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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00030
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 15, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00030
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


I ;.; FRIDAY HISTORY
i.- .IRiARY WEST
UI: VARSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611


Chamber, Schools
Sponsor 'Take
Students To Work'

Story, Page 6
I


Recycling
Industry Sets
High Goals

Editorial, Page 4


S Friday Morning





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.30, 50 CENTS


Severe
Weather Terms
Defined

Story, Page 8


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Joyner Speaks
To Responsible
Pet Owners

Story, Photo, page 12


ws

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005


City Officials Taking Steps




To Control Coming Growth


New Policy

Sets Fees

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Wanting a more hands-on ap-
proach to coming development, city
officials are taking steps to tighten
regulations and assume review pro-
cedures currently handled by the
county.
The action, which comes in lieu of
the short-term moratorium that City
Clerk Emily Anderson suggested
last month, is prompted by the on-
slaught of developments that the
city is beginning to experience.
Early on Tuesday morning, An-
derson, Mayor Julie-Conjey and
City Superintendent Don Anderson
-- together with Robert George and
Joe Miller of George & Hutcheson
Engineering, Inc.. -- began review-
ing a draft document that city offi-
cials hope to have in place soon.
The document, among other things,
establishes fee schedules and in-
house review procedures.


The way the process works now,
the county's planning department
reviews all developments within the
city and keeps the applicable fees.
Under the draft document, the city
staff, in conjunction with the engi-
neering firm, would conduct all the
appropriate reviews. The city also
would apply and retain the applica-
ble fees.
The document, which uses Talla-
hassee as a model, establishes a
four-step process for approval of
new developments.
The first step calls for a land-use
compliance review, which would
determine upfront the things that the
developer needs to do to facilitate
approval of the project.
The second step calls for a pre-
application conference, where city
officials and developers could iron
out'any potential problems. As part
of the procedure, developers would
be asked to submit a rudimentary
plan of the proposed project.
Such a conference would serve a
dual purpose. It would make city of-
ficials aware of the developer's in-
tentions, at the same time it would
educate the latter on the city's re-
quirements and concerns.


"It would make life easier for eve-
ryone," Miller said.
Next would come the site plan re-
view, followed by the preliminary


plat approval and the final plat re-
view, if it's a subdivision.
City officials' one concern was
how county officials might react to


CITY OFFICIALS and representatives of
George and Hutcheson Engineering, Inc.,
discuss the draft document. From left, City
Superintendent Don Anderson, City Clerk


the change, given that the latter
would cease receiving the fees it
now gets.
"A couple of commissioners un-


Emily Anderson, City Attorney Bruce Lein-
back, Robert George, Mayor Julie Conley
and Joe Miller. (News Photo)


derstand that we're not completely
satisfied with the present process,"
Conley said.
City officials' best expectation is
that the county will actually wel-
come the change, given that the cur-
rent arrangement presents a burden
to the already overextended plan-
ning department.
"I think the county will be
relieved," (Emily) Anderson said.
"Before, we didn't have much de-
velopment. But now the county is
inundated with development, and
we're getting inundated with devel-
opment. I just feel we need stronger
control over reviews. We don't
mind the county issuing the
permits..."
"We need to get that too," (Don)
Anderson cut in. "The only thing the
county should be getting (on devel-
..pments inside the city) is the build-
ing permits. The county should only
be issuing building permits and do-
ing the inspections;"
As part of the agreement with
George & Hutcheson, the engineer-
ing firm will create all the necessary
forms and establish a fee schedule
(See City Growth Page 12)


Castor Says Districting


Process Needs Reform
memo detailing how Republicans and keep going."
LAZARO ALEMAN could exploit the Terri Shiavo case She noted that her campaign had
Senior Staff Writer to damage Democrats. raised $11 million, more money
The memo, and Martinez's in- than any other Democratic candidate
Former Commissioner of Educa- volvement with it, has been the sub- has ever raised in the history of the
tion and recent Senate candidate ject of much recent media attention. state. "
"A1LI I 1IJ ~g~~LIL


Betty castor was in town uesuay
night to give local Democrats a
heads up on her latest doings.
Castor, who lost to Mel Martinez
in her bid for the Senate seat previ-
ously occupied by Bob Graham,
thanked the local community for its
overwhelming support of her candi-
dacy. If the rest of the state had
voted as Jefferson County had, the
Senate seat would be hers now, she
said.
She pointedly asked if "Martinez
had surprised anybody with his re-
cent shenanigans", referring to the
Senator's circulation of a 10-point


A little bit of me is gleeful to
know he got his due," Castor
beamed.
As for her Senate race, Castor
said the experience had so energized
her that she had decided to put that
energy to good use, helping rebuild
the Democratic Party from the
grassroots up.
"We have got to build our party up
again," Castor said. "And we have
got to do the self-analysis. We have
to ask, why didn't we connect
better? But we don't want to be too
defeatist. Our party stands for some-
thing. We need to pick ourselves up


When you do that, you begin to
build an infrastructure," Castor said.
"That's something the Democrats
never had in Florida. We've got to
go back and start building up step
by step. It starts at meetings just like
this one."
One of her major projects now,
she said, was Campaign for Florida,
an initiative that she is heading.
Among the issues that Campaign for
Florida has identified as needing at-
tention are health care, education,
and ethics in government, she said.
"I'm committed to leading a redis-
(See Castor Page 5)


BETTY CASTOR, former Commissioner of discusses education issues with School Su-
Education and recent US Senate candidate, perintendent Phil Barker. (News Photo)


Sheriff's Dept. Ordered To


Return Confiscated Money


k\P.

SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS talks with Road De-
partment Superintendent David Harvey
about a package left in front of the latter's
office recently. Harvey feared the package


might contain a bomb. Turns out it con-
tained drugs, left there for an inmate in the
prison work crew to pick up, according to
Hobbs. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A Circuit Court judge recently or-
dered the Sheriffs Department to
return to a defendant the money the
department had confiscated in 2001.
Circuit Court Judge L. Ralph
Smith Jr., in a Final Judgment and
Peremptory Writ of Mandamus is-
sued March 21, ordered the depart-
ment to return $30,180 to Tony
Murphy, of Gadsden County.
Sheriff David Hobbs made com-
missioners aware of the matter last
week. The good news, Hobbs said,
was that the county would not be
out any money.


The reason, he explained, was that
his department's portion of the for-
feiture, which amounted to
$6,154.68, was still in a special ac-
count. And the two other agencies
involved in the case, the Gadsden
County Sheriffs Department and
the US Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration (DEA), had agreed to re-
turn some $16,000 and $8,000
respectively.
The case stems from a Jan. 20,
2001, traffic stop on 1-10 here. The
stop wasn't routine, however. An in-
formant had supposedly alerted the
various law enforcement agencies
involved in the case that the Murphy
would be traveling east on I-10 on a
specified day carrying "money to


purchase cocaine down South."
"Although deputies claimed they
smelled marijauna, no marijuana or
other drugs were found in the vehi-
cle," states one of the briefs for the
plaintiff. Deputies did, however,
find $30,180, which they confis-
cated.
According to the Florida Contra-
band Forfeiture Act, defendants
must be granted an opportunity to
contest the seizure if they file the
appropriate request within a speci-
fied time. This Murphy's attorney
did on Feb. 2, well within the time
limit provided by the law.
The Sheriffs Department, how-
ever, failed to respond to this and a
(See Seized Page 5)










PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005

County Relay For Life Begins

Friday Evening At JCHS Track


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County's Relay For Life
begins 6 p.m., Friday, for an 18 hour
event to benefit Cancer research.
Jefferson's fifth Relay For Life
continues to noon Saturday.
More than 30 teams with 10-15
members each have committed to
raising a minimum of $1,000 and
having at least on member of their
team on the track at all times
:The 2005 theme is "Blast from the
Past," and each team will represent a
different.:ra.
S"Each year that our community
has been involved in this event,
vie've gained strength by coming to-
gether to fight cancer," comments
Publicity Chair Lisa Reasoner.
"Everyone participates in Relay
For Life for different reasons. This
is a way to remember and honor
loved ones who have past away and
to celebrate with those who are win-
ninn their battles with cancer.
i "n addition to raising awareness,
the i'oney we raise helps fund edu-
cation, research, advocacy and serv-
ices that are available to all Jeffer-
son County residents.
;"This family-oriented event brings
the entire community together to
celebrate life, and we urge all to join
us. Together, we can find a cure."
Mike McCall from WCTV Chan-
nel 6 and Carmen Cummings, Mon-
ticello's own local celebrity, are
scheduled to share hosting responsi-
bilities at this year's event.
On site at the track, each local
cancer survivor will be recognized
is he/she opens the Relay with the
-Victory Lap. The second lap is dedi-
cated to caregivers who helped a
loved one during their battle with
-cancer.

-Participants will be treated to 18-
-hours of fun events and entertain-
n-ent, including live entertainment
from local and regional singers and
-a performance by the Mountain
Dew Cloggers.
There will be a silent auction, a
2Kiss the Pig' fundraiser, chance
drawings for a beach trip, a deluxe
grill, afghans, a massage, carpet in-
stallation and more.

Teams will be selling various
glow in the dark and blinking
lighted items.
Food and drinks will be sold at the
campsites, and community members
Will find everything from hamburg-
ers, to sausage and hot dogs, fish


sandwiches, fries and baked beans.
There's been a report that even
Possum Stew can be found on site.
Teams will also sell breakfast at
the sites.
Through efforts of the local Ki-
wanis Club, the Southeastern com-
munity Blood Center's bloodmobile
will be at the track on Friday after-
noon to accept blood donations. Lo-
cal residents are encouraged to give
the gift of life.
The Luminaria Ceremony will be-
gin at 9pm, Friday, and will include
bagpipe music from Sean McGlynn,
a prayer and moment of silence to
those lost, as well as a presentation
by cancer survivor Kim South.
Community members may pur-
chase luminaria in memory of those
lost or in honor of those who have
fought the battle with cancer and are
with us today.
As the sun sets, these candles of
hope will light the night.
The American Cancer Society de-


pends on individual donations and
corporate sponsors to help local pa-
tients and their families continue to
receive the programs and services
offered by the society, and to help
fund research needed to find a cure
for cancer.

Bronze Sponsors for the 2005 Re-
lay For Life are: Progress Energy,
Southern Biologics, Inc., Steve C.
Walker Realty, Inc., Southern Sea-
food Market, Mitchell L. McElroy,
Private Forester, Inc., Farmers &
Merchants Bank, Jefferson County
Health Department, Jefferson
County School Board, Total Land-
,scape Supply, IQ Computers, Cold-
well Bankers Kelly & Kelly
Properties, Big Bend Eubanks Ter-
mite & Pest Control, and Kiwanis.
For more information contact
Event Chair Jaunice Hagan at 414-
4605 or Nancy Floyd Richardson at
the Cancer Society Office at 297-
0588.


-4


RECENTLY, the C&F Cancer Defense team
raised $405 for the fight against Cancer, by
selling barbecue sandwiches. L-R: Charles


Hayes, Bobo Chancy, Kim Chancy, and Ali-
son Flynt. (News Photo)


Rescued Dog Ready

For Special Home


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

"Coonster", one of the animals
rescued by the Humane Society,
previously adopted, is once again
looking for a good home.
The dog was returned by the
adoptive owner because she was
moving and dogs are not allowed
at her new residence, said Shelter
Caretaker Cheryl Bautista.
She added that Coonster requires
a very special adoptive family.
"She has hip displacia and needs
surgery," said Bautista. "It's expen-
sive and she needs someone special
enough to adopt her and take care
of her."

Coonster is a very playful loving
and sweet animals. She is spayed
and all of her vaccinations are up'to
date. "There's noting 'she loves
more than loving," Bautista added.
Coonster is an eight month old
female Shephard/Rotweiler mix,
who was abandoned at the dump-
ster on the Ashville Highway when
she was merely three weeks old.
Resident Jerry Cole found the
puppy in a cardboard box that was
sitting in the direct sunlight in the
heat of the day, underneath a black
rag, which was attracting even


more heat.
Cole, knowing that the puppy
was in really bad shape, brought
her immediately to the shelter for
care.
Bautista said. "That poor puppy
was dehydrated and just moments
from death."

She nursed the pup back to health
in her home, feeding her with an
eyedropper at first and then gradu-
ating to bottle feeding, until Coon-
ster was officially ready for
adoption as a happy and healthy
animal.

To adopt Coonster or any of the
many other available animals at the
shelter call 342-0244.


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GOP Committee
TO Meet At

S. Willow Pond


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005 PAGE 3
meeting. The cost for the dinner is can Party.
$10 per person, with all profits go- A tentative agenda is also avail-
ing to the Jefferson County Republi- able on the website.


OVER THE WEEKEND, Hog Heaven Bikers tendees took part in
were seen around town. Some 500 at- year. (News Photo)


1 'Q
te .a

the annual event this


500 Bikers Turn Out For


Annual Hog Heaven Event


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Fifth Annual 2005 Hog
Heaven Biker Barbecue and Rally,
Saturday, was a big success, feed-
ing nearly 500 people a barbecue
chicken meal with all of the trim-
mings.
Spokesman Ron Drake said that
though coordinators wished the
numbers were higher, they did co-
incide with the number of people
fed last year.
"It was a beautiful, sunny day and
we had a good community
turnout," said Drake. He added
that groups providing music for the
event, did a wonderful job.
At the .end of the day, the left
over food was taken and donated to
Haven of Rest, a homeless facility
in Tallahassee.
The groups providing the variety
of Contemporary, Blue Grass,
Christian and Folk entertainment


included Charles Atkins and
friends of Tallahassee, Destini Mu-
sic Ministry of Ocala, Roy Daven-
port of Nashville, TN, Spirit Wind
of Daytona beach and 24/7 of Tal-
lahassee.
The rally is a joint effort realized
through the sponsorship of both
United Methodist Churches and
Regional Christian Motorcycle
groups.
Drake said that it's through the,
generous support of local busi-
nesses, churches and community
that meals and entertainment are
free to attendees.
"From it's conception, this event
has been viewed as a local missions
outreach to communicate goodwill
and fellowship to a broad-based
community," said Drake.
"The beauty and takeaway from a
venue of this type is to showcase
the fellowship between bikers and
non-bikers as a celebration of life."
Churches joined in this event are
Lloyd United Methodist Church


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(UMC), Sardis UMC, Mt. Lebanon
at Lamont UMC, Wacissa UMC
and Waukeenah UMC and biker
participants include Spirit Riders
Motorcycle Ministries, Christian
Motorcycle Association and Spirit
Riders Motorcycle Ministries.
Drake concluded that a show of
appreciation was due to the many
churches and businesses, who
through their contributions, helped
make this year's rally a tremendous
success. "We could not have done
it without you."


The April meeting of the Jefferson
County Republican Party Executive
SCommittee will be held 7 p.m.,
i Tuesday April 19, at Willow Pond.
Directions to Willow Pond may be
found at the Committee website
http://www.jeffersongop.com.
Dinner will be served prior to the
meeting at 6 p.m. All Republicans
are welcome to both dinner and the


Fire Destroys
Trailer In City


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Fire totally destroyed a trailer
located at 940 Tung Street, owned
by Jerome Mays, early Monday
morning.
County Fire Rescue Chief Larry
Bates said the call came in at 1:32
and approximately 12 firefighters
from Fire Rescue and the Monti-
cello Volunteer Fire Department
were on the scene at 1:37.
"The Trailer was totally involved
when we arrived," said Bates.
"There wasn't anyone inside at the
time of the fire and that was my
biggest concern."
The destruction of the double
wide structure and the contents is
estimated at approximately $28,000
and the cause of the fire is still un-
der investigation.


i i ll i
big rewards
Prevent tw 2Diabetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


A message from the National Diabetes Education Programn, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.


"Ilk


The Story Bel
Breast Cance


hind the Susan G. Komen
r Foundation


When Nancy Brinker's sister Suzy died of breast cancer at the
age of 36, Nancy kept her promise to help others battling the
disease. Her tribute to Suzy, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer
Foundation, is recognized today as the country's leading catalyst
in the fight against breast cancer.

Join us for this free video presentation featuring founder
Nancy Brinker. For reservations, please call or stop by.
For more information, visit www.edwardjones.com/promise
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DIABETES


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT


a m#15 ---M1



Eat a small meal, luclle


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

E MEMB# RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Recycling Industry


Sets High Goals


Chances are you are not the first
person to read this paper. In fact,
many other people have probably
read from it, used it as wrapping or
even written on it.
That's because more than 37 per-
cent of the fiber used to make new
paper and paper products comes
from recovered paper. U.S. paper
recovery recently reached an all-
time high of 50.3 percent.
SPositive that we can recover more
paper for recycling, the paper indus-
fry has set an aggressive goal to re-
cover 55 percent of all paper con-
sumed in the U.S. by 2012.
SExperts say the benefits of recy-
ljing paper are extensive and that
every bit of paper used for recycling
t~day helps to improve the environ-
ment tomorrow. In addition:
S* Americans recycle 270. million
pounds of paper every day.
Newspapers are recycled into
jiew products including cereal
lOoxes, egg cartons, grocery bags,
tissue paper, corrugated boxes, and
iany more diverse products.
S* Every ton of paper recycled
saves more-than 3.3 cubic yards of
landfill space.
SThe current success of paper re-


cover in America is the direct re-
sult of individual, corporate and in-
dustry support and action. To con-
tinue the upward trend in the
amount of paper being recovered for
recycling, the American Forest &
Paper Association (AF&PA) has
created a variety of materials and re-
sources that are available at
www.paperrecycles.org.
/The site features information
about the paper and paper products
we use in our everyday lives, and
provides insights into creating or
improving a paper recycling pro-
gram. Visit www.paperrecycles.org
to learn how you can help increase
paper recovery at school, at the of-
fice, and in your community.
AF&PA is the national trade asso-
ciation of the forest, paper and wood
products industry. AF&PA repre-
sents more than 200 companies and
Telated associations that engage in,
or represent, the manufacture of
pulp, paper, paperboard and wood
products.
The forest products industry ac-
counts for approximately seven per-
cent of total U.S. manufacturing
output, employs 1.5 million people,
and ranks among the top 10 manu-
facturing employers in 42 states.


Baby Boomers Near


Retirement Years


From Our Photo File

























AM ERICAN n LE ION -adisAux r rces CH. .ccheplais; a Brooks n histo esan;
dent Myrtle Merrell, at podium. L-R; Peggy dent (News File Photo)
Sort Takesther N

















.. I
PA,




-






AMERICAN LEGION Ladies Auxiliary officers Hutto, chaplain; Fay Brooks, historian; Jane
were sworn in, July, 1988, by District Presi- Cox, vice-president; Sharon Dukes, presi-
dent Myrtle Merrell, at podium. L-R: Peggy dent. (News File Photo)




Opinion & Comment__




k-
I-



.. IShort Takes & Other Notions
Wj .


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

State employees in the Big Bend
raised $2,232,069 last year for sev-
eral charities. More than 400 em-
ployees gave $1,000 each ... Jerry
Sutphin sporting a sling on his right
arm. Recent shoulder surgery, he
says. ,Some .folks, o tease. him :about
getting belt up in his new role as
County, Commissioner.
Sons of Confederate Veterans held
their annual dinner Saturday night
with a big crowd on hand. Lots of
poignant moments as troops mus-
tered and relived history as word
came of Lee's surrender. Fred
Beshears is troop commander.


We need to continue to press DOT
for.the next phase of study on a pos-
sible bypass... I really enjoyed the
North Florida Community College
concert Friday night at the Opera
House. Monticello resident and
NFCC prof Rebecca Burkart con-
ducted.
Relay for Life kicks off tonight at
the JCHS track. The event has
gro'an over the years and hundreds
of'people participafe.'Churdhes and
clubs-have tents and boaths. with
some hearty souls spending the
Snight'so walkers are on the track 24-
,hours.
Research shows that laughter low-
,ers blood pressure and protects the
-heart. Laughing has also been
.shown to strengthen the immune
system.


County having to pay some* Didja know book matches were
$2,000 for unauthorized phone calls invented by Joshua Pussey, a Phila-
from the Grants Office. Glad to hear delphia patent lawyer, in 1892?
Commission Chair Skeet Joyner : The average American home col-
wants the individual responsible lects.up to 40 pounds of dust each
prosecuted. year. A 9x12 carpet can collect an


average of about 10 pounds of dust
per year.
Biking vacations, long popular
with Europeans, are starting to take
off in the United States, capitalizing
on the miles of dedicated trails de-
veloped in the last 30 years. Soon,
Monticello will have a 2.1 mile bike
trail.
The average annual expenditure
for cat food by cat owners is $185z
while .dog owners. spend $241 per-
year to feed their pet. By the way,
there are 90 million pet cats and 73
million pet dogs.
Nearly six million people took up
tennis in 2003 but nearly as many
dropped out of the sport. Tennis el-
bow is given as the reason.
How's this for intrusive govern-
ment? Bears were once placed under
government control in Rumania.
Whiskers could be worn only if the
owner secured an official permit and
paid the appropriate fee.
Nearly one in three Americans has


high blood pressure and 30 percent
of those affected don't know it. If
left uncontrolled, high blood pres-
sure can lead to stroke, heart attack,
heart failure or kidney failure.
American women buy, on
average, seven new pairs of shoes a
year to the tune of nearly $16
billion.
Stuff happens! The Royal Society
for the Prevention of Accidents
ereetedu'a;display .at .the 'Institute of
Personnel Management Conference
in Harrowgate, England. It
collapsed.
Lightning traditionally causes
more deaths than tornadoes or hurri-
canes and occurs when outdoor ac-
tivity reaches a peak. Lightning
strikes are fatal in some 10 percent
of victims. Another 70 percent of
survivors suffer serious long term
effects.
How long would it take to pay off
a credit card debt of $5,000 if you
made the minimum payment? The
answer if 46 years.


You may not be a runner, but are
you sprinting? If you were born be-
tween 1946 and 1964 you may be
racing against the clock.
Numerous studies have shown that
many baby boomers are "sprinting"
through their last 10 years of work
in an effort to accumulate enough
wealth for retirement.
As they near retirement, many
boomers may need to rethink their
strategies. Fortunately, taking the
right steps can help.

Below are five tips for boomers to
consider as they near the retirement
finish line. They come from the Lin-
coln Long Life Institute, a part of
Lincoln Financial Group.
1. Plan for a long life. Most people
underestimate the potential length of
retirement. There's a high probabil-
ity that a 65-year-old couple in good
health will have one person live to
be 95-years old. Research shows
that most people need to plan for a
25 to 35-year retirement.
2. Think about your second act.
Retirement is being redefined every
day. Many boomers may end up
working in some capacity during


their retirement years.
In fact, a Lincoln Long Life sur-
vey found that one in six respon-
dents who initially went into
retirement ended up returning to the
workforce and not necessarily be-
cause of monetary needs.
Most said they enjoyed the intel-
lectual stimulation and social as-
pects of their jobs,
3. Don't count on inheriting
money from your parents. Surveys
show that leaving an inheritance or
legacy is a relatively low priority for
parents. While Social Security will
be available at some level, in the
end, you can only count on your
own financial plan for funding re-
tirement.
4. Obtain a professional financial
advisor. A national survey shows
that almost 60 percent of affluent
70-year-oldshired financial advisors
during their retirement years.
5. Don't neglect your health care
and insurance needs. With health-
care costs on the rise, you don't
want to end up in a position that un-
expected illness or skilled nursing
care may have catastrophic financial
implications. (NAPS)


Myths About IRAs Debunked


According to a recent "Retirement
Trends" survey by Fidelity
Investments, 96 percent of
Americans saving for retirement
don't know the current contribution
limit for an individual retirement
account, with some guessing as low
as $1,000.
The reality is that for tax year
2005, IRA contribution limits in-
crease to $4,000 up from $3,000 in
2004.
When it comes to knowing the
facts about retirement, mispercep-
tions can lead to missed opportuni-
ties.
Today's workers will face rising


health care costs when they retire, as
well as declining pension benefits
Sand a higher cost of living.
" That's why it's important to save
ias much as possible, and as early as
possible, in tax-advantage accounts
like IRAs.
. Knowing the facts can help dispel
common myths that may keep some
investors from making the smart
p~ove of saving in an IRA.
Myth No. 1: My 401(k) savings
should be enough.
, Nearly one-third of Americans in
their prime savings years who have
not yet opened an IRA account think
their 401(k) savings will be suffi-
cient for retirement, according to the


Retirement Trends survey.
However, Fidelity estimates that re-
tirees will need approximately 80
percent to 100 percent of their pre-
retirement income to live comforta-
bly. Using an IRA now to
supplement workplace programs can
help investors make sure their sav-
ings will continue to grow and last
throughout retirement.
Myth No. 2: I have to come up
with thousands of dollars all at once
to open an IRA:
For the one in four non-IRA own-
ers surveyed who say they can't af-
ford-the initial investment required
to open an IRA, opportunities to


save even more for retirement may
be daunting. But getting started
without an initial lump sum is as
easy as setting .up automatic
monthly payments through a Fidel-
ity SimpleStart IRA.
Myth No. 3: IRAs are for older
people with lots of money to save.
The truth is that younger investors
could benefit the most by starting to
save early because they have time
on their side. Nearly two-thirds of
young adults have started to save for
retirement before age 30, according
to the Retirement Trends survey.
That's good news; starting to save
as early as possible is one of the best
ways to prepare for the future.


Heroes See Greater Purpose


BY DANIEL R. CASTRO

As the fourth anniversary of 9/11
approaches, the spin doctors and
politicians will be beating us over
the head with questions, such as
how to prevent terrorist attacks in
the future, who was truly responsi-
ble, and whether we should have
gone to war over it.
But maybe the fourth anniversary
of 9/11 should prompt us to pause,
just for a moment, in honor of those
who died that day, and contemplate
the bigger questions of life. Did the
events of 9/11 do anything to
change how we look at life? Did it
do anything to change what we
value as a society? Did it change
whom we look up to?
We are a society of hero worship-


ers. But we have had a dearth of he-
roes in the recent years. Most of our
leaders, superstar athletes, movie
starts. CEO's, president and senators
have left us disappointed, frustrated,
and disillusioned.
These days we have to look be-
yond the glitz of Hollywood, the
weak excuses of superstar athletes,
and the "spin" of politicians and
CEO's to find the true heroes. What
is it, historically, that has set true he-
roes apart from the rest of the
world? Who are the people we truly
admire? Who are the people we
want our children to be like?
Historical research shows that he-
roes have consistently followed the
same set of principles over the last
several thousand years without even
knowing it. They have left us a well-
worn trail to follow by their exam-


ples. Each of them, as individual
role models, have joined together to
form one giant, universal role
model.
Were there any true heroes on
September 11, 2001? Of course
there were, There was no single,
Hollywood style Spider Man type
hero who was able to "save the
day." No'one was able to stop the at-
tacks on the World Trade Center.
The true heroes were those who saw
a purpose bigger than themselves in
the heat of the moment, when the
natural instinct 'was for self-
preservation. The firemen who ran
into the burning World Trade
Center not knowing whether they
would even be able to save anyone,
saw something that others could not
see. Of course they saw the fire. Of
course they saw the danger to them-


selves. But they saw something else
as well.
No matter what is going on, no
matter'how deadly serious the emer-
gency, somehow our true heroes are
able to see something in the world
around them that the rest of us
don't.
What would cause the chaplain of
the New York City Fire Department,
Father Mychal Judge, to pause for a
moment while the fire blazed and
huge metal objects fell all around
him, just so he could administer
"last rights" for a fallen comrade?
What would cause Jeremy Glick,
Todd Beamer, and Tom Burnett, Jr.,
without any training, weapons or
military skills, to try to take back the
plane which had been kidnapped by
terrorists?
(See Heroes Page 5)


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.
500 words or less.


P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005 PAGE 5


Letters...


Citizen Says Group Does Not


Duplicate Society's Efforts


Dear Editor:
I am writing in response to Guery
Watson's letter in Friday's paper. It
appears some clarification of the
goals and charter of the Responsible
Pet Owners of Jefferson County
(RPOJC) may be in order.
First, I want to assure your readers
that the Humane Society and
RPOJC are not duplicating efforts.
In fact, many member of RPOJC
are supporters and members of the
Humane Society.


The primary focus of the RPOJC with animal control in the county is


is to establish owner responsibility
of animals, whereas the Humane So-
ciety is more focused on animal
care.
While the Humane Society does a
wonderful job caring for animals, it
is not involved in the development
of county ordinances or the enforce-
ment of those ordinances.
RPOJC primary focus at this time
is to systematically identify ways in
which the current ordinance dealing


Heroes See Greater I


(Continued From Page 4)
When the U.S. decided to retaliate
against the terrorists, a professional
football player named Pat Tillman
gave up a $3 million salary to an-
swer the call to arms. He later
fought and died on a special mission
in Afghanistan. Why would he give
up what every high school football
player in America dreams of?
Heroes come in al snapes, sizes,
and genders. Just last year, in
Belsan, Russia, a young 17-year-
old-girl knowingly ran into a gym-
nasium crowded with terrorists
holding automatic weapons and
bombs while other children ran to
safety. Why? Because she saw
something others could not see.

Her little brother was in there with
a withered leg. Over the next three
days, the terrorist made them all
strip down to their underwear, de-
nied them food and water, and made
them drink their own urine. After
three days of suffering, a bomb sud-
denly exploded without warning,
and the Russian military stormed the
building.


Karina grabbed her little brother
under his arm and half-dragged,
half-carried him to safety. They
crawled through a widow of broken
glass where Russian police whisked
them away.
What would cause little Karina to
run toward a group of armed terror-
ists while other children were run-
ning toward safety? She saw what
heroes over the last several thousand
years could see. She saw what most
people don't.
So, what is it that heroes can see
that the rest of us don't? Heroes
have an uncanny ability to look be-
yond the crisis of the moment and
see a purpose so big and all encom-
passing that they forget, momentar-
ily, about everything else, every-
thing including their own interests.
These are the types of people who
have always been our heroes con-
sistently over the last several thou-
sand of years. These are the types of
heroes we need more of today.
We can now clone animals, and
we may even be able to clone hu-
man beings soon. But we can't clone
character and integrity and the kind


lacking in handling problems with
dangerous and nuisance animals.
To that end, we have had speaker
Sheriff David Hobbs who in-
formed the group of current enforce-
ment measures the Sheriffs Office
is able to take, and of those meas-
ures they are not able to take.
Michael Bauer from the State At-
torney's Office educated the group
as to the existing state statute re-
garding dangerous animals.


Finally Commission Chair Skeet
Joyner shared his knowledge of the
history of the county in dealing with
dangerous dog problems and the
pulse of the community for dealing
with these problems in the future.
Each speaker helped clarify where
we are and where we need to go.
We hope to make Jefferson
County safer for citizens to enjoy
their own property, and outdoor ac-
tivities, without the threat of unsu-
pervised dogs.
There are stray and abandoned
dogs that roam the city and rural ar-
eas of the'county threatening people,
domestic animals as well as live-
stock.
There are also dogs that are hl-
lowed to roam off their owners
property making these same threats,
and currently there is little that can
be done without civil action.
These problems will only get
worse.


We are simply a group of con-
P u rp o se cerned citizens willing to give our
time, money and attention to provid-
Ss ing solutions to the problems and
of selflessness that makes up the hopefully any additional pain and
heart and souls of wherehopefully any additional pain and
heart and souls of heroes. So, where
S u heroes.So suffering from vicious attacks.
will our future heroes come from? ur goal would be to lessen the
They will come from within, burden of the Humane Society in its
When we learn to see through the already commendable efforts to care
eyes of heroes, we will see the kinds for many of the animals forced upon
of things heroes see. them by uncaring owners.
We will be able to walk where he- The RPOJC welcomes anyone to
roes walk, and we will be able to act contact us directly or attend a meet-
as heroes act. But first it takes a de- ing where our charge may become
cision. The decision behind the deci- clearer.
sion is to focus on a purpose bigger I can be contacted by phone at
then ourselves. 997-6599.
(By Daniel R. Castro, author of Regards,
Critical Choices That Change Lives, Bobbie Golden
How Heroes Turn Tragedy into Tri- Steering Committee Member
umph) (Beartooth Press, September RPOJC
11, 2005)


Deputies Assist US Marshals

With Arrest Of 2 Fugitives


Castor
(Continued From Page 1)
tricting effort in this state," Castor
said. "Not one incumbent was de-
feated in the last election and not
one member of Congress was de-
feated in the last cycle.
"Many races, in fact, went totally
uncontested. You have to ask, "is it
because everyone is doing a super
job?' No, it's because legislators are
drawing the districts to create safe
seats. Both parties do it. But the dif-
ference today is the sophistication of
technology.
"Technology is so precise today
that legislators now select the
voters, rather than the voters choos-
ing the legislators. Districts should
be compact, contiguous and repie-
sent communities of interest, but
that's not the case today."
Castor gave several examples of
districts in central and south Florida
that extend from one coast to the
other, or meander all over the place
in an effort to capture a certain seg-
ment of the population.
"Our districts are being packed


and stacked," Castor said.
The solution, she said, was for re-
districting to be taken out of the
hands of legislators and put into the
hands of a nonpartisan commission.
Toward that end, she said, she was
helping lead a petition drive to add
three amendments to the Florida
Constitution.
The amendments, she said, would
respectively establish a standard for
redistricting, create a nonpartisan
commission to draw the lines, and
make the newly redrawn districts ef-
fective for the 2008 election.
The goal, she said, was to get the
amendments on the ballot for the
2006 election. To do that, she said,
would require 61,000 signatures
simply to get the issue before the
Florida Supreme Court, which
would determine if the issue could
proceed to the next step.
"That would give us credibility,"
Castor said of the Supreme Court
approval.
The next step, she said, would be
to get 600,000 signatures to put the
proposal on the ballot.


Sovereign Grace Academy

of Jefferson County

Now Enrolling

For The 2005 2006 School Year
2660 W. Washington St. 997-6050


J M FORESTRY INC.


1231 EAST PARKER STREET P.O. Box

249 BAXLEY, GEORGIA 31515

Office 912-367-6043 Fax 912-367-0380
Home 913-632-2755 Mobile 912-337-6740


Man Charged With
Child Welfare Attempted Murder


....Jefferson,.County. Community
Coalition ,will .meet 9:30 a.m., Fri-
day, May 13, at the library to focus
on Child Welfare.
Pam East, of Big Bend Commu-
nity Based Care, the contracted pro-
vider for Child Welfare Services,
will present an update on services
provided during the past year.
Residents are encouraged to at-
tend the meeting, which will offer a
question and answer period.


Seized Money
(Continued From Page 1)
second request for an adversarial
hearing, according to the plaintiffs
appeal.
Sheriff Ken Fortune, in a Dec. 30,
2003, memo affirmed that "he per-
sonally had no knowledge of the ap-
peal" which supposedly was mailed
to County Attorney Buck Bird.
Getting no response from the
Sheriffs Department, Murphy filed
a complaint in Circuit Court seeking
the return of his money.
The Sheriffs Department re-
sponded to the complaint by filing a
motion to dismiss, which the court
granted after an evidentiary hearing
in 2003.
Murphy appealed that decision to
the First District Court of Appeal
.(DCA), which on Oct. 28, 2003, re-
versed the lower court's ruling. The
DCA essentially found that Mur-
phy's "due process right" had been
violated and so his money should be
returned.
"Florida law is clear," states the
DCA ruling. "Once a post-seizure
adversarial hearing is requested, the
seizing agency must set and notice
the hearing and the hearing must be
held within 10 days after the request
is received or as soon as practicable
thereafter."

Disaster Services
Volunteers Needed

Become a trained American Red
Cross Disaster Services Volunteer.
Contact the Capital Area Chapter
of the American Red Cross at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Sheriffs Department has ar-
rested and charged a county man
with robbery and attempted murder,
stemming from an incident in early
April.
According to the Major Bill Bul-
lock, David Randolph Jr. filed a
complaint with the department April
7 stating that several individuals had
robbed and tried to kill him in the
process.
During the ensuing investigation,
Deputy Kevin Tharpe learned that
Randolph had been driven to a re-
mote area of the county and robbed.
"He was thrown into a creek and
an attempt was made to drown
him," Bullock states. "One of the in-
dividuals present when the incident
occurred intervened and stopped the
attacker from drowning the helpless
man."
The investigation resulted in the
arrest of Henry Andre Sharpe, who
was charged with robbery and at-
tempted murder.
Bullock says the investigation
continues, with charges pending
against the other persons involved in
the incident.


p -1


I

a e ,Brw &Hadee ,A.A.

Jon D. Caminez
BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL LAWYER


(850)386-7553
Tallahassee
1882 Capital Circle NE, Suite 103
Tallahassee, FL 32308


(850)875-9992
Quincy
227 E. Jefferson St.
Quincy, FI 32351


Toll Free: 1-877-997-8181
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send yo
free written information about their qualifications and experience.


lan Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III
Nakia D. Purdie-Lawson
Hal Richmond, Of Counsel

Personal Injury
& Wrongful Death
* AUTOMOTIVE, TRUCK, & MOTORCYCLE
ACCIDENTS
* DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS
* MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE/MALPRACTICE
* SLIP & FALL PREMISES LIABILITY
* NURSING HOME NEGLIGENCE

$No Fees or Costs
Until Recovery

(850)997-8181
Monticello
S 1307 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32344


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$1500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!




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MONTICELLO NEWS


i ~_


F-














PACE 6. MONTICELLO. (FLL. NEWS. FRI.. APRIL 15. 2005


Lifestyle


Chamber, Schools Sponsor


Take Student To Work Day


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Chamber of Commerce and
the County School District will
sponsor a "Take Our Daughters and
Sons to Work Day" event, Thurs-
day, April 28.
The event is designed for children
who live in the County and whose
parents work in the County.
"For years children whose parents
worked in Tallahassee or other areas
- .M_ -vwaas ...r- ,' "a m I~ ~1a


have had the opportunity to partici-
pate in 'Take Our Daughters and
Sons to Work Day' event.
"We felt that this is a great event
that helps to strengthen our families
and community, and we wanted our
children to have this opportunity,"
Chief David Frisby said in announc-
ing the County's inaugural 'Take
Our Daughters and Sons to Work
Day.'
"As president of the Chamber of
Commerce, I urge all employers in
Jefferson County to join us, and
welcome our youth to come to work


CAMELLIA CIRCLE ladies are active in nu-
merous projects. In this photo they are
making corsages. L-R: Robin Loford, Dianne


Camellia Circle will

Air Layer Camellias


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Camellia Garden Circle will meet
at 2 p.m., Sunday, at the home of
ke McClellan to Air Layer Camel-
lIas.
SThe location of the meeting is
6152 South Waukeenah Highway.-
For more directional information he
may be reached at 997-3304. .

As only 8-10 people can be ac-
commodated for this project, it is
necessary to RSVP to Isabelle De-
Sercey at 997-2170, if planning to
attend.


"with their parent or adult mentor,
Thursday, April 28.
"The School District and Chamber
will host a welcome reception and a
wrap-up reception for all children
and their parents who participate
that day," Frisby said.
Superintendent Phil Barker ex-
plained that the day is designed for
students ages 8 to 12, in grades 3 to
7.
Students in school will bring home
a letter, registration form, and re-
quest for absence from school.


Braren, Edye Corley, Ethel Strickland, Dot-
tie Jenkins, Mary Ellen Given. (News Photo)


and heavy duty aluminum foil. Also,
tags or tape to mark air layers with
names.
..,.,Anyone is .welcome ,to join,.or re-
newmemhiership at any time during
the year. However, membership
dues must be paid by April 30 for
names to be included in the
National, State, and Monticello Gar-
den Club Directories for 2005-2006.
A check for the $20 dues, payable
to the Camellia Garden Circle, may
be sent to:.Jean Brenner, 128 Turtle
Run Drive, Monticello, FL. 32344.


ONLY
'279 o.'


This program has been demon-
strated before, and some members
have air layered with much success
and satisfaction.
Member Lynn McGrady says
"Those of us who .have air layered
before will be happy to give our
spot to newer members for this ac-
tivity.
DeSercey adds that if there are too
many for McClellan to accommo-
date, she has sphagnum moss that
can be used and she will purchase
the rooting hormone for others to
use.
Members are asked to bring a
small sharp knife, clear plastic wrap,


* Local Trade
* Leather
* Automatic
* Power Top


Parents/mentors of children who
are home schooled, in private
schools, or who do not receive a let-
ter, may stop by the Chamber of
Commerce or School Board Office,
to pick up a registration form.
Forms must be returned to the
student's teacher or the School
Board Office, by Friday, April 15.
Parents or mentors who work in
the County are encouraged to check
with their employer to find out if
their employer is participating in the
event, and to confirm that they will
be allowed the time away from the
worksite to attend the welcome and
wrap-up receptions with their child.
"If a parent's worksite is not ap-
propriate for a child because of
safety or security reasons, I encour-
age you to find another role model,
such as a grandparent, aunt, uncle,
or mentor, who cant take you child
to work that day.
"This is a great way to help our
youth see the value of a good educa-
tion, and what it means to have a
job,' Frisby said.
Barker said: "For students whose
parents work outside of Jefferson
County, many employers sponsor
'Take Our Daughters and Sons to
Work Day' events.
"I urge those parents to participate
in their employer-sponsored event.
Their child must provide written
proof of participation and submit it
with a request for an excused ab-
sence, if they attend a Jefferson
County Public School."
The schedule for the day follows:
*Registration and Welcome at
School Board Office, 9 a.m.
Children/parent arrive, register, and
enjoy a light morning snack. Name
tags and information packets for
children will be distributed.
*Welcome by Frisby, Barker,
City Mayor Julie Conley, and Com-
mission Chair Skeet Joyner, 9:15
a.m.
*Go to Work, 9:30 a.m. Children
will be asked to complete a work-
sheet while at work and to return the
sheet at the afternoon reception.
*Recepti6ri at the IC linil'.'r, 2' p.m.
Afternoon refreshments adfdreports
on the day's activities by children.
A lightning round quiz with door
prizes is set and certificates of par-
ticipation will be awarded.
Students will be dismissed at 2:45
pm. to return to work with
parents/mentors, or the parent/men-
tor can arrange transportation home.


Bible Conference Set

At Lloyd First Baptist


Rev. Morgan Bailey will conduct
a Bible Conference at the First Bap-
tist Church of Lloyd April 15
through April 17.
The Bible Conference will begin 6
p.m., Friday with a cookout, fol-
lowed by services at 7 p.m.
A pizza blast is'scheduled 6 p.m.,
Saturday, followed by services at 7
p.m.
A special morning training service
takes place 9:45 a.m., Sunday, with
worship at 11 a.m.
Sunday evening services will be-
gin at 5 p.m. for training and 6 p.m.
for worship.


BAILEY


Bailey will be speak about Sunday
School and Multiple Services.
Morgan is pastor of Santuck Bap-
tist Church in Wetumpka, AL.
.He was pastor at Fellowship Bap-
tist Church in Madison for four
years before moving to Alabama.
He has lead his church, to an un-
precedented exponential growth.
,anucnrk RnTrtist Ch'lnrch wrsc rankle-1A


in the top three percent of growing
churches in America by the Billy
Graham School at Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary in Louisville,
Kentucky.
Morgan received the Troy Morri-
son Leadership and Church Growth
Award in 2000.


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Listen, my son, to
yourfather's
instruction and do
not forsake your
mother's
teaching.
Proverbs 1:8

Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


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The Wakulla County Coastal Optimist Club
Presents

S* The 31st Annual* *

BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL

PARADE

Saturday, May 7

If you are interested in joining the parade,
please contact Patsy Byrd, Chairman
984-5733


ORGANIZATION NAME
CONTACT PFRS)N


TELEPHONE
ADDRESS
TYPE OF ENTRY
RETURN TO: PATSY BYRD
P.O. Box 884 Panacea, FL 32346 .
i i i- i I I


t'kffji!l U, IyAwi I A









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005 PAGE 7


Cancer Survivors Dinner

Attracts Full House


I .j


..-.
I

lr
i;



SURVIVOR DINNER guests are welcomed by
Chairperson Cricket Edwards. L-R: Wanda
and Jim Becker, Edwards, and Ray Hughes.


The Beckers
caregivers.


:-L .

and Hughes are survivors and



.- %







./,-^ .


7,
fy.,.


v1t!


)1'.


P- .c-.,;i




s1f


WOMAN'S CLUB ladies prepared and served
the Cancer Survivors' Dinner Tuesday at the
Opera House. L-R: Emily Taylor, Jan Wad-


9' ? 5r


.5I


,"I'


," ,\v:- .


sworth, Club President Amanda Ouzts, and
Ethel Strickland. (News Photos)


Church News


.. .. Union Hill AME Church observes
j ,-? .Family 'and Friends Day 3:30 p.m.,
Sunday. Guest speaker is Pastor
Helen Johnson-Robinson, and her
congregation from Bethel AME
Church is in charge of the service.
' ***
New Bethel AME Church will ob-
serve its annual Youth Day
Program, 11 a.m., Sunday. Speaker
is Ramon Alexander, President Stu-
dent Government Association at
FAMU. Music will be provided by
Gospel True Tones of Madison,
with Elder Carol Joseph.
Dinner will be served.


ANDY CREEL, left spoke at the survivor dinner about the
importance, of upbeat relationships. Juanice Hagan dis-
plays the survivor T-shirts presented at the dinner
Tuesday. (News Photo)


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


As seen

on TV.


- I


MODULAR HOUSE










Aft -

,Y : .' !,
-.- ,.-
U'" '" iTY


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Cancer Survivors Dinner,
held at the Opera House, Tuesday,
drew a full house.
The rooms were loud with chatter-
ing and laughing as cancer survivors
visited with friends, caregivers, rela-


RSVP For
Center Banquet

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Nursing Center will host
its annual Volunteers Banquet 7
p.m., Friday, April 22, at the Center.
The Banquet is given by Mae Ky-
ler and Voncell Edwards, activities
directors for the Center, who en-
courage residents to attend the
affair.
There is no charge for the
banquet.
RSVP to 997-2313 by Tuesday,
April 19.


Homes Of

Mourning

Marye Helen Arrants
Crampton
Marye Helen Arrants Crampton,
age 73, a retired registered nurse
died Tuesday, April 12, 2005.
A graveside service will be held
11 am., Thursday, April 14th at
Roseland Cemetery in Monticello.
Memorial Contributions may be
made to Christ Episcopal Church
Altar Guild, 425 N. Cherry, Monti-
cello, Fl. 32344.
Mrs. Crampton was born in Au-
cilla, Florida and resided in Jeffer-
son County all her life. She
graduated in 1953 from Charity
Hospital School of Nursing in New
Orleans, Louisiana. She was a mem-
ber of Christ Episcopal Church
where she served many years on the
Altar Guild.
She is survived by her husband of
51 years, Alan, of Monticello. Two
sons: Charles and wife Jeanne of
Tallahassee and Philip of
Monticello. One daughter: Marydell
Capelouto and husband Grant of
Tallahassee. One brother: George
W. Arrants and wife Jan of Fresno,
California. Two granddaughters:
Lauren and Larissa Crampton of
Tallahassee. One cousin: Peggy Ste-
vens and husband Charlie Port St.
Joe.


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tives, and other survivors, and en-
joyed a meal of ham and chicken,
and complements, prepared an
served by the Woman's Club.

Committee Chair Cricket Ed-
wards, reminded everyone that the
gathering was about celebrating life
and hope, and honoring all cancer
survivors.
Among speakers at the event
were: Andy Creel who spoke about
the Importance of Relationships;
Debra Bishop spoke about the "Joy-
ful Journey"; and Elaine Daffin,
with the American Cancer Society,
presented an update about Patient
Services available.
In closing, Relay For Life Chair
Juanice Hagan, encouraged the
audience to attend the Relay events
this weekend and to get involved for
a good cause, that of finding a cure
for cancer.

She invited all survivors to help
themselves to a survivors sash and
T-shirt, and a Luminaria bag, and to
bring them to the weekend events.

Wacissa Group
Sets Annual
Trail Ride
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Rescue
will hold a Trail Ride 9 a.m., Satur-
day, April 23.
The ride will begin on the inter-
section of Hwy 59 and Pinhook
Road, in Wacissa.

Riders will proceed to Richard
Williams' Wacissa River Camp for
picnic lunch, swimming, and games.

They will return to Wacissa mid
afternoon.

A wagon will be provided for
those who wish to ride along but do
not have horses.

This is an annual event by the Wa-
cissa Volunteers.

CARD OF THANKS i
Thanks to the churches and my
many friends for the kindness
shown to me during my illness.
Thanks to my daughter for taking
me in her home.
My God forever bless you.
Mother,
Elnora K. Armstead


ROBOTS (PG)
Fri-4:30
Sat -2:15-4:30
Sun- 2:15-4:30
Mon. -Thurs. 4:30

GUESS WHO (PG13)
Fri- 4:40 -9:45
Sat- 4:40 -9:45
Sun- 4:20
Mon.-Thurs. 4:20

MISS CONGENIALITY
2 (PG13)
Fri- 7:00
Sat. 1:40-7:00
Sun- 1:40 7:00
Mon. -Thurs. 7:00

FEVER PITCH (PG13)
Fri. 4:15-7:30- 10:10
Sat. 1:15-4:15-7:30- 10:10
Sun. 1:15 -4:15 -7:30
Mon. -Thurs. 4:!5 7:30
NO PASSES

SAHARA (PG13)
Fri. 4:00- 7:05 -9:50
Sat. 1:00 4:00 7:05 -9:50
Sun. 1:00 4:00 7:05
Mon. Thurs. 4:00 7:05
NO PASSES

BEAUTY SHOP (PG13)
Fri. 4:55- 7:35- 10:05
Sat. 2:00 4:55 7:35 10:05
Sun. 2:00 4:55-7:35
Mon. Thurs. 4:55 7:35

SIN CITY (R)
Fri. 7:15 10:00
Sat. 7:15 10:00
Sun. 7:15
Mon. Thurs. 7:15

PACIFIER (PG)
Fri. 5:15 7:25 9:40
Sat. 12:45- 3:00-5:15-7:25 -940
Sun. 12:45 3:00 5:15-7:25
Mon.- Thurs. 5:15 7:25
NO PASSES

AMITYVILLE HORROR(R)
Fri. 5:45 7:55 10:15
Sat. 1:25-3:35-5:45-7:55-10:15
Sun. 1:25- 3:35 5:45 7:55
Mon. Thurs. 5:45 7:55


B

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Fear or Favor

Monticello News


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRL, APRIL 15, 2005

Director Explains Meaning

Of Severe Weather Terms


As the severe weather season
and hurricane season, approaches,
Chris Floyd, Emergency Services
Director of the Capital Area Chap-
ter of the American Red Cross,
stresses the need for residents to be
alert to weather terms and their
meanings.
Terms include:
Advisory A message released
by the hurricane center, usually at
six hour intervals, updating infor-
mation on a tropical depression,
tropical storm or hurricane, includ-
ing watches and warnings when-


ever they are in effect.
A special advisory is given any
time there is a significant change in
weather conditions or change in
warnings previously released.
An intermediate advisory updates
information in advisories in two to
three hour intervals, whenever a
watch or a warning is in effect.
Gale Warning A storm with
non-cyclonic winds of 30 to 54
miles per hour (MPH) expected.
Hurricane A tropical storm
with winds of 74 MPH or more.
Hurricane Season June 1


through November 30 is officially
designated as hurricane season.
Hurricane Warning A hurri-
cane is expected to strike the area
within 24 hours with sustained
winds of 74 MPH or more accom-
panied by heavy rain and heavy
waves.
Hurricane watch The alert
given when a hurricane poses a
threat to coastal areas within 34
hours.
Small Craft Warning When
a tropical storm or hurricane threat-
ens a coastal area, small craft are
advised to remain in port and not to
venture into the open sea.
Storm Surge A rise in tides
caused by a tropical storm or hurri-
cane as it moves over or near the
coastline. It can be much higher


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Local resident Luke Teasley was
recently accredited as one of three
winning pitchers in the LaGrange
Directors Cup Tournament for the
Palm City Beach Marlins.
The Marlins were credited with
timely hitting, a strong defense and
outstanding pitching performances
to defeat the unbeaten South Geor-
gia Warriors, 7-4.
Teasley got the save in the sev-
enth inning of the final, by striking
out two of the three batters he
faced.
He also hit a right field ball for an
in the park home run.
During the tournament, the Mar-


lins defeated the Twin City Titans,
5-4, lost to the Deluth Wildcats,
8-7 and rebounded to beat the cen-
tral Alabama Heat, 3-0. The Mar-
lins currently have a 19-11-1
overall season record.
Teasley has been playing on a
traveling baseball team for approxi-
mately four years, and this being
the first with the Marlins, a team
for 13 and 14 year olds.
He also competes in the track
team and recently took first place
in the 100 yard dash with a time of
10.06 seconds.
He is the 13 year-old son of Bert
Teasley of Aucilla and Brenda Tea-
sley of Panama City, and is a mem-
ber of the Elizabeth Baptist Church,
in Monticello.


than the normal tide rise, with
breaking waves on top.
Storm Warning Storm with
non-cyclonic winds of 55- 73 MPH
expected.
Tornado Watch Tornadoes
and severe thunderstorms are possi-
ble in the area.
Tornado Warning Tornado
detected in the area. Seek shelter.
Tropical depression An area
of low pressure, rotary circulation
of clouds and winds of 38 MPH.
Tropical Disturbance A mov-
ing area of thunderstorms in the
tropics.
Thunderstorm Counterclock-
wise circulation of clouds and
winds, 39-73 MPH. The storm is
assigned name.
For additional information on
preparing for a tornado, storm or
hurricane, or to become a disaster
resistant neighborhood, call the lo-
cal Emergency Management Office
at 342-0211.


CO* CHAMBER Op
torO -


April
Walk,


24th Annual Four Freedoms Festival
April 15th & 16th
15th 6:00 p.m. Street Dance & Food. April 16th 5k Run/
Parade at 10:00 p.m., Arts/Crafts, Food, with scheduled
activities throughout the day.


For More Info. 850-973-2788 or
email chamber@madisonfl.org


-~-~- ~S


DIVf IN!







Dive into MDA, and
learn more about
summer kids' camps,
family support groups,
and life-saving research.

. Muscular
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2 Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
S1-800-572-1717
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Teasley One Of Three
Marlin Winning Pitchers


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Sports


Warriors Defeat ware Iy

County Magnet School
enth, struck out one, and was cred- -
BILL BROWN ited with the save.


Aucilla Warriors defeated Ware
County Magnet School 9-5 in base-
ball action, Monday.
Warriors stand 13-2 season.
Dustin Roberts pitched the first
four and two-thirds innings, and se-
cured his second win of the year.
He gave up six hits, four runs and
struck out three.
Casey Gunnels pitched two in-
nings, gave up one run, one hit and
struck out three.
Ridgely Plaines finished the sev-


Plaines was two for two, stole
one base, had one RBI and one sac-
rifice fly from the batters box.
Josh Carswell also had a hot bat
with two hits and four RBI in three
trips to the plate.
Drew Sherrod hit a double,
single, and one RBI; Glen Bishop
accounted for two RBI on a double
and a sacrifice fly; and Gunnels
and Kyle Peters accounted for the
other two Warrior hits with one
single each.


Liberty County Downs

Tigers 14-4, Tuesday


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005 PAGE 9


SNFC Blanks Tigers

19-0 In Recent Play


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

North Florida Christian blanked
the Tigers 19-0 in recent action.
The game was called after five
innings due to the ten-run rule.
"We got beat down bad," said
Coach Alfreddie Hightower. "We
barely scraped up enough players
for the game. A lot of the players
were out for one reason or
another."
During the game, the Tigers were
unable to come together as a team,
committing 16 errors. "You can't
go in against a team like North
Florida and do that without coming
away with a beating," he added.


There were three Tigers hits.
Markyce Larry hit a single and a
double; and Dionte Hightower hit a.:
single.
Hightower said the problem with-
the Tigers did not come from the;,
pitching effort. "They didn't have"
anyone there behind them. There
were just too many errors," he,,
added.
Darell Brooks pitched four in-
nings, struck out three batters, and."
gave up seven hits and two walks.
"He did a remarkable job on the
mound," said Hightower...
Larry pitched the final inning,.
striking out no batters and giving
up one hit and one walk.
The Tigers now stand at a 3-4-
season.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Tigers fell to a 3-5 season at-
ter losing to Libery County 14-4,
Tuesday.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
the Tigers e\ecuied a good game
until the fiftti nninm .
"Then the % heels just came off, it`
was mistake' after mistake after
mistake."
Hightower said that though the
teams rallied back and forth for the
score, Liberty has a very good team
and the Tigers definitely added to
their loss with a lot of mistakes.
"We weren't consistent Ith our


FRAN HUNT
S*aff Writer

The Warrior JVs split a double
header with Madison Academy,
Tuesday.
STeam stands 3 11 season
In the first game, the Warriors
defeated Madison 4-2.
Stephen Dollar pitched the game,
striking out two, giving up two hits,
four walks; and Casey Anderson
made it to first base on an error and
scored one run.
SMatt Bishop smacked a triple and


The Lady Warriors won two
games over Carrabelle, and rose to
14-3 season.
In the Monday night game, Au-
cilla blanked Carrabelle for a 13-0.
The Lady Warriors had a total of
nine hits and committed no errors.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the entire
game, striking out two batters,
walking four, and giving up four
hits. She is 8-3 for the season.
Cassi Anderson went two for
three and had four RBI; Kayla
Gebhard went three for four and hit
two doubles with three RBI; and
Jenny Tuten went two for three
with one RBI.

In Tuesday night's game, the
Lady Warriors again blanked Car-
rabelle 10-0.
Lady warriors had 10 hits and
committed no errors.
Bethany Saunders pitched the
game, striking out four batters, and
giving up two hit and no walks.
She now stands at a 5-0 season.
Lisa Bailey went two for three,
with one double and one triple; An-
derson went three for three, with
one double and two RBI; Saunders
went two for four with one double;
and Tuten and Hobbs each had two
RBI.
Coach Roslyn Bass said the Lady
Warriors are readying for their face
off against the Lady Tigers 4 p.m.
tonight, on Jefferson Field.
"If we keep playing constantly,
I'm positive the girls can chalk up
another win," said Bass. She said
Wednesday morning that she was
thinking of the possibility of having
Bailey pitch the game and using


hitting after the fifth," said High-
tower. "We've got to learn to play
as a team. The mistakes we made
were throwing mistakes, a lot of
overthrows.
Dionte Hightower had one single
and two walks.
SMarkyce Larry had two singles
'and one walk.
Alex Lingle had one single; Tho-
mas Lyles hit a double; Breon
Parker had one single..
Lyles pitched four innings, struck
out no batters and gave up seven
hits, four walks iand one extra base
hit.
Lingle finished the pitching, strik-
ing out two and giving up four hits
Sand two walks.


scored one run; Rob Searcy scored
one run; and Casey Wheeler went
.two fiortwo and scored one run.
In the second game the warriors
suffered a 7- 4 loss.
Anderson pitched the entire
.game, striking out three batters and
giving up seven hits and two walks;
Bishop went two for three and
scored two runs; Elliott Lewis and
Rob Searcy each went one for two
and scored one run.
Warriors were to face off
against Carrabelle 4 p.m.,
Thursday, in a make-up game.


Saunders as the catcher.
Currently, the Lady Warriors are
number one is the district and they
have a district game in Munroe,
Friday at 7 p.m.
Bass said that the Lady Warriors
are determined to again come out
as winners ot the district champion-
ship, set April 26 and 28.


I, R Vy


DUSTIN ROBERTS, shown in an ACA
pitched 4 2/3 innings against Ware, his
season. (News Photos)


practice session,
second win of the


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Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.



Your Newspaper

Serving Your Community


FREE PARKING
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE LADIES ESPECIALLY WELCOME
BUY SELL TRADE BROWSE
Bring Your Gun and Trade for the Gun You Always Wanted. And see the Many Displays of
New, Used and Collectable Guns, Ammo, Gun Parts, Books, Knives, Knife Sharpening,
Pepper Spray, Stun Guns, Militaria. Camouflage and Related Items at Discount Prices.


Warrior JVs Split

Madison Double Header


Burns toast.


: ,,,.. .. -, -- )


Brightens flures.

Some Gifts

Just Do More

Than Others.
Giving Savings Bonds can make
a difference in someone's future.
They're available through most banks,
your work, or automatically through
the new Savings Bonds EasySaver"
Plan at www.easysaver.gov.
Call 1-800-4US BOND for recorded
rate information, or write to:
Savings Bonds Pocket Guide,
Parkersburg, WV26106-1328.

Creating a SAVNGS
New Century'1 / r
of Savings- S BOND S
For complete information
about U.S. Savings Bonds,
visit our Web site at
www.savingsbonds.gov.

A public service of this newspaper


ACA Lady Warriors Blank

Carrabelle In Two Games


12 noon to 12 midnight


TI


1.

---








PAGE 10MONTICELLO(FL [ 2005


LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Public Hearing: The Jefferson
County Planning Commission will review
and make a decision to approve or not
approve a variance for a driveway to be
located on the north side of West Lake
Road approximately 250 feet east of the
W.T. Lewis Road intersection. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Planning Commission
meeting on May 12, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in
the courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the


LEGAL NOTICE I


proceedings and that for such purpose, he
or she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O. Box 1069, Monticello, FL 32345 and
provide comments. The development
proposal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
4/15, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 05-2005-24-CA;
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., 344,
LLC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES
COMPANY OF FLORIDA, INC.,


ilLYr lu, I11V ,4IUYYY %1 k- I-


LEGALNOTICE
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES
OF AMERICA. INC. PLAINTIFF VS.
ELLA MAE PETERSON, I, ET AL
DEFENDANTS) NOTICE OF ACTION -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE
ESTATE OF ELLA MAE PETTERSON
AND WILLIAM G. PETERSON whose
residence is unknown if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming
an interest by, through, under or against
the Defendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or interest
in the property described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage and enforce a lost


LEGAL NOTICE
note and/or mortgage on the following
property: THAT CERTAIN PIECE OR
PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE OF NW
1/4) OF SECTION 21, IN TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, WHICH IS
ENCLOSED WITHIN THE
FOLLOWING BOUNDARY LINES,
TO-WIT: BEGINNING AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THAT
CERTAIN TWO ACRE TRACT OF
LAND WHICH WAS CONVEYED UNTO
LUVENIA WILLIAMS BY BEN
EDWARDS, JR., AND MINNIE
EDWARDS, HIS WIFE, BY DEED
DATED NOVEMBER 1ST 1938 AND OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, IN
DEED BOOK "YY" PAGE 251 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY MADE AND RUNNING
THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY
DIRECTION, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID LANDS SO CONVEYED
AS AFORESAID TO SAID LUVENIA


LEGAL NOTICE
WILLIAMS, A DISTANCE OF 420
FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TWO
ACRE TRACT CONVEYED AS
AFORESAID TO THE SAID LUVENIA
WILLIAMS, THENCE RUNNING
SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET,
THENCE WEST A DISTANCE OF 630
FEET. MORE OR LESS AND TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID SE OF NW '/
OF SAID SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP
AND RANGE AFORESAID, THENCE
RUNNING NORTH A DISTANCE OF
420 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AND TO A
POINT DUE WEST OF THE POINT OF
BEGINNING AND THENCE RUNNING
EAST A DISTANCE OF 208.7 FEET,
MORE OR LESS AND TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY BEING THE
SAME PROPERTY DEEDED TO JOHN
HUNDLEY AND LIZZIE HUNDLEY,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY BEN
EDWARDS, JR., AND MINNIE
EDWARDS, HIS WIFE, BY DEED
DATED THE 14TH DAY OF
FEBRUARY A.D. 1953 AND OF


I /ri 't u-/ iie' ,
Interior ~ Exterior


342nm3 288


DANNy'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING ALL OF YOUR
PAINTAND BODYNEED 'S


997- 150
765 E. WASHINGTONST.


1. I ` ,


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.

Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobie: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.


STARTER


&ae


0
M
A
vS
V


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


I Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


C tiM gnc


COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR

SPRING SPECIAL!! $15 OFF

ANY REPAIR BILL OVER $75
(Not Valid With Any Other Offer)


*Sand
*Top Soil

Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


SCREENPRINTING
& EMBROIDERY
ALL OCCASIONS


:/


1830 Thomas
Tpllahassee,
(850) 22
(800) 54
Free De
Tallahassee
Funera


llyn Sikes
Owner


sville Road
, FL 32303
4-3473
1-8702
livery To
Hospitals &
I Homes


Register's

Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah
Hwy.

1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior ~ Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


.Lot Cleaning-Driveway~
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lic.
#SR0971265


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile-
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


Thurman
Tractor
Service

Mowing
(Harrowing
( Food Plots

Licernsvd & Insued
James Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


I U 0 I


I-10 Chevron
rand + Tax pk. 3pks ct.


305


DTC


$1.59 $4.47 $14.00
2ct+ $13.30 each
$1.70 $4.80 $15.20


2ct+ .$14.40 each
Marlboro $3.00 $8.69 $2765
Another Delivery Ladies Leather Purses $5.99 $18.99
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all


DAY'S TREE


TRACTOR SERVICE

Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial De\ ice
Tree Removal
Mlowing.
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
[Maintenance
Feed Plots
For Free Estimates


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Got an idea?


SEPTIC TANK
&

LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT,
Rt. I Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


G







SR.


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682





WE CO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!


997-6500

WHEN YOU NEL) 10 SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UPGRALLS
INSTALLATIONS COU SULIAfiONS
CUS tOM ,COMPUL LS 1 U10RIA S
REMOVAL Or VIRLFSES, AD\VARE, SPYWA,'K


Have a concern?


Gene Hall

County Commissioner



(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or
ghallboard@yahoo.com


I f rI couponI...


Call Can Fint, rYfi-()R ; I I I


Call Lene Va'5-1U-V45-4f I-i


REAL GOOD P.-ANT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
(5 Callon Afinimnum)

342-3288


Local Glass Company



Auto A Homure CoiLnrnefcial
Accepted by All Insurance
Companies
NO INSURANCE?
\\e'll find ou a windshield at
a reasonable price!
\\e Install Qualitt
624 Range St.

464-2500
973-4527


Border 2 Border



Lawn & Landscaping


r Mention This
Ad & Receive
A 10% I
L Discount -

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE

Rough-sawn Oaks,
Cherry, Pecan, and
Pine available.

Also Plainning Available


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-5808
850-545-9964
850-251-2911

155 JOHN

COLLINS RI).


I;_


- r I r


I


W-0


L~ I~ ~ I 1


III


I


.


*


a a


LEGAL NOTICE
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN
DEED BOOK "000" PAGE 420 AND TO
WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY MADE. SAVINGS AND
EXCEPTING FROM THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY: ONE (1)
ACRE OF LAND, MORE OR LESS, IN
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LAND
MEASURING 210 FEET MORE OR
LESS NORTH AND SOUTH AND 210
FEET MORE OR LESS EAST AND
WEST. THIS BEING THE SAME ONE
ACRE OF LAND MORE OR LESS
DEEDED BY WILLIE LANE JOINED
BY HIS WIFE, MATTIE B. LANE, TO
JOHN HUNDLEY, JR., BY DEED
DATED THE 8TH DAY OF AUGUST
A.D. 1975. has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DAVID J.
STERN, ESQ. Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 801 S. University Drive, Suite
500, PLANTATION, FL 33324 on or
before April 15, 2005 (no later than 30


A


-- l


I


i; I I Nv











To Place Your Ad






997-3568


M




CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


[ONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005 PAGE 11,

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

days from the first publication of this
notice of action) and file the original with
the clerk of this court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court a JEFFERSON County,
Florida, this llth day of April, 2005.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT. IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse at
850-997-3595, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Law Offices of David Stern, P.A. 801 S.
University Drive Suite 500, Plantation, FL
33324, 954-233-8000, 05-37264 (TCFMH)
4/1, 22, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL
JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.:
04-18-DPA IN THE INTEREST OF: J.J.
02/06/2004 MINOR CHILD; NOTICE OF
ACTION TO JESSIE JOINER LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: 6307 Dills Road,
Monticello, Florida 32344 YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition
under oath, has been filed in the above
styled court for the termination of
parental rights and the permanent
commitment of J.J., a male child born on
02/06/2004 in Leon County, Florida to the
State of Florida, Department of Children
and Families, Adoption and Related
Services a licensed child placing agency,
for subsequent adoption and you are
hereby to be and appear in the above
court at the Jefferson County Courthouse,
County Courthouse, Room 10 Monticello,
Florida 32344 on Tuesday, May 24th at
9:00 a.m. for a Termination of Parental
Rights Advisory hearing and to show
cause why said petition should not be
granted. You must appear on the date and
time specified. FAILURE TO
PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE
ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES
YOUR CONSENT TO THE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL
TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD
NAMED IN THE PETITION. WITNESS
iy hand and official "seal' as the
Magistrate of said court this 30th day of
\March, 2005. /s/ this matter was referred
to'a Magistrate
4/1, 8,15, 22, c
Notice of Public Hearing: The Jefferson
County Planning Commission will review
and make a decision to approve or not
approve a site plan development proposal
from the Union Branch Church for an
*addition to their church building at 9961
Lake Road. Interested parties may present
their concerns at the Jefferson County
Planning Commission meeting on May 12,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and
U.S. Highway 90 in Monticello, Florida
32344. The meeting may be continued as
needed. From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice
that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency, or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings and that for such purpose, he
or she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O. Box 1069, Monticello, FL 32345 and
provide comments. The development
proposal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
4/15, e


NOTICE

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read
DIANETICS by Ron L. Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianatic's,
3102 N. Havana Ave., Tampa Fl 33607.
4/15, fcan

Clothing Giveaway 8am 2pm. Saturday,
April 15 at Harvest Christian Center, 1599
Spring Hollow Road, off Hwy. 259. 997-
4859, 342-1486
4/13, 15, Pd


HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MORE PAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
4/8, fcan
Looking for licensed Jefferson County
Real Estate Rep for our firm. College
Degree preferred. Excellent training;
scholarship for the right individual. Fax
resume to 850-421-0027 or call

850-421-0020/www.premierpropertiessold.
net
4/13, tfn, c
Part time Stock / Customer Service Clerk:
Must be available to work all day
Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
,48, tfn
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com.
4/15, fcan
Wanted: 23 more people to lose up to 30
pounds. 30 day $- back guarantee. Dr.
recommended. Call Laurie
1-800-607-7040. web site.
HOMEBUC IU.COM
4/6, 8, 13 15, c
Part time L-mnber Yard Customer Service
/ Grounds Maintenance person. Must be
available to work Saturdays, additional
hours flexible. Apply in person at
Jeffet son Builders Mart.
4/8 tfn.
Child Care Providers Needed "Our
Blessings'. Now taking applications for full
and part time teachers. Requirements: 40
hour, CPR & First Aid.
4/8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg

UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
4/15, fcan
POSTAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE!!
Federal, State, Local. $14.00-$48.00+hr.
No Experience necessary. Paid Training
and Full Benefits. Entry Levels. Call 7
days for information. (888)826-2513
ext.111.
4/8, fcan

GARAGE SALE

COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET:
Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage
Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Road from 8am 4pm on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
997-1754. Donations appreciated.
4/1, 8, 15, 22, 29, pd
Garage Sale Saturday, April 16, 2005 8am
'til 1:00 at Royal Mini Storage U.S. 19
South. Furniture & H/H misc.
-115, f

REAL ESTATE

Enhanced 4 bedroom/2 bath 2200 Sq. Ft.
on 156ac, outbuilding. Financing avail.
$115,00. 997-1093
4/15, 22, 29, 5/6, pd

Your RE/MAX Connection for Jefferson
& Leon. Pam Bowling, Broker Associate.
850-385-6685 x20 or 1-888-701-2205 x20
4/1,tfn


FOR SALE

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
to sale $1, $2, $5, $10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m @ 342-3246.
4/1, 8, 15. 22, 29,pd
Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
4/8, fcan

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
4/8, fcan

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000,
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn

Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn


Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn

Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn


DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn


FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE 50+ Premium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limited time offer.
S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
4/8 fcan


FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26, tfn,c

Small quiet family looking for nice quiet
home to rent in western Jefferson Co. call
845 565-2090
i 15, p d

1 large 1 small bedroom Rustic House on 4
acres. Large Screen porch, 1 year min.
lease $550 month Call 342-1005/997-8175
Lv. Mess.
% tfn

One bedroom furnished apartment.
Upstairs, spacious rooms, screened porch.
Adults only, modest rent, deposit &
references required. 997-5637.
4/15, pd

House For Rent in City 997-0950
4/15, c

AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn


Dad's Auto Sales LLC
'93 Dodge Dakota $2495
'90 Olds Cutlas $1795
'89 T-Bird $1995
2685 South Jefferson St. 997-3245
tfn, 4/15,c


*CIVIL RIGHTS
*SEXUAL HARASSMENT


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
4/8, fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
(800)836-3464#BO2428.
4/8, fcan
Online Job Offer eBay Workers Needed.
Come Work with us online.
$$$$$Weekly. Use your home computer
or laptop. No experience necessary.
(800)693-9398 Ext. 1856.
4/8 fcan


SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
yard work, cleanup, home repairs. By day
or w'.ek. 342-1486, 510-0998.
4/13, 15, pd


Mother's Day is almost here. Come see
what AVON has for her. (850)509-4481.
Mary %tabrooks
S4/8, 4/15. pd
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing Work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates -
551-2000
1/7,14,21,28,2/4 11,,18,25,3/4,11,18,25, pd


Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)


Home Health Care Equipment -
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 15, 2005

Commission Chair Addresses

Responsible Pet Owners Group


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A meeting of the Responsible Pet
Owners of Jefferson County took
place recently at the Monticello/Jef-
ferson Chamber of Commerce.
Speaker at the meeting of this
newly formed group was County
Commission Chairman Skeet
Joyner.
Coordinator Bobbie Golden acted
as the facilitator for the group, and
asked Joyner a series of questions
that he answered matter-of-factly.
Some of the answers weren't what
the group hoped to hear.
Joyner was asked to give a brief
history of the County Commission's
actions to establish dog ordinances
in the county.
Among the concerns voiced to
Joyner were:
Who makes up the Division of
Animal Services mentioned in the
current ordinance, and, how can a
constituent contact them in the event
a permit must be obtained?
Does the county currently have
the personnel and facility to carry
out section 3.4 Impoundment of the
county ordinance?
SIs there funding provisions.

What can be done about stray and
abandoned, dangerous and nuisance
ani mals?.
SJoyner said that these issues were
always a problem and funding to
police them was an even greater
problem.
: He said that on vicious dog com-
plaints, the County works with the
City to combine resources.
If the animal is a stray or unsuper-
vised, it is darted and taken to the
local vet on call. Attempts are then
made to contact the owner.
A committee of three knowledge-
able individuals is already setup to
decide the outcome of the animal.
He was asked if there could be a
licensing process that would include
a fee. And, if fines could be levied if


the owners don't register by licens-
ing their animals.
Joyner said that he would consider
that, and it sounded like a good idea.
He would need a plan put together
before it could be reviewed by the
Commission.
Joyner recommended that when
the group puts together a plan of ac-
tion, it needs to ask itself: How are
you going to police this? How are
you going to address this issue?
How are you going to get people to
register their animals?
His strongest suggestion to the
group was to figure out a self
funded program, which would be
equitable and workable.
Joyner stated that he's all for
these kinds of programs, and will
work with the group as much as he
can.
Enforcement of such laws as ra-
bies vaccinations was discussed.
Also, a possible mandatory pet li-
censing fee, and a referendum for an
increased sales tax to help with the
cost of a program.
The suggestion was made to
create, and then enforce, a law to
ticket the animal owners after a sec-
ond complaint call, and have then
issued by the Sheriffs Department.
Focusing on the owners identity of
the animals that run at large, and de-
manding owner responsibility, is an-
other issue that was discussed with
Joyner.


The possibility of having a chip
put into the ear of the animals after
vaccination was brought up. This
would also be a help to the owners
in finding lost pets.
Joyner suggested working on re-
fining ordinances that are now in
effect, and find a way to make them
work better.
He also suggested that the group
join forces with the local vets, attor-
neys, and the County Humane Soci-
ety.
A connection with these three en-
tities would definitely help in the
cause, Joyner said.
Joyner explained the County
Commission's position on the issues
of animal control, specifically its
ability to handle dangerous dogs and
nuisance animal complaints.
He said that he would request a
County Commissioner to work with
the group to help resolve some of its
issues.
Information packets were distrib-
uted containing information on: the
process for dealing with dangerous
or vicious dogs in Jefferson County
per the current county ordinance;
A petition for classification of a
dangerous or aggressive animal; A
nuisance animal research (defini-
tions and enacting language;) .
Funding options; An example of a
pet license application; and the
County's Dangerous Dog
Ordinance.


-d-:..- ywia r ..- : ? w ww. womw.w.^w; ,_,,^s, : -waNt.:A. w- -- :.,..L-..- .
BOBBIE GOLDEN, coordinator facilitated the meeting of
the Responsible Pet Owners, at which Commission Chair
Skeet Joyner was guest speaker. (News Photo)


City Growth
(Continued From Page 1)
for the review process, as well as re-
viewing all developments, tweaking
-the existing ordinances and regula-
tions to close loopholes, and stream-
line the process.
The engineering firm will also
conduct final reviews of all projects
to ensure that they comply with the
city's requirements and reflect what
the developer indicated at the onset
would be done.
Finally, the engineering firm will
update zoning and land-use maps
and post them on the Web for the
convenience of developers and oth-
ers.
One thing city officials hope to
avoid by taking control of the re-
view and approval process is the
spread here of the "cookie-cutter
concept" that developers are pres-
ently utilizing in Leon County.
There, because of high land values
and limited space, developers are
creating compact subdivisions that
crowd houses on small lots in order
to maximize the available space, ac-
cording to George.
All were also in agreement that
that Leon County had reached its
saturation point, insofar as develop-
ment, and that the wave of develop-
ment was definitely coming toward
the outlying counties.
City officials want to make sure
they are ready for that wave when it
hits.


Investigation Solves Series Of Burglaries In wacissa Area


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Sheriffs Department reports
headway in solving a series of bur-
glaries that have plagued the Wa-
cissa area in recent months.
According to Major Bill Bullock,
of the Sheriffs Department, the in-
vestigation led to William Harley
Jones III, whose residence deputies
searched on a warrant April 6.
"The resulting search yielded a


number of stolen items from both
Leon County and- Jefferson
County," Bullock reports. "Recov-
ered property included power tools,
construction equipment, a dishwater
recently stolen from a home under
construction, computer equipment,
other electronic equipment and a
firearm."
Deputies also allegedly uncovered
a marijuana cultivation project,
which earned the suspect additional
charges.
"Some of the recovered property


was identified as being stolen from
Leon County residents," Bullock
says. "They also found evidence
linking the suspect to at least three
burglaries in the Wacissa area."

At least four Leon County burgla-
ries were solved during the course
of the investigation, according to
Bullock.

He says deputies charged one sus-
pect with property crimes ranging
front grand theft to burglary, and a


second man is being sought.
Additionally, charges are being
considered against at least one other
individual, according to Bullock.

"Federal weapons charges are also
pending against the suspect," Bul-
lock says. "The Leon County Sher-
iffs Department has indicated that it
is pursuing cases against the suspect
as well. There are several more area
burglaries that have not yet been re-
solved, but the investigation contin-
ues."


School Board Approves Daycare

Agreement For TAP Students


The ATF (Alcohol, Tobacco &
Firearms), as well as an officer from
the Monticello Police Department
assisted in the investigation.



WOODEN
Table & Chairs

$14995&






;P e Sbown

$149.95

INCf.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

An agreement was signed Monday
between Washington Home Child-
care, and the School Board, to pro-
jsde day care services to children of
eligible students currently or previ-
oisly enrolled in the Teenage Parent
Ptiogram (TAP) at Jefferson County
High School.
- .The agreement is in effect through
-May 25, 2005.
- Under the terms of the agreement,
Washington Home Childcare will
provide:
*Full childcare services equivalent
to the length of a regular high
school day, for children of eligible
TAP participants, on 'days when
classes are in session.
SFor DCT students, care is ex-
tended beyond the school day to end
by regular closing time at Little An-
gels Center, without additional cost
to the participants.
S*Attendance information for each
child receiving day care services,
ton a daily basis by telephone, and in
writing on a weekly basis, to desig-


nated personnel of the school sys-
tem.
*Other documentation to facilitate
payment for services rendered in a
timely manner.

The Board agrees to the
following:
*Placement of eligible children
for day care services up to the limit
of available space.
*Required transportation of chil-
dren and parents to and from day
care services.

*Prompt drop off and pick up of
children as scheduled, and insuring
that the children of DCT students
are picked up in the afternoon by
regular closing time.
*Administration and supervision
of the TAP program at the district
and school levels.

*Designation of appropriate per-
sonnel to monitor and facilitate day
care services and transportation.
*Payment for child care services
at the agreed upon rate, upon sub-
mission of proper documentation by
Washington Home Childcare.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


The rate is $90 weekly or $18 per
day.

Both parties agree to adhere to
applicable, local school Board poli-
cies, and rules of Washington Home
Childcare.



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