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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00032
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 22, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00032
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text



LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAIUISVILLE, FL. 561%


Veterans Advised

Of Reemployment

Rights

Story, Page 11


Sorority

Celebrates

50 Years Here

Story, Photos, Page 7


Eagles' Nest

Endowment Funds

Paying Off

Story, Page 14


OS Friday Morning





Monticell


137TH YEAR NO.32, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ws


FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2005


School BoardWorkshop Looks




At $700,000 Cut In Spending


Budget Cuts Necessary

To Replace Fund Balance


Monday evening. The Board will meet again
Monday to make specific recommendations
to balance the 2006 budget. (News Photo)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

At a School Board Workshop
held Monday, members wrestled
with how to .cut approximately
$700,000 from the 2006 budget.
The problem arose when $1.1
million in excess of income was
spent in the 2005 fiscal year.
Finance Director Hal Wilson ex-
plained Wednesday that the over-
spending was covered by a transfer
of non reoccurring funds, (monies
from a one time source) the major-
ity of which came from the fund
balance districts are required to
keep.
"Our budget is balanced for the
,.i.*i.i fiscal year,". Wilson said.
"The problem is we have to come up
with ways of cutting $700,000 for
2006, and $400,000 for 2007 fiscal
years, to replace non reocurring
funds.


Wilson prepared a list of possible
cutbacks for the Board to consider,
so that he can prepare a balanced
budget for fiscal 2006, which is
done in June.
He stated that of a total budget of
approximately $10 million, $8 mil-
lion was spent on salaries alone, and
this was an area the Board would
have to examine.
As enrollment declined, and is
projected by DOE to continue to de-
cline, funding'declines also.
Approximately five years .ago,
then Finance Director Randy Beach
proposed a staffing formula to be
used by each school, that kept the
number of teachers equivalent to
what was necessary to teach the stu-
dents enrolled.
Superintendent Phil Barker ex-
plained that while the staffing for-
mula for teachers was followed
regularly, and cutbacks made by at-
trition, as necessary, no such de-
tailed staffing plan was ever


designed for non instructional em-
ployees.
"The thinking was that non in-
structional staff would help teachers
in the classrooms," Barker said, and
noted that in recent years, an in-
creasing number of non instructional
staff took over duties unrelated to
the classroom.
Board Chair Beverly Sloan stated
that the workshop was designed as a
discussion of the 15 possible cost
saving strategies offered by Wilson.
Another meeting is set for 6 p.m.
Tuesday, at which specific recom-
mendations will be made, based on
additional information gathered by
administrators during the week.
Among the strategies Wilson of-
fered are:
*Eliminate 14 teacher aide posi-
tion.
*Consolidate high school and
middle school.
*Eliminate the Adult School
*Eliminate 30 non-instructional
positions.
*Eliminate 5 administrative posi-
tions.
*Reduce the number of days in.
(See School Board, Page 12)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Planners last week recommended
for approval the Oak Hill Farm Sub-
division, a 300-plus acre residential
development about a mile south of
Lloyd off SR-59.
The recommendation comes with
the provision that the developer
must meet certain outstanding con-
ditions.
Planning Official Bob Arredondo


expressed satisfaction with the pro-
gress that developer Jeff Ard had
made thus far in meeting previously
imposed conditions.
"I think they've improved the pro-
ject significantly," Arredondo said.
"I think they're well on their way to
making progress."
Among the changes that Ard made
to address planners' concerns were
the reduction of the total number of
lots by 40 or so, and his decision to
pave all roads and provide water for
the development. The plan initially


Y- ..
CARMEN CUMMINGS gives her all
"Cheerleader" for the Relay for Life over
Cummings and Mike McCall were emcees
(News Photo)


as official
the weekend.
for the event.


called for individual wells.
Planners had also expressed con-
cerns about the development's po-
tential impact on a high-quality go-
pher tortoise habitat included in the
original proposal. The gopher tor-
toise is identified by the state as a
threatened species.
Ard addressed this concern by ex-
cluding from the development the
acreage that makes up the gopher
tortoise habitat. This explains the re-
duction in the number of lots.
The original proposal called for
109 single-family lots ranging in
size from one to several acres.
Among the things that Ard must
yet do to satisfy planners' concerns
are to provide a copy of the subdivi-,
sion's covenants and provide the ap-
propriate Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP) and De-
partment of Transportation (DOT)
permits.
The last two conditions are par-
ticularly critical, given the concerns
of adjacent landowners that storm-
water from the development will
flood their properties.
Two of these landowners, Jose
Luis Rodriquez and Santa
Hokanson, addressed the Planning
Commission last Thursday night.
The two wanted assurance that the
new development would not be put-
ting extra stormwater on the DOT
right-of-way and ultimately on their
properties.
The engineer for the development
assured Rodriguez and Hokanson
that two stormwater facilities to be
installed in the subdivision will re-
ddce the flows leaving the develop-
ment "to equal to or less than the
present flow".
"I have no idea how you take the
water from the east to the west,"
said Rodriquez, whose property is
on the west side of SR-59. "I will be
vigilant."
In other action, planners recom-
(See Planners Page 12)


PLANS call for a 5,500 sq. foot addition to
, this motel in the Capital City Truck Center
at the intersection of 1-10 and SR-59. Plan-


. .







I.ners approved the renovation last Thursday;
(News Photo)
i :'* <


Lloyd Motel To Get Renovated


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Change is coming to the old motel
in the Capitol City Travel Center, at
the intersection of I-10 and SR 59 in
Lloyd.
Specifically, the motel is slated for
major remodeling and refurbishing,
including the addition of a two-
story structure on the west end.
According to Alan Saucier, who
represented owner Arun Kundra, the


addition will add 5,500 sq. feet to
the existing structure, which cur-
rently holds 47 rooms.
Saucier described the addition as a
conference-type center. He said
Kundra is engaged in negotiations to
make the motel part of a national
chain, such as a Best Western Inn.
He said the upgrade was part of a
plan to make the facility more at-
tractive to the traveling public.
Kundra himself explained that the
average occupancy rate for the mo-
tel is presently about 50 percent,


compared with a 70 percent occu-
pancy rate for motels at the US 19
interchange.
The reason for the lower occu-
pancy rate, Kundra said, was that
"our motel doesn't look nice." He
said the renovation should cure that
problem.
Planners unanimously approved
the change, which is final -- one of
the few Planning Commission ac-
tions that does not require County
Commission review or approval.


Sheriff Keeping Eye On Sex Offenders Here


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Recent Florida high-profile cases
involving sexual predators have
raised concerns about the local
situation.
Commissioner Gene Hall recently
asked Sheriff David Hobbs what


was being done to prevent a similar
tragedy occurring here.
Hobbs assured commissioners that
his department was keeping on eye
on the 22 registered sexual offend-
ers in the county, four of whom are
classified as predators.
"We know who they are and
where they live," Hobbs said.
But he added the caveat that,


short of tracking these individuals
on a daily basis, there was no way a
law enforcement agency could guar-
antee anything.
"No department has the manpower
to follow these individuals all the
time," Hobbs said. "It's a sad fact of
life."
He said citizens can help by edu-
(See Sheriff, Page 2)


Know Your

Rights When

Dunned

Editorial, Page 4


~..\


BEVERLY SLOAN, Board Chair, and Member
Franklin Hightower examine a potential
budget cut item at finance workshop held


Planners Green Light



300-Acre Subdivision


I


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005



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AT HEALTH DEPARTMENT Camp at Relay
were front row, L-R: John Barnhill, KayKay
Steele, Joyce Steele and Colleen Harmen.
Back, L-R: Daniel and Marianne Goehrig,

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a .


Jackie Guyton, TocCis Roberson, Kim Barn-
hill, Donna Milgard, Crissy Hendley and
Shena McFaddon,


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LARRY BATES, Fire Rescue Chief restocks the cooler at
the camp at the weekend relay


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The District School Board of Jefferson County
Announces A Workshop To Which The Public Is Invited


Date: April,26, 2005
Time: 6:00 p.m
Place: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building

Subject: Budget Issues and other School Related Matters


Sheriff
(Continued From Page 1)
rating themselves on the issue. Citi-
zens can view photos of registered
sex offenders and read their bio-
graphical information on the
FDLE's Web site.
Anyone who sees one of these in-
dividuals hanging around a youth-
oriented facility should call his
department, Hobbs said.
"I take this issue very seriously,"
he said.








CALL 0R VISJT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE UOT2E.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

385-6047
S i C ..ICOGenrul In1uOn eCo
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GI(0. Washinlon, D( 0016 W 00 DGldC0


REPRESENTING Capital City Bank a
campsite at the Relay were,,from left,


t its
Mon-


ica Cicatello, Geri Ann Driggers,
ter, and Ana McGlamory.


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*0~ ~ ~ ~ 1 0. 4
* 9 ~ o 05


Tonia Bax-
`' F A


NOTICE

The Street Committee of the Monticello City
Council will meet on Thursday,
April 28, 2005 at 10:00 a.m. to
discuss parade applications anid regulations.

The meeting will take place at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida.
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w- JmL~~Pi


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XAN HOLTON brought her pot bellied pig to the Relay for
Life Event over the weekend. Her plans were to have a
"kiss the pig" fundraiser, but Piggie wasn't having any of
it. (News Photos)- '





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JCHS JROTC Cadets Receive


Awards At Annual Ceremony


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

At the annual JCHS JROTC
Awards Ceremony, recently, ca-
dets garnered some 38 awards.
Superior Cadet Awards, a medal
which is a United States Army
award presented to one outstanding
cadet in each JROTC academic
level, LET I through LET IV.
Recipients were: Tabitha Smith,
LET I; Lawrence Blake, LET II;
Heather Miller, LET III; and Krys-
tal Wilson, LET IV.
The US Army Recruiting Com-
mand Award was presented to
Charles Pitts. This honor goes to
the third-year cadet who is at the
top 25 percent of the class.
The Sons Of The American
Revolution Award was presented
by Colonel Harry Raymond to Kris
Bellamy.
The award is presented by the
Tallahassee Chapter of the Sons Of
The American Revolution to a ca-
det who displays a high degree of
merit with regard to leadership
qualities, soldierly bearing and gen-
eral excellence.
The Daughters Of The American
Revolution Award was presented
by McKinney to Krystal Wilson.
It is presented to a LET IV cadet
who has demonstrated dependabil-
ity, good character, leadership abil-
ity, outstanding military discipline,
and who is in the upper 25 percent
of the JROTC academically.
The Veterans Of Foreign Wars
award was present to Jairamy Good
by.
The award is presented by the lo-
cal VFW Chapter to the cadet who
exhibits a high degree of leadership
and patriotism. The cadet must
rank in the upper 25 percent aca-
demically, and must display good
judgment, initiative and courtesy.
The Military Officer Association
Of America Award was presented
to Geneva Miller.
The award is presented by the
Tallahassee Chapter of the Military
Officer Association to the LET III
cadet who has demonstrated excep-
tional potential for leadership.
The American Legion Awards
For Military And Scholastic Excel-
lence was presented to Tommy
Smith.


Brenden Curtis received the
American Legion Scholastic excel-
lence Award.
The Noncommissioned Officer
Association Award was presented
to Kimberly Gilley.
The award is presented to a cadet
noncommissioned officer who has
demonstrated outstanding military
bearing, personal appearance, con-
duct and leadership ability.
The Daedalian Award was pre-
sented to Jason Felix,
The Daedalians are an organiza-
tion of military pilots. The award
is presented to an outstanding cadet
who has demonstrated great poten-
tial for further military training and
service to the nation.
The Reserve Officer Association
Award was presented to Tim Hodg-
ins.
This award is presented to a LET
II, lI or IV cadet who is in the up-
per 25 percent of JROTC academi-
cally.
The Military Order Of The World
Wars Award (MOWW) was
awarded to Allen Kent by Aikens
and the MOWW Certificate Of
Achievement was presented by
Craig to Alexia Huggins.
The award is presented by the
Tallahassee Chapter of the Military
Order Of World Wars to a LET I or
II cadet. The cadet must be out-
standing in both academic and
JROTC grades.
The Scottish Rite Award was
awarded to Charles Pitts,
This award is presented by the
Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction
in Tallahassee, to a LET III cadet
who has made great contributions
among other cadets to encourage
and demonstrate Americanism
through participation in community
and extracurricular activities. The
cadet must be in the top 25 percent
academically, and must have dem-
onstrated potential for further lead-
ership through their good character,
dependability, self-discipline, and
good citizenship.
The VFW Most Improved Cadet
Award went to Freddie Scott.
This award is presented by VFW
Post 251. It is presented to a LET
II, II or IV cadet each year. The re-
cipient is chosen by the JROTC in-
structors. The criteria, for this
award is to be the cadet who has
worked the hardest during the


Creative Stitches Gets

Festival T-Shirt Bid


RAY CICHON


with the owners to discuss the
menu.


Managing Editor The Festival Princess (Jr. Miss)
Pageant deadline has been ex-
Creative Stitches was awarded_ tended through Friday, as addi-
the bid for printing the.Watermelon tional entrants are needed to make
Festival T-shirts, Festival Chair the event a reality.
Betsy Gray announced at the com- The Little King and Queen Pag-
mittee meeting Monday. eant has 13 entrants, 8 girls and 5
Pageant contestants will wear the boys, and has begun rehearsals.
T-shirts as they attend the various It was noted that a security offi-
festival events. cer would be hired to protect the
Mary Frances Drawdy, Kickoff Arts and Crafts exhibits overnight
Dinner chairperson reported that on Friday, June 17.
Frank Stone would grill the chicken The search continues for an MC
for the dinner, or the platforms events, Gray said
The search is on for a band to the move is on to determine if a
play in the Opera House Gazebo, stage van can be obtained from
after the dinner. Leon County Parks Department, as
It was suggested the past queens the Lotto Van is being refurbished.
lunch at the Rare Door, and The committee will meet again
Drawdy, event chair, will meet 5:15, Monday, May 2.


"If you take me home, I'll be a good dog. You'll be glad to
have me as your pet." (News Photo)

'Bo' Named Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Bo has been named the Humane
Society adoptable canine of the
week.
Bo is a one and a half year old
hound mix male, and is neutered
with all vaccinations are up to date.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl 3lutista
said he is going to be a smaller dog


because he is full grown and
weighs in at only 35 pounds.
She said he is very excitable and
a very happy animal. "He would
be a great dogs for kids," said Bau-
tista. "He loves to play and he
loves attention."
Bo is an inside/outside animal
and gets along well with other
dogs.
To adopt Bo or any of the other
loving animals at the shelter call
342-0244.


school year on self improvement.
The National Sojourners Award
was presented to Michelle Allen.

The award is presented to a LET
II or III cadet who has demon-
strated the ideals of Americanism,
and who has demonstrated out-
standing potential for leadership
and for higher education.

The Association Of The United
States Army Award was awarded
to Charles Taylor.
This award is presented to a cadet
who has excelled in school and
JROTC activities throughout the
high school year.

The American Veterans Award
was presented to Jasmine Brown.
The award is presented to the ca-
det who has demonstrated overall
excellence in academics and mili-


tary bearing.
The Military Order Of The Pur-
ple heart Award was presented to
Kimberly Gilley by Shofner.
This award is presented to a LET
IV cadet who is in the top 25 per-
cent of academic and JROTC
classes.

The Distinguished Cadet Award
For Academic excellence went to
Pitts.

The award is presented to the ca-
det with the highest academic aver-
age in the JROTC program.
The Academic Excellence Award
'is presented to a cadet in each LET
level who has the highest GPA of
all other cadets at that level. The
awards were presented to Adam
Lingle, LET I; Misty Mills, LET II;
-Pitts, LET III; and Krystal Wilson,
LET IV. -.....

School letters are earned by Drill
Team, Color Guard, and Rife Team
members. The actual letters are
awarded during the cadet's senior


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 3
year, while cadets who are not sen- Kent, Drill and Rifle Teams; Ta-
iors received certificates noting bitha Smith, Drill Team; Elijah
their participation. They will re- Kersey, Drill and Rifle Teams; Tif-
ceive their letters in their senior fany Griffin, Drill Team; Jason Fe-
year. lix, Drill Team; Pitts, Drill Team;
The Letter Jacket was awarded to Brenden Curtis, Rifle Team; James
Tommy Smith and certificates were Jones, Rifle Team and Lawrence
awarded to Gilley, Drill Team; Blake, Rifle Team.


Monticello Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
c Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.



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MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES




#15




Eat a small meal, Lucille





"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings .
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department ""
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301


Take Your First Step Today. For more information big rewards
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and ask PRwentp2DiabetOe
for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes" www.ndep.nih.gov

A message from the National Diabetes Education Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

SIMEM,,p RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Know Your Rights


When Dunned


Ten years ago, consumers who
had not honored their long-standing
debts did not need to worry, as few
collection agencies ever tried to col-
lect on old bills.
Nowadays, collecting on old debts
is a burgeoning multimillion dollar
industry. Companies known as junk
debt buyers purchase debt on uncol-
lectible accounts from original lend-
ers for pennies on the dollar and use
credit scoring to identify which con-
sumers are most likely to pay.
Consumers should know their
rights to ensure they are not being
contacted to pay an old debt that
violates the Fair Credit Reporting
Act and the Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act.
SKnowing the statue of limitations
which is the time. limit for a creditor
to file a lawsuit is the first step to
protecting oneself against junk debt
buyers.
This period starts when the debt
becomes delinquent and can last
several years, depending on where
the consumer lives.
After the time has passed, debts
expire and are supposed to be re-
inoved from consumers' credit re-
ports. If the statute has expired,
companies have limited rights in
collecting the amount owed.
"It is important that consumers
know their rights in the event they
hre contacted by a junk debt buyer,"
said Dianne Wilkman, President of
Springboard, a nonprofit credit
counseling organization.
"These companies are experts at
persuading unknowing consumers to
agree to pay old debts, which can
severely damage their credit."


Ask for Proof. According to the
Fair Debt Collecting Practices Act,
collectors can't report on an old debt
if they cannot provide proof that the
consumer owes the money.
Never Acknowledge a Bad Debt.
By agreeing to pay or simply ac-
knowledging the debt, consumers
can unintentionally extend the stat-
ute of limitations and suffer a nega-
tive drop in their credit.
Monitor Your Credit Report. The
first course of action is for consum-
ers to obtain a free copy of their
credit report by calling 1-877-322-
8228 or visiting
www.annualcreditreport.com to en-
sure their credit stays clear of misre-
ported entries.
Opt out of prescreened credit of-
fers. Your name on these lists may
alert debt collectors who will drop a
derogatory item onto your credit re-
port in order to snag your mortgage
application (you may not be able to
close without paying them.) Call
888-5-OPT-OUT (888-567-8688) or
visit www.optoutprescreen.com.
Opting out reduces some of these
risks.
Get Help. Springboard, a non-
profit education and credit counsel-
ing organization, can help
consumers avoid making decisions
that can negatively affect their credit
report and, ultimately, their purchas-
ing power, as well as help consum-
ers clear up inaccuracies on their
credit reports and improve their
credit scores.
The toll-free number for consum-
ers who seek additional assistance is
1-800-WISEPLAN (800-947-3752).
The Web site is www.credit.org.


Parents Help Children


Build Self Confidence


One of the greatest gifts a parent
can give a child is the gift of self-
confidence, because it can be a gift
that keeps giving.
Self esteem is an indicator of good
mental health. It is how we feel
about ourselves.
Parents can play important roles in
helping their children feel better
:about themselves and developing
.greater confidence.
Doing this is important, because
:children with good self-esteem learn
how to act independently, assume
ITesponsibility and handle peer pres-
sure appropriately.
SWords and actions have great im-
pact on the confidence of children,
and children, including adolescents,
remember the positive statements
that parents and caregivers say to
.them. Phrases such as "I like the
tway you..." or "You are improving
at..." should be used on a daily
'basis. Parents can also smile, nod,
wink, pat on the back or hug a child
to show attention and appreciation.
SWhat else can parents do?
Be generous with praise. Parents
must develop the habit of looking
for situations in which children are
doing good jobs, displaying talents,
or demonstrating positive character
traits. Remember to praise children
for jobs well done and for effort.
Teach positive self-statements. It
is important for parents to redirect
children's inaccurate or negative be-


liefs about themselves and to teach
them how to think in positive ways.
Avoid criticism that takes the
form of ridicule or shame.
Children can learn also about self
esteem from other surprising
sources, such as cartoons. The "Fat
Albert" movie, which is based on
the old Saturday morning cartoon
series, is a good example.
Now, Bill Cosby's characters have
made their way to movie theaters
and are available on DVD.
The program's appeal was based
equally on its sense of humor and
fun and its pro-social messages and
characters. To make the show,
Cosby and the producers assembled
a special Advisory Board to consult
on the program.

The distinguished panel, com-
posed of linguists, psychologists,
historians, teachers and scientists,
and a clear goal: to create an enter-
taining program that would delight
youngsters while telling pro-social
age-appropriate life lessons.


Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and
include phone number of
writer


WORK was done
sonage, in July


From Our Photo File











Imo







.- ..... "- --A '!





on the New Nazarene Par- roof is Bob Miller. Man on the ground is
22, 1988. Working on the Dan Benedict. (News File Photo)


_-Opinion & Comment


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I was awakened at 3 am by the
large behemoth rising out of the
Gulf, grumbling and spitting fire.
The feature thunderstorm was one
of the most fascinating I had seen in
a while. I just got up and made cof-
fee and watched it as it rushed east
towards Madison, without leaving a
drop of rain in Jefferson County.
I turned on the Weather Channel
and saw that Madison County was
orange denoting severe weather. It
was the only orange in a sea of
green. All other Florida counties
were calm and quiet. I wondered
why Madison?
I recall numerous bad weather
events in Madison. Maybe the land
and sea come together in some con-
figuration that allows this weather to
drop in on our neighbor. I believe a


tornado tore up, among other things,
the Florida Highway Patrol Station
in Madison several years ago.
At the time, I imagined lots of
dancing in the streets and high 5's as
that months traffic tickets twirled
skywards. In reality, I'm sure com-
puters had records of those tickets.
Computers certainly help us all
but sometimes provide some needed
laughs. They 'get' spelling and;
grammar, but not content: I recently
saw an ad in the paper that read
"Need a lawyer arrested?" I thought
heck yea! I could think of several.
Monticello really rolled out the
red carpet for the one thousand bicy-
clists that hit town. I wandered
around town talking to them and
-was surprised to see so many
middle-aged participants. I was told
that one cyclist was in his 80's.
I also watched as they sped around
the area. Those bicycles are fast. A
spill could be injurious. I wondered


if the cyclist worried about being in
many small towns where medical
service might not be available. Of
course, we have topnotch medical
services here.
Not all small towns are so fortu-
nate. The hubby and I were driving
in a small mountain town and listen-
ing to AM radio. A furniture store
was closing and the announcer said,
"Come on down the hill! Eerything
must go! We, are, having ,a.jiquida-
tion sale!" Thinking about the doc-
tor in that town gave me the willies.
County Commissioner Gene Hall
placed an ad in the paper asking his
folks to call him with any problems.
Good policy in my book. He in-
cluded a cute photograph of himself
that looked like it was taken in about
middle school. He had that look of
eager anticipation and good hope
that most children have.
I live in a neat neighborhood. The
new Pastor of First Baptist recently


moved in across the street. An army
of parishioners showed up to.clean
up the yard, paint and get the house
ready for: the new. arrivals. They
made very short work of this and
Reverend Thurmon Moore and fam-
ily are settled in.
When the hubby and I first moved
to Madison Street, we would notice
small gatherings in the middle of the
road. This was usually proceeded by
'a Woo Hoo" calling. Our dear de-
parted "frieiid, India .Lmebaugh,
would stand in the street Woo Hoo-
ing to all passerby's. She loved to
talk and many neighborhood parties
started in this way.
I miss her. Her daughter Sally
Worely and her husband Sam have
now moved into the house. Recently
I sa%\ a gathering in the street, folks
all talking to Sally.:I have not heard
the Woo Hob yet, but I suspect, I
will.


Illegal Alien Flow Continuing


BY TOM DEWESSE
Columnist

The issue that will define our era
and determine the nation's future is
illegal immigration. Political debate
is full of schemes like "guest
worker" programs and temporary
worker cards to allow illegals to "fill
jobs that Americans just don't want
to do."
Such programs are really just po-
litical doublespeak from politicians,
who lack the intestinal fortitude to
protect the borders of the United
States.
The truth is, President Bush is
-pushing the guest worker plans be-
cause he is trying to appease Mexi-
can President Vicente Fox, who
wants the borders between Mexico
and the U.S. and Canada open, just
like the European Union.
Prior to the 9/11 terrorist attacks,
President Bush and Fox agreed to
consider granting permanent resi-
dency, or green cards, to as many as


3 million Mexicans living illegally
in the United States. The plan was
temporarily side tracked in the after-
math of the 9/11 attacks, but now
-the White House has put it back on
the agenda.
Fox thinks that the best way to
save Mexico's failing economy is to
grab hold of the U.S. economy in
what his administration calls "very
common objectives." Fox's plan of-
fers very little advantage to the
United States.
Economically speaking, the plan
offers no hope to solving Mexico's
institutional ills. The reason is that
Mexico's economic problems are
created by the fact that Mexico is a
socialist country that denies private
ownership of property to its people,
and taxes businesses to pay for just
about any confiscation scheme its
corrupt government can dream up.
It's the same old story. Socialism
can't survive without a free market
to prop it up.
Mexico has sunk to the depths of


socialist depravity and now desper-
ately needs the U.S. economy to
save it.
Apparently, Fox has never consid-
ered fixing his own economy. Like
all drowning despots, his only plan
of action is to cling to our economy
until it too starts to sink under the
weight of a hoard of illegal aliens.
These law breakers, with Fox's
help and encouragement, are rush-
ing across the border for American
goodies.
In an orchestrated plan to actually
help Mexican citizens illegally cross
our nation's sovereign border, the
Mexican government is creating
tools to instruct them, in detail, as to
how to do it. Once they are in our
nation, Fox's government then pro-
vides identification for the illegals to
help them obtain American docu-
mentation and services.
Specifically, the Mexican govern-
ment is distributing to its citizens a
colorful new comic book with ad-
vice on how to cross the border.


The 32-page book, "The Guide for
the Mexican Migrant," was pub-
lished in December by Mexico's
Foreign Ministry. Using simple lan-
guage and colorful drawings, the
books offers: safety information for
illegal border crossings.
The book also provides a primer
on their legal rights once they get
across, and gives advice on living
unobtrusively in the United States.
"This is more than just a wink and
a nod," says Rick Ottman, Western
field director for the Federation for
American Immigration Reform.
"This is so transparent, this is the
Mexican government trying to pro-
tect its most valuable export, which
is illegal migrants."
Ottman is referring to the fact that
illegal Mexicans are taking billions
of dollars out of the U.S. 'economy
each year and sending the money
back to Mexico. In tact, illegal im-
migration is one of Mexico's biggest
(See Illegal Aliens, Page 5)


Talking Books Help Seniors


Older Americans are one of the
fastest-growing groups in the coun-
try. As a result, a rising number of
younger family members are being
asked more and more to make rec-
ommendations on resources and ac-
tivities that will improve the health
and lifestyles of their older family
members.
For older relatives, finding out
that they can no longer read the
standard print of a newspaper, or
even the pages of a large-print book,
can be one of the most difficult


changes to accept.
It can cut out activities they've al-
ways loved to do, like reading the
sports page or using a cookbook.
Talking Books, a free program of-
fered through the National Library
Service for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped (NLS) network of re-
gional libraries, helps those who
have trouble reading a standard
printed page keep the pleasure of
reading in their daily lives.
The program loans members a
wide selection of recorded books


and magazines, braille books and
magazines, and music scores in
braille and large print.
"Reading plays an important role
in our daily lives, whether it's for
information or just for fun," said
NLS director Frank Kurt Cylke.
"Through Talking Books, we are
able to put books back into the lives
of those who thought they might
have to give up reading."
Anyone who is a resident of the
United States or an American citizen
living abroad and who cannot read


or use standard print materials be-
cause of a visual or physical impair-
ment may qualify to participate in
the Talking Books program.
Applications may be requested
from the regional or subregional li-
brary closest to the eligible family
member.
A searchable list of locations is
available at www.loc.gov/nls. The
application does require the signa-
ture of an official source such as
the eligible family member's doctor,
(See Talking Books, Page 5)


1 'Ik Is~R


J








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 5


r Letters..


:iWriter Urges Pi


!






I


et Owners


ane Society
glected, abandoned and officials didn't have
nals; whereas RPOJC to pass it.
bout the animals of this Also, the first cha
Monticello got, they
also likes to talk about funding for an
and persecuting pet officer.
iell as raising our taxes Please don't ki
us pay more in govern- RPOJC can overcor
influence of the hu
es she think pushed for plantation owners of
ed the dangerous animal This county does
this county? of do-gooders such
mane Society did, and
a nuisance animal ordi-
d but local government


more than we need People for the you join the Humane Society and
Ethical Treatment of Animals become active members; not just
(PETA) sticking their nose where it someone who pays the dues.
doesn't belong. Maybe then the animals nf th;i


As I stated in my letter, disband
yourself and each and every one of


county will get a fair shake.
Yours truly,
Guery Watson


the political will Talking Books
(Continued From Page 4)
since the City of caseworker or an NLS regional li-


eliminated the
animal control

id yourself that
ne the political
nters and large
this county.
i't need a bunch
as RPOJC, and


brarian in order to join the pro-
gram.
Once an application is completed,
the playback equipment for the
Talking Books program will be sent
within three working days.
An initial shipment of books and
catalogs is usually sent within the
following two working days.


Opening the door
to hope
Call our lifeline.
It's toll-free.
THE VOICE OF HOPE A"
1-800-572-1717 M-SCy


To Join Hum;
SDear Editor: of stray, ne
I am writing in response to Bob- abused anil
k bie Golden's response to my original talks a lot a
letter regarding the duplication of county.
V effort concerning animal welfare in RPOJC e
SJefferson County. prosecuting
I want to thank her for clarifying owners as w
Sthe charter of the Responsible Pet and making
Owners of Jefferson County ment fees.
(RPOJC). Who doe
At least now I know the two or- and got pass,
ganizations are not duplicating ef- ordinance in
forts. The Hur
The Humane Society actually tried to get
Scares for the welfare and well being nance passe



Illegal Aliens
zens are abc
(Continued From Page 4)al ID ca
tional ID ca
growth industries. sive data b
The comic book is being distrib- every aspect
uted as a free supplement to El Li- job history,
bibro Vaquero, a popular cowboy cords, and ba
comic book, in five Mexican states We're told
(zacarecas, Michoacan, Puebla, private lives
Oaxaca, and Jalisco) that send the the nation fri
Majority of illegals to the United next 18 mo
States. The government plans to cards will be
print 1.5 million copies, them Ameri
Once over the border and safely able to get
tucked away in a U.S. city, the ille- bank account
gals need some form of identifica- ried, or in
tion to help them get jobs and gov- American soc
ernment services. Again, the Mexi- Yet, with t
can government is providing the an- Administratic
swer for its "citizens." ernment's mn
The Mexican government has is- accepted as a
-sued more than 800,000 slick, nation's 9,00(
pocket-sized identification cards to Illegal ali
both legal and illegal immigrants, broken our ir
Of course, those immigrants who tering the col
have come to this nation using legal checks, and o
means have no need for the cards. Yet, there i
So the cards really are specifically the cards can
designed to help illegals gain a foot- and there is
hold in this country. Called "matric- background
ula consular" cards, the are being the card. In
distributed across the United States cards are allc
through the Embassy of Mexico and to bypass the
its 45 consulates in the U.S. ernment-conti
The cards list the holder' birth on American
'iate, place of birth,. and U.S. True to its
address. The Mexican government is eminent, the
openly lobbying U.S. cities, police has been sile
forces, local government agencies, unprecedented
and banks to accept the cards as of- government,
ficial identification. than a planned
Ironically, today, legal U.S. citi- tion.


out to be tied to a na-
ard, controlled by mas-
anks which document
of our lives, including
tax history, medical re-
ink accounts.
d such intrusion into our
is necessary to protect
om terrorist.' Within the
months, the national ID
e in place, and without
can citizens won't be
on an airplane, open a
t, buy a gun, get mar-
any way function in
ciety.
he blessing of the Bush
on, the Mexican gov-
atricula cards' are now
form of ID at 74 ofe .l
)banks.
ens, who have already
immigration laws by en- '
untry illegally can cash
pen bank accounts.
s nothing to assure that
ry accurate information
no means to check the
of the person holding
practice, the consular
owing illegal Mexicans
growing web of gov-
rol now being imposed:
citizens.
promises theiFo:x gjv-I'. : ',
Bush Administration
nt, refusing to act on
d actions by a foreign
which are little more
ed invasion of our na-


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I
S MONTICELLO

J NEWS
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ll ris 'asI$ '"' "..- ^ .i' r iFT H ai-H' rii ri -.T .s:-"ia ;I'..'r : l l;: *l" *:'"',1,: ;,!i;',, ........... F, ,",",i' ''i ,,ii .i '

















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.,- ,A .....T'TTn-r.T Ir\ MIA 1 Nrw FRI.. APRIL 22. 2005


Lifestyle


Elizabeth AME Church will hold
its fifth annual Men's Day Program
11 a.m., Sunday. Guest speaker is
Rev. Lucious Wade. Ernest Ulee is
the sponsor.
***
:Saints Tabernacle Church of God
Unity, Inc. will hold a Praise-A-
Bration program 7:30 pm Friday
and Saturday. Guest speaker Friday
is Minister Miner Brookins. Guest
Speaker Saturday is Minister Kata-
bia Henry.

Elizabeth MB Church celebrates
Family and Friends day 4 p.m., Sun-
day. Guest speaker is Rev. Willie
Hagan and the Arnett Chapel Fam-
ily of Quincy.
***
Old Greenville AME Church will
hold its annual Family and Friend


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

At a recent meeting, the Woman's
Club, heard Dr. Wes Scoles speak
about his medical mission trip to
Guatemala.
His slide show took the members
on a tour of the location, and gave-
him the opportunity to introduce
them to the Guatemalan people and
their plight.
He does plan to repeat his efforts
x'hen he travels to Guatemala, Oct.
t-16.

Homes Of
Alice D. Mitchell
Alice D. Mitchell, age 60, of Colton
C4lifornia, died Friday, April 15,
2005.
:Mitchell was a native of Jefferson
County and lived in California for
49 years.
: She was a member of Mt. Zion
MB Church in Pomona, California.
A, graduate of Howard Middle
School of Jefferson County in 1962.
She was employed as a secretary for
the State of California.
She is survived by 3 children:
Glenetta Mitchell, Colton
California, Tawana Cox, Colton
California and son James Terry of


Day Celebration Sunday. Speaker is
Rev. A. Fudge, Pastor of Jerusalem
MB Church.
***
Philadelphia AME Church cele-
brates Family and Friends Day 2:30
p.m., Sunday. Guest speaker is Min-
ister Shirley Washington of Pine
Grove MB Church. Music will be
rendered by Holy Ghost Revival
Center.

Wacissa United Methodist Church
presents Emmaus Road Quartet live
in concert 7 p.m., Sunday.

Welaunee MB Church will hold
appreciation services Friday and
Sunday. Minister Shirley Washing-
ton speaks Friday and Rev. James
Leonard speaks Sunday.


He will take with him a collection
of necessities such as sandals, cloth-
ing, and medicines.
President Amanda Ouzts notes
that his presentation was both infor-
mative and interesting to the mem-
bers and their guests.
A brief business meeting took
place with a discussion of end of the
year projects.
These include the Secretary's
Luncheon scheduled for Thursday,
April 28, and the Watermelon Festi-
val Fashion Show and Luncheon,
June 16.


Mourning
Moreno Vally California; 3 sisters
Anniemae Mitchell of Ontario Cali-
fornia, Leona Thompson (Louis)
Tallahassee, Janie Bell Mitchell of
Monticello; 7 grandchildren, a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins, and
sorrowing friends.
Funeral services will be Thursday,
April 21, 11 am at Mt. Zion MB
Church in Pomona California, with
Rev. Leo Smith pastor and officiat-
ing. Pallbearers are nephews. Hon-
orary pallbearers are deacons of Mt.
Zion MB Church of Pomona, Cali-
fomia. Tilliman Riverside Mortuary
of Riverside, California is handling
arrangements.


Amanda Ouzts Surprised


With 90th Birthday Party


AMANDA OUZTS, left, celebrated her 90th birthday with
family and friends, who signed the guest register as they
arrived. With Ouzts is her daughter Cheryl Faye. (News
Photo)


Fashion, Hair Show Set

At JCHS Auditorium


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School Boys and Girls Club of the
Big Bend STARS Program will
host a fashion and hair show
Friday, 7 p.m. at the old high
school auditorium.
, All high school students in the
program will be participating,
albng with a couple of the middle
I


school students.
Admissions is $3 per person.
Students will be modeling outfits
that they coordinated and pur-
chased and their hair will be styled
by students and/or area stylists.
Door prizes will be awarded and
all funds generated will go to bene-
fit the Boys and Girls Club of the
Big Bend.
For further information call the
JCHS office at 997-3555.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Long time resident Amanda Ouzts
was surprised with a 90th Birthday
Party on Saturday April 9, at the
First Baptist Fellowship hall, with
more than 100 friends and family in
attendance.
The fellowship hall was decorated
in a spring theme of pastel colors of
pink, blue, green, and yellow. The
birthday cake was tiered, and was
huge.


Ms. Bellamy

TO Marry

Mr. Crumitie
David Matthew Crumitie and
Tonechia Lachery Bellamy will
marry Saturday, April 23, 2005.
The bride's parents Jackie and Jo-
seph Lee Bellamy, and Celia Mae
Jenrette, and a special aunt Evelyn
Williams, all from Monticello,
would like to remind you of the ap-
proaching marriage of their daugh-
ter Tonechia to David, son of Sallie
Mae and the late Grant Crumitie Sr.
of Monticello.
The ceremony will take place at
4:00 p.m., Saturday, at Memorial
MB Church in Monticello.
The reception will follow at Angie
Alexander and Major Bellamy
(Vern) resident's, south on Hwy. 19
at 366 Brown Alexander Road, to
the Boland's Community in Monti-
cello, FL.


Although her birthday wasn't until
April 10, her friends say the party
was planned the day before to help
keep it a surprise.

Ethel Strickland and Lottie Berry
collaborated in putting this party to-
gether, with the help of Ouzts'
granddaughter, Michelle Beerbower
of Houston, TX.
Because her party was a surprise,
secrecy was a must. So, invitation
was by word of mouth only.
"I just couldn't understand why I


hadn't received any cards in the
mail. I always received at least 7
cards way before my birthday,"
Ouzts said.
She was excited to have her chil-
dren, grandchildren, and great
grandchildren, from Houston, in for
a visit.
It was a great opportunity to sit
-for a Four Generation picture. The
photos were taken as moments to
be presented to Ouzts.
She has a son, Paul; a daughter,
Cheryl Faye; a granddaughter, Mi-
chelle Beerbower; and two great


a


DAVID CRUMITIE AND TONECHIA BELLAMY


I'.~.

-3r


AVA LYNN PHILLIPS


New Arrival
Devyn Phillips announces the
birth of his sister Ava Lynn Phillips.
born 6:07 p.m., Monday, February
21, 2005 in Coconut Creek, FL.
Ava weighed 6 pounds 14 ounces
and was 19 inches long.
She is the daughter of Sarah and
Austin Phillips of Coconut Creek.
Her maternal grandparents are Ka-
tie and Randy Elkins of Monticello.
Her maternal great grandparents
are Janet and Charlie Elkins, of
Monticello, and Jane Harp and the
late Tom Harp, also of Monticello.


CARD OF THANKS
We the family of the late Mother
Celia Hester Mills would like to ex-
press a big thank you to everyone
that demonstrated your love and
concerns through your personal vis-
its, telephone calls, food, and espe-
'cially fervent prayers whispered in
our behalf. Again, Thank you, The
Family.

In Case Of Emergency

Dial 911


SRead Together, florida
FMarch April 2005

I ',:^ Essay Contest for Middle School
I "' .. www.VolunteerFloridaFoundation.org

| | H^13 ^ sponsored by U !ll Washington Mutual
SIl zIg a ,xerolrsToI i.' e nrt,, iT, l t"II.,.La l_,


granddaughters.
Family members from Thomas-
ville and Cairo, Havana,
Tallahassee, and her sister Bea Ales-
sandrini from Panama City were in
attendance.
And, helping her to celebrate were
her many friends from the Monti-
cello Woman's Club and Garden
Club, and her Sunday School
classes.
"Ethel and Lottie worked so hard,
and they did an excellent job of put-
ting my party together and keeping
it a secret from me," Ouzts said of
the party organizers.


Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


7rZ7(w7HOME
N D D U FURNISHINGS

(L -( = '1,.C.--111l"i'LI lHI IIIm -12il[(w 1Ia ItmillA.
1317 W. Jefferson St. Monticello 342-3201

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Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166

Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The fear of
the Lord
teaches a man
wisdom.
Proverbs 15:23


Church News Notes


Dr. Scoles Speaker

At Woman's Club


PAGE 6O, MON-F IELLU, t vl,), 1,4rv a, %A., P A X -I


Li









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 7


Beta Sigma Phi Sorority


Celebrates 50 Years


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Beta Sigma Phi social sorority.
celebrated its 50th anniversary Sat-
urday.
A brunch was held at the home of
Pickles (Helen) Bentley to celebrate
50 years of friendship, with 37
members and guests attending.
The members invited their daugh-
ters and other family members to
celebrate the occasion with them.


Ann Coxetter, Charter Member,
joined the Sorority in 1956 and is an
active member today. She was in at-
tendance with her daughter Sissy
Beggs.
Members supplied the food and
the menu consisted of a breakfast
casserole, French toast casserole,
Angel biscuits with ham, fresh as-
paragus, and snow peas, a variety of
seasonal fruits, and a fruit trifle. An
endless supply of juices, and coffee
were also served.
A Springtime theme was used


H 1M,


FOUR GENERATIONS; Helen Pickles Bentley, seated. L-R:
Kalyn Brown, Brenda Brown, Carolyn Bentley.


throughout with fresh flowers ar-
ranged by Pickles Bentley.
President Connie Boland invited
the members of the Sorority to share
what the Club had meant to them
over the years. She invited the
guests to consider starting a new
chapter of Beta Sigma Phi in Monti-
cello for the younger women.
The Bentley family had four gen-
erations in attendance, Pickles
(Helen) Bentley, Carolyn Bentley,
Brenda Brown, and Kalyn Brown.
Member Jean Folsom's daughter
came the greatest distance, from Ar-
lington, VA. to attend.
Beta Sigma Phi is a group with
common interests in a family-like
atmosphere. It's about friendship
and mutual support.
Some of the Service Projects of
the Club include: the Watermelon
Beauty Pageant and Judges Tea;
Opera House Garden donations;
Christmas gifts to needy families;.,
Retarded citizens and nursing home
patients; Thanksgiving baskets to
needy families and elderly; and,
members walked in the Relay For
Life and the March of Dimes.
Some of their Ways and Means
projects have been: Valentine and
Christmas dances; preparing break-
fast for the Car Rally Tour; giant ga-
rage sales; auctions, and dinners.
Services to members have in-
cluded: helping at wedding recep-
tions and funerals; donations of
books to the Library, in honor, of
Betty Kelley; Donations to Hospice
House in memory of Betty Kelley;
holding wedding showers for mem-
ber's children; a Secret Sister gift
program; and an annual Christmas
Ornament gift exchange.
Social events have included: Fish
Frys; Beach Days; Costume parties;
Dances; Ladies Night Out; dinners;
Plays; weekend trips to. Savannah
and to Blountstown; cruises; Hobo
parties around the campfire; and
Ghost Walks.


Fish Fry TO
Benefit JCHS
Track Team

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High School-
Track Team will hold a Fish Fry
llam-2pm Friday, April 22 at the
new Jefferson County High School.
This fundraiser will help the team
members with the cost of their trip
to Miami for the State Champion-
ship Track Meet, scheduled to take
place on Thursday, April 28 through


~~.-"
I
?z;
'
.t
'"
"'
r


BETA SIGMA PHI Sorority celebrated 50
years in the community recently with a
Friendship Brunch. L-R: Katherine Boland,


Connie Boland, president,
Boland. (News Photos)


and Sarah


COnfederate Memorial Day

t


To Be Observed Sal


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Kate Dilworth Scott Chapter
of the United Daughters of the Con--
federacy (UDC), announce their an-
nual Confederate Memorial Day
Ceremony, to be held at the Old
City Cemetery 2 p.m. Sunday, April
24.
Local UDC members will have a
short program assisted by Pickens
Bird Campl of Sons of Confederate
Veterans.
After welcome, Invocation, and
Flag Salute, Gary Wright will be the
guest speaker.
Flowers will then be placed on the
graves of the soldiers, both Confed-
erate and Union, which are' in
small section of the cefinetery, un-
marked.
Music of the period Will be
played, and refreshments will be
served.
For more information, contact
Betty Rose Fountain at 997-6463.
Eleanor Hawkins provides, this
historical information: the local me-
morial service began more than 100
years ago, when widows and chil-
dren decorated the graves of
soldiers,-both Confederate and Un-
ion, killed in the War Between the

Local Students
Honor Society
Three county students were in-
ducted into Phi Theta Kappa, inter-
national honor society of two year
colleges, recently, at North Florida
Community College.
Local students include: David
Baylor, Shaundala Brownn. .and
Sheila Combs.


Saturday, April 30. To qualify, students must have
The cost is $6 for a fish dinner and earned a 3.2 GPA and have com-
$3 for a fish sandwich. pleted a minimum of 12 college
Booster parents of track team credits hours.
members will help with the prepar- At total of 31 students were in-
ing and serving of the meals. ducted into the ho6or society at the
Ceremony.

Free initial consultation


ANN COXETTER, charter member of the sorority since
1956, and her daughter Sissy Beggs, left.


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States.
The May 30 Memorial Day origi-
nated shortly after the War ended
when in 1868, the head of an or-
ganization of Union veterans, the
Grand Army of the Republic, estab-
lished Decoration Day as a time for
the nation to decorate the graves of
the war dead with flowers.
Earlier tributes to the Civil War
dead already had been held in vari-


Surday
ous places.
One of the first occurred in Co-
lumbus, MS., April 25, 1866, when.
a group of women visited a ceme-
tery to decorate the graves of Con-
federate soldiers who had fallen in.,,,
battle at Shiloh.
Nearby were the graves of Union.
soldiers. Disturbed at the sign of the',
bare graves, the women placed
flowers on those graves as well.


Secretary's Day Lunch Thursday.
There 'will be door prizes and'"
DEBBIE SNAPP hopefully-other items to offer to the-:
Staff Writer secretaries.


The annual Secretary's Luncheon,
hosted by the Woman's Club, is
scheduled for noon Thursday, April
28, at the clubhouse.
The entree is Pork Loin Roast,and
the cost of tickets is $10.


Tickets need to be purchased in
advance. ',
To purchase tickets, call Amanda.
Ouzts at 9.97-4553, Ethel Strickland ;,
at 997-33 2,,or Lottie Berry at 997-,:
S2249. ,


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005
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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA Undefeated


fin District Play


13ILL BROWN

SFollowing wins in their three re-
. cent games, the varsity Warriors
Climbed to a 16-2 season, and are
I undefeated 8-0 in district play.
SIn the Carrabelle game, the War-
Sriors slipped by with one of the
closest games of the year to win 3-
2.
The highlight of the game oc-
curred in the sixth, when a Carra-
. belle batter reached third with no
Scouts and failed to score.
. Drew Sherrod pitched the entire
Game to record his fifth win of the
J year, giving up seven hits and strik-
Sing out eight. One of the runs, a
1 home run off the bat of Cody Bras-
, bet in the third, was earned.
: Aucilla's three runs resulted from
eight hits and one Carrabelle error.
The "Big bat" was provided by
Ridgely Plaines with three hits and
one RBI.
Josh Carswell hit safely twice,
Followed by Jason Holton with a
double and Chris Tuten and Daniel
Roccanti, each with one single.
S On Thursday, Echols County,
GA came to Finlayson field and de-
parted with an 8-4 loss.:
In his first start of the season,
Chris Tuten pitched the first five
'innings, gave up one hit, no runs
and struck out seven.
SHolton was the only Warrior to
hit safely more than once, getting

bats.
Sherrod connected with a double
Sand two RBI in three official trips
to the plate.
Others hitting safely, all singles,
were: Casey Gunnels, one for one;


JCHS Win


Climbs T(


FRAN HUNT


Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School baseball team won its last
two games and climbed to 5-6 sea-
I son.
* In a hard-fought game that went
an extra inning, the FAMU High
edged the Tigers 6-5.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
the score was tied in the bottom of
the seventh inning, but two major
Tiger errors committed in the
eighth, cost them the win.
Jason Kirkpatrick pitched six in-
nings, striking out three batters and
giving up four hits and two walks.
Markyce Larry pitched the final
two innings, striking out three bat-
ters and giving up one walk and no
hits.
Larry smashed one home run, hit
one double, had two RBI, scored
one run; Dionte Hightower went
three for four, hit one double, had
one RBI, scored two runs; Thomas
Lyle had one RBI, scored one run;
and Malcolm Norton scored one
run.
SIn a make-up game against Mel-
ody Christian, the Tigers won,
12-1, before the game was called
because of the ten-run rule.
"We've started to come back to a
Record a little bit," said Hightower.
Alex Lingle pitched the five-
inning one-hitter, striking out 10
batters, giving up one walk, and he
went two for four at the plate.
Hightower went two for five with
one double; Lyle went two for four,
smacked a three- run home run;
Larry went one for one; Clark Lat-
son went two for four and ripped
the skin off of the ball for a grand-
slam home run; and Breon Parker
and Kirkpatrick both went two for
four.
In their second make-up game,
the Tigers played what Hightower
called "an ugly game", committing


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Monticello News
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Chris Tuten, one for three with two
RBI and one stolen base; Plaines
one for four with one RBI; Glen
Bishop, one for three with two sto-
len bases; Roccanti, one for three
with one RBI; and Jeremy Tuckey
with one single, his first hit of the
year.
ACA defeated R. F. Munroe 8-1
in what is called the big game of
the week and of the season.
This resulted in the Warriors be-
ing the number one seed in the dis-
trict tournament, starting May 2 on
Munroe field.
It was especially sweet then the
Warrior batters collected nine hits
and five earned runs off the Mun-
roe pitcher, Joey Higdon, and
handed him his first loss of the
year.
Plaines pitched the first four in-
nings for Aucilla, to record his fifth
win of the year. He gave up five
hits, one run and struck out five.
Sherrod finished, allowed no
runs, gave up one hit and struck out
seven.
Tuten led Aucilla batters with
two hits, one RBI and one stolen
base; Roccanti hit two singles in
four at-bat; Gunnels bounced a
double off the left-field fence to ac-
count for one RBI and ignite a two
run, three out fifth inning rally to
break a 1-1 tie.
Sherrod and Plaines each had one
single; Carswell was one for three
with two RBI; and Dustin Roberts
was one for three with one RBI.
The next home game will be
against East Gadsden 4 p.m., Fri-
day, and in their final home game
of the season, the Warriors face off
against Altha 1 pjn., April 26, for
a double-header.


-,..
," A .. U '> *i;



,. i '. t --' i i i -II ~ i i , '



CINDY WAINRIGHT of Simply Smashing ladies tennis team
#3 returns the serve at a recent practice session.


HMS Bees Win Two


Five Recent Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Bumblebees baseball team
now stands at a 4-5 season after
dropping three of their last five
games.
The Bees swarmed and stung
Trinity Catholic in the first game
for a 10-2 win.
SDemontray Johnson struck out
five and had one single; D'Vonte
graham hit two doubles; Arnez
Ammons and Anthony McDaniel
each hit a single; Markyce Leonard
hit a double; and Shayne Broxie hit
one single and struck out four.
When HMS faced off against
Florida High, they were defeated
10-5.
Graham had one double and


s 2 Of 3 Games,. ;


o 5-6 Season
12 errors and still coming out with with two singles, scored three runs;
a 21-14 win over John Paul II. -Darnell Brooks scored three runs;


"We made every conceivable er-
ror possible and was still able to
win the game," said Hightower.
The Tigers gave John Paul 10
runs due to errors before John Paul
even had their first hit of the game.
"We made a serious comeback,
hit real well, got set, took advan-
tage and took it to the limit," said
Hightower. "We had to work what
was working for us, out speed."
Dionte Hightower went two for
five with a triple and scored two
runs; Lyle went three for five with
one triple; Larry went three for
three with three doubles and scored
four runs.
Scottie Norton hit two doubles,
one single, scored four runs; Kirk-
patrick went three for five with two
singles; Parker went two for five


Quantez Burke scored three runs;
and D'Vondre Pittman scored two
runs.
Lyles pitched the first six innings,
striking out five batters and giving
up three hits and three walks; and
Larry wrapped up the pitching
chore, striking out two and giving
up no hits or walks.


struck out three; Broxie struck out
four; Ammons hit a double; and
Johnson hit a single.
The Bumblebees clobbered Tay-
lor County for a 13-3 victory.
Curtis Hightower had one single
and one RBI; Broxie had one single
and struck out five; Ammons had a
single and a double; Johnson hit
two singles and a double; Graham
had two doubles, three RBI and
struck out four; Telvin Norton had
one single and one RBI;and Leon-
ard and McDaniel each hit one sin-
gle.
,1 In a hard-fought battle, the Bum-
.'blebees lost to Trinity Catholic, 10-
'S.
Johnson had one single and six
RBI. Bro\ie hit one single, as did
. Higlito\eir Graham and Norton
and A.mmons hit one single and
one double.
In their fifth game, the Bumble-
bees were exterminated for a 15-10
loss.
Ammons hit a single and a dou-
ble, Broxie had two singles and
struck out two, Norton and Leonard
each had two singles, Graham had
one single and struck out two and
Hightower struck out two batters.


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Simply Smashing Tennis

, Team Wins 1 Of 6 Matches


in the league and that they were
just trying to stay off the very bot-
tom of the list.
"We've got some really tough
-teams to finish up with but we will
get in there and do our best," she
concluded.

ACA Ladies

Blank Tigers
The Lady Warriors blanked the
Lady Tigers last week 13-0, in their
first face-off of the season.
The Lady Warriors had nine hits
and no errors.
Lady Tigers had one hit and two
errors.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the first
four innings, striking out five batters
and only giving up one walk and
one hit. She has a 9-3 season
record.
Bethany Saunders pitched the fi-
nal two innings, striking out four
Lady Tigers, giving up no hits and
walking one. She has a 5-0 season
record.
Jenny Tuten went two for four
with four RBI; Caitlin Murphy went
two for four and had one double and
two RBI; and Cassi Anderson went
two for three and had two RBI.


After returning from a two-week
long spring break, Simply Smash-
ing women's "A" league tennis
team, lost five of six of their
matches against Bainbridge last
week.
Team #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie
Brock lost its sets, 6-1 and 6-1.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and Maxi
Miller lost its sets, 6-0 and 6-4.
Team #3, Cindy Wainright and
Trisha Wirick lost its sets, 6-1 and
6-2.
Team #4, Laura Phillips-
Kirchhoff and Angie Delvecchio,
won its first set, 6-2, lost the sec-
ond, 4-6 and came back to win the
third, 6-1.
Team #5, Judy Faircloth and
Jennifer Ellis, lost its sets, 6-2 and
6-2.
Team #6, Susan Scarboro and
Lisa McAnally, lost its sets, 6-2
and 6-2.
There are only two matches re-
maining in the season. The next is
against Capital City Aces 9:30
a.m., Thursday at Tom Brown
Park.
Hardy said that the ladies were
standing at second fromthe bottom


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

C & F Fencers defeated State.
Farm Insurance in Coach Pitch ac-
tion Tuesday, for a 13-3 victory.
Ronzo Wade led the Fencers as
he hit his fourth home run in foul
times at bat, and had one double.
Taylor Clemmons added a
ground-rule double, along with
Calvin Crumitie, Casey Demott,
Brady Adams, and Brandon Holm,


who all hit doubles.
Defensively, the Fencers were led
by Douglas Gulledge, who made
some good plays at shortstop.
Crumitie caught a line-drive and
made a double-play; Hunter Han-
dley made several good plays; and
Ty Chancey caught a line-drive.
Crumity went two for two, as did
Gulledge, Demott, Brian Bowman
and Handley.
Mallory Register, Holm, and Ad-
ams all went one for two; and
Clemmons, Chancey and Joslyn
Dix all went one for three.


4 FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Fencers Beat State Farm

In Coach Pitch Action


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005

Lady Tigers Win Last Three


Games, Raise Record 6-8


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Lady Tigers won their last
three games and brought their sea-


son record up to 6-8.
A double-header was played
against Rickards, one game of
which was a makeup game be-
cause of a rainout.


JV Warriors Beat


Carrabelle 17-3
run.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The JV Warriors wound up their
season with a 4-11 record after
clobbering Carrabelle, 17-3, last
week.
Coach Daryl Adams said the
Warriors played a good game,
coming together strongly as a team.
Stephen Dollar pitched five in-
nings, striking out five batters,
walking three and giving up four
hits.
Luke Whitmer pitched two-thirds
of the seventh inning, striking out
one; and Michael Kinsey pitched
the final third of the seventh, strik-
ing out one.
SCasey Anderson had one walk,
:scored one run; Dollar went two for
'five, scored one run; Matt Bishop
*went three for five, smashed a
-home run and a grand-slam home
:run, hit one single, scored three
:runs, had 'five RBI; and Elliott
'Lewis went one for five, scored one


Fencers Beat Chi
:27-21 In Coach P

:FRAN HUNT
'Staff Writer

", In recent Coach Pitch action, C &
F Fencing defeated Chicken Delite
27-21.
'; In a close game that was tied after
he fourth inning, the Fencers out-
%cored Chicken'D1ite sevefi t:bone.
SCoach Mike Holm said that with
the help of some good defense and
timely hitting in the final inning, the
-Fencers were able to pull out the
win.
Taylor Clemons, Hunter Handley
'and Casey Demott all made good


Rob Searcy went one for three
and scored one run; Joe Mizell had
two walks, scored two runs; Bran-
don Dunbar had one walk, scored
one run; John Stephens went one
for one with a walk, scored one
run.
Kinsey went three for five and
scored three runs; A. J. Connell
went one for one and scored two
runs; Reggie Walker went one for
two, had one RBI;-and Brian Sholte
had one walk, scored one run.
Batting averages are as follows;
Anderson, .171; Bishop, .342; Con-
nell, .153; Dollar, .200; Dunbar,
.125; Hartsfield, ..200; and Kinsey,
.300.
Also, Lewis, .238; Searcy, .200;
Stephens, .500 (up to bat four
times); Walker, .444 (up to bat nine
times); Casey Wheeler, a sixth
grader who played first base 11 of
14 games, and is considered a very
strong defensive player, .130; and
Whitmer, .153.


icken Delite
itch Action
defensive plays.
Ronzo Wade was three for three
with all three hits sailing over the
fence for home runs.
Ty Chancey and Clemons were
four for four; Joslyn Dix was three
for four; Handley was three for
three; Brandon Holm was three for
three with a double and a triple; and
Demott was three for three with two
doubles.
Justin Brown was three for three;
Brady Adams went two for three
with a double and a triple; Mallory
Register was two for three; Brian
Bowman was two for four; and Cal-
vin Crumitie was one for three.


-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Services
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland
urges residents to learn all they can
about insurance policies and what
they cover, particularly with the
Hurricane Season on the horizon.
Hurricane Season officially be-
gins June 1 and continues through
Nov. 30.
"It pays to plan ahead, and now is
a good time to-review your insur-
ance policies relating to storm dam-
age," Copeland states.
She notes that the booklet "Guide
for Insuring Your Home," from the
Florida Department of Financial
Servcies, (DFS) contains a wealth of
information. The booklet is free by
calling. 1-800-342-2762.
Among the information that the
booklet contains is that consumers
cannot obtain immediate coverage
when a tropical storm or hurricane
reaches a certain distance from Flor-
ida.

SOther pointers include the wisdom
bf adding an inflation guard en-
aorsement.
: "Now is the time to take precau-
lions to protect your family and
property," said Copeland.
In addition DFS states:
Insurance should be purchased
now, because insurance companies
do not accept new applications or
new requests once a storm nears.
; Know what your insurance cov-


ers. Flood and wind damage are of-
ten separate policies.
Make sure coverage is adequate.
Know the value of your home and
its contents and whether insurance
covers actual coast or replacement
cost.
Make an itemized inventory of
your belongings and property. Pho-
tographs and videos are a good idea.
Know the name of your insurers
and immediately report property
damage. Write down the name of
your agent, agency and insurance
company, policy number and know
how to contact your company.
Safeguard your records. Store
important insurance and financial
papers in a safe and accessible
place.
Secure your home. Fortify your
home's roof, windows garage and
entry doors against hurricane dam-
age.
Put aside some money so that
you have cash on hand, banks and
ATM's could be out of order in the
event of a disaster.
Have a credit card with at least
$1,000 available, a good alternative
for cash, especially if repairs have
top be made on your dwelling.
Always pay bills a few days be-
fore they are due, to avoid being
caught without power in the event of
nonpayment of a bill after a storm.
Finance repairs. Document all
transactions. Many insurance poli-
cies require you to mitigate damage,
so photographs of before and after
are important.


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You're Holding On To A Precious Freedom.


Lady Tigers won the makeup
game 10-1.
Kim Gilley went one for two,
scored two runs, stole two bases;
Ashli Washington went one for
two, scored' two runs, stole two
bases; and Tiffany Walker went
one for one and scored two runs.
Heather Miller went one for three,
had three RBI, scored two runs,
stole four bases; Nikidra Thompson
went one for three, with two RBI;
and Samantha Pohle scored one
run, and was credited as the win-
ning pitcher.
The Ladies also won the second
game, 16-4.
Most of the game was played in
the rain with the exception of the
third inning.
Gilley went one for three and
scored two runs; Washington went
two for three, and scored three
runs; and Thompson went two for
four, and scored three runs.
Zan'Quisha Jones went three for
four, and scored one run; Chevarra
- Ulee went two for three, and scored
one run; Pohle went two for four,
scored three runs, and was the win-
ning pitcher.
In a District 4 2A game against
Maclay, the Lady Tigers played
what Coach Earlene Knight called,
"Perhaps the best game it has
played all season," and won 11-1.
Gilley went two for four, and
scored one run; Walker went one
for two, and scored one run, went
two for two, scored three runs,
scored a home run, and had two
,RBI.
Tierra Thompson went two for
two, had three RBI, scored one run;
and Washington gunned down a
runner trying to steal second. This
was her third pick-off of the year.


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Consumer Agent Urges

Review Of Home Policies


Ne 2.0


RCCILICC VOLII-
I'lsk factol's


Your Local Newspaper...

Monticello News



If It Happens In Jefferson County,

You'll Read It Here!










Veterans Advised Of Rights


Under Reemployment Act


Ron Hill, veterans representative
for this and surrounding counties,
alerts residents of their rights under
the Uniformed Services Employ--
ment and Reemployment Rights Act
(USERRA).


Humane Soc

Vice-Preside


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Highlight of the Humane Soci-
ety meeting was Angela Henderson
volunteering for the position of sec-
retary, unanimously approved by
the group.
A need still exists for a vice-
president and additional Board
members.
Adoption Committee Chair Tina
Ames reiterated the need for vol-
unteers for the upcoming Adopt-A-
Thon at Petsmart.
The three-day event is sched-
uled for April 29 through May 1.
Ames also informed members of
her disappointment in the response
for the adoption booths training
class held prior to the meeting.
"Only one person showed up for
the class, Leland Canady, society
treasurer. We need to find a way to
generate more community involve-
ment in the shelter."
Bobbie Golden, founder of the,
Responsible Pet Owners of Jeffer-
son County, suggested that those
on the list who called to inquire
about the Board needing a
secretary, be contacted and asked
to volunteer for specific projects.
"If they're not given a specific
view of what exactly is needed,
they'll hem-haw around, but if
they're asked to perform a specific
task, they'll be more likely to do
so," said Golden.
She also asked about those who
have adopted from the shelter in
the past. "If you get me a list of
:those who have adopted arid those
who called to inquire, I'll solicit
them to volunteer for the baths,
help with adoptions, the booths,


This act protects the job rights of sent members of the uniformed
individuals who voluntarily or in- services, and applicants to the uni-
voluntarily leave employment posi- formed services.
tions to undertake military service. Veterans have the right to be re-
employed if:
It also prohibits employers from *Employers receive advance writ-
discriminating against past and pre- ten or oral notice of service.


:iety Has Secretary;

nt Still Needed
shelter cleanup and whatever else Board Member Jerry Sutphin
is needed," Golden said. added, "The number one problem
Ames said she would provide a would be 'finding someone to en-
list of needed tasks and Carswell force it. Someone or a group
said she would provide the list of would have to be designated to do
people who called. it."
Ames, who is presently the Di-
rector of Shelter Operations and Golden said through investigation
serving as the Adoptions Chair, her group has found that it would
added that an Adoption Chairper- take approximately $150,000 to
son was desperately needed also. pay for two people and one vehicle
"We need someone who can focus to address the problem. Sutphin in-
specifically on what needs to be terjected that they would also need
done in that position and we need a training, the specialized equipment
vice-president, Caroline (Carswell, and a place to house seized
president) has been carrying the en- animals.
tire load and it's too heavy for one
person to bear," said Ames. The society meets 7 p.m., May 2
After being asked the function of and May 16 at the shelter.


her group, Golden explained that
the Humane Society was about the
care of the animals and that the Re-
sponsible Pet Owners were focused
on the laws.
"We're still an exploratory
group," said Golden. "We're
checking on how to invest funding,
and rules and laws governing nui-
sance animals.
"Animals are going to do what
animals do, we're going after their
owners to keep the animals on their
own property," she added. "If the
animal is in someone else's yard,
the owner would be fined, even if a
dog is in the middle of the road
scratching his backside, the owner
can be fined. That's what we're
looking into."
She added that the group has had
many speakers addressing the par-
ticular animal control laws and the
like.
"Making the owners responsible
for their pets, should alleviate a lot
of your work," said Golden.


Schwan 's Route Sales Managers can expect paid training
and a 5 day work week with potential of advancement to a 4
day work week with a first year earning potential of
$35K or more!
Schwan's, the nation's largest distributor of frozen food is currently
hiring Route Sales Managers in Tallahassee, FL. Our route sales
managers are highly motivated, self-starters, with a strong desire to
succeed. Schwan's Route Sales Managers provide home sales and
delivery of fine frozen foods.
Previous customer service, restaurant management, retail
management, or sales experience a plus.
Schwan's offers:
Retirement Plan. Medical/Dental/Life/
Disability Insurance, Paid Sales and
Management Training, Paid Vacations,
Tuition Reimbursement, Employee Discounts.
To schedule an interview, call 850-574-3900 or 800-336-7569 or
email your resume to Jose.Morell@schwan's.com (EEO/AA)


Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.


Pass It On.


THE FOUNDATION foR A BETTER LIFE
www.forhbtrcrlife.org


~;;~I~~Bg~-F I,


*They have five years or less of
cumulative service in the uniformed
services while with the above em-
ployer.
*They return to work or apply for
reemployment in a timely manner at
the conclusion of service.

*They have not been separated
from service with a disqualifying
discharge, or under other than hon-
orable conditions.
If veterans are eligible to be reem-
ployed, they must be restored to the
job and benefits they would have at-
tained if they had not been absent
because of military service, or in
some cases a comparable job.

Citizens who:
*are past or present members of
the uniformed service;
*have applied to join the service;
*are obligated to serve;
may not be denies any of the fol-
lowing because of this status:
*initial employment
*re employment
*retention in employment
*promotion or
*any benefit of employment.
In addition, an employer may not
retaliate against anyone assisting in
the enforcement of USERRA rights,
including testifying or making a
statement in connection with a pro-
ceeding under USERRA, even if
that person has no service connec-
tion.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 11

You are invited to attend an

Oen 7-ouse for Nurses

Come join the Archbold Family!
Archbold Memorial Hospital in Thomasville, GA,, ,
is now hiring nurses for all areas including the
soon-to-be-opened cardiovascular/nephrology tower.
Ask about our new premium-pay PRN rates.
TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2005
S 4:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. --
JOHN D. ARCHFOUD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
AUDITORIUM A ."-GE6R
AUDITORIUM A &i: B


* Interview with Unit Managers
* Refreshments


* Tour Departments
* Door Prizes


For more information, call 229-228-2747 or 229-228-2713.


Your hands

may be

telling you

something
Any sign of muscle
weakness could mean
neuromuscular disease.
Call our lifeline. It's toll-free.
- Muscular Dystrophy
Si m^ Association


1 *

1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


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PAGE 12MONTICELLO( 2005


A


1


IT'S NOT WORTH THE WEIGHT.


r /s






For better health and fitness, exercise.


American Heart Association
1992. American Heart Association
1992. A c Hea Associ


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED
ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE
2005-03: The City Council of the City of
Monticello proposes to adopt the following
entitled ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF
THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLOR-
IDA, BORDERED ON THE NORTH BY
EAST PEARL STREET AND ON THE
SOUTH- BY EAST WASHINGTON
STREET (U.S. 90 EAST) TO THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO; REDEFINING THE
BOUNDARY LINES OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO; TO INCLUDE SAID
PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. A complete metes
and bounds description as well as the en-
tire text of the ordinance may be inspected
at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday. A public hearing will be held on
the adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday,
May 3, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall.


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 05-2005-24-CA;
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., 344,
LLC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES
COMPANY OF FLORIDA, INC.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES
OF AMERICA, INC. PLAINTIFF VS.
ELLA MEA PETERSON, ET AL
DEFENDANTS) NOTICE OF ACTION -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE
ESTATE OF ELLA MAE PETTERSON
AND WILLIAM G. PETERSON whose


LEGAL NOTICE
residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming
an interest by, through, under or against
the Defendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or interest
in the property described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage and enforce a lost
note and/or mortgage on the following
property: THAT CERTAIN PIECE OR
PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE OF NW
1/4) OF SECTION 21, IN TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, WHICH IS
ENCLOSED WITHIN THE
FOLLOWING BOUNDARY LINES,
TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THAT
CERTAIN TWO ACRE TRACT OF
LAND WHICH WAS CONVEYED UNTO


InteriIorl lExterior
Interior ~ Exterior


34232HI88


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Allyn Sikes
Owner


Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


1830 Thomasville Road'
Tpllahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
Funeral Homes


.Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation~Fill
Dirt~ Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D. O.HLic.
#SR0971265


I


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. 1 Box 137
Lament, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


CARROLL HILL


AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
STARTER


n
0
M
A
S
Os
v


; v
vI Complete Auto
LL Electric Repair
E Service


Thomasville Road .
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR

SPRING SPECIAL!! $15 OFF

ANY REPAIR BILL OVER $75
(Not Valid With Any Other Offer)


rlO0 Chevron
rani+Tax pk. 3 pks ct.


305


DTC


$1.59 $4.47 $14.00
2ct+ $13.30 each
$1.70 $4.80 $15.20


2ct+ $14.40 each


Marlboro $3.00 $8.69 $27.65
Another Delivery Ladies Leather Purses $5.99 $18.99
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAx
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all
manufacturer's coupon


1400 S. Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida 32344
Phone (850) 997-2519 FAX (850) 997-0692


*Tractors *Ditch Witch *Backhoe *Construction
Canisters *Pressure Washers *Power Tool
r*Much more


Browning Carolina
SnakeP Rnnt- f'nork Rnntrv-Ca,,al


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured



SCREENPRINTING
& EMBROIDERY
ALL OCCASIONS


Register's

Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


Thurman
Tractor
Service
Mowing
i'Harrowing
i Food Plots

Licensed & Inscued
James Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


___________U I I


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


REAL GOOD PAINT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
(5 Gallon Minimum)

342-3288
3// ..
Z6


Got an idea?


D.
GUN &
SHOI
CASH IN
Highes
On Your
GUNS
TV'S
STEREOS
GOLD
SILVER
Mon. -
1511 Jackson Bl
575-


L.'S
tPAWN
P, INC.
A FLASH
;t Loans
Valuables
DIAMONDS
VCR'S
RADIOS
GUITARS
TOOLS
Sat. 9-6
uff Tallahassee
7682


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NELD 10 SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UIPGCRDtS
INSTALLATIONS CONSULTATIONS
CUSTOM COMPUTERS I1UlORIAIS
REMOVAL Or VIRUSES, ADWARE, SFYWAKE


Have a concern?


Gene Hall

County Commissioner



(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or
ghallboard@yahoo.com


U I U


Border 2 Border



Lawn & Landscaping


FMention This
Ad & Receive
I iI
A 10%
I I
SDiscount j

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE

Rough-sawn Oaks,
Cherry, Pecan, and
Pine available.

Also Plainning A% ailable


Clenn Griffinn ,
850-997-9947


- ffL- -... ..Y-*'''- LIULS* I 1 1 I


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-5808
850-545-9961
8 50-251-221 I
155 Jom

C(OLLINs l).


DANNy'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING ALL OF YOUR
PAINTAN BODY NEED'S


W99A7-15
765 E. WASHINGTON ST.


PL,--~~~'--~ --~~I-


I


_


I


LUVENIA WILLIAMS BY BEN
EDWARDS, JR., AND MINNIE
EDWARDS, HIS WIFE, BY DEED
DATED NOVEMBER 1ST 1938 AND OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, IN
DEED BOOK "YY" PAGE 251 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY MADE AND RUNNING
THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY
DIRECTION, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID LANDS SO CONVEYED
AS AFORESAID TO SAID LUVENIA
WILLIAMS, A DISTANCE OF 420
FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TWO
ACRE TRACT CONVEYED AS
AFORESAID TO THE SAID LUVENIA
WILLIAMS, THENCE RUNNING
SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET,
THENCE WEST A DISTANCE OF 630
FEET. MORE OR LESS AND TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID SE OF NW %
OF SAID SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP
AND RANGE AFORESAID, THENCE
RUNNING NORTH A DISTANCE OF


i


I


|


A ; NON


- -









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

420 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND TO A
POINT DUE WEST OF THE POINT OF
BEGINNING AND THENCE RUNNING
EAST A DISTANCE OF 208.7 FEET,
MORE OR LESS AND TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY BEING THE
SAME PROPERTY DEEDED TO JOHN
HUNDLEY AND LIZZIE HUNDLEY,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY BEN
EDWARDS, JR., AND MINNIE
EDWARDS, HIS WIFE, BY DEED
DATED THE 14TH DAY OF
FEBRUARY A.D. 1953 AND OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN
DEED BOOK "000" PAGE 420 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY MADE. SAVINGS AND
'EXCEPTING FROM THE. ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY: ONE (1)
ACRE OF LAND, MORE OR LESS, IN
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LAND
MEASURING 210 FEET MORE OR
LESS NORTH AND SOUTH AND 210
FEET MORE OR LESS EAST AND
WEST. THIS BEING THE SAME ONE
ACRE OF LAND MORE OR LESS
DEEDED BY WILLIE LANE JOINED
BY HIS WIFE, MATTIE B. LANE, TO
JOHN HUNDLEY, JR., BY DEED
DATED THE 8TH DAY OF AUGUST
A.D. 1975. has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DAVID J.
STERN, ESQ. Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 801 S. University Drive, Suite
500, PLANTATION, FL 33324 on or
before April 15, 2005 (no, later than 30
days from the first publication of this
notice of action) and file the original with
the clerk of this court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court a JEFFERSON County,
Florida, this llth day of April, 2005.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT. IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse at
850-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Law Offices ofvyid Strm P-.. 801 S. &
University Drive Suite 500, PIlantation, FL 1j
33324, 954-233-8000, 05-37264 (TCFMH)
'415, 22, c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL
JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.:
04-18-DPA IN THE INTEREST OF: J.J.
02/06/2004 MINORCHILD; NOTICE OF
ACTION TO JESSIE JOINER LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills Road,
Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that ia petition
under.oath, has been rdled in the above
styled, court for the rermination of:
parental rights and the: permanent
commitment of J.J., a maie clild born on
02/06/2004 in Leon Counr,. Florida to the
State of Florida, Department of Children
and Families, Adoption and Related
Services a licensed child placing agency,
for subsequent adoption and you are
hereby to be and appear in the above
court at the Jefferson County Courthouse,
County Courthouse, Room 10 Monticello,
Florida 32344 on Tuesday, May 24th at
9:00 a.m. for a Termination of Parental
Rights Advisory hearing and to show
cause why said petition should not be
granted. You must appear on the date and
time specified. FAILURE TO
PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE
ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES
YOUR CONSENT TO THE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL
TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD
NAMED IN THE PETITION. WITNESS
my hand and official seal as the
Magistrate of said court this 30th day of
March, 2005. /s/ this matter was referred
to a Magistrate
4/1,8, 15, 22, c


In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction May 14, 2005 @ 10:00am 1991
Chev. Vin # 1GCDT19Z1M8248216; 2001
Chev Vin # 1G1JF12T517168556; 1991
Mazda Vin # JM3LV5223M0310554; 1993
Mitsu Vin# 4A3CF34B4PE019007; To be
sold as is for Towing & Storage charges.
Conditions & Terms at Auction. Dave's
Towing 7261 East Washington St.
Monticello, Fl 32344 (850)342-1480
'22, c

NOTICE
Looking for someone to carpool with to
Tallahassee by 8:30 a.m.. Have car.
997-2422.
4/20, 22, c

GARAGE SALE


COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET:
Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage
Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Road from 8am 4pm on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
997-1754. Donations appreciated.
4/1, 8, 15, 22, 29, pd
3at. 8:AM 1495 N. Jefferson. Kids'/large
women's clothes, jewelry, curtains, dishes,
refrigerator, Avon bottles, telescope,
lollhouse.
1/20, 22, pd


AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn
Dad's Auto Sales LLC
'93 Dodge Dakota $2495
'90 Olds Cutlas $1795
'89 T-Bird $1995
2685 South Jefferson St. 997-3245
tfn, 4/15,c
91 Buick Regal. Very good condition,
$2,000 obo 997-6664.
4/.'2, 27, pd

HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MORE PAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
4/22, fcan
Attn.: OTR Drivers now hiring solos &
teams to run east to west coast call
1-800-367-2640 Brandy or Jim.
4/20. 22, c
Director of Nursing : Nature Coast
Regional Surgery Center Immediate
management position opening for a
licensed RN with current ACLS & BLS.
Medicare-certified ASC that enhances
quality of life through improved vision.
Strong managerial, human relations and
organizational skills are preferred. Salary
commensurate with experience. Excellent
benefits. Fax resume to Human Resources
(850) 838-3937 or call (850) 584-2778, Ext.
639. Closing date: 05/31/05 EOE.
4/20, 22, 27, 29, 5/4, 6, c
Looking for licensed Jefferson County
Real Estate Rep for our firm. College
Degree preferred. Excellent training;
scholarship for the right individual. Fax
resume to 850-421-0027 or call

850-421-0020/www.premierpropertiessold.
net
4'13, tfn, c
Part-time Stock / Customer Service Clerk:
Must be available to work all day
"Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/3, tfn
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com. .
4/22, fcan" i
Part time Lumber Yard Customer Service
I Grounds Maintenance person. Must be
available to work Saturdays, additional
hours flexible. Apply in person at
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8 tfn.
CTii!d Care Providers Needed "Our
Blessings'. Now taking applications for full
and part time teachers. Requirements: 40
hour, CPR & First Aid.
4/8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd


EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
Seeking a qualified individual to perform
horticulture production and landscape
maintenance activities at Green Industries
Institute in Monticello. Must possess or
obtain a limited pesticide license. Should
be able to operate and maintain
tractors/mowers. Contact Ernest at
850-997-4088 or
ernest@greenindustries.org.
4/22, 27, c

FOR SALE'

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
4/22, fcan

Guernsey Black Angus Heifers. 1-year old,
not bred, bottle raised, grain fed, $700
each. Goats. Female, $25 each 997-9630
4/22, 27, pd

20 ft. Pontoon with Mercury 70 HP Eng.
Trailer included. Great condition $7500
obo. 997-4562.
4/20, 22, 27, 29, pd

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn


Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New ii plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn

Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn


Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn


FOR SALE

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
to sale $1, $2, $5, $10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m. @i, 342-3246.
4/1, 8, 15, 22, 29,pd

Used Proform Treadmill. Excellent
condition. Good buy for $175 cash
997-0122
4/22, pd

1 Roof Top Air conditioner for trailer,
Van, RV, Pop-up, 11000BTU DUO-Therm
Sunchaser XL Series $150.00. 1 Whirlpool
window air conditioner 12,000 BTU, $125.
J.C. Wilson 850-997-8591. Leave Mesage.
4/22, 27

1987 Suzuki Samurai JX 4wd convertible
190k mi., runs OK, CD player, fiberglass
top, toolbox, new 8" suspension (Rancho);
new 33" mud tires, new 15x10 steel wheels,
LOW gears, rear Lock-Right locker, other
goodies. Needs some work, but
unbelievable off-road! $1800 obo. Call
997-4253 between 6 pm-9pm M-F,
9am-9pm Sat-Sun.
3/25 tfn

Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
4/22, fcan


FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
4/22, fcan


SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
I am looking for a special little someone to
fill a vacancy in my home child care. Also
I take after school children. Nice home,
fun playground and good food. For more
information please call anytime 997-8797.
4/20, ..2, pd

Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
yard work, cleanup, home repairs. By day
or week. 342-1486, 510-0998.
4/22, 29, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11-tfn
EARN YOUR DEGREE Online from
Some. Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
,4 available, job placement assistance, and
computers provided. Call free
S(866)858-2i21.
S4/22, fcan

SDo you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
S1/29 tfn (10/3)


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The Home Health Care Equipment -
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of Western Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
NC Mountains. Cabins, Acreage, & 'Call for assessment of your needs.
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain 997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy Call 1/19-tfn
for Free Brochure. (800)841-5868. & S Repair small engines, tractors,
www.cherokeemountainirealty.com
www.cherokemountanrealty.com outboards, ATV's, etc. 997-4015.
422, fcan : 4/6, 8,15, 22, 29


Enhanced 4 bedroom/2 bath 2200 Sq. Ft.
on !.56ac, outbuilding. Financing avail.
,$115,000. 997-1093
4/i, 22, 29, 5/6, pdl

NORTH CAROLINA LAKEFRONT
ONLY $39,900. Great All-sports lake. to
fish, boat, swim or just relax. Call for
details, MLC (866)920-5263..
4/22, fcan

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free
boat slip! High elevation beautifully
wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in
TN. Paved roads, u/g utils, central water,
sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3154, ext. 608. Sunset Bay, LLC.
4/22, fcan

FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext.1299.
4/22, fcan

COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I
sold out. Now offering new home sites in
Phase II at Shine Landing, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner
in this upscale community with boating
access to the Neuse River, Pamlico Sound
and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness
center, tennis, swimming,pool and private
marina. Homesites as low as $29,900.
Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC
(800)566-5263, www.shinelanding.conm.
4/22. fcan

Your RE/MAX Connection for Jefferson
& L.ac Pam Bowling, Broker Associate.
850-385-6685 x20 or 1-888-701-2205 x20
4/1, tfu


Grand Opening Land Sale! FLORIDA 10+
SACRES Only $294,900. luge savings on
big ranch acreage in Sdlty; Florida!
*Gorgeous mix of mature oaks, palms, &
"pasture. Miles of bridle paths. Near Lake
'Okeechobee. Quiet, secluded, yet close to
:1-95 & coast. Also, 5 acres $174,9000.
Great financing, little down. Call now.
'(866)352-2249 x379.
4/22, fcan

Get Your Florida .Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
'Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
1958. Call for a free Brochure!
'1-800-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
'3/2,4,9,11,16,18,23,25,30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15,
20. 22,27, 29 chg
,Loans By Phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No
Credit Check! Bank Account Reg.
. 888)350-3722 www.paychecktoday.com
4/22, fcan

FOUND

qMale Bulldog Red & White Found on
Pearl St. 3/31/05, 997-2506.
4/15, 20, nc


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides &
Double Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @
$895, $50 dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571





The Grove Apartments
7400 N. Jefferson St., Monticello, Fla.


We are taking applications for all
eligible tenants 62 years
or older and/or handicapped.

Rent starts from $0 to $617 per month based
on applicants income. Equal Housing Opportunity



-g Call 997-5321 for more information.


person County's

Real Estate Team!

Brctt Killd -Sale Associat...
850-556-1418
CritlBshuars -Sals Associate....
850- 251-4392
Margart Lraings-Sales Associate...
850-508-4414
Sarah Ann Holbcster-Sales Associxat
850-212-8167
Barry Kely-Brokcr/Owner...
850-510-4220
PanmKlly- Broker Owner...
850-510-8359
Monticello (50-97-5516 www.chkbldum


R :(850) 997-4340

1 www.TimPeary.com


8 I
1 Choice Building Lots in Town call for de- 1
1 tails $10,000 to $40,000
B Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre E
E Nice Home Under Contract 3 bedroom 2
bath home on Virginia Street with deck, :
1 fenced backyard and single car garage
1 priced to sell $87,500
Sweetfield Forest under contract 5
S wooded acres between Monticello and Lloyd
S $47,500
iI Check this Out Like new home, built in 1
22002;, 3 bedrooms'2 batiis.screened porch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
S acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
I (16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
1 pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000 0
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295,000 :
I Hiqh on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
I wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $55,000
SSaddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
S $40,000
E Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
1 garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$76,500 i
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
I bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
I planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
S ing land, a great buy $79,500
S New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
S Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
2 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi- i
dential space $169,500 I
d Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
1 near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
E sewer and water $240,000
1 Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
S high land in deed restricted neighborhood
$10,000 per acre
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store E
1 for rent $650mo Leased new insurance
S agency coming soon!
Home Site on the edge of town on West
$I1 0Grooverville Road with paved road frontage i
$14,500
I Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest & 1
E1 Meadows $10,000 E
S Shady Lane 2.39 wooded acres near St.
Augustine Rd $18,500 i


IRealtor Tim Peary
I 850-997-4340
n www.TimPeary.com
SSimpl the Best!

1 '
1 -
1 Buyers looking for Homes and Land 1.
rs:::::ir-- i1-tr-!r -B-lt- ir-lr ir"! ir-' B i-t-'i l-gp I : :In--I= B----=tB


SJef
KEl2a&MKELLY 1
FROPE #S 1

Vlrgla w- Brokr/Associtc...
850-50641844
KtriaUWalton- Sales Asociatc...
850-510'.9012

850-528-10'79
850-09r -s19 o...19

Mfly.y addum -Salci Associate...

aTrish W ack -Sales Associate...
850-213-1713
215 N. Jaffrman St. Downtown]


I~-~9~ 9L9~--I-~14i-i1~9L~~l-1(L-l 4i~~l~sl~l-~~c19~








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 22, 2005


Humane Society Adoption


Booth Set At Petsmart


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With the rapid approach of the
annual pet population boom, Hu-
mane Society members stress the
urgent need for volunteers to assist
with adoption booths, as well as
with other needs, in -order to be
able to accommodate incoming ani-
mals at the shelter and successfully
find them homes rather than having
to resort to euthanasia.
Director of Kennel Operations
Tina Ames informed members dur-
ing their latest meeting that there
was a three-day Adopt-a-thon
scheduled at Petsmart April 29


QO

i




4)


DONNA, is one of the pets
available at Petsmart Adopt-
A-Thon. (News Photo)


through May 1. "These Adopt-a-
thons are a Godsend to us," she re-
iterated.
"This is our big chance to get a
bunch of our critters homes," said
Ames. "We need people all three
days to help with loading and un-
loading of animals, especially on
Saturday morning and Sunday af-
ternoon. Grooming (dog bathing)
needs to be done Thursday, April
28," Ames stated.
She added that she would also
like to begin regular adoption
booths in Monticello, at least once
or twice per month. "But we need
the volunteers to help us with
them," said Ames.
Ames informed members of the


Eagles' Nest Endowment


Fund Begins To


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Farmers & Merchants Bank this
week presented the Eagles' Nest
Committee with $3,750 -- the ac-
crued interest on a fund established
by the committee specifically to
help pay the upkeep on the scout's
Water Street home.
"This is a fantastic moment," Dick
Bailar said of the receipt of the first
annual payment. "Now the boys and
girls of Jefferson County have a
scouting home that is guaranteed
forever."
Bailar headed the three-year effort
that led to the raising of the more
than $80,000 needed to establish the
Eagles' Nest Forever Endowment
Fund.
It all started in 1996, when Bailar,
along with Larry Freeman, initiated
a community-wide drive to build a
permanent home for the county's
scouting groups.
The campaign ultimately raised


more than $50,000, along with thou-
sands of dollars in donated
materials, equipment, services and
labor.
Some three years later, when the
project was completed, the scouts
were in possession of a fully-
furnished 3,000 sq. feet facility val-
ued at over $170,000.
No small thanks either to the
American Legion, which donated
the land that made the enterprise
possible.
While construction of the Eagles'
-Nest was a veritable success, how-
ever, it produced an unintended con-
sequence. Namely, it put a burden
on the scouts,.,who were now faced
with the task of coming up with the
more than $3,000 needed annually
to cover the cost of the building's
insurance, utilities and general up-
keep.
"That is not what scouting should
be about," Bailar said. "It certainly
is not what our youth should be do-
ing in their time away from school


ay Off
or home tasks. The funds they do
raise would be better used for sum-
mer camps, jamborees and special
equipment."
In hope of correcting the problem,
as well as in appreciation of Bailar's
fundraising skills, the Scout Council
approached him in 2001 and asked
him to lead a second drive. This one
to raise $80,000, which the council
figured would generate sufficient
annual income to underwrite the
maintenance expenses of the Eagles'
Nest into perpetuity.
Bailar agreed to the task and re-
cruited a core committee to assist
him with the seeking of contribu-
tions. That committee consisted of
Buck Bird, John Bottcher, Diane
and Larry Freeman, Barbara Graves,
Brenda Sorensen and David Ward.
It took more than three years to
accomplish the goal. But in the end,
the committee surpassed its expecta-
tions, raising well over $98,000.
"On behalf of the boys and girls of
Jefferson County, I thank everyone
who has worked and contributed to
make this possible," Bailar said.


successful high number of adop-
tions during March and that with
the pet population boom being right
around the corner, goals were set to
greatly increase those numbers, but
the number one need was for the
volunteers to do it.
"We're just a few and we can't do
it all alone," she added. "It's like
Caroline (Carswell) says, many
hands make light work." Ames
said a lot of people can not donate
large quantities of time, but if all
the animals lovers in the county
were to donate perhaps one hour
per week, so very much more could
be done for the animals.








SAHARA (PG13)
Fri. 4:00 7:05 9:50
Sat. 1:00-4:00-7:05 -9:50
Sun. 1:00 4:00 7:05
Mon. Thurs. 4:00 7:05

BEAUTY SHOP (PG13)
Fri. 4:55 9:55
Sat. 4:55 9:55
Sun. 4:55
Mon. -Thurs. 4:55

PACIFIER (PG)
Fri. 7:35
Sat. 2:00- 7:35
Sun. 2:00- 7:35
Mon.- Thurs. 7:35

AMITYVILLE HORROR(R)
Fri. 5:45 7:55 10:15
Sat. 1:25-3:35-5:45-7:55-10:15
Sun. 1:25- 3:35 5:45 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:45 7:55
NO PASSES

KING'S RANSOM (PG13)
Fri. 5:35 7:50 10:05
Sat. 1:05 3:20- 5:35 -7:50 -
10:05 Sun. 1:05 3:20 5:35 -
7:50 Mon. Thurs. 5:35 7:50
NO PASSES

A LOT LIKE LOVE
Fri. 4:10 7:00 9:30
Sat. 1:30 -4:10-7:00 -9:30
Sun. 1:30 -4:10 -7:00
Mon. Thurs. 4:10 7:00
NO PASSES

THE INTERPRETER (PG13)
Fri.. 4:15- 7:15- 10:10
Sat. 1:15 4:15- 7:15 10:10
Sun. 1:15-4:15-7:15
Mon. Thurs. 4:15 7:15
NO PASSES


Ames reiterated to members how
the number of adoptions had in-
creased last month.
"March was a phenomenal month,"
said Ames. "There were a total of
26 adoptions, seven felines and 19
canines."
One dog had to be euthanized
due to there being no room at the
shelter for him and three cats were
released as barn cats rather than be-
ing euthanized because they were
too feral to become pets.
During the first quarter, a total of
141 animals came to the shelter, in-
cluding 83 canines and 58 felines.
83 of those animals have since


left, including 40 canine adoptions,
eight canine euthanasia's, includ-
ing the three dogs that had attacked
a Christmas Acres resident, and
two due to Parvo.
There were 33 feline adoptions,
one feline escape and one feline re-
turned to it's owner.
"If we're going to be successful in
helping these animals find loving
homes, the solution is simple, we
need the hands and the hearts to
help them. A little bit of time goes
a long way," Ames concluded.
To volunteer for adoption booths,
grooming or the Adopt-a-thon, call
the shelter at 342-0244.


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N.E. Capital Circle Only 1/2 mi. past Capital Cir.
422-3 699 ww 5767159
mv-32450 & 18488 www.walkerbodyshop.com


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3272 Apalachee Pkwy, Tallahassee, FL

878-TACO (8226)


JERRY BOATWRIGHT, left, of FMB, presents
a check to Larry Freeman, center, vice
chairman of the Eagles' Nest Committee.
Dick Bailar, right, presented Freeman with


an additional check donated to the endow-
ment in memory of the late Dick Sauer, a lo-
cal builder and scouting enthusiast. (News
Photo)


School Board To Cut $700,000


(Continued From Page 1)
teacher aide contracts.
*Reduce the work day for aides by
one hour.
*Reduce discretionary spending
(for supplies and the like.)
*Reduce General Fund travel.
*Eliminate or reduce summer em-
ployment for instructional and non
instructional personnel.
*Reduce administrators from 12
to 11 months.
*Eliminate general fund paid uni-
forms.
Sloan stressed that these were
items of discussion only at the
workshop and that cutbacks in some
areas could be phased in rather than
undertaken at one time.

Other suggestions generated at
the meeting include:
*Sloan suggested that Board
Members give up a year's salary
which would generate about
$100,000.
*Board Member Charles Boland
suggested that the Board rescind its
vote to lease surplus buildings to the


county but offer to sell them to the
county or sell them outright.
Vilson said Wednesday, that nei-
ther Sloan's nor Boland's suggestion
was viable, as both are a one time
deal, and would only stave off the
inevitable.
"Budget cuts have to be made
which will continue to occur each
year," he explained.
Sloan stated at the workshop that
the Board was in the process of ex-


mining surplus properties scattered
around the county, with the intent to
sell them to raise additional funds.
She closed the workshop stating it
was meant for discussion and.to
provide food for thought.
Tuesday's workshop is designed to
discuss specifics, as since no action
can be taken at workshops, whatever
decisions are to be made have to
come up at presumably the May
Board meeting.


Planners Green Light
(Continued From Page 1) ment for the Tallahassee-based
.T- .. IU .


mended for approval a revised plat
for the Heritage Hills Subdivision,
also in the Lloyd area.
The revisions were prompted by
Department of Environmental Pro-
tection (DEP) concerns about the in-
trusion of some of the roadways into
wetland areas. The reconfigured
roadways and lots eliminate this
problem, according to Danny
Brown, vice president of develop-


Turner Heritage nomes.
The County Commission ap-
proved the preliminary plat for the
Heritage Hills Subdivision in Sep-
tember of last year.

The subdivision is slated for a
300-acre parcel just north of 1-10 in
the Lloyd area. The plan calls for
the developer to subdivide the prop-
erty into 92 three-acre lots, with a
total of 125 residential units.


TUESDAY


Jamie s~ody Works.


Group Fitness Schedule


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


MONDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
3 to 5 yr. olds Piates Plfates


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
Fitness Combo Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information