<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00031
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 20, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00031
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text









Teens Say

Happy Is
American Dream

Editorial, Page 4


LI-RARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611



Rev. George Smith

Named Pastor

At Lloyd Baptist

Story, Page 7


HMS

Honor Roll

Announced

Story, Page 10


FAMU TO Offer

Summer Program

For Local Youths

Story, Page 12


Wednesday Morning )





Montic


137QH YEAR NO.31, 50 CENTS


YI =--- ------ -

WALLACE BULLOCK, right, has been tapped Dick Bailar, of the SHIP Citizens Advisory
to head the combined Grants Office and Board, talks with Bullock about the
Building Inspections Department. Here, program. (News Photo)


LARRY HALSEY, director of the Extension
Office, will act as interim director of the
Grants Office until the restructuring. Halsey


will assist Bullock once the restructuring'
takes place. (News Photo)


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


Grants Department



To Be Restructured
operationo n To Be inputting the grants writer in the
;p. JHealth Department. Rather, he
,i- "...i. .-.' I -- A .. thought the grants writer should re-


TO BUIlding Inspections


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners on Thursday
pretty much decided to restructure
the Grants Office, putting the opera-
tion under the supervision of the
building inspector and hiring a sepa-
rate grants writer.
The move is being prompted by
the resignation of Director Cory
Burke, in combination with alleged
long-standing concerns about the
operation.
"I've always had a concern with
the way the office ran," Commission
Chairman Skeet Joyner said in
opening up the morning workshop.
"The grant writer's never been able
to write grants because of being
bogged down with housing author-
ity issues... I think if we separate, the
two operations, it will benefit this
county tremendously."
His idea, Joyner said, was to com-
bine the Grants and Building In-
spection departments, put Building
Inspector Wallace Bullock over the
entire operation, and hire a grants
writer specifically to write grants.
It was his further suggestion, Joy-
ner said, that the grants writer be put
under the supervision of Health De-
partment Director Kim Barnhill.
Commissioner Junior Tuten
agreed with Joyner, to a point.
"It's my idea that we need to re-
vamp the whole department," Tuten
said. "We need the Grants Office to
do what its name implies and not be
involved in food distribution and
other such activities."


main under the control of the
county, to ensure that the individ-
u11a's eneroipe werep comnleptpl fn-


He thought the choice of Bullock b. W V.,
cused on the county, he said.
was an excellent one. But he wanted caused on the county, he said.
input from Taylor County on how it "I, don't want to fund a position
had reorganized its grants and build- that is writing grants for the Heal
ing inspection departments before Department," Tuten said. "I want
proceeding with the restructuring person who is committed to Jeffe
here. son County."
"We have worked on the Grants This despite Barnhill's assuran
Office at least two times while I've that, although the grant writer wou
been on this board to no avail," be a state employee and enjoy.st'
Tuten said. "I'd like professional in- benefits, the individual would be
put from Taylor County to make tally dedicated to the county's int
sure we do it right this time." ests.
He opposed, however, the idea of (See Spilt-Up Page 11)


Outgoing Director

Assesses Operation


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A parting memo to commissioners
from Grants Office Director Cory
Burke, who resigned the post after
less than a year, offers an inside
view into the department's current
problems.
"Respectfully, but with full
knowledge of the potential impact
of the report, I submit to you my ob-
servations related to the Jefferson
County Grants Office," Burke
writes.
She begins by listing her extensive
professional background, which in-
cludes 25 years of employment in
the public sector, a Masters Degree
in public administration, and the des-
ignation of certified government fi-


on
Ith
a
er-

ce
ild
ate
to-
er-


nancial manager.
"Suffice it to say, I brought an
abundance of education and experi-
ence to the job," Burke states. "I
also brought compassion, dedication
and common sense. None of this
served me well during the past year.
Hired to write grant proposals,
Burke says it took her no time to re-
alize that the Grants Office director
does not have time to do the as-
signed job.
"The director of the Grants Office
spends 90 percent of the time being
the administrator of a housing
authority, being bookkeeper to the
Grants Office, interacting with cli-
ents (listening, counseling) and
managing a large operation on a
shoestring," she writes.
Burke then proceeds to list some
(See Director Page 11)


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2005


Driveway Installations


Fixing To Get Costlier


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County residents will henceforth
have the option of letting the county
or a private contractor install their
driveways.
Either way, however, residents
are going to be paying much more
for the service.
That essentially was the outcome
of several discussions commission-
ers held on the issue during the last
three months.
The discussions were triggered by
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin, who in
February suggested that driveway
installations were better left to the
private sector.
"County employees have plenty of
other work to do besides this," Sut-
phin said. "We need to let private
contractors do the work and free our
county employees to do what
they're supposed to be doing."
In April, Road Department Super-
intendent David Harvey resurrected
the issue. Harvey asked commis-
sioners for permission to phase out
the county's installation of drive-
ways over a two-year period.
Among the reasons Harvey cited
for phasing out the practice: it cost
the county more to install the drive-
ways than it was recouping; it would


free a backhoe and 'a crew for road
maintenance work; and it would al-
low residents to get their driveways
installed in a more timely manner.
The Road Department would still
issue the required permit, inspect the
work after completion, and maintain
the driveways in perpetuity, Harvey
said. But the simple elimination of
the task would remove a tremendous
stress from his already over stressed
department, he said.
Commissioners were sympathetic
to Harvey's request, but not con-
vinced of the need for the change.
"I have a problem'with the county
phasing out of the business," Com-
missioner Junior Tuten said at the
April 7 meeting. "We don't need to
get out of the business per se. What
we need to do is provide an option
for the public to contract the work
with a private contractor."
Tuten, along with the other com-
missioners, also thought that the
county should recoup its cost for the
driveway installations. That meant
figuring into the computation the
cost of fuel, materials, equipment,
manpower and intangibles such as
equipment depreciation and work-
man's compensation.
Given those calculations, someone
ventured, the cost would approxi-
mate $3,000, versus the $500 the
county presently charges.


So be it, was commissioners' re-
sponse.
"If you go to private contractors,
it's going to cost that much
anyway," Tuten said.
Last week's discussion pretty
much echoed the earlier arguments.
Sutphin still thought the county
"needed to get out of private enter-
prise." He also thought that the
phase-out should be accomplished
over a six-month period, not over
two years.
Sutphin alone took that stand,
however.
"I think we need to leave it open-
ended so that individuals can have
an option," Commission Chairman
Skeet Joyner said.
"What option do residents now
have on septic tanks?" Sutphin
asked. "What options do they have
for building houses?"
The difference, Commissioner
Junior Tuten pointed out, was that
homeowners assumed responsibility
on houses and septic tanks."
"But on driveways, the county as-
sumes all responsibility and liability,
regardless who installs the
driveway," he said.
Commissioner Gene Hall's main
concern was that the county recoup
whatever the cost of the installation.
"We're losing money right now,"
(See Driveways Page 6)


S .a. w,

-r '.''





MAYOR JULIE CONLEY welcomes members the Opera House on Thursday evening. The
of the Board of Directors of the Northwest meeting was followed by a catered dinner.
League of Cities, which held its meeting at (News Photo)

Health Department Reports Case Of

Viral Meningitis In Eight-Year Old Boy
Meningitis causes inflammation of lights, drowsiness or confusion, and


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill reports a case of meningitis
in the county.
The case involves an eight-year-
old boy at the elementary school.
Fortunately, the illness was viral,
rather than bacterial, which is more
serious, according to Barnhill.


the tissues that cover the brain and
spinal cord. Viral, or "aseptic" men-
ingitis is the most common type. It
is caused by an infection with one of
several types of viruses. Between
25,000 and 50,000 people report-
edly are hospitalized every year be-
cause of viral meningitis.
The more common symptoms of
meningitis are fever, severe head-
ache, stiff neck, sensitivity to bright


nausea and vomiting.
In babies, the symptoms are more
difficult to identify. They may in-
clude fever, fretfulness or
irritability, and the refusal to eat.
Viral meningitis is serious but
rarely fatal in persons with normal
immune systems. Normally, the
symptoms last seven to 10 days and
patients recover on their own, given
(See Meningitis Page 11)


- I I I I I I


..I
: i

~.
.,..
~.
..~,
:C -
-


.,


4-4


CO




















..-





SURVIVORS open the Fifth County Relay For former JCHS track. The Survivor Ceremony
Life to help fight Cancer, Friday night at the is one of the signature events of the Relay.


- .--- %- -.&- i cm nn e


STATE FARM campsite, "Good Nabor Hill- Vicky KoDerts, uLisa neaov..-. .
billies," won first prize at the Relay For Life Photos)
event over the weekend. L-R: Tricia Lacy,

Fifth County Relay Raises


$78,391, Most TO Date


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Fifth Annual Jefferson County
Relay For Life Event to help fight
Cancer, was hild at the former
JCHS track over the weekend, rais-
ing $78,391.
Coordinator Juanice Hagan stated
the funds were the most raised to
date in the Relays here.
Twenty-eight groups, organiza-
tions, and businesses made up the
34 teams that helped raised these
flhds.
"They worked hard, did a fantastic
job, and had fun doing it. We are so
appreciative of all of them," Hagan
exclaimed.
She said that 11 teams raised more
than $2,500 each, and the county
school district raised more than
$4,700.
Among the top four teams in
terms of funds raises are: Elizabeth
Baptist Church, Jefferson County
School System, First United Meth-
odist Church, and Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank.
Master of Ceremonies was Mike
McCall, of WCTV, with Carmen
Cummings acting as official "cheer-
leader" for the event.
Residents Bill Bassett and Hagan
welcomed attendees, and Rev. How-
ard Adams, offered a prayer.
The JCHS JROTC presented the
Colors, followed by the singing of
the National Anthem.
Local dignitaries were recognized
and the Relay For Life Steering
Committee was introduced.
Wacissa United Methodist
Church won the Best Cuisine Award
for its Homemade Ice cream.
Honorable Mention went to the
State Farm Team for its Possum
Stew and Beth Page Church for its
fish sandwiches and dinners.
The Best Campsite Award went to
the State Farm Insurance team,
Tommy Surles Agency with Honor-
able Mention to the teams of Beta
Sigma Phi and First United Method-
ist Church.
Best Costume Awards were pre-
sented to the First United Methodist
Church team with Honorable Men-
tion to the teams of C&F Fencing
and State Farm Insurance.
Survivors, clad in their yellow Sur-
vivor Shirts, began the relay with
the Victory Lap, followed by the
Caretaker Lap, and Team Laps.
uA mini Survivors Reception was
held after the first lap, at the Survi-
vors tent.
At 9 p.m., bagpipes, played by
Sean McGlynn, began, "Amazing
Grace," as the track lights were
tamed off leaving only the flicker-
ing glow of the Luminaria bags to
lIht the track.
I The Blood Drive was successful,
With approximately 30 donors.
The Survivor Ceremony and the
I4uminaria Ceremony were the sig-
rfature events of the Relay.


Hagan expressed her thanks to the
survivors, corporate sponsors,
County School Board, local govern-


P.


( I





(New


Landowners

Field Day,

Workshop Set
Local landowners are encouraged
to attend the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Commission's Workshop and
Field Day, 9 a.m., Friday, May 13,
at the Madison County Extension
Office.
A field trip to a Forest Steward-
ship property follows the workshop.
The event is offered by the Habitat
Conservation Scientific Services
Section of the Division of Habitat
and Species Conservation.
Its purpose is to provide informa-
tion on the services available to pub-
lic sector and private landowners.
The Workshop and Field Day will
offer both classroom and field in-
struction on various habitat manage-
ment practices that will benefit
species including: white tailed deer,
quail, turkey, waterfowl, and threat-
ened endangered species.
Participants will also learn about'
several landowners assistance pro-
grams, including cost share pro-
grams, available to the public.
Instructors for the event include
State Wildlife Biologists and State-
wide Habitat Specialists whose pri-
mary jobs are to develop
habitat-based management plans for
private landowners and recommen-
dations for plan implementation to
public land managers.
To reserve a spot, register early as
space is limited. Contact Leslie Ad-
ams at (386) 758-0531 for reserva-
tions.



16,11luam~i'l


ment, entertainers, teams, and to the
citizens of Jefferson County for
their contributions to the Relay.


Monticelfo Christian Academy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006

A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


Best Pnce Best Warranty Free Towng PREVENT COSTLY REPAR
Faste Stt ervice.A....AND MOREl I EVEN SL EI
Don't settle for poor quality; get the very BEST for LESS!


FRE NATIONW


WARRANTYi


OI'


FREE 7 Day. 24 Hour FREE
LIFT FREE p FO NC
INSPECTo N i. FRIII ER RMANC
I cIoSPECTION
FREE t TOWING I EE
SXTERNAL on major repairs R D TE
INSPECI ROAD TEST

.11 i I I N .I 11:1 Ji' l k Free Computer
L Diagnostic Check
SUP R SPECIAL Free Minor Adjustments
S*Estimate Before
Transmission TuneupWork Begins
siT1,1 Motor Home and
Includes the following: 4x4 Specialist
I T Standards- Clutches
Road Test Labor and Automatics
Change Fluid Snil Adlslmenrs Bana Ulusmenl (II pplibtle) We Honor All Extended
Clean Screen Pan Gaskes Comprer Scan ll needed) (used car) Warranties
(bring in your contract,
I *we take it from there)

........ 24-hour number / 90 Ter MAHA
224 749 enyS90W Tenn MAHAN DR
'I ll~ 224-7492 Gainesi ..
__. 866-211-7492 toll-free
S1910 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee
We never sleep...CALL US AND SEE!
www.mrtransmission.com 0325


USDA


United States Department of Agriculture


The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (also called "Tobacco Buyout").




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


) Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

, Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

) Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


--


I


Approved by
Motor Clubs


11V TV







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005 PAGE 3


Piano, Guitar Concerts

Set At Opera House
and BBC television specials, and on
RAY CICHON NPR radio.
Managing Editor He has been an instructor a the
Augusta Heritage Workshops in


FMB CAMPSITE sold an assortment of flow- Strauss, Peggy Leight, Susan Estes, Randi
ers and jewelry at its site at the Relay. L-R: Brannan, Connie Robinson.
Lani Howell.. Annette Rudlaff, Wanda


-"T

POSING for our camera at the Relay Friday,
were members of the Rotary Camp. L-R:
Blaire and Welsey Scoles, John Dodson,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School Science
Fair saw 145 participants, working
for three weeks to assemble their
projects.
Students each competed in three
areas of science, Physical Science,
Earth Science and Life Science and
first, second and third place win-
ners in each category were awarded
with ribbons.
In Physical Science, the team of
Courtney Holmes and Kayla Strait
took first place with their project,
"Got Gas."
The threesome of Cassandra Wil-
liams, Jalissa Rooks and Lassasha
Bright, took second place with,
"Which Battery Lasts The
Longest?"
Two projects tied for third place
winners included: were Tercina
Jones, and Jeirca Odom with their


Jana Grubbs, Mary Frances Drawdy and Bill
Beaty. (News Photos)


project "Baking Soda Bomb," and
Kristen McCoy, with her project,
"Butter".
In Earth Science, Matthew Crider
took first place with his dam pro-
ject.
Brittany Henson took second for
her project, the solar system.
Third place was tied with Iresha
Denson and Melissa Crumity and
Erica Wilson and My'eisha
Thomas, for their projects on plant
growth.
In Life Science, the team of
Heather Kisamore and Amber
Kirkpatrick took first place for their
project, "Extracting DNA."
Arsenio Bright and Shayne
Broxie took second place for their
project, "Soil Salinity."
The team of Tyler Murdock and
Andrew Redmond took third place
for their project featuring the "Shii-
take Mushroom".
Serving as judges were Artis
Johnson, Julig Conley, Eleanor
Hawkins and Donald Johnson.


I-.--- -.-. -


GOT LAND?


et's uild


_________ -
Melal Rool is oplonal Copyrighl Home Slore Plans and Publcations
Call Today! PW TH
(850) 224-0614
Toll Fre 1-800-771-0614 PWHhornes.com
A Division of Pennyworth Homes, Inc.
ur ahassee Open Mon.- Fri. 9ain 6pm Saturddy 9am Ipmt
Visit Our New Home Design Center Today! p
.3 r- 35o Tnleose Sree I' Fl.ql.n 0CMS d477i"


Pianist Kevin Sharpe, and Guitar-
ists Robin Kessinger and Brandon
Bentley take the stage at the Opera
House Friday and Saturday, respec-
tively.
Sharpe returns to the House by
popular demand, 8 p.m. Friday.
An hors d'oeuvres reception pre-
cedes the concert at 7 p.m..
Tickets are $15 for adults and $13
for members.
Sharpe will showcase his talents at
the Baldwin Grand with a wide se-
lection of composers and styles.
Among the selections are: "Two
Spirituals for the Piano," by Samuel
Coleridge Taylor and Margaret
Bonds; "Three Sonatas for Key-
board," by Domenico Scarlatti;
S"Children's Songs," by Chick Corea;
and Sharpe's signature piece, "Rhap-
sody in Blue," by George Gershwin.
Proceeds of the concert will bene-
fit the Artists in the Schools Pro-
gram.
Flat pick guitar legend Robin
Kessinger take the stage 8 p.m., Sat-
urday, with Brandon Bentley, for an
evening of knee slapping, down
home acoustic guitar music.
Kessinger has appeared on PAS


INTRO.DUCT PY IAL


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


COMPLETE


S115.00
4-x.


QEE DEALER
FOR DETAILS


GAS SERVICE
INCLUDES:
Normal Installation
6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas


AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


starz'


Elkins, WV, since 1983, and has
also taught a the Allegheny Echoes


Workshop since 1997.
He has been awarded the title of
National Flat pick Champion, and
Best Performer, at festivals through-
out the country.
Tickets for the concert are $12 for
adults and $10 for members.
Tickets are available at the door
for both performances.
For additional information, call
the Opera House at 997-4242.


Did YOU know the average person saves
$1500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!




Find out how you can save...



Commuter Services
ofNorth FloridaX

888-454-RIDE



or visit our website at

www. commuterservices. org


Already carpooling or vanpooling?
Ask about the guaranteed ride home program.


30



25 I Tfl



B cineo e WinME SPORTS PACK


DIRECT V
rethink tv


(3is4L


( I (E) fIVWER DIGIAI
'IQUALIY CHANNELS
Including Top
J ,Local Channels
ft 11.ioh don,,
Opion E ta 7doxge





SATE LLITE Et 1980 V
Serving all of Florida, Georgia,Alabama, South Carolina ondTennessee. Locally Owned and Operated-Licensed, Bonded, Insured
904-879-4231 or 1-800-386-3896
Because of the C"ustomer, We Exist!
New customers only Programming sold separately. Programming lee of $4.991mo.lor second and each additional recele. While Supplies Lst! Mus Quality. ACTIVATION OF
PROGRAMMING MAY BE SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL AND REQUIRESVALID SERVICE ADDRESS AND SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER. DEPOSIT OR PREPAYMENT MAY BE
REQUIRED. Some Promotions Relire a Valid Major Credt Card. New residential customers between 3O111200 and 7131105 purchases any DirecTV system and subscrlbs to DIrectvTotl
Choice Premium programming with a I year commitment to any DirectTotal Choice Package or any Directv Para Todos packages wll receive months FREE oThe Spedal Offer.


i


HMS Science Winners


I U


4 FREE!
Includes satellite dish, up to 4 standard receivers and standard installation.


I


y


.,I


i-


MM


:


9335 WstlenesseebtreI


___


I


ro,l








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals.Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Teens Say 'Happy'


LOIS RITTER, right, then Supervisor of Elec-
tions, was the first to qualify in primary
elections in July, 1988. Candidate for
County Commission Judy Bauslaugh, left,


then signed up. Asst. Supervisor Evelyn
Brannen processed both transactions.
(News File Photo)


is American Dream Opinion & Comment


Nearly half of American teens be-
lieve the American Dream is to be
happy. That's more than the number
who think it involves owning a
louse or their own business.
SThat's one of the key findings of a
poll conducted in support of Job
Shadow Day 2005. On February 2,
-2005. over a million young people
-explored their futures when they
'shadowed" workplace mentors as
part of the eighth annual Groundhog
Job Shadow Day initiative.
According to the poll sponsored
by the Job Shadow Coalition and
Harris Interactive nearly half of
jeens surveyed (47 percent) defined
the American Dream as "Simply Be-
ing Happy, No Matter What You
b)o."
Only one in five teens queried
equated the American Dream with
being rich or famous. Seven percent
bf those polled said the "dream" in-
Volved owning their o\n business.
Other definitions of the American
Dream included:
S* "Having a house, cars and good
job" (38 percent);


"Having the career of my
dreams" (27 percent);
"Being the Boss" (5 percent).
Overall, nearly three in four teens
(71 percent) believe the American
Dream is achievable and most of
those nearly three in four believe
higher education is essential to
achieve it.
The Job Shadowing project is a
yearlong national effort to enrich the
lives of students by acquainting
them with the world of work
through on-the-job experiences and
a carefully crafted school curricu-
lum that ties academics to the work-
place.
National job shadowing is a coor-
dinated effort of America's Promise,
Junior Achievement (JA), the U.S.
Department of Labor. ING is the na-
tional title sponsor of Job Shadow
Day 2005. Nelnet and Valpak are
co-sponsors.
Last year, more than one million
of America's youth were able to ex-
perience more than 100,000 work-
places throughout the nation.


From Our Files


Life's Been Tough For Classmate


I think it was in the third grade
when Gus and I became fast friends.
He pushed me and I turned around
and socked him and that encounter
began a friendship that lasted
through high school.
Gus was a whiz in science and
math. I wasn't. He was a dud in
English and literature while I en-
joyed those subjects.
When I was booted out of private
school in the eighth grade because I
was "too ambitious," Gus came
around to say he was sorry to see me
go.
We both went to the public high
school the next year and our friend-
ship continued.-
Fact is, we sat next to each other
in several classes. I especially re-
membered sitting next to him in
Latin class. Neither of us was
thrilled with Latin but I think he
hated it more than me.
Gus had a peculiar way of laugh-
ing that I found funny. A guy like
that's good to have around on dull
days.
After our share of shenanigans we


Publisher's

Notebook


S..
,.r


.Ron Cic- on


managed to become seniors in high
school.
I remember asking Gus what he
was thinking about doing when he
graduated and he said "I dunno."
I went off to get my military serv-
ice behind me and Gus was still un-
clear about his future plans.
The next time I saw Gus was 25
years later at our class reunion. It
was a shock!
I was registering at the reception
desk and renewing acquaintances
when Gus came over.


All the men were in suits or sport
coats except Gus. He had on a blue
flannel shirt.
"How ya doin', Ron? Boy you
look great! Looks like you're eating
good!"
The first thing I noticed about
Gus, besides his flannel shirt, was
his rotten teeth. The second thing
was his color which was on the gray
side.
To tell you the truth, Gus looked
like he had slept in the alley the
night before, brushed himself off,


and came to his class reunion.
You don't tell a guy who looked
like Gus he was looking' good, so I
told him I was glad to see him.
He stepped away from the table
and I asked him how things had
been for him.
"Not very good," Gus said drop-
ping his eyes to the floor. "I've had
a drinking problem.
I asked him if he had a family and
he said, no, he'd never married.
Nothing Gus said was very upbeat.
He was living in a small flat nearby
and walking about because he'd lost
his license for drunk driving.
In the litany of bad things he was
reporting, Gus' face brightened and
he said, "I'm gonna become a
teacher."
Really? Why, Gus had enrolled in
a college nearby and was in the first
semester of his freshman year.
I encouraged him and told him I
knew lots of folks who went to
school in their forties.
That was my last conversation
with Gus. I hope things are OK with
him.


TEN YEARS AGO
April 19, 1995
Billy Ray Head Jr., the 13-year-
old charged with the shooting death
pf 62-year-old county resident Joe
Aknderson Jr. in Taylor County was
found guilty of manslaughter with a
firearm Thursday evening.
SThe Jefferson County Juvenile
Justice Council is celebrating Juve-
nile Justice Week through Friday.
The two youths involved in the
shooting of the clerk at the Kwiky
Mart in Aucilla in October of last
year plead no contest Thursday and
were sentenced as adults.

TWENTY YEARS
April 17, 1985
School Superintendent Stephen
Walker announced Monday that he
will recommend Pink Hightower for
the position of Howard Middle
School principal.
Prospective growth in the Aucilla
Shores area has prompted Tri-
County Electric to install a substa-
tion near the I-10 exit off Highway
257.
Jefferson Elementary School is
preparing for kindergarten registra-
tion. All children in Jefferson
County who will be five years old
before September 1 are eligible to
register.
Biomass President John Matthews
says he has been able to obtain suffi-
cient funds to complete the Jefferson
plant and expects to be producing.
power by early June.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
April 17, 1975
The Monticello Lions Club held
.their broom and mop sale last Friday
:and Saturday, April 11 and 12. Ac-
-cording to a spokesman for the Li-
-ons Club the sale was quite
:successful as the club realized
:nearly $500 from this exceedingly
:worthy project.

- At the annual Suwanne River Area
:Council of Boy Scouts ceremony
'held Monday night, April 14 at Tal-
lahassee, T. Buckingham "Buck"


Bird was one of six men to win the
coveted "Silver Beaver" award.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 16, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hamilton
had as their guests over the weekend
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Klinger of Ft.
Wayne, Ind.
E.H. Finalyson left Sunday to
spend several days in Jackson,
Miss., on business.
Miss Linda Smith, a student at
Florida Southern College in Lake-
land, spent the weekend with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William B.
Smith.
Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Bassett spent
the weekend in Central Florida and
attended services Sunday at Zell-
wood Academy.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
April 15, 1955
Polly Clarke and Dorothy Mathers
were named to represent the county
at Girls State.
George Wright, Earl Merritt, Rus-
sell Sheffield and Herbert Thigpen
were Future Farmers, who were
named to receive State Degrees at
the Daytona Beach meeting in June.
Lt. Governor Tom Braswell in-
ducted Julius Hauch into Kawanis
Club. He presented Julius with a
new builder's apron with instruc-
tions to wear it until every member
of the club had signed it. This was a
new procedure that would insure
new members being introduced to
every club member.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
April 13, 1945
Rep. Richard Simpson received
several key appointments on house
committees. He was chairman of the
committee on rules and calendar and
vice chairman of the committee on
fiance and taxation.


Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and
include phone number of
writer


Program Targets Skin Cancer


No animal is better at shading it-
self from the sun than an alligator,
and for more than 10 years, Univer-
sity of Florida faculty members have
used the wisdom of their school's
mascot to teach young children
about the importance of sun protec-
tion.
The GatorSHADE program was
developed in 1994 to educate Flor-
ida's children and their parents
.about skin cancer and encourage
them to make appropriate lifestyle
changes to prevent the disease.
Now, GatorSHADE founders have
decided to make the GatorSHADE
curriculum available to both educa-
tors and consumers.
"Skin cancer had become the No.
1 cancer found in the United States
today, and Florida had one of the
nation's highest incidences of the
disease," said primary founder Carol
Reed Ash, Ed.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.,
UF College of Nursing Eminent
Scholar and Kirbo Endowed Chair
in oncology nursing and associate
director at UF Shands Cancer
Center. "Yet skin cancer is one of
the most easily detected and curable
forms of cancer if treated early."
The new Web site,
www.gatorshade.ufl.edu, contains


interactive games and learning tools
designed to make skin cancer educa-
tion fun and easy, and the curricular
tools allow teachers and counselors
to easily integrate GatorSHADE
principles into their learning plans.
It was designed by Big Media Stu-
dios, Inc. in Gainesville.
"After 10 years of developing,
testing and implementing the Gator-
SHADE program, we felt it was
time to share this with those who
could most benefit from it," Ash
said. "Education is no longer con-
fined to books and lectures, and to-
day's children utilize the internet to
learn about important issues. We felt
a Web site would be the best way to
communicate and share our
program."
The GatorShade program is the
brainchild of Ash, who, along with
Jill W. Vames, Ed.D., the interim
dean of the UF College of Health
and Human Performance, launched
the program at a 1994 UF football
game with the distribution of
GatorSHADE hats to children and
information cards and SPF 30
sunscreen to all in attendance. The
hats were particularly important
because they contained special neck
flaps that gave extra protection in a


vulnerable area.
That led to the development of a
compete curriculum package
designed to teach elementary
students about sun-safe habits and
the hazards of overexposure to
ultraviolet radiation. The package
includes a 16-minute video,
two-player board game, exercise,
experiment and a take-home
information packet for parents.
Ash and colleagues have now
made the entire curriculum package
available online for children, parents
and teachers. The new Web site
gives kids a fun and high-tech way
to learn about skin cancer
prevention.
The "Reach the Beach" game
allows kids to flip a virtual coin,
take a turn answering a skin cancer
question, and advance through
colored footsteps in the sand.
Whoever answers the most
questions correctly will "reach the
beach" first. Also included are a
crossword puzzle, word search and
even a science experiment involving
the sun. The video, which features
child newscasters reporting about
sun safety, has been made available
in Web format so that children may
watch one segment at a time.


Educators will find the curricular
materials easy to integrate into their
lesson plans, Ash said. The curricu-
lum has been proven to raise aware-
ness through field tests at P.K.
Young Elementary School in
Gainesville and 12 Indian River
County elementary schools. More
than, 1,000 elementary students par-
ticipated in the field tests.
Among the organizations that
have taken notice of the Gator-
SHADE program has been Florida's
4-H program, based at UF's Institute
of Agricultural and Food Sciences
(IFAS). The 4-H program hopes to
begin using the curricular materials
with children this summer at recrea-
tional camps. The organization also
is exploring the production of more
of the very popular GatorSHADE
hats, which will feature both the
trademarked GatorSHADE logo as
well as the 4-H logo.
"The Florida 4-H program is
working to create safe activities for
youth in our outdoor programs,"
said Marilyn Norman, Ph.D., assis-
tant dean for the 4-H Youth Devel-
opment Program in the UF Institute
of Agricultural Sciences. "Incorpo-

(See Cancer Page 5)


Lifestyle Impacts On Health


You may think you have no con-
trol over developing cancer, diabe-
tes, heart disease and stroke but
guess again.
The American Cancer Society,
American Diabetes Association and
American Heart Association want
you to know that you do have some
control over your risk of developing
these diseases, even though a survey
conducted by the organizations re-
vealed that most Americans believe
they don't have any control.


The survey designed to examine
Americans' awareness, attitudes and
behaviors regarding chronic disease
risk shows that while most people
said that they knew about the dis-
ease that kill the most people in this
country, majority feel that there is
not much they can do about it.
Seven out of 10 Americans think
they have only some or little control
over their chances of developing
cancer, diabetes, heart disease or
stroke.


They do not seem to acknowledge
that the "everyday" health choices
they make can have a tremendous
impact on their risk for developing
disease. Healthy choices are seen as
"too difficult" or "too much work,"
the study found.
People are twice as concerned
about outside threats to their safety
as they are about factors that are
threat's to their health factors they
can personally influence.
People will take steps to protect


themselves from outside risks such
as burglary (by locking their doors,
for instance) or car accidents (by
wearing a seat belt), but they are
less likely to act to improve their
own health risk by getting regular
exercise, controlling portion sizes,
and limiting high-fat foods.
To address this problem, the
American Cancer Society, American
Diabetes Association are promoting
"Everyday Choices For A Healthier
(See Health Page 5)


From Our Photo File


N \
- "


I ,, .


I


-,


'


I I~ II









MONTICELLO,,(FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005 PAGE 5

Collision Friday Sends vision was not alcohol-related ant
that Bm fi cl wqlqr t c, or l l*ritl


Woman To Hospital


OWNER of this Jeep, Devony Rearby, was
treated at the hospital for minor injuries
when the vehicle was struck, as it traveled


northbound on North Jefferson
day.


4.

Street, Fri-






-; ..
'*
*


U' kj


TRUCK driven by David Brumfield was pull-
ing out of Fountain Street Friday when it


struck a Jeep northbound on North Jeffer-
son Street. (News Photos)


'RAN HUNT
;taff Writer

A vehicle collision on North Jef-
ferson Street Friday morning,
caused a Thomasville woman to be
transported to the hospital with mi-
nor injuries.


According to Monticello Police
Sgt. Roger Murphy, at approxi-
mately 7:10 a.m., David Brumfield
of Monticello was pulling off of
SFountain Street in his pickup truck,
turning left, heading south on
North Jefferson Street when he col-
lided with an SUV owned by De-
vony Rearby of Thomasville, who
was northbound.


Health
(Continued From Page 4)
Life," a joint initiative whose goal is
Sto improve disease prevention and
early detection and to increase pub-
lic awareness of the importance of
healthy lifestyles in reducing the
risk of chronic disease.
The three organizations jointly
recommend four basic steps that
People can take to help protect
themselves from the four major dis-
eases:
Eat right to maintain .a healthy
weight;
Be physically active;
Don't smoke; and
See your doctor. (NAPS)


Murphy said that Rearby sus-
tained minor injuries and was trans-
ported by EMS. Brumfield received
no injuries. He added that the col-


LI u OmIII e was c arlllge w
failure to yield the right-of-way.

Murphy said the estimated dam-
age to Brumfield's vehicle was
$3,500 and the damage was about
the same to Rearbv's vehicle.


_ -- I-

The Time is NOW...to Enhance
Your Skills or Make a Change!!

NEW ON-LINE COURSES -..-,
Over 300 COURSES!!
Choose from Microsoft Office
(Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Access), l, ,
Grant Writing, Certification Prep, T
Test Prep, Accounting...Call or visit I*'i"- -
www.ed2go.com/keisercollege
Real Estate Sales
License Preparation A+ Certification Prep
63 Hour Pre-License course Learn to configure, install
63 Hour Pre-License course upgrade, diagnose, repair,
Full preparation for the service and support
state exam. microcomputers. This program
Wednesday 6-9 prepares you to take 2
AND independent administered
Saturday 9-5 certification exams to become
63 hrs/6-week program an A + Certified Service Tech.
Starts June 15th Enroll Now for MAY 11th!
Register Now! HIPPA and Food Safety
Medical Billing & Codin Programs offered on-line!!
AND New Courses required for
the Restaurant and
Advanced Outpatient Coding Medical Proessonals
Register for one or bundle them Call for more details!
together and SAVE MONEY!!
The medical community .............................
continues to need these Custom Training
specializations. Courses start Train employees at your site
June 24th and 25th! Customize your training content
Seats already taken-Hold YOURS! Competitive costs

KEISER COLLEGE
Department of Continuing
& Professional Education
Call 906-9005!!!
9911111111 1 lI1'jT *T *AaT 99^L


Cancer
(Continued From Page 4)
rating GatorSHADE into our learn-
ing activities, as well as modeling
good practices in sun safety and skin
protection is a part of that effort.
4-H utilizes the experimental learn-
ing process. The learning modules
provided through GatorSHADE
were both hands-on and age appro-
priate."
Ash and her colleagues hope that
the new Web site will assist both
parents and educators in teaching
children about the importance of sun
protection and making sure the prac-
tice lasts a lifetime.


"Over exposure to the sun's rays is
cumulative and begins to build in
childhood. Like safe driving, safe
sun practices have dramatic effects,"
Ash said. "For these reasons the best
defense against skin cancer is
prevention."



News Without
Fear or Favor
Monticello News


WE DELIVER. CALL F OR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN


MORE THAN 50 WAYS


F----5I--#15




Eat a small meal, Lucille


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301


Take Your First Step Today. For more information
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and ask
for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"


877-4550


Monticello "Border /
2 Border / -10
MAHAN /


A message from the National Diabetes Education Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.


TO PREVENT DIABETES


small stes I-
big rewards
Prevent t Diabetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


d
th


t


i
r
; i
-


r
I '
;*P~;a~ '~
Cs~E~~












PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005


Lifestyle


SRed Hat Meeting Featured


." f 4IX Theme Of Friendship


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


IRENE EVANS shares with Red Hat Ladies
photos from her friendship hat, at a recent
meeting. Standing, L-R: Thelma Birdwell,


Church Brotherhood

Creates Scholarships


The Brotherhood of Christ Episco-
.pal Church announces the creation
:of two scholarships for deserving
:Jefferson County seniors.
One male and one female, who
:must be active in their church and
-have outstanding character, will be
;awarded $500 each.
Scholarship applications are
:available at Jefferson County High


'llslltlrtitVlVll-._." > I!- "T',",",",",'-!.:'---
Rowena Daniel, Mary Connell, Evans, Min-
nie Stokley, Carmela Naranjo. Seated is
Lois Piper. (News Photo)


a one page essay describing their
character and church or community
involvement, and obtain letters of
recommendation from their Minister
and a teacher.
Applications must be received by
May 6, 2005, at the Christ Church
office at 425 Cherry Street.
Additional information may be
obtained at 997-6045.
The Men of Christ Church hold
fundraisers throughout the year with
proceeds used to improve the lives
and welfare of county residents.
The major fundraiser is the annual
Gourmet Dinner held at Gerry Hall
each spring.


School and Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy.
The scholarships will be awarded
based on the following criteria:
Must be a county resident, a 2005
graduating senior, and attend full
time a two or four year post secon-
dary school.
In addition, applicants must submit


In addition to providing this schol-
arship opportunity, the Brotherhood
has sent children to camp, provided
gifts for underprivileged, and pro-
vided for others as needs have
arisen.


rr
r :i

''* i ' "
- .^ ,


'01 tI


WALLACE GREEN, left, shown with Adult School Principal
Dr. Artis Johnson, is the 60th graduate of the current
class. (News Photo)


Wallace Green 60th

Adult School Graduate
sufficiency are overcoming low edu-
FRAN HUNT national levels, and enhancing
Staff Writer employment opportunities.


Wallace "Omar" Green is the 60th
Adult School graduate to receive his
high school diploma from the De-
partment of Education, recently.
"I wish to give much thanks to
Dr. Artis Johnson and his dedicated
staff at the Jefferson County Adult
School for their hard work in pre-
paring me to practice responsibility,
commitment, sacrifice and the will
power to win and just keep on win-
ning,' said Green.

Green plans to enroll in a voca-
tional school to pursue higher edu-
cation and expects one day to enroll
in a community college.

"I believe that education is power
and power is knowledge," he added.
Johnson said Green's view of his
school years reflects on one of the
most pressing problems faced by the
country today, minorities becoming
self-sufficient.
Green believes the goals of self-

Disaster Services
Volunteers Needed
Become a trained American Red
Cross Disaster Services Volunteer.
Contact the Capital Area Chapter
of the American Red Cross at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


The Red Hats of America met for
their regular monthly meeting at the
Chamber of Commerce, recently,
and enjoyed a program on "Friend-
ship."
Hostesses for this month's meet-
ing were Barbara Sheats and Mona
Mackenzie.
Members were asked to decorate
their hats appropriately and to bring
items of friendship with them to
share with those in attendance.
Lois Piper presented a Certificate
of Appreciation to Queen Mum


Driveways
(Continued From Page 1)
Hall said. "We're actually subsidiz-
ing certain individuals. We should
seek to make a little profit if possi-
ble."
Sutphin wanted to know what was
going to be the advantage to home-
owners to have the county do the
work, if the county was going to
charge the same as private contrac-
tors?
The county wouldn't charge the
same, Joyner said. Actually, the
county would do the work at cost,
whereas the contractor would do it
for profit.
In that respect, there would be a
difference, however small, he said.
But more important, he said, the
homeowner would have an option,
especially if the individual wanted
the work done right away.


You deserve it!


Integrated Therapeutic Massage
510-2268
Pamela Radcliffe, Ph.D., LMT, NCTMB.
325 John Knox Rd
MA 39889 MM 15277



Sovereign Grace Academy

of Jefferson County

Now Enrolling
For The 2005 2006 School Year
2660 W. Washington St. 997-6050


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


S 307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, Fl. 32303 (904) 414-0844


Minnie Stokley from the .Hospice
Volunteer Department for the gener-
ous donation of 45 pairs of socks to
the patients of Big Bend Hospice in
Monticello.
Thelma Birdwell talked about her
friends over the years and especially
the friendships she made through
her involvement with the Red Hats
of America.
Lois Piper read a few excerpts
from "Webster's 21st Century Book
of Quotations.'
Mona Mackenzie read from
"Friendship Statements of Fact."
Statements selected were made by
well-known people and brought
smiles and comments from the
group.


Barbara Sheats read from a book
called "Friendship Ideals." The book
is thought provoking and inspiring.
Irene Evans read selections from
"The World of Friendship, Reader's
Digest Words of Gold."
Evans then took off her top hat
full of pictures of her Red Hat
friends, and proceeded to give the
pictures to her friends, as a token of
her friendship.
Pages of Hallmark's comic char-
acter, Maxine, were distributed, and
evoked much laughter.
The Chamber meeting room was
tastefully decorated by Executive
Director Mary Frances Drawdy,
who prepared lasagne, followed by
a banana pudding dessert.


America's Home Place
Introduces

The Signature Series

S, '2 -- .
.. ,. ... .


r .
The Cooper "B'
This classic charmer features timeless design, split bedroom floor plan,
designer master bath and an optional garage all at a price you can afford!
This home is specifically designed to include those details that will make
your home special. Built just for you, 100% complete on your land!
Call for an appointment or come by our
showroom to see all the plans in the
Signature Series.
/ Choose from over
70 plans!

850-309-0800
S1989 Capital Circle NE
Tallahassee, FL 32308 .
S.. www.AimebicasHoniePlace.com
FLCR-C67032 '0 Cooy0lo 2004,n A'tae Ho',.R. lc orinc o-*,d o n tIn td o


















DicrketonoS irurg ytore
S"Where Phairllacy is Phalmily" .
loinic -l health Ciarc *l Frc 13lood Ilc rssure
SGi fts CouniOseling on Medication O
|- Free Delivery for Prescriptions |
166 East Dogvood Monticello 997-3553



woo dmorn
13v ---nc r eI SeIi Li\inle
T lialha .ssee O(ri) :iil, listedsted L;vin g L.'o i
Assisted Living Rlspite & Adult Dayi' Service
t850) 562-4123 3207- Norih Monroc St.-wvw'.encoresl.cou

A.ssis'ed _ivm n ,' Facilit licence #99 .--9

Eye ,, re F;rm TheEt-iar Family


TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW S I IWY. 22 1, GREENVILLE, :L, (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid
Ienrstebeck ). & most insurance plans

Open Mon-Fri 8-5, Tue, 8-7 walkins welcome,24hr telephone coverage


You're Holding On To A Precious Freedom


Information Is Vital!

Get It Here.


When was

the last


time, you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


r











Rev. George Smith Named

Pastor At Lloyd First Baptist


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Pastor George Smith has been in
the ministry for 30 years. Recently,
he and his wife, Chris, accepted the
call to First Baptist Church of
Lloyd.
They have three young adult chil-
dren: Carey Beth, Anna, and Naomi,
married to Jason Sullivan, and one
four months old granddaughter, Na-
talie Joy.
The Smiths have experienced
many facets of ministry through
their service to the Lord.
They have served in Christian
Education for seven years in Alex-
andria, LA. and in Jacksonville, FL.
He has been in the pastoral minis-_


try for the last 20 years, serving as
pastor at Perry Baptist in Perry, FL.;
Heritage Baptist, in Natchidoches,
LA.; St. John Baptist in Greenville,
FL.; and Central Baptist in We-
tumpka, AL.
During his ministry, Smith has
taught various Discipleship proc-
esses and Evangelism strategies.
His desire is to be a servant to
Christ's church and be used by God.
Chris has received her Master's
degree from Auburn University in
Auburn, AL. in Foreign Language
Education.
She has been using her gifts of
music and language in the Mont-
gomery School system and taking
mission trips to France, Matinique,
and other Francophone countries.
She hopes to be able to attend the


National Association of French
Teachers Convention in Quebec this
July and meet local missionaries to
assess their needs and bring gifts of
gospel frisbees and bracelets for dis-
tribution.
Smith is the son of J.P. and Her-
mina Smith of Perry, and Chris is
the daughter of the late Olin Gran-
thum and Ginny Granthum, who re-
side in Tallahassee and own the "Go
Taylor Rollers" skating rink in
Perry.

They are excited to be back in the
area near family and friends, and in-
vite the community to visit the First
Baptist Church of Lloyd to experi-
ence the powerful and exciting wor-
ship and ministry among the
fellowship of believers there.


:i",a

;




iaw
d a


SMITH


Wirick Simmons Grounds

Receive Spring Cleanup


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005 PAGE 7

JES, HMS Club Members

Place In Championship


Members of the JES and HMS
Boys and Girls Clubs recently par-
ticipated in the Gulf Coast Martial
Arts Championship in Gulf Breeze,
FL.
They competed with other Boys
and Girls Clubs of the Big Bend on
a recent Saturday at the Santa Rosa
Recreation Center.
' Kinds of martial arts included
Gojitsu, Kwon Dojo, Art Den, and
the Jitsu Ryu System.
I Local members who placed in the
event include: Edward Walker III,
S of HMS, Second Place on Forms
and Third Place on Sparring.
Winners from the JES Club were:
Emily Howell and Alphonse Foot-
S man, both taking Third Place in
Sparring.
Joshua Wesley, Simone Williams,
Lanesiya Massey, Charlene Austin,
and Emanuel Finn all placed Fourth
in Sparring.
This was a spectator event, so par-
S ents were invited to join in and
S1 cheer on of the members.


After the event, participants en-
joyed a meal at Bamhills Restaurant
in Destin, FL.





-
7V

CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICQ


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

385-6047
Goernmen employees Iuun o *. G1CO G ro ulne lns L [o
Gtl(O Indemny (Co GlCO a uul o Colonel CounltyM luao Ins to
WICU oShtnflont. bDL 20 0 OUD0 2 D I'(O


pered Chef party, cleaning up the
house for rentals, and the like to
raise enough money to pay for the
garden cleanup.
The project is designed to make
sitting in the garden or on the patio
more pleasant.
Additional cleanup of the house
and yard is planned, and future
fundraising lunches to benefit the
Wirick Simmons House as well as
other projects are scheduled.
Many new residents have not had
an opportunity to see the Wirick
Simmons House, and the public is
encouraged to watch for announced
events.
Anyone interested in becoming a
member of the Jefferson County
Historical Association may call
Brinson at 997-2465 or Eleanor
Hawkins at 997-2863.


Homes Of Mourning


Harriette Couver, RN, BSN
Harriette Couver, of Wacissa, age
89, passed away during the early
morning hours of Sunday, April 17,
2005, in Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital.
She was born on July 8, 1915 in
Ross County, Ohio, to parents Harry
L and Hazel Metcalfe Cockerelle.
An alumna of the Chillicothe High
School Class of 1933, she became a
Registered Nurse following gradua-
tion from the Jewish Hospital
School of Nursing in Cincinnati,
Ohio, in 1936, and earned a Bache-
lor of Science in Nursing from the
Florida State University School of
Nursing in 1969.
During a successful nursing career
spanning six decades, Ms. Couver
was stationed in the Canal Zone as
part of the Panama Canal Service
and at Tyndall Air Force Base dur-
ing World War II. She worked on
hospital staffs in Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Maine and West Virginia.
She later became a self-employed
private duty nurse working with
terminally-ill patients and completed:
her career as a staff RN in local
nursing homes.
She was a charter member of the
Women's Memorial at Arlington
National Cemetery and is listed in
the Registry of the National WWII
Memorial in Washington, DC for
having also served in the war effort.
Active in the community, Mrs.
Couver was instrumental in an ini-
tiative that resulted in the recently
completed Jefferson Communities
Water Systems, Inc., which supplies
Safe drinking water to households in
Sthe southern areas of Florida's Jef-
Sferson County. She helped organize
the Wacissa All-Volunteer Fire De-
partment and served as one of its


first Fire Chiefs.. She was .an active
proponent of the recent revitaliza-
rion of this important community
service. .

Ms. Couver is survived by two
daughter: Margaret Couver-Berk of
Pensacola, Florida and Roberta Cou-
ver of Arlington, Virginia. Two
grandsons: Sean Robin Berk and
Simcha Schi Berk both of Pennsyl-
vania. A surrogate granddaughter:
Sara Ethel Boland the daughter of
Charles and Andrea Boland. Two
nieces: Beth of lHakeland, FL and
Cindy of Texas. Nephews: Tommy
Thomas in the Southwest United
States; Larry Bell of Chillicothe,
Ohio; Lawerence Reeves and wife
Imogene and family in Leesburg,
Florida; Gary Reeves and wife Vicki
of Wacissa; Gary Reeves Jr. and
wife Missy and their children Ker-
istan Nicole and Kaitlyn Marie.
Augustus Reeves and wife Dorothy
with family in Jacksonville, FL.; and
Ernest Reeves and wife Pat and
family in Tennessee. Brother-in-law
John R. Parrett of Chillicothe, Ohio.
Former Sisters-in-law Helen Reeves
of Wacissa and Margaret Hlebakos
of California. A former Brother-in-
law, WA Couver and daughters of
Wacissa. And, numerous grand
nephews and' grand nieces scattered
throughout the continental USA.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, two sister, (Lois Thomas
and Jeanette Parrett), and a borther
(William Thomas Cockerelle).
In accordance with Ms. Couver's
wishes, her remains will be donated
to the Anatomical Board of the State
of Florida for use in medical re-
search. No funeral or memorial
service is planned at this time.


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba


Ti'urawtn4 ,cFwue-rc4'


Yome&


-. 1 ?.. 620 York St., P.O. Box 425, A
4; Monticello, FL. 32344

850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Corerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


BETTON HILLS

PREPARATORY SCHOOL
Focusing on A.cacdemic Excellence

FuCCy AccreCited
Elementary Middle School Preschool
State of Florida Gold Seal Approved
*Academic Excellence *Core Knowledge Curriculum
*Advanced Mathematics & Science
*Accelerated Language Arts
*Spanish *Fine Arts *Theatre
*Sports Program *Small Classes


Summer Camps
Preschool ~ Kindergarten Readiness
Art Camp ~ Theatre
Softball ~ Lazy Days
Specialty Camps
Baking ~ Soccer ~ Cheerleading
Crochet ~ Sign Language ~ World Cuisine ~ Music
~ Experimental & Earth Science


KAMERON BURNS begins the JES mini-relay held at the
school Friday, class carrying the torch. for Ms. Davis' K-5
class. (News Photo) '


JES Students

Raise $1,470

In Mini Relay

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Students at Jefferson Elementary
School performed a symbolic Relay
For Life, Friday, for several hours
around the main building and in the
process, raised $ 1,470.47 to fight
cancer.

The first grade classes collected
the most money, a total of $736.29.
Miss Whitty's class collected the
most of the first grade classes, with
$306.81.
JES students dedicated their ef-
forts in memory of two people that
they admired: Grashauna Crumitie
and Mary Hughes.

A torch was constructed and con-
tinually moved throughout the mini
relay, passed from one class to an-
other at 30 minute intervals.
The fourth grade passed the torch
to the third and the passing contin-
ued in descending order to pre-K
and K-5-


~ Computers


850.422.2464 *fax 850.422.1369
*email: info@bettonhill.com
2205 Thomasville Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32308


Up to $25,000

in Down Payment Assistance
Available to qualified buyers. Some restrictions apply on interest rates and down payment assistance.


MARK YOUR CALENDARS

84th Rose Shoz
Annual I- os I i-hCo L

&5 Festival

April 21-23 Thomasville, GA

A Weekend Filled with Fun!

2 Parades Street Dance *Rose Show

*Art in the Park "Bark in the park" dog show

*Rose City car & truck show
sponsored by: For Complete Event Listing visit

Swww.downtownthomasville.com
T E L E oVs N or call (229)227-7020


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

After several months of fundrais-
ing, the Directors of the Jefferson
County Historical Association have
hired the Border to Border Co., in
:Leon County, to give the Wirick
.Simmons yard some much needed
care.

This week a group began working
on the yard, cutting dead wood from
the Dogwoods, trimming the shrubs,
uncovering reappearing perennials,
weeding, putting down pine straw,
and clearing the brick patio and
walkways.
President Beulah Brinson and vol-
unteers have been working for
months, holding luncheons, a Pam-


'.a
''







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005


HOME






IMPROVEMENT


FOLSOM CONSTRUCTING o

SHINGLE x HOT TAR m METAL
15 YEARS EXPERIENCE w REFERENCES AVAILABLE"
Leak Repairs a Rotten Wood Repla ed a Skylights Soffit & Fascia v Roof Vents
5 YEAR WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEE ROOF INSPECTIONS a ALL WORK SUPERVISED BY OWNER
LSS fPrompt Service
*---'~~~~~~ ~~~~ -#-,-,H^^^BI^B^^^^^ I-- T_____


I.,- 28-83 '


MODULAR HOUSE


I A Z'T~
H O l0 3
~~WA-- -


<2l


LOT SPECIAL
$69,990
4BR/2BA
2128 sq ft


EsuUs 6A


Z!-r T or CO-
DIN
Num mowm RONIU~
-4 Owl
#3 I=3
ffi~F#f :E


Pretig Hoe Cnte
251'. eneseeSt -Talaasee Ford
85 -56-45 ,o80 -56-97 0315


CeCebrating


36 years


I 14 I

__^'I I _.i _., Pb Inc a '- ...





S-24-Hour Service
...... Comm...erCi le aneiengtia m Repair S,
-- Servirciall&aReSidential epai rSecals


TAKI
I~r3~Q. Adl N.1%m~(lZ


I


r,


'; ;?
f;~a~ -rJ i;:- .. ~ .


ac~sfa~ ~c~v~c;a;7aa:










Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA Remains At Top

Of Big Bend Leaders


JCHS Splits
Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Warriors continued to top the
list of Big Bend Leaders last week,
as they continue to rally for
position.
The Warriors remain at a tie with
Port St. Joe for the top ranking as a
team, both having a 14-2 record.
Lady Warriors are in the number
one spot with a 15-3 season.
In baseball action, Casey Gunnels
is in at number seven in batting, up
from number eight. He has
connected with the ball 23 of 46
times at bat and has a .500 average.
Chris Tuten is at number 12, up
'from 13, with 22 hits out of 48 times
at bat. His average is .458.
Drew Sherod stands at number
16, up from 18, with 21 hits of 47
times at bat. His average is .47.
Ridgely Plaines is in at 35, up
from 50, with 17 hits out of 42 times
at bat. His average is .405.
Josh Carswell is added to the list


CONSTRUCTION
AHEAD


at number 28 with 14 hits out of 35
times at bat. His average is .400.
Sherrod is tied at number one in
RBI with 32 for the season and is
tied for number two in home runs
for the season with five.
He is tied at number one in pitch-
ing with a 5-0 season, and Plaines is
tied at number six with a 5-2 season.
In earned run averages Sherrod is
at number five with 1.24 per game.
Plaines is at number five in
strikeouts with 41; and Sherrod is in
at number five in innings pitched
with 33.2 for the season.
In softball action, Cassi Anderson
is at number two in batting averages
with an average of .567.
Shae Eason is at number eight
with an average of .500.
Lisa Bailey is at number 12 with
.562; Kayla Gebhard is at number
14 with .432; and Brittany Hobbs is
in at number 24 with a .385 average.
Bethany Saunders stands at num-
ber one in pitching with a 5-0 sea-
son record; and Hobbs is in at
number nine with a 9-3 season.


With your help,
MDA is building a tomorrow
without neuromuscular diseases.


SAMANTHA POHLE, throws a
fast ball at a JCHS practice.
She was the winning pitcher
in the Rickards game. (News
Photo)


Muscular Dystrophy
Association
1-800-572-1717


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Lady Tigers split their last
two games and stand at 7-9 season.
In the first game, ACA blanked
the Tigers 13-0.
Coach Earline Knight said the
Lady Tigers did not have many
highlights during the game. "We
only got four runner on base," she
added. There was only one Lady
Tiger hit.
Ashli Washington went one for
three and stole two bases.
In the second game, the Lady Ti-
gers picked up pace to defeat East
Gadsden, 16-6.
Kim Gilley hit a grand slam in
the third inning, went three for
four, adding a two-run home run in
the fourth, and a base hit in the
sixth. She had six RBI, scored three
runs and stole four bases.
Washington went two for five,
scored two runs, stole two bases;
Nikidra Thompson went two for
four and scored one run; Samantha
Pohle went one for three, scored
one run and stole one base.
Heather Miller, Zariquisha Jones
and Tiffany Walker each scored
two runs, and Chandra Tucker and
Tierra Thompson each scored one
run.


12 noon to 12 midnight


2005 ChevyMalilbu
$15,900 or

"22OP'0
MONTH I-
STKAPI67

2004 Dodge Intrepid
$14,400or '
f9402-



2004 Nissan X-Terra
$16,400 or

*22 P....
MONTH
STK#PIS 44A -

2002 Chevy ikaillbzer
$15,900 or
h k*03,:


2003 Chevy Monte Carlo
$13,200 or

MONTH -


2005 Ford Taurus
$15,700 or -..


2004 Pontiac Grand Prix
$14,900 or

MONTH .
SITK#Pl61 .I


2005 Chevy Impala
$16,300 or

MONTH
STK#P1660

2003 Honda Civic
$14,300 or

MONTH
SIK#35611B 1 .1

2004 Ford Ranger Edge
$16,300 or ,.SL


MONTH '
STK#pil .g


2002 n-P tiac Grand Prix 2002 Honda Accord
$Ht,900 or .. $15,900 or

MQNTH" MONTH'' :
. f 15 I.-4 -, .. iii 't 1 '' ..i .1C


7 W. .... .. ... .. -


Locafton


U S. Hwy,,:19 North


I WARRANTY INCLUDED ON ALLVEHICLES ]


I i


~I~BC~VR~








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005

Lady Warrior JVs Blank


North Florida Christian


Lady Bees Win 1


Of Last 3 Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Lady Warriors JVs blanked
North Florida Christian in two
games, bringing them to a13-2 sea-
son.
ACA won the first game 6-0.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat four
times, scored two runs, hit one sin-
gle and was walked on being hit by
the pitch and stole one base.
Nicole Mathis went to bat three
times, scored one run, had one sin-
gle and one strikeout; and Mallory
Plaines went to the batters box four
times, scored one run and hit two
singles.
Lindsey Day went to bat four
times, scored one run, hit three sin-
gles; Paige Thurman went to bat
four times and hit three singles.
Tristen Sorensen went to bat
three times, had hit one single, and
had one walk; Jodie Bradford went


HMS Honor

Roll Told

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Howard Middle School Guidance
Counselor, Kathy Walker, reports
the A/B honor roll for the fifth six
weeks grading period.
Students appearing on the roll and
their grade levels follow:
In grade eight: Shayne Broxsie,
Melissa Crumity, Courtney Holmes,
Tyler Murdock, Andrew Redmond,
Cindrilla Wade, Lariesha Wilson,
Keneshia Coates
In grade seven, Jasmine Francis,
Jasmine Graham, and Paris Little-
john.
In grade six, Sara McDonald,
Lashawntra Mitchell, Devondrick
Nealy, and Brandon Whitfield.


to bat once and struck out; Hannah
Sorensen went to bat three times,.
struck out twice, and was walked
once.
Katelyn Levine went to bat
three times, scored one run, hit one
single, stole two bases; Angela
McCune went to bat once, and
struck out; and Erin Kelly went to
bat three times, and struck out
twice.
In the second game, the Lady
Warriors also blanked NFC, 13-0,
in
ACA had a total of 15 singles,
two doubles, three walks and 12
stolen bases.

Olivia Sorensen went to bat four
times, scored two runs, two singles,
and two stolen bases; Mathis went
to bat twice, scored one run, hit one
single, struck out once, and stole
one base; and Plaines went to the
batters box four times, scored two
runs, hit three singles, stole one
base.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman reports the scores for spring
sports at the park.
In T-ball, Bishop Farms beat Jef-
ferson Builders Mart for 22-165.
Rotary fell Capital City Bank for a
20-10; and slid by the Builders 20-
17.
Capital City Bank edged Bishop
Farms 12-11.
In Coach Pitch action, Hiram Ma-
sonic Lodge beat Chicken Delite 20-
8.


The Grove Apartments
1400 N. Jefferson St., Monticello, Fla.

We are taking applications for all
eligible tenants 62 years
or older and/or handicapped.

Rent starts from $0 to $617 per month based I
on applicants income. Equal Housing Opportunity


S Call 997-5321 for more information.


Day went to bat three times,
scored one run, hit two doubles,
stole one base; Thurman went to
bat three times, scored a run, one
single; and Tristen Sorensen went
to bat three times, scored two runs,
hit three singles, stole two bases.
Hannah Sorensen went to bat
three times, scored two runs, hit
three singles, struck out once and
stole two bases.
Levine went to bat once, had one
walk, one stolen base; Kelly went
to bat twice, scored two runs, hit
two singles, stole two bases; Mi-
randa Wider went to bat once and
struck out; and Savannah Williams
went to bat once and hit a single.
Thurman pitched the first four in-
nings, struck out three, and walked
one; and Day pitched the final in-
ning, giving up two walks.
The Lady Warriors will be mak-
ing up two rained out games this
week, the first is 4 p.m., Thursday,
against Carrabelle, there; and the
other is 5 p.m., Friday, against Ma-
clay, there.


Kiwanis slid past State Farm Insur-
ance 14-13.
State Farm Insurance downed Hi-
ram Masonic Lodge, 12-9.
C & F Fencing beat Chicken Del-
ite 27-21.
In Little League action, Williams
Timber defeated Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank 4-2.
Monticello Milling blanked Jeffer-
son Farmers Market, 13-0.
FMB felled the Farmers 13-3.
Millers beat Williams Timber
6-1.
In softball action, Jackson Drug
Store downed Joyner's Travel Cen-
ter in two games, 2-1 and 13-8.


A'rHORIZED DEALER
FOR LEAFULARD


,.*- '-


aL
TRISTEN SORENSEN waits
for the pitch at an ACA prac-
tice session. In the NFC
game, she has 2 runs, 3 sin-
gles, and stole two bases.
(News Photo)



Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'

in State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00









Get Your Annual
Subscription Today!


n~ Aluminum QwwL.-.

copper uttelL.'-
WE GOT M,:
:Installation..


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Bumblebees fell to a
3-3 season after losing two of their
three last games.
When the ladies faced North Flor-
ida Christian, they lost, 23-11.
HMS put together a nine run
fourth inning to get back in the
game, but NFC added three more to
put the game away.
Scoring for the Lady Bumblebees
were: Majetta Jefferson, Shanka
Farmer, and Lena Odom each scor-
ing two; Latoya Footman, Ireshia
Denson and Chanta Brooks each
scoring one run.
When the Lady Bumblebees faced
Havana, the Bees won 22-4.
HMS opened with an 11 point first
inning.


Scoring for the Lady Bumblebees
were: Jemaria Cuyler with four
runs; Maresha Barrington with one;
Footman, three runs and Jefferson,
two.
Farmer scored two runs; Keneshia
Coates and Brooks three; and Den-
son and Ashley Allen, one run each.
In the third game, the Lady Bum-
blebees were blanked by Trinity
Catholic 12-0.
Jefferson hit a standup double and
stole third base for the only real
threat for the Lady Bumblebees, but
she was left there unable to score.


In Case Of Emergency
Dial 911


*dddidddEdddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddidddEdddidddiddddddidddddddddddddd.J


THE TALLAHASSEE
S COMMUNITY CHORUS
Florida's Premier Community Chorus www.tcchorus.org
Dr. Andre J. Thomas, Musical Director
S....... .. .................. ...............
. Ai Evenin5 of Wal1t W hitma
Poetry 1M SonM
Guest Conductors: Dr. Judy Bowers and Dr. Kevin Fenton
07 THE
S Saturday, April 23, 2005 TALLAHAS
,, 8:00 p.m. .': COMMUN
0 FSU Ruby Diamond Auditorium 'A CHORU
G Florida's Premier Communit y (
*7 Oeneral Admission: $18 Seniois/Students $12 Florida's Premier Community
7 www.tcchorus.org
FFSU Fine Arts Ticket Office (850) 644-6500 Information: (850) 668-53

SMusCMastefS BeethovenCompan
S 1114 North Monroe St. 1415 Timberlane Road
, (850) 224-6158 (850) 894-8700
'""l '>"."""' """'" ''" "" -"'


3
07


>SEE
TITY
Chorus
94


"' I
0,
--*


I


D.W. JHughies Realty
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Anything Relating To Real Estate
Call: (850)539-0726

Home Office: 470 N. Barber Hill Rd.
Lamont, FL. 32336


*Commercial
*Residential
*Nonprofit BURTON & BURTON
*Nonprofit
*Land MORTGAGE INC.
*DW Mobile Homes PaulW.Hughes
Professional Administrator
2141 N. Monroe St., Talla., FL 32303
(850) 385-8383 (850)997-3856
"Licensed Mortgage Correspondent Lender"


BIUDS I NE Ca 9973
BUSINESS I





_ __ _DIR E C T O R Y _ _
Uri qer


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
SWELL SERVICE
-Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs





Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All! r
f c"Call Andy"


997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


REALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming.
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT Licensed & Insured John A. Kuhn
CAC 058274 Owner
J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
Wd 850-997-5808 A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience
:850-545-9964-850-251-2911 (850) 997-4577
(85155 JOHN COLLINS 0)30 Tandy Lane, Monticello997-4577. 32344
155 JOHN COLLINS RD. 30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


I U


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CutsMra' aaeIc


I Complete Automotive Repair
Spring Special Fuel Injector Cleaning
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


J


153 N Jefeso


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Barbwire Field Wood





Jim Phillips
850-973-8117


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

S,-,, i Allstate Insurance Compa
''; 3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 1
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cn
(I otwo tn od ut


Norman L. Barfoot
Exclusive Agent
arfoot Insurance Group


ni
130
tr.)


878-8077
OP(IN Muondlay-llday 8 30-5 30
I-mail'NURM\ANHAKIRl'OOTa'llslktalc comu


Spring Sports At Park

Scores Reported


NEED GUTTERSP....


WE GOT IT! GOT

9e0494t- -cea
Seamless Gutters, Inc. -
1800.796f742 Liensed and Insured BUm I


I


i


,I


940


W4r


5










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday ;
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


Split-Up
(Continued From Page 1)
The rationale for putting the grants
writer in her department, Barnhill
explained, was that she could then
sweetened the salary pot, assuring
for the recruitment of a higher-
qualified individual.
"This position will be in Jefferson
County and will be addressing the
needs of Jefferson County," Barnhill
said.
Other individuals who addressed
the board to express concerns in-
cluded citizens Dick Bailar and
Wendy Moss and Extension Office
Director Larry Halsey, who will be
the Grants Office acting director un-
til the restructuring takes place.
Bailar questioned the application
of administrative fees, which cur-
rently total about $135,000. These
fees come with certain grants and go
to the county for the administration
of the grants. Bailar said commis-
sioners needed to get a better under-
standing of exactly how these ad-
ministrative fees were being utilized
before proceeding with the restruc-
turing.
He also thought commissioners
should have a better understanding
of the operation's organizational
chart before dividing up the office.
Moss urged commissioners to re-
tain control of the grants writer and
to make the salary high enough that
it would attract the best qualified
candidates.
Halsey, for his part, cautioned
commissioners not to short change
the bookkeeping and record-keeping
aspects of the grant-writing opera-
tion, something that was being done
presently, he said.
He noted that tracking a grant's
expenditures and ensuring compli-
ance with the funding requirements
were functions that were as critical
as the actual acquisition of the fund-
ing.


LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE
OF WILLIAM E. BIPPUS, Deceased, File
No.: 05-23-PR Division Probate NOTICE
TO CREDITORS The administration of
the estate of William E. Bippus, deceased,
File Number 05-23-PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Probate Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Clerk, County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date
of the first publication of this Notice is
April 13, 2005. Attorney for the Personal
Representative: Eric W. Ensminger, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 673341 Smith Hulsey &
Busey Post Office Box 53315 Jacksonville,
FL 32201-3315 (904) 359-7700,
CO-Personal Representatives: William E.
Bippus, Jr. 810 West Washington Street,
Monticello Florida 32344; Margaret
"Sunny" Bippus, 284 Queens Court, West
Palm Beach, Florida 33401.
4/13, 20, c
The City Council of the City of Monticello
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2005-04 AN ORDINANCE
OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA AUTHORIZING THE CITI
TO PROVIDE BROADBAND
WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE AND
TO ESTABLISH SCHEDULES FOR
SUCH SERVICES; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL


Director Assesses Office


(Continued From Page 1)
of the problems she sees with the
operation. These problems include:
the reduction of the staff from seven
to three people with no reduction in
the workload; the absence of a Sec-
tion 8 coordinator; the absence of a
dedicated bookkeeper; and the ab-
sence of a weatherization specialist.
Other cited problems: The build-
ing is subject to flooding, rodent in-
festation and mold and mildew
growth; computer equipment, al-
though functional, lacks the needed
speed to accomplish any but the
most rudimentary tasks; and Internet
connection is limited to one user at a
time.
Burke also notes the absence of
standard operating procedures for
the office, as well as the absence of
job descriptions and duty
statements.


Among her several recommenda-
tions:
"The management and supervi-
sion of the Grants Office would best
be served by placing the day-to-day
activities of the office with the Ex-
tension Office under Larry Halsey."
The county should hire a dedi-
cated grants writer, "charged with
researching and writing grant pro-
posals, with administering grants,
and with coordinating the activities
of the grants," or, hire a consultant
to do the same duties.
The county should hire a staff
member who is trained to do inspec-
tions for the Section 8 and weatheri-
zation programs; or the county
should refuse the funds for the wea-
therization program and train an ad-
ministrative assistant in the Grants
Office to do the Section 8 inspec-
tions.


Meningitis Case Reported


(Continued From Page 1)
plenty of rest, fluids and medicines
to relieve the fever and headache.
Bacterial meningitis, on the other
hand, can be very serious and result
in disability or death if not treated
promptly.
Meningitis is contagious. Entero-
viruses, the most common cause of
viral meningitis, are often spread
through direct contact with the res-
piratory secretions of an infected
person. This usually happens by
shaking hands with an infected per-
son or touching something they
have handled and then rubbing your


__._^ ^ ,- ,


nose or mouth.
The best way to avoid contagion is
to adhere to good personal hygiene
habits. Indeed, the best way reduce
the chances of becoming infected is
to wash your hands thoroughly and
often.

Also, clean contaminated surfaces
and soiled articles, first by washing
them with soap and water, and then
by disinfecting them with a dilute
solution of chlorine containing
bleach.
For more information, call the
Health Department at 342-0170.

GET OUT OF LINE
...and go online for government
services and information.
FirstGov.gov
I he official web portal
of the Federal Government
I. S Cen-rrl t'rvll c Adm ln~nitrdtion


LEGALNOTICE

ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT
HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR
EFFECTIVE DATE. The entire text of
the ordinance may be inspected at City
Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Public
hearing on the ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, May 3, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. at
Monticello City Hall. Interested persons
may appear at the meeting and be heard
with respect to the proposed ordinance.
4/20, c

HELP WANTED

Experienced painter. Full time position,
transportation required. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.
Child Care: "Our Blessings" Now hiring
for full and part time Teachers.
Requirements: 40 hr., CPR ,First Aid,
Please Call 342-1111 Wed. Sat.
4/6, 8,13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd
A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: SECRETARY #2173
High School Diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/office clerical experience.
Typing score of at least 35 cwpm. Starting
salary $6.43. Shift: 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. For more information
and a complete listing of available
positions: www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or 1-800-226-2931, Human
Resources, 2634-J Capital Circle N.E.
Tallahassee, FL. Pre-hiring drug screen &
FDLE background check. An equal
opportunity/affirmiative action employer,
drug free workplace.
4/20, c
Attn.: OTR Drivers Now hiring solos &
teams. To run east to west coast. Call
1-800-367-2640, Brandy or Jim.
4/20, 22, c
Part Time Stock/ Customer Service Clerk:
must be available to work all day
Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn


DIRECTOR OF NURSING: Immediate .
management position opening for a FOR
licensed RN with current ACLS & BLS.
Medicare-certified ASC that enhances
quality of life through improved vision. 1 Large/
Strong managerial, human relations and acres. Li
organizational skills are preferred. Salary lease $55
commensurate with experience. Excellent LV. Mess
'benefits. Fljiresume to Iuman Resources nl- tf -
0(850)838-3937 or call (850)584-2778, ext.---
.639. Closing Date: 05/31/05 EOE FOR


Looking for licensed Jefferson County
Real Estate Rep for our firm. College
Degree preferred. Excellent training:
scholarship for the right individual. Fax
resume to 850-421-0027 or call

850-421-0020/www.premierpropertiessold.
net.
1/13, tfn.
Part Time Lumberyard Customer
Service/Grounds Maintenance person.
Must be available to work Saturdays,
additional hours flexible. Apply in person
at Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn

SERVICES

Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates Call
551-2000
3/9,11,16,18,23,25???


SERVICES
Christ Episcopal Church extends a special
invitation to sinners, doubters,
backsliders, lost sheep, prodigal sons and
daughters, the confused and merely
curious. We are three blocks N of
Courthouse. Sunday service at 10:00 am
997-4116.
4/20, pd
I am looking for a special little someone to
fill a vacancy in my Home Child Care.
Also I take after school children. Nice
home. Fun playground and good food. For
more information please call (anytime)
997-8797.
4/20, 22, pd
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29
chg
Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tfn

NOTICE
Looking for someone to carpool with to
Tallahassee by 8:30 a.m. Have car.
997-2422
4/20,4/22, r

GARAGE SALE
Sat. 8:AM 1495 N. Jefferson. Kids' / large
women's clothes, jewelry, curtains, dishes,
refrigerator, Avon bottles, telescopes, doll-
house.
4/20, 22, pd


RENT

1 small room Rustic House on 4
irge Screen Porch. 1 year min.
0 month. Call 342-1324/997-8175



SALE


20 Ft. Pontoon with Mercury 70 HP
engine. Trailer included. Great condition.
$7500 obo. 997-4562.
4/20, 22, 27, 29, pd
New Motorized Wheelchairs Scooter
Type. Diabetic Supplies NO COST if
eligible. FREE delivery! Medicare/private
insurance accepted. TLC Medical
Supplies. 888-601-0641.
4/20, c

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides &
Double Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @
$895, $50 dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571




J M FORESTRY INC.


1231 EAST PARKER STREET P.O. Box

249 BAXLEY, GEORGIA 31515

Office 912-367-6043 Fax 912-367-0380
Home 913-632-2755 Mobile 912-337-6740


Personal and Commercial Auto
Great Service! Visit us online:

www.corbininsurance.com

1-800-730-8421

Corbin Insurance-Serving ALL of Florida


P~itW 1~tlES

am"- f BronkcrlAssocis

KaifrmnWalbu- Sales Asacia
850.5I*.kil
C*40P PfiCayd -Sales Assoi

Jplar Hauhni -Sales Asociat
830-aw.O95o
MO.Jdy knu -Sales Assoeiah
b35.S28-1'7e7
TrhhaLWble -Sale. Aunciat
850-509-1153


Jefferson County's

#1 Real Estate Team!

ad... Bratt X -Sales Associte...
850-556-1418
itc... CristlBa s -Sales Associat....
85D- 251-4392
cate... MxParat Lefmigs-Sales Associate...
850-508-4414
t... Sarah Aim Hoflnmd er-Sles Associate
850-212-8167
c... Barry K]ely-BrokerlOwncr...
850-510-4220
x... Pam Kdy- Broker I Owner...
850-510-8359


215 N.Jaffman St. Downtown Moticello 5)-997-5516 ww.chlkkdcXu


J..""i.J ".IJ--aildhim hh |ii. a dthidi-ii,i| dhJ MnMl p


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Great Buyl Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre
Nice Home 3 bedroom 2 bath home on Vir-
ginia Street with deck, fenced backyard and
single car garage priced to sell $87,500
Sweetfield Forest under contract 5
wooded acres between Monticello and Lloyd
$47,500
Check this Out Like new home, built in
2002, 3 bedrooms 2 baths screened porch,
tile floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
,,, (16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice *.
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
a diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen
in remote location only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
wide on a hill way out in the country, new
carpet, with 2 acres asking $89,900
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$96,000
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property under contract On US
90 in town Retail space, warehouse and resi-
dential space $169,500
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Bellamy Plantation 11.7 acres of very pretty
high land in deed restricted neighborhood
$10,000 per acre
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo Leased new insurance
agency coming soon!
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Shady Lane 2.39 acres with a well and sep-
tic tank $18,500




Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate






Buyers looking for Homes and Land


======= =


u v I







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 20, 2005


Local Disadvantaged Youth To


Attend FAMU Summer Program


15T" ANNUAL




IER Fr -. T
s K- r s v


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Florida A & M University has
contracted with the School Board
for the use of buses and drivers to
transport disadvantaged youth to its
National Youth Sports'Program.
The university will reimburse the
Board for transportation expenses.
The program is scheduled to begin
June 11 and conclude July 22.
It is designed to provide whole-
some activities for disadvantaged
youth, ages 10-16.
Youth will participate in activities
which provide an outlet for physical
and social development.
The program begins with each
participant receiving a physical ex-
amination.
Examinations will be conducted
from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday June


The regular program operates 11
a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through
Thursday each week.
The School Board agrees to fur-
nish buses and drivers to transport
students from the pick up point at
JCHS and stops en route to FAMU,
and return daily, for the duration of
the program.
FAMU agrees to pay the Board at
the rate of $1 per mile to cover bus
expenses and regular hourly rate of
the drivers.
The pay is calculated on a 40 hour
week at $9 per hour. Total hours
each week should not exceed 40.
Any hours over 40 require overtime
pay at time and one half.
FAMU will secure a certificate of
insurance with the School Board as
beneficiary, with minimum cover-
age of $300,000.
All rules which apply during the


school year will apply for students
transported to and from the
program.
If a need arises to recommend a
student for suspension or expulsion
from the program, administrators
will need detailed information con-
cerning the incident that precipitated
the recommendation.
The driver and/or transportation
director will furnish information to
the school administrator.
The first offense garners a confer-
ence with the principal and a three.
day suspension form the bus.
The second offense garners per-
manent suspension form the bus for
the remainder of the program.


Saturday, April 23 10:00am to 7pm
Sunday, April 23 10am to 4pm
ADMISSION IS FREE

Fine Art & Crafts Seafood Wildlife Exhibits
Live Music Sand Sculptors Costumed Pet Parade

Festival located on Marine Street along Carrabelle's Riverwalk
For information call
The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce
(850) 697-2585


Pageant Deadline

Extended To April 22


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Lack of entrants may force cancel-
lation of the Watermelon Princess
(Jr. Miss) Contest, if additional en-
trants don't come forward.
Co-chair Lauren Blank said that
the application deadline was being
extended another week, to April 22.
To date four contestants have en-
tered. The pageant requires at least
six contestants, Blank said.


Theme of the pageant is "50's
Summer Fun."
Contestants must be 11-14 years
old, and there is a $25 registration
fee, along with a 3 X 5 photo due
with the application.
Applications are available at Mon-
ticello Florist, Jackson's Drugs, and
the Chamber of Commerce.
There are 13 contestants for Little
King and Queen and applications
are closed. Practice begins Thurs-
day, April 21.
Co-chairing with Blank are Ni-
colle Honcell and Leslie Rabon.


$10835
or

Stk#5D160 Plus Tax, Tag, Title. WAC
Bright Silver Metallic C/C Paint, Cloth Low-back Bucket
Seats, 5 Spd. Manual Transaxle, 2.0L 4 Cylinder, AC,
Speed Control Weind

2005 DODGE
DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
7,694
or
S268s0
Stk#5D298 Plus Tax, Tag, Title. WAC
Flame Red Clear Coat Paint, Cloth Bucket Seats,
4 Spd. Automatic Transmission, 3.7L Magnum V6 Engine,
Sliding Rear Window


"MY NAME is Brian, and I am a shepherd mix. I will be a
big dog, so I can be sure no harm comes to those who
adopt me. I'm really very gentle with my loved ones."
(News Photo)

Brian Named Pet Of Week


?RAN HUNT
3taff Writer

"Brian" has been named the Hu-
mane Society's adoptable canine
pet of the week.
He is a six month old Shepherd
mix with brown and black mark-
ings, neutered with all vaccinations
up to date.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista


describes him as being a very calm
but playful and loving animal. "He
would be great for a child," she
said. "He is great with other dogs
and also cats."
Bautista said he is going to be a
large canine because he presently
weighs in at 50 pounds and is an
indoor/outdoor animal.
To adopt Brian or any of the
other many adoptables at the shel-
ter call 342-0244.


i ~iihL A
i~s -1,


'* -***">^j