800 beautification grant from
the Department of Transportation
i DOT).
The landscaping is part of a
county effort to beautify the three
Interchanges and make them more
attractive to passing motorists,
hopefully drawing some of these
here.
The thinking is that motorists who-
pull off the road will spend money,
adding to the local economic devel-
opment effect.
The project was more or less the
SIF ^^ ^^ ^^


7 ye


4'~7 a'f


--- _
:..* .'


*. .


REPAIRS to the dam at Lake Miccosukee
could well add up to more than $1 million.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation


The repairs also called for con-
struction of an emergency spillway
just west of the pipe being replaced.
As Michael. Hill, FWC fisheries
biologist explained it, absent re-
placement of the pipe, the leak
would continue to enlarge. And
eventually, the dam would collapse,
causing an unintended draw down
of the lake, he said.
The pipe was originally scheduled
to be replaced last May, with the
work expected to last a couple of
months. But the series of hurricanes
that swept through the area in early
.fall, combined with engineering dif-


brainchild of Commissioner Gene
Cooksey, who pursued it doggedly
for more than two years, despite nu-
merous setbacks.
Several times, in fact, the county
almost lost the DOT funding be-
cause of missed deadlines, incom-
plete paperwork and alleged foot
dragging on the part of the engineer
charged with the preparation of the
specifications.
Each time, Cooksey would rally
and get the project back on track.
Cooksey, in fact, got involved in the
actual planting of the trees, when
problems developed as to where ex-
actly the trees should be placed.
Commission Chairman J. N. "Jun-
ior" Tuten praised Cooksey for the'
latter's persistence in ensuring the
completion of the project.
On a related matter, Cooksey in-
formed the board that the DOT will
soon be putting up lighting at the I-
10 and US Highway 19 interchange.
'The county has been trying to get
the DOT to install lights at this loca-
tion for years.


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ficulties and an expansion of the
project, caused the schedule to be
pushed back. Hill expected the pre-
sent phase of the work would be
completed by April.
One major difficulty, he ex-
plained, was that the repairs were
being done while the lake was full,
which created an element of risk..
From an engineering point of view,
he said, the project would have been
much easier and cheaper to accom-
plish if the lake were dried.
But given that the last draw down
was only a few years back and the
benefits of that effort were just be-
ginning to kick in -- in terms of in-
creased fish and waterfowl popula-
tions -- Hill said a draw down was
never seriously contemplated.
"We didn't want to undo the good
of the last draw down," he said.
"This is an important fish and water-
fowl lake."
That meant that before any repair,
work could begin, the area had to be
l id i:the 'introduction of a
wall of interlocking sheet pilings
driven 25 feet deep.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


*, .-
e*.


.. ,. .
.V


Commission and the Department of Environ-
mental Protection are paying for the
repairs. (News Photo)


Monticello now has its own
Cuban-American restaurant.
La Concha, Spanish for The
Conch, opened Dec. 27 on the west
side of town, off US Highway 90.
Oneri Fleita, with wife, Sharon,
and son, Matt, operates the Cuban-
style coffee/sandwich shop, a la Key
West tradition.
A Key West firefighter for 30
years, Fleita moved to Monticello in
May, following his retirement. He'd
never owned a restaurant before, he
says, but decided that it would be a
good idea to start one here.
Fleita learned to cook from his
Cuban father and American mother
and from preparing breakfasts,
lunches and suppers at the fire sta-
tion while on duty.
"I can cook anything," Fleita says,
adding that -in time, and depending
on the local demand, he may offer
more exotic Cuban fare.
For the time being, however, he is
limiting the menu to the lighter side,
including such standards as Media
Noche (essentially a ham, pork and
cheese sandwich), palomilla (a steak
sandwich with a liberal dose of
cooked onions on top) and papa rel-
lena (a meat-stuffed potato).
The restaurant also offers tasty
guava pastries and, of course, Cuban
coffee.
"I'm trying to make it as Cuban as
possible," Fleita says of the menu.
But whatever possessed him to
move to Monticello from Key West
and start a Cuban-American restau-
rant of all things?
Fleita points to brother-in-law
Barry Kelly, of Coldwell Banker
Kelly & Kelly Properties.
A former Key West resident hini-
self, Kelly talked up Monticello's
high pointsand convinced Fleita
that he needed to move here and
start a Cuban-American restaurant,
the one thing the town lacked.
'Consequently, upon retiring,
Fleita purchased a five-acre property
in Cooper's Pond and built a house
there. His plans, he says, are to re-
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If the business goes well,
however, his idea is to expand the
offerings and the facility.


"I may put tables outside," Fleita
says. "It all depends how it goes.
This is an experiment, un experi-
mento."


'Dafadale' Antiques Open Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Scottie Ebberbach opened his an--
tique shop, "The Dafadale House of
Antiques," in March. He eventually
hopes to open the shop during the
week.
The shop is located at 620 West
Washington Street and open from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Ebberbach calls the house "Dafa-:
dale" because it was the original
name of the house in 1900.
Pieces for sale include everything


from ancient art to American, an-
tiques, collectibles and knickknacks,
a few lines of designer jewelry and
even electric bikes.
Inexpensive, but wonderful
things," he explains.
"It's been going great," says
Ebberbach. "I've had a tremendous
amount of people coming in and
looking, a s many as 200 a day."
He added that he hosts a Victorian
yard sale every Saturday, and people
stopping to look are lured inside to
further check out the types of items
available.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 7A


Letchworth Mounds



Event Draws Crowd


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

About 400 people from all over
'the area turned out in June for ar-
o*chaeology day at the Letchworth
bMounds, an event sponsored by the
Department' of State, the Depart-
hment of Environmental Protection
and the Florida Parks Service.
r Granted that the majority of visi-
?tors came from Tallahassee, Monti-
[cello and surrounding vicinity. But
Amanda Evans, an FSU graduate


students who helped coordinate the
all-day program, said the sign-in
sheet showed people came from as
far away as Jacksonville, Panama
City and Ft. Walton.
Visitors to the site got to tour the
grounds, view interpretive displays,
observe flint-napping demonstra-
tions and participate in archaeologi-
cal excavations.
For the children, there were
hands-on activities, including simu-
lated ceramic painting and soil sift-
ing.
At 46 feet high, the main mound


at the Letchworth site is the largest
known Indian mound in Florida and
one of the largest in the Southeast. It
is believed to have been built before
or during the Weedon Island cul-
tural period, which flourished be-
tween 200 and 800 AD.
Based on the artifacts found in the
area, archaeologist speculate that the
mounds were occupied from the pa-
leoindian to historic times, a period,
spanning more than 10,000 years.
The Weedon Island culture is sup-
posed to have been endemic to the
central and northern parts of Florida


MORE than 400 people turned out for Ar- Jefferson County. The event was sponsored
chaeology Day at the Letchworth Mounds in by the Department of State. (News Photo)



County Approves Bed Tax,


Multi-Use Agri Center


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

In a brief meeting in late Octo-'
be, county commiss'ohe '
proved two measures of importance.
to the county.
The first measure involved a tour-
ist tax, which will be paid by travel-
ers who spend the night at any of
the county's motels, bed and break-
fast inns, or campgrounds.
The next step calls for citizens to
vote the measure up or down via a
referendum. Because time did, not
permit placement of the measure on
the November ballot, however, the
vote will have to be postponed until
2006, unless a special election can
be financed in the interim.
It's estimated it will cost $9,000
to finance a special mail-out
election, an expenditure that county
officials say the budget does not al-
'opw at present.
. Meanwhile, the Tourist Develop-
ment Council (TDC) is in place. The
TDC, a necessary component of the
process to impose the two-percent
tourist tax, decides how the tax-
generated funds will be spent,
among other things,
SEconomic Development Council
Director Julie Conley, largely re-


sponsible tor the formation of the
TDC, told the commission that the
group will start meeting soon.
She sjid the group's .first order of
- te - I pr,':,bl, b-e to do an
ssessmemn of the county's natural
and historical resources and create a
web page.
Once these two things are accom-
plished, Conley expects the group
will concentrate its efforts on a cam-
paign to educate the public about the
benefits of the tax.
I Projections are that the tax will
raise $54,000 or more during the
first two years, money that will be
applied to promoting and attracting
tourism here.


The second important action com-
missioners took was to approve a
resolution supporting the establish-
ment of an agriculture and commu-
nity development center here.
Thine il lipurpo-.se center, which is
envisioriei will eventually include a
pavilion, an arena, and a civic
center, is slated for a 20-acre prop-
erty just west of town.
The county is seeking $1.2 from
the Legislature for the project. Ex-
tension Office Director Larry
Halsey, who is leading the effort,
thinks that county stands a good
chance of getting the money this
time around. The county tried for
the same funding about two years
ago.


Danny Lee Open Custom,

Collision Repair Shop


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Danny's Collision & Custom
LLC, a new business in Monticello,
opened in early June.
Owner and operator Danny Lee
moved to the area from Fort Myers.
His purpose for moving here was


to enjoy a friendlier living environ-
ment and to close the driving dis-
tance between his parents and his
children's grandparents.
Lee has been in the automotive
body repair business for 17 years
and has learned every aspect of the
business from the sanding and tap-
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and neighboring states. The culture
is best known for its animal and hu-
man effigies on its ceremonial pot-
tery, which is considered the most
impressive in North America.
The culture gets its name from an
island near St. Petersburg, FL,
where the first and best examples of
Weedon Island artifacts were found.
The mounds are believed to have
served religious and ceremonial pur-
poses, hence their sacredness to Na-
tive Americans.
FSU archaeology students have
been conducting digs around the
main mound at the Letchworth site
for the last several weeks in the
hope of learning more about the
early inhabitants. Among other
things, the park service hopes to use
the new information to create inter-
pretative displays that will be posted
around the park for the benefit of
the public.
Dr. Ryan Wheeler is chief of the
Florida Bureau of Archaeological
Research, one of the event's spon-
sors. He also heads the FSU excava-
non project, which is expected to
conclude about June 20.
\Wheeleir said the students thus far
ha e conducted more than 200
shovel tests, mostly on the north and
south sides of the big mound.
The excavations have produced
\\ hat he called lithic wastes, or frag-


New Owners

At Jakes

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After three years of ownership,
Audy and Diane Payne sold Jake's
Sub Shop to the Family of Raouf,
Hoda and Peter Guirguis in.Septem-
ber.
Peter Guirguis said Jake's would
continue featuring American,foods
and the buffet, as well as a wide va-
riety of authentic Greek dishes, in-
cluding Gyros.
He added that he was raised in the
restaurant business overseas, and his
parents have been in the business all
of their lives.
"We chose this location because it
is a good one," said Guirguis. "And
we look forward to serving the peo-
ple."
The hours remain the same, Mon-
day through Thursday from 6:30
a.m. until 8 p.m., Fridays from 6:30
a.m. until 9 p.m., Saturdays from
6:30 a.m. until 10:30 p.m. and
closed on Saturdays.


ments of chipped rocks and other
materials used in the making of ar-
rows, pottery and other tools.
The digs have also produced
pieces of what Wheeler called com-
mon village pottery, as opposed to
the more beautiful and ceremonial
mortuary pottery.
He said the latter-type pottery, if it
exists at all at the site, is likely bur-
ied in the main mound, which is
closed to excavations because of its
sacredness.
Wheeler said the excavations so
far have revealed a concentration of
potential artifacts north of the
mound, in an area never surveyed
before. The concentration extends to
the east, he said.
The excavations also have re-
vealed the existence of another pos-
sible mound south of the big mound.
Archaeologists are able to decipher
the possible existence of another
mound from the coloration of differ-
ent layers in the excavated soil.
Built over long periods of time by
the dumping of basket full after bas-
ket full of soil, the different layers


tell a distinctive story, according to
archeologist.
"The different baskets full leave a
signature," is the way one archae-
ology student put it.
Wheeler said once the present
study is concluded, it will be about
six months before the results are
produced.
Meanwhile, he expects that the
Letchworth Mound will continue to
attract research.
Although the mounds can't be ex-
cavated, Wheeler explained that less
intrusive techniques exist to learn
their contents.
These techniques include remote
sensing, ground penetration radar
and soil receptivity, which he de-
scribed as a mechanical and electri-
cal method of distinguishing
differences in the soil.
In fact, an individual from the Uni-
versity of Arkansas is scheduled to
conduct some of these very tests on
the main mound in the not too dis-
tant future, according to Wheeler.
"The state is interested in continu-
ing research here," he said.


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PAGE 8A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


industrial Park Facility


Holds

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Despite heavy rains from
storm "Bonnie" in August tl
out for the groundbreaking
mony of the Florida SafeRid
facility at the Industrial Pa
impressive.
Al Wofford, president of
SafeRiders, Inc., said he wa


Groundbreaking
ing forward to being in Jefferson Development Council (EDC), Julie
County and that the new facility Conley, welcoming everyone and
would allow him to double the num- thanking those who had worked so
ber of students, hard to make the project a reality. It
tropical The Alabama native is. a captain continued with EDC Chairman Ron
he turn- with Florida Highway Patrol in Cichon lauding the City Council,
g cere- Madison. County Commission, and businesses
ers, Inc. Florida SafeRiders is a small and that helped fund EDC.
irk was emerging business that provides mo- Special thanks went to Frank
torcycle education and training. Stone, former EDC director, who
Florida The ceremony began with interim launched the project, City Superin-
is look- executive director for the Economic tendent Don Anderson, Road De-


I!..


AFTER repeated
Department of Tr
to change the a;


,State


efforts by city officials, the
transportation finally agreed
ngle of parking on a one-


S .....-

block area on US 19. The city has since pe-
titioned the DOT to change the parking
angle on other streets. (News Photo)


Changes Angle Of


Uptown F

S A little more than three months
: after state officials agreed to change
Sthe angle of parking in the down-
Stown district, Department of Trans-
Sportation (DOT) personnel began
Doing the work in mid November.
Specifically, the DOT people
I. sketched in the new angle parking
" lines on the east side of N. Jefferson
-Street, one block north of the court-
house.
The new lines change the angle
of the parking from 45 degrees to
about 30 degrees. The idea is to give
parked motorists greater visibility of
the oncoming traffic as they exit the
parking spaces.


Parking Spaces


The DOT is testing the idea in a
one-block area to see how well it
works out and how it plays with lo-
cal residents. If the change proves
successful and non-controversial,
the DOT will expand the program to
othei parking areas.,
City officials got the DOT to
agree to the change, if rather reluc-
tantly, after repeated appeals and
even soliciting the assistance of
Congressman Allen Boyd.
DOT officials preferred that the
city addressed its alleged traffic
safety problems in more conven-
tional ways, such as reducing the


lengths of the parking spaces or re-
stricting larger vehicles from park-
ing in the spaces.

The DOT officials pointed out
that the 30-degree angle parking
would reduce the total number of
available parking spaces, further ag-
gravating the parking situation in
the downtown area.. -.... -..-

They also wanted assurance from
city officials that area merchants
were in agreement with the change
and required a city passed resolution
before they would authorize the
change.


apartment Superintendent David Har-
vey, the architectural firm of
Johnson-Peterson, and Charles
Clemons, state director of USDA
Rural Development.
Cichon especially praised Com-
mission Chairman Junior Tuten for
his hands-on efforts to help secure
the project.
"Investing in the economic vitality
of the Jefferson County Industrial
Park, supports President Bush's vi-
sion for a strong and vibrant rural
America," said Clemons. "Rural De-
velopment is pleased to be a partner
in promoting economic develop-
ment and job growth in Jefferson
County."
"This is an exciting event for the
people of Jefferson County," said
Congressman Allen Boyd." Through
the creation of jobs and sellable
products, the Jefferson County In-
dustrial Park will bring more visitors
to the area and expand the economic
viability of our rural community."


New Massage

Therapist

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kristy Fagaragan, a new massage
therapist in town, began working out .
of the office of Dr. Raymond Ver-
rier in the Cherry Street Commons
in October.
Fagaragan specializes in Swedish
and sports massage, core myofacial
and deep tissue massage. She is
widely experienced and has worked
as a student athletic trainer, as well
as with various professional athletes
and teams.
Fagaragan has also worked with
triathletes on the British Olympic
Team and the Iron Man Competi-
tions, both past and present.
Fagaragon obtained her sports
massage certification from the Core
Institute For Massage Therapy. Cur-
rently, she attends Florida State Uni-
versity and Tallahassee Community
College to earn her Sports Medical
Degree.


Business Aims To Help

Potential Home Buyers


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Home Ownership Action Plan
(HOAP), Inc. became a new busi-
ness here in February, when Guy
and Sharon Garrett relocated the
business from North Carolina.
They report that they are really ex-
cited to be here and they like the
]Monticello "pace of living"


already.
The business is located at 150
West Washington Street (on court-
house circle next to Edenfield's).
HOAP, Inc. allows people to
build, buy or sell a home for less
than $1,000 down.
Guy Garrett said the market here
is drawing people from Tallahassee
and that the real estate values are
going up.


JCKC Offers Poker Games


Jefferson County Kennel Club
(JCKC) owner/operator Steve An-
dris will tell you he is not one to ex-
aggerate.
Andris, however, was not holding
back on the superlatives in late May
when reporting the results of the
opening night of card games at his
facility.
"It was fabulous," Andris said. "It
was super... It was just sensational."
Better than 500 people attended
the event, according to Andris. That
number, he said, came from the list
kept by the JCKC personnel who


greeted and seated the participants,
pending the availability of playing
tables.
"We opened at 12 (midday) and by
1:15 p.m., every table was full," An-
dris said. "And it stayed that way
until midnight when we closed. Eve-
rything went really smooth."
Andris didn't want to engage in ru-
minations about the future. But he
conceded that if opening night was
any indication, and if things contin-
ued as they started, it certainly
boded well for the race track.


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Sat: 8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 9A

Reopened Cafe Offers Southern cooking.
Additionally, there are homemade
4,, Good Southern Cuisine deserts, including sweet potato pie
-' to a seafood buffet on Fridays, and and fresh ginger bread, and a salad
IAWN FRAN HUNT everything in-between in the line of bar.
-l rf.pI Staff Writer


WILLARD BARNHART, executive director of
Communities in Schools; Bill Gunnels, com-
munity president with Capital City Bank;
Gloria Cox-Jones, assistant for the Learning
Center; and Byron J. Barnhart, CEO of Inno-


.vative Partners Coalition, Inc., accept a
$2,500 check to serve as seed money for
the after-school compute lab and learning
center.


Although not really new to the
area, the Tip Top Cafe reopened its
Doors for business in October.
Owner Richard Glenn said he was
proud there would once again be
good 'old-fashion Southern cuisine
available to residents.
S "I saw a need for it," Glenn said.
"Country food made in the old tradi-
tional ways of doing things is hard
to come by.'"
"It's got to be done and done the
right way," he added.
Glenn said the foods offered in-
cludes everything from the tradi-
tional fast-food orders, such as ham-
burgers, hot dogs and French fries,


County Receives $614,000



To Fix Aucilla-Drifton Road


1400 South Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344


Phone:850-997-2519
Fax: 850-997-0692


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LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioner Gene Cooksey
brought his colleagues and residents
of the Drifton and Aucilla area good
news in August.
After months of waiting for word
from the Department of Transporta-
tion (DOT), Cooksey announced
that the department had approved
$614,000 for the widening of the
Aucilla-Drifton Road.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Cox's Soul Food, a new restaurant
in Monticello owned and operated
by Gloria Cox-Jones opened in Oc-
tober.
The restaurant is located at the in-
tersection of East Palmer Mill Road,
South Railroad Street and East
Holly Street, behind the Branch
Street Funeral Home.
The doors are open Mondays
through Thursday from 11 a.m. until
2 p.m. and Friday and Saturday
from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m.



Torch Run


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Recently, law enforcement offi-
cers from Jefferson County, Correc-
tional Institution (JCl). Madison
Correctional (MCI. the Jefferson
County Sheriffs Department and
one judicial'' representative took
part in the Special Olympics Flor-
ida Law Enforcement Torch Run.
Participants gathered in the Brah-
man Inn parking lot and ran the
torch to the Advance Discount
Auto parking lot at Jefferson
Square.
Special thanks from event coordi-
nators go to the participants- and
sponsors.
These include lead escort, Sgt.
Ray Lacy, of the Sheriffs Depart-
ment; Judge Bobby Plaines; Adam
B. McKinney, 29 year-old Special
Olympic Athlete.

From JCI Escorts Warden Mark
Redd and Assistant Warden of Pro-
grams Howard Clark.
Also from JCI Assistant Warden
of Operations Rick Anglin, Special
Olympics County Coordinator
Howard Pepper as escort, Assistant
County Coordinator Sharon
McKinney, and Vocational Instruc-
tor Robert Jones.
Also, Sgt.'s Franklin Brooks,
Douglas Tran, Arthur Ford, Jerry
Loggins, and officers Darlene
Cleveland, Larry Lee, Herbert Tho-
mas, Andreas Green, Timothy But-
ler and Anthony Roe.
Participating from MCI were: As-
sistant Warden Thomas Zaccardi,
Classification Specialist Orma
Stainbaugh, Assistant Warden Tom
Crews and Captain Bill Massey of
the Sheriffs Department.
Also the JCI Employees Club and
Pizza Hut of Monticello.


The widening, to be undertaken in
conjunction with the resurfacing of
the road, which was expected to
proceed in the coming weeks.
"As soon as Gerran can get the pa-
perwork done, we will let the con-
tractor start widening and resurfac-
ing the road," Cooksey said. "As
I've said before, we can't thank John
Gerran enough. And I can't say
enough about the traffic safety team,
which is doing an excellent job."'
Gerran is John Gerran, a retired
engineer and local resident who has


C.isti:omers can eat in or carry out
theii orders To inquire about daily
specials or to place an order, call
997-2359.
Cox-Jones was raised in Monti-
cello and resided in Atlanta for the
past 29 years. Upon returning to the
area, Cox-Jones said she wanted to
Li.,e b ac] '. [l .. q.:;m I,
which she was raised.
"I want to put the soul back into
soul food," she said. "I.want to do it
like grandma taught me.

"I love Monticello, I love the peo-
ple and I appreciate their labors of
love in the community. This way, I


been volunteering his services to the
county ever since the departure of
County Coordinator and engineer
Richard Musgrove.
The traffic safety team, or Com-
munity Traffic -Safety Team
(CSTS), is a group that consists of
various community representatives,
including city, county and school
officials. The group, which Cook-
sey heads, works hand-in-hand with
the DOT to resolve community traf-
fic safety problems that can be ad-
dressed within a limited budget.


can say thank you to them," she
said.
To extend that thank you, she also
delivers mealt to the elderly. "My
heart just goes out to the elderly,"'
Cox-Jones said. "To be able to find
a good meal today is :nothing when
you are healthy, but when ydu're
homebound, it's rough."
Young people work in the restau-
rant on weekends and Cox Jones
also helps.them with any 'items they
may need in school.
"When you come from a poor
family, you can't afford field trips
or other things often taken for
granted by others," she added. "I
help youth with those things."
Also to assist the youth of the
community, 25 cents off the cost of
every meal she sells goes into the
-Raleigh R. Cox Scholarship Fund
for college-bound students.


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Limited, that is, in terms of DOT
budgetary considerations. The
agency applies: the term to those.
projects that don't require millions
of dollars to fix. .
Since its formation six or so years
ago, the CTST has attained quite a Schwan 's
remarkable record of accomplish- and a 5 daj
ments. The successes include the day wo
striping of county roads several
years back and more recently, the
sidewalk extension project and the S 's
DOT's approval for the changing of Schwn, th
the parking angle on downtown hiring Route
streets. managers are
succeed. Schb
Commissioners have long held as delivery of fit
a goal the resurfacing and widening
of the Aucilla-Drifton Road, consid- Previous c
ered one of several dangerous roads m
in the county.

That's because the road is narrow
and curvy and school buses often
travel it, picking and delivering chil-
dren.
Although the county has long had Tui
the DOT money for the resurfacing To schedule
part of the work, officials were wait- email your
ing word on the widening money
before proceeding.with any work,.


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PAGE 10A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


County Gets $65,000



To Help At-Risk Kids


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Department of Juvenile Jus-
tice (DJJ) in January awarded the
county a $65,000 grant for the im-
plementation of an intervention plan
that aims to keep at-risk youths out
of the juvenile justice system.
The plan -- titled "Jefferson
County: Disproportionate Minority
Contact Intervention Plan" and re-
leased in June 25, 2004 -- is based
on a study conducted here during
the previous year by FAMU.
It now remains for the Jefferson
County Juvenile Justice Council
(JJC) to decide how the grant money
will be used to implement the plan.
It's possible, meanwhile, that the
county may be eligible for another
$35,000 grant from the DJJ, depend-
ing on the completion of the appro-
priate paperwork.
The $65,000 grant is the result of
a study conducted by Florida A &
M University here and in two other
north Florida counties beginning last
January.
That study, which was funded by
a $100,000 DJJ grant, sought to
identify the reasons for the overrep-
resentation of minority children in
the juvenile justice system and to of-
fer community-based solutions to
the problem.
The fact of Disproportionate Mi-
nority Contact (DMC) is supposedly
well documented by the literature.
Indeed, all the empirical research
dating from the early 1900s report-
edly "supports the position that mi-
nority group members are over rep-
resented at every stage of the crimi-
nal justice process."
The debate over whether the legal
system consciously discriminates
against an individual based on race
is far from over, however. The ex-
perts' suggested explanations for the
causes of the overrepresentation


range from the contention "that such
(statistical) numbers can be ex-
plained as a function of artifacts in
data collection" to the argument
"that (minority) juveniles are actu-
ally more involved in delinquent be-
havior."
"Yet others," notes the literature,
"maintain that the statistics simply
reflect an inherent bias in the juve-
nile justice system."
Meaning that nonwhite youths are
more likely to be processed through
the juvenile justice system, "not be-
cause of the nature or seriousness of
the offenses with which they are
charged," but rather "because they
fit the stereotype that juvenile jus-
tice officials hold regarding what
constitutes a 'delinquent'."
The local DMC taskforce found,
among other things, that communi-
cation and collaboration between
parents and the schools is often
lacking here; and that a correlation
exists between poor academic
achievement and juvenile delin-
quency and entry into the juvenile
justice system.
"The Jefferson County Dispropor-
tionate Minority Contract Stake-
holders taskforce has identified a
gap in mediation and advocacy be-
tween the school administration and
the parents/guardians of the commu-
nity," the intervention plan states.
Among the existing collaborations
and problems or obstacles that the
taskforce identified as contributing-


7-ww wepreent o *


to the Disproportionate Minority
Contact issue in Monticello were "a
lack of communication
between...(law enforcement, prose-
cutor and public defender, courts
and DJJ) concerning resources
available and the roles and responsi-
bilities of each" and a lack of public
transportation that prevents youths
and their families from accessing
the needed services, often provided
in Tallahassee. ,
The taskforce also determined that
the DMC issue for Jefferson County
"could be significantly reduced if
advocacy and mediation services
were available for youth and fami-
lies at the schools."
"A large percentage of the juve-
nile arrests occur on Jefferson
County school campuses," the re-
port notes. "Yet, if the community
and schools effectively partner, at-
risk youths would receive the neces-
sary assistance in less time."
The taskforce's proposed vision
statement calls for the community to
take a more proactive approach to
minimize the entry of minority
youths into the criminal justice sys-
tem. This new approach entails
identifying at-risk behavior early on,
and referring youths to the appropri-
ate prevention, intervention, diver-
sion or treatment services.
Community agencies expected to
participate in this new approach in-
clude the schools, law enforcement
agencies and the state attorney and
public defender.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005 PAGE 11A


HoW


TO


TO


YOUR


DRUGS.


The best thing about this subject
that you don't have 'to do it well.
simply have to try.


is
You


If you try, your kids will get the
message.
That you care about them.
That you understand something
about the conflicts they face.
That you're there when they It's never
need you.
The alternative is to ignore the subject.
Which means your kids are going to be listening
to others who have strong opinions about the
subject. Including those who use drugs. And
those who sell them.
ACCEPT REBELLION.
At the heart of it, drugs, alcohol, wild
hairstyles, trendy clothes, ear-splitting music,
outrageous language are different ways of
expressing teen-age rebellion.
That's not all bad. Part of growing up is to
create a separate identity, apart from parents a
process which ultimately leads to feelings of self
worth. A step along that path is rebellion of one
kind or another which is to say rejecting
parental values, and staking out new ones.
You did it. They're doing it. And that's the
way it is.
The problem comes when kids choose a path
of rebellion that hurts them, destroys their self
wort, and can ultimately kill them.
That's the reality of drugs.
DON'T GET DISCOURAGED.
When you talk to your kids about drugs, it may
seem as though nothing is getting through.
Don't you believe it.
The very fact you say it gives special weight to
whatever you say.
But whether or not your kids let on they've
heard you, whether or not they play back your
words weeks or months later, keep trying.
START ANYWHERE.
"Have you heard about any kids using drugs?"
"What kind of drugs?"
"How do you feel about that?"


to


"Why do you think kids get
involved with drugs?"
"How do other kids deal with peer
pressure to use drugs? Which ap-
Sproaches make sense to you?"
"Have you talked about any of this
in school?"
However you get into the subject,
o early to start. it's important to state exactly how
strongly you feel about it.
Not in threatening tones. But in matter-of-
fact, unmistakably clear language:
"Drugs are a way of hurting yourself."
"Drugs take all the promise of being young
and destroy it."
"I love you too much to see you throw your
life down the drain."
SON1E DO'S AND DON'T. -- :--
The do's are as simple as speaking from the
heart.
The biggest don't is don't do all the talking.
If you listen to your kids really listen and read
between the lines you'll learn a lot about what
they think. About drugs. About themselves.
About the world. And about you. They'll also
feel heard and that, too, is a step along the path
towards self esteem.
There are other do's and don't: Don't threat-
,en. Don't badger them. Don't put your kid on
the spot by asking directly if he or she has ever
tried drugs. They'll probably lie whichunder-
mines your whole conversation.
If you suspect your child is on drugs there
are all sorts of.symptoms that's a different
matter. Then you've got to confront the subject
directly. (This will be another ad in this contin-
uing series.)
In the meantime, just talk to them.
It's okay if you don't know much about drugs.
Your kids do.
But they need to know how you feel about
the subject.
And whether you care.
For more information on how to talk with your kids
about drugs, ask for a free copy of "A Parent's Guide to
Prevention." Call 1-800-624-0100.


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Kus.







PAGE 12A, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 29, 2005


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