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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00029
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 13, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00029
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


t' LOR-IDA HISTORY
'.rv WEST
: :'.';:.''TY OF FLORIDA


CG


Endangered

Species To

Get Attention

Editorial, Page 4


I I !'


JCI Fun Day

Raises $1,582

For Cancer Fight

Story, Photos, Page 8


Humane Society

Sets Adoption

Training Class

Story, Page 10


CQ


Wednesday Morning
J


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.29,50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005


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County May Get



Extra $400,000


Grant Money Earmarked

For House Rehabilitation


COMMISSION CHAIRMAN SKEET JOYNER
discusses funding and other issues with
Cory Burke, outgoing head of the Grants Of-


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Grants Office Director Cory
Burke last week officially tendered
her resignation, effective April 29.
Burke will be returning to the
TFlorida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, where she worked
:years ago before moving to Massa-
.chusetts.
SBurke worked for the Grants Of-
fice almost exactly a year. She
:found herself "a round peg in a
:square hole", in her words.
"It wasn't a good fit," Burke
gave as the reason for her decision
'to leave the position.


City Extends


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city last week extended its
annexation amnesty program an-
other 60 days.
The program was scheduled to ex-
pire Friday. Now it will go until
June 15.
City Clerk Emily Anderson re-
quested the extension to allow for
applicants who might yet want to
take advantage of the program.


fice. Joyner has set a workshop for 9 a.m.
Thursday to decide the future direction of
the department. (News Photo)


She has made commissioners
aware of several problems that she
believes need to be addressed if the
Grants Office is to operate more ef-
fectively.
Among the problem areas that
Burke has identified are the Section
8 Program, which currently lacks a
coordinator, and the fact that the of-
fice functions as a housing authority
rather than a grant-writing
operation.
Commissioners will be discussing
these and other Grant Office's re-
lated problems, as well as possible
solutions to the problems, at a 9 a.m.
workshop.this Thursday in the
courthouse.
In related news, Burke was able
to negotiate a lower payment for an


Annexation


"We have one and maybe two
who want to apply," Anderson said.
The brainchild of Councilman
Brian Hayes, the amnesty program
offers free annexations to property
owners whose lands are adjacent to
the existing city boundaries.
The city, in other words, will
waive the fees for filing, legal ad-
vertisements and recordings during
the period of the program, which
started Oct. 15.
To qualify for the program, appli-
cants must provide proof of property


CITY OFFICIALS talk about the amnesty an-
nexation program and other issues following
Tuesday night's council meeting. From left,


t
unauthorized telephone bill dating
from 2002. The negotiated amount
is $2,639, versus the original
$3,325.05.
Burke explained that the lower
amount resulted from Nextel's will-
ingness to drop the interest that had
accrued on the original bill.
A former consultant with the
Grants Office is blamed for the mis-
use of the special phone, which is no
longer in service.
The commission agreed to pay the
negotiated amount last week. But
Commission Chairman Skeet Joyner
indicated that. the county plans to
pursue prosecution of the individual
allegedly responsible for the misuse.
He said he had already referred the
matter to the State Attorney's office.


Amnesty


ownership or proof of authority to
sign the annexation petition.
Applicants must also provide a
metes and bounds description of the
property. It's also possible that a
survey will be required, if the
boundaries can't be readily deter-
mined.
Among the benefits that annexed
property owners will enjoy, accord-
ing to city officials, are improved
police protection, sewer and water
service, and garbage pickup.


City Attorney Bruce Leinback, Mayor Julie
Conley and Councilman Gerrold Austin.
(News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials last week re-
.ceived an update on the $548,000
Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) awarded the county
late last year, as well as receiving
good news on two related issues.
Lisa Blair, a consultant with Me-
ridian Community Service Group,
told commissioners Thursday that it
was very likely that the county
would ultimately receive the
$700,000 it had requested.
"I anticipate that you will get the
full amount as monies come back
ifito the department," Blair said.
"Typically, we would have gotten
the full amount by now, but last
year's storms have delayed the proc-
ess."
The $548,000 is earmarked for the
rehabilitation or replacement of sub-
standard houses in the county. Blair
said her group had advertised for
clients and had received 18 applica-
tions, which had been ranked ac-
cordingly.
She said the next step was for the
Citizens Advisory Task Force to re-
view the applications and make a
recommendation to the County


Commission. Her group would then
advertise for contractors, with an ex-
pected bid opening date of June 1,
she said.
"Things are going very well,"
Blair said. "We should know within
the next few months if we will get
the balance of the $700,000."
CDBG funds come from the US
Department of Housing and Urban
Development and are funneled
through the Florida Department of
Community Affairs. The monies are
competitively awarded to eligible
local governments for housing,
commercial and neighborhood revi-
talization projects.
The other piece of good news in-
volved the possibility that the
county may be eligible for another
$300,000 with the Home Again Pro-
gram.
"I think you have a good chance
of getting it," Blair said.
She said the program, which has a
reported $2 million available state-
wide, was similar to the CDBG.
Meaning that the money could be
used to rehabilitate or replace
houses.
Up to $50,000 could be utilized
per house, she said. The main differ-
ences from CDBG program, she
said, was that the Home Again Pro-


gram did not require the establish-
ment of a citizens advisory board.
Too, it was stricter in terms of the
requirements it applied to the reha-
bilitation of mobile homes, she said.
The program's one possible catch,
Blair said, was that structures had to
have sustained storm damage to be
eligible for the funding.
But she didn't think the rule was
being applied very strictly, she said.
Besides, she reminded commis-
sioners, the county had been in-
cluded in the emergency disaster
declaration issued in the wake of the
storms.
Additionally, an informal survey
by her office indicated that 31 struc- '
tires here had suffered storm dam-
age to one degree or another, she
said. Given that $300,000 would
cover only about five houses, she
had no doubt that the necessary
number of storm-damaged struc-
tures would be found, she said.
"But nothing in the rule says you
have to repair storm-damaged
houses," Blair said. "And even if it's
minor storm damage, once you start
doing the repairs you have to bring
the house up to standard."
She said commissioners had noth-
ing to lose by applying for the
money. Her firm, in fact, would file
the application at no cost, she said.
And if the county was successful in
.getting the money, her firm would
take its fee from the awarded
amount.


Bike Trail Contruction To Begin


'LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The bike trail, that city officials
have been pursuing for about six
years finally appears will be coming
to fruition soon.
Engineer Robert George, of
George & Hutcheson Engineering,
Inc., informed the City Council last
week that the Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) has funded the
$550,000 construction phase of the
project.
George said he expects the project
will take six months, start to finish,
with the majority of the work being
completed in the first four months.
He said the plan was to advertise
for bids within the next three weeks,
with an expected construction
startup time of May.
"We're ready to proceed with ad-
vertisement and construction,"
George said.
Total estimated cost of the bike
trail, which the DOT is funding un-
der its Rails to Trail Program, is
$708,782. The DOT released
$96,400 for the design phase of the
project in 2002.
The trail will extend 2.1 miles,
from Nacoosa Road on the south to
Rocky Branch Road on the north.
Some even envision the trail ulti-
mately extending to Drifton.
As George described the concept
several years ago, the trail will trav-
erse urban and rural terrain. As a re-
sult, he said, the trail's design will
vary accordingly.
In the urban area, the plan is to
create tree and shrubbery buffers,
put in stamped asphalt to define the


trail where it crosses pavement, and
install barriers at potential access
points to prevent vehicles from en-
tering the path.
In the rural area, the plan is to take
advantage of the natural beauty and
leave the trail as much as possible in
its present state.
Benches, as well as information
and direction signs, will be installed
at points along the 10-foot wide


path.
The idea for the trail originated
with Mayor Julie Conley when she
was city clerk. Made aware of the
DOT's Rails to Trails program and
the fact that the city might be eligi-
ble for the funding, Conley applied
to the program in May, 1999.
More than a year later, the DOT
informed the city that it had quali-
fied for the funding.


.. --.;- '----


ROBERT GEORGE, consultant engineer for the city, has
been working on the bike trail for about five years. He told
the council last week that the trail will become a reality
within the coming months. Here he talks with City Superin-
tendent Don Anderson. (News Photo)


Workshop Aims To Explore


Problems At Grants Office


Program For Another Two Months


r I I I L. I I~ a_ I ~


;VILLE, FL. 3261.


Brown

Honored At

JCHS

Story, Photo, Page 6







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005

Thermon Moore Named Pastor


At First Baptist Church


FRAN HUNT
3taff Writer

Rev. Thermon Moore has been_
named Pastor of the First Baptist
Church and brings with him a
wealth of experience.
"When God says go, you go, so
here I am," said Moore. He ex-
plained that when he made plans to
come to Monticello, he put his
home in Tallahassee up for sale and
it sold by 2 p.m. that very same af-
ternoon without a Realtor. "That
was one of the Great Affirmations."
As a Southern Baptist, Christ is
the ultimate authority in the
church," said Moore.
"I want Monticello First Baptist_.
Church to be known as the most
caring, loving and friendly church
that most people have ever been-
in," said Moore. "We have the fin-
est people here that I've ever met in
Florida.
"It's a caring church and I have


MOORE
...retired Air Force Chaplain
named permanent Pastor at
First Baptist.


Diabetes Groups Help

Manage Diabetes


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


To. help fight diabetes in the
County, two DOers Clubs, meet c
regular here, and both have meet-,
ings scheduled next \ eek. t
The Senior Center's DOers Club-
.meets 10:30 a.m. Monday, and
every second Monday.
County Health Department DOers
6Club meets Noon, Friday, and on
kthe second Friday of each month.
Meetings are open to those who
,have diabetes, or are interested in,-
-preventing diabetes in their families .
Members participating in the DO-
.ers Club, Diabetes Support Groups .
;benefit from both the education, and
;the ongoing support the groups pro-
Svide.
Indi\ idul diabetes counseling is
. also available' throtg1h the "Health
:Deparrnient b contacting the De-
partnmen,. bh doctor's referral.
SThose interested in joining a sup-
port group should contact Health
SEducator Bonnie Mathis at the
Health Department at 342-0170.
S Diabetes Support Group contact,
Agnes, McMurray notes that 12.4
percent of the population of Jeffer-
h son County have been told by a
health care professional that they
Shave diabetes.
In 2002, the county ranked 14th in
Sthe state in deaths because of diabe-
Stes complications.
The goal of the diabetes Outreach
and Education Program, funded by
,the grant, is to improve the health
status of diabetic patients by provid-
ing education and support for diabe-
tes self management.
IThe program includes: Diabetes
testing at churches or community
organizations; Help starting DOers
Clubs, Diabetes Support Groups;
Regular education programs de-
signed to help members help them-
selves; and help to get low cost or
free medication through the pre-
scription Assistance Program.
Mathis states "pure and simple,
:diabetes is self managed. We all
know this is not easy. The person
:with diabetes is likely to visit with a
:physician about three or four times a

City Police

,Arrest Four
SMonticello Police Department
(MPD) officers on Friday arrested
four individuals on drug-related
; charges, the result of a traffic stop.
The four arrested were Eric
Travis, 21; Travis Harris, 27; Gar-
netta Graham, 18; and Glenneth
Miller, 46.
According to the MPD, officer Ed-
die O'Neal stopped a vehicle Friday
evening on W. Washington St. for
Excessive speed.
SWhen the officer ran a check on
Sthe occupants of the vehicle, one of
Sthe passengers was identified as be-
Sing wanted in Leon County.
The passenger then changed his
i story, telling the officer that his real
'name was Eric Harris. A check of,
the name, however, revealed that
Harris also had an arrest warrant for
-violation of probation in Leon
County.
Harris was arrested on the war-
(See Police Page 7)


year. The rest of the time they are
on their own on with family.

"So, how does a person get sup-
port to stay on the right diet, get ex-
ercise, test their blood' sugar? By
getting help from others with diabe-
tes in a Diabetes Support Group.".


'U-


communicated with people in the
church and I've been getting a good
response from them," he added.
He said that since he came here,
nearly 30 people have joined or re-
joined the church.
Plans call for outreach and visi-
tation to regain those members who
have been lost over the years.
"We're also going to try to reach
out to those in the community who
are lost and don't have a church
home and invite them to make First
Baptist their church home."
Moore attended Southern Illinois
University from 1958-1962 to earn
his BA Degree and from 1962-
1966, he attended the Southern
Baptist Theological Seminary in
Louisville, Kentucky and earned
his Master of Divinity Degree.
Moore was ordained by Temple
Baptist Church in 1959. He served
as Pastor in Southern Baptist
Churches in Indiana, Illinois, Ken-
tucky and Georgia.
He also served as an Interim Pas-
tor in churches in Nebraska, Colo-
rado and Georgia.
Moore was selected by the
Southern Baptist North American
Board to serve as an Air Force
Chaplain in 1969 and retired in
1991, during which time, he served
in 10 assignments in the US and
overseas.
He retired from the Air Force
Academy as Command, Chap-
lain with the rank of Colonel.
From 1966-1969 Moore served
as pastor of Enon Baptist Church in
Rome, GA. and from 1991-1999 he
served as hospital Chaplain at Hos-


pital Corporation of America.
Moore served Redmond Regional
Medical Center as the director of
chaplaincy.
This position was established for
Moore when he retired from the
Air Force. The position is still in
place, as a full time staff position in
a for profit hospital.
Moore retired and moved to
Tallahassee, and while there, he has

Electric

Wheelchairs-

Available
Wishes on Wheels makes electric
wheelchairs available to non-
ambulatory senior citizens, 65 years
old and older, usually at no out of
pocket expense, if they qualify.
The electric wheelchairs are pro-
vided to those who cannot walk and'
cannot self-propel a manual wheel-
chair in their homes or independent
living quarters, and who meet the-
additional qualifications of the pro-
gram.
This service may also be available
to the permanently disabled of any
age.
For additional information, call.
(800) 823-5220.
The Wishes on Wheels program's
main purpose and goal is to.develop
public awareness that there are as-
sistance options that allow senior
citizens (as wells the permanently
disabled) to remain independent in
their own homes.
Without this awareness and assis-
tance, the family may prematurely
choose a nursing home, or make an
unnecessary retail purchase on
power mobility equipment.


served in Supply status, and con-
ducted Revivals.
He has served as Interim Pastor
for the First Baptist Church since
Sept, 2004.
Moore is married to the former
Betty J. Thompson of Terre Haute,
IN and they have two sons.
Steven Moore is a graduate of the
Air-Torce Academy, class of 1980.
After 10 ears as an Air Force As-


tronomical Engineer, he resigned
his commission and now works for
Allied Technical Co. in Elkton
MD.

Mark Moore is an ROTC gradu-
ate of Auburn University, AL. He
is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Air
Force and is the Director of Opera-
tions for NATO in Frankfort, Ger-
many.


uon r serre ror poor quality; getr me very Bt5 tor LEfSSI


FREIE NATIONWIDE
W JARRANTY


C FREE A
LIFT
I ECTIoN V

INSPECTIONm


rTwDay lour
FREE
STOWING
on major repairs


Transmission Tunerup 8 500
Includes the following: Cars
* Road Tesi Labor
* Change Fluid Snlh Adjustments '* B3a Auausmnen (if applucace)
* Clean Screen Pan Gassels -Computer Scan (I nepdial



24-hour number
m 224-7492
EI 866-211-7492 toll-free
S 1910 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee
We never sleep...CALL US AND SEE!


FREE
PERFORMANCE,;
; INSPECTION
FREE
' ROAD TEST

* Free Computer
Diagnost;c Check
* Free Transmission Check
* Free Minor Adjustments
*O Estimate Before
Worik Begins
*- Motor Home and
4x4 Specialist
SStandards- Clutcner
and Automatics
* We Honor AII.Etended
(used car Warranties
(bring in your contract:
we take it from there)


USDA


United States Department of Agriculture





The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (aiso called "Tobacco Buyout").
'r B




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


SDid you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

) Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

) Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


~fajq~R~W


--


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A121Y ved bv
M 01.
.'ro Clubs


I


---Odom








The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005 PAGE 3

MonticeCCo Christian AcaCemy
Now Enrolling For Fall of 2005
Grades K thru 12
Call Pastor Mike For Information
850-294-1006
A ministry of First Church of the Nazarene
1590 N. Jefferson St.


JERRY JOHNSON, plant manager for the
Postal Service, spoke to Kiwanians recently
about mail processing and distribution. He


explained that mail goes to Tallahassee for
processing and is sent back here for distri-
bution.


57 JCHS Students Rewarded

With Trip To View FAMU Play


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Last week, 57 Jefferson County
High School students, along with.
six adults, traveled to FAMU to see
the production, "The Trial of The
Big Bad Wolf'
Principal Michael Bryan said the
trip was in recognition for those
students who had at least a 3.0
GPA on their last report cards.
The next report cards will go
home Friday and plans are under-
way for another recognition trip for
those students with a 3.0 GPA or
higher.
Upcoming events at the school
include the Gates-McGinitie Test,


April 13 and 14.
April 14 is also the ROTC
Awards Banquet at 6 p.m. in the
cafeteria.
The PTSO/SAC meeting is 6
p.m., Monday, April 18, in the me-
dia center.
The Grade Test will be adminis-
tered April 19 and 20,
An Artists in the Schools pro-
gram is scheduled 9 a.m., April 21,
at the Opera House.
The date and time for the Sports
Banquet has yet to be determined.
Other upcoming events include:
The 4-H Field Day 9 a.m, May 5,
at Razor Lake.
Grad Night, in Orlando, is set
for May 6-8, with the time to be an-


ELIZABETH MURPHY is a frequent visitor of the County
Senior Center. She also works diligently on the Center's
Friendship quilt. (News Photo)




NOTICE
Two or more Members of the Monticello City Council
may be present during a bus tour of the City of
Monticello on April 16, 2005 departing from City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street at 10:00 a.m.





BAs seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, n T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED.

DATE: April 18, 2005
TIME: 6:00 p.m.
PLACE: Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building
Subject: Budget Issues and Other School
Related Matters.


nounced.
Year end events include: JCHS
Awards program 7 p.m., May 12,
in the old high school auditorium.
Baccalaureate is set at 7 p.m,
May 15, in the old high school
auditorium.
Senior exams are May 17 and 18;
Graduation practice 10 a.m. May
20, at the old high school audito-
rium.
Graduation takes place 7 p.m.,
May 20, in the old high school
auditorium.
The year concludes with under-
graduate exams scheduled May 24
and 25.
U


Up to $25,000
in Down Pavment Assistance
Available to qualified buyers. Some restrictions apply on interest rates and down payment assistance.


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES



asall eal, lce#15



Eat a small meal, Lucille


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
'I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"
You Are Invited to participate in these FREE
services if you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:
Group Diabetes Classes
*3 Saturday morning sessions on June 4, 11 and 25, 2005
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department to register: 342-0170, extension 218
Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
*Call Jefferson County Health Department for more info. 342-0170, extension 218
Individual Diabetes Counseling
*Contact your doctor for a referral to the Jefferson County Health Department
*Call the Jefferson County Health Department for more info. at 342-0170, extension 1301

Take Your First Step Today. For more information
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and ask
for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"


big rewards
Prevent tymr :D abetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


A message from the National Diabetes Education Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.
II -


Bih)lDgl ~\








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


F, MEMB RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
SPeriodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Endangered Species


To Get Attention


"The Endangered Species Act
(ESA) desperately needs an updated
and renewed focus on species
recovery," said Richard Pomrbo
(R-CA), chairman of the House
Resources Committee. "Its
one-percent recovery result over the
last 30 years has failed to live up to
the Act's noble intent and our
intrinsic value as Americans."
Pombo, who has joined Senators
Chafee (R-RI) and Crapo (R-ID), as
well as Representative Walden
(R-OR) to work on improvements to
ESA, was referring to the fact that
only 10 of over 1,300 species listed
as threatened or endangered since
the Act was passed in 1973 have
recovered sufficiently to be taken
off the lists.
Both Democrats and Republicans
who support the goal of recovering
threatened and endangered species
increasingly see the need to update
and strengthen the Act to make it
more effective.
Proposed changes include
requiring scientific reviews of
species before listing as endangered
or threatened; scientific review of
critical habitat designations;
requiring state participation in
planning and decision-making; and
making formation of recovery plans
mandatory at the time a species is
listed. Incentives for voluntary
conservation and recovery programs
by private property owners, are also


important.
The recovery of the peregrine fal-
con, which some have hailed as an
example of the ESA's success, was
actually accomplished by private
captive breeding programs and re-
strictions on the use of the pesticide
DDT.
Similarly, the bald eagle, which
may soon come off the endangered
list as fully recovered, grew its num-
bers, not because of the ESA but be-
cause of restrictions on hunting and
the use of DDT.
Much of the ESA's lack of success
can be because no recovery plan is
required when a species is listed,
though set-aside of critical habitat is
required, often before it can be sci-
entifically determined what habitat
should be protected.
Some say habitat protection
should remain the single tool in the
Act for recovering species. Habitat
protection, however; proved to be ir-
relevant in the case of the falcon.
The adaptable birds now thrive in
the nation's largest cities, nesting on
tall buildings instead of mountains
while feeding on the large pigeon
populations common to metropoli-
tan areas.
Even bald eagles, thought to shun
humans, became comfortable resi-
dents in many of Florida's residen-
tial areas when their customary
habitat was ravaged by hurricanes.
(NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
April 12, 1995
Proposed Republican changes to
the National School Lunch Program,
if approved, could have dire conse-
quences here.
Longtime county resident and
businessman Nason Revell died
Monday in Tallahassee Memorial
Regional Medical Center, following
heart surgery. He was 75.
The city and the county are nego-
tiating the terms of the agreement
that will govern what fees will be
collected for the I-10 sewer/water
expansion project, how the fees will
be dispersed and who will operate
the system.
TWENTY YEARS
April 10, 1985
Monticello City property owners
will clean up their property within
15 days after notification or the City
will clean up the property and bill
the owners, said City Superintendent
Don Anderson.
Commissioners replaced $2,500
into county coffers at last weeks
regular meeting. The money was
originally paid for services of Pro-
fessional Consultant, Fred Fox
Patatka, who assisted the county in
writing three HUD grants.
The repair of the jail roof domi-
nated time at Wednesday's County
Commission meeting. Nothing has
been decided yet.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
April 10, 1975
In an early Saturday morning fire,
the home of Mr. and Mrs. William
Rice of South Water Street was
completely destroyed by fire.
Marine PFC Andrew Redmond Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie M. Wil-


liams of Rt. 2 Monticello, partici-
pated in an amphibious training
exercise at the Marine corps Base
Camp Lejeune, NC.
Milady's Shop Business of the
Week.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 9, 1965
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Allen of Ham-
let, NC spent the weekend with his
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. C.C.
Wright.
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Blackmon
visited over the weekend with her
brothers and their families in Jack-
sonville.
Mr. and Mrs. B.B. Ballard of Mid-
land, MI, spent the weekend with
her brother and sister-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Ralph Rhymes and family.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
April 8, 1955
G.R. Soter was honored with a
birthday dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Al-
fred Foster were hosts at El-Al-Joe
Lodge.
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse
entertained at El Destino Plantation.
Honored guests for the afternoon
were Governor and Mrs. LeRoy
Collins.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Mahan en-
tertained honoring Senator S.D.
Clarke on his birthday. Among the
many gifts received by the senator
were orchids, one for each birthday,
from Exotic Gardens in Miami.


Letters to the Editor
Welcomed
500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and
include phone number of
writer


From Our Photo File


WHEN many area service stations were
forced to install new underground tanks,
Herbert Thompson used the occasion, in
July 1988, to celebrate a second grand


opening and the completion of the tank in-
stallation, giving away Cokes and hot dogs.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Everyday Stuff Makes Columns


A good columnist can crank out a
piece using everyday stuff as a
springboard. You know, headaches,
flat tires, misunderstandings be-
tween spouses, stubborn cats:,
cranky cars and toothaches.
Fact is, you write a thought pro-
voking piece and you get a few
comments; write a column about the
garbage disposal attacking you and
you get notes and phone calls.
The late Lewis Grizzard was a,
master at this. You may recall he
frequently mentioned the green
mold in his refrigerator and every
unmarried male in the country iden-
tified with him. Women sympathize
with him.
Grizzard became so popular that,
he, was paid :$20,00,0 a pop for
speeches. "
He even appeared on some televi-.
sion shows. Too bad he had a bad
heart and died before his 50th birth-
day.
I never wrote a column about
green mold but I have written about
being attacked by kitchen
appliances. The toaster, microwave
oven, stove, can opener, and even
the 'fridge have given me trouble.
Things are better now. I was sin-


Publisher's

Notebook


.4 Y'


-Ron Cichon


gle for a long time and leased to
work with these things.
But I well remember my first night
of single status when I put a bottle
of milk in the 'fridge. The bottle hit
the switch-that turned the light off
and on and broke it. From that time
forward I had no light in my refrig-
erator.
When friends came over and had
occasion to open the refrigerator,
they invariably asked, "What hap-
pened to the light?" I always replied,
"It broke."
I used to have a little hot pot to
make tea. The morning after break-
ing the light in the 'fridge, I burned


up the pot. I'm not exactly sure what
happened but the thing was fried to
a crisp.
Now, the interesting thing about
those columns where I reported be-
ing under attack in the kitchen was
the response from people who had
similar experiences.
.One woman called me and said
her husband was so inept with appli-

ances that she banned him from the
kitchen. Apparently, he tried to re-
pair the toaster while it was still
plugged in and pow, toaster was
toast.
In the early days of microwaves,
readers identified with my experi-


ence of getting bacon from the mi-
crowave either half raw or burned
up.
A caller said, "You should have
seen what my husband can do with
aluminum foil in the microwave."
She described it as a "light and laser
show." By the way, the microwave
is off limits to him.
See what I mean about people re-
lating to everyday stuff?
Cats are a good source of column
material. Lots of people have cats so
they understand when I write about
cats staring at you or washing up af-
ter you pet them.
Anybody with a cat knows, you
don't own a cat, they just live where
you do, eat your food, sleep on your
furniture, and hang out on their.own
terms.
If you are good, you can .scratch
the cat behind the ears. Then the cat
has to bathe 'cause you touched
him.
Well, I am now okay with kitchen
appliances and no longer have a cat
so I don't write about things like I
used to.
I will check the 'fridge to see if
there's any green mold. Why not? It
worked for Gizzard.


Farmland Value Increasing


BY CHUCK WOODS
University of Florida

The value of agriculture land con-,
tinued to increase in all areas of the
state last year, buoyed by a popula-
tion boom and strong nonagricul-
tural demand for land, according to
a new University of Florida survey.
"Following recent trends, the mar-
ket for agricultural land was very
active this past year, and the rate of
increase in land values was particu-
larly high in the southern regions of
the state," said John Reynolds, a
professor emeritus with UF's Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences. "In most land-value catego-
ries, we recorded double-digit in-
creases."
He said the most prominent
changes occurred in South Florida
where the value of cropland in-
creased by 58 percent and pasture-
land values jumped by 76 percent.


The largest increases were in the In-
dian River area, Okeechobee County
and the Gulf Coast counties.
Cropland and pastureland in other
regions also experienced substantial
increases: 19 to 25 percent in the
central region of the state, 10 to 19
percent in the northwest region and
9 to 15 percent in the northeast re-
gion.
Although citrus groves did not in-
crease in value as much as cropland
and pasture, the value of orange
groves in the south region increased
by 10 percent and 12 percent in the
central region. The value of grape-
fruit groves increased 34 percent in
the south region and 15 percent in
the central region. The value of land
with 5- to 7- year-old citrus planting
increased about 9 percent in the
south and central regions.
The average value of orange
groves in the south region was
$6,540 per acre, about $130 per acre


higher than in the central region.
The estimated value of grapefruit
groves mcreased to $5,204 per acre
in the south region, about $746 per
acre higher than in the central
region. The average value of land
with 5- to 7- year old citrus groves
was $5,920 per acre in the south re-
gion, about $580 per acre higher
than in the central region.
Reynolds' 2004 land value survey,
which measures changes over the
past year, divides the state into five
regions: south, southeast, central,
northeast, and northwest. Because of
the impact urbanization has on agri-
cultural land values, Reynolds col-
lects data for the southeast region,
including Miami-Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties.
He also measures the value of
transition land acreage being con-
verted or likely to be converted to
nonagricultural sites for homes, sub-
divisions and commercial uses.


Counties were divided into metro-
politan and non-metropolitan coun-
ties, and transition land values were
estimated for each region.
The value of transition land with
in five miles of a major town in met-
ropolitan counties increased by 7 to
13 percent in northern regions of the
state and by 6 to 52 percent in
southern regions. In dollar amounts,
the value of transition land in metro
counties ranged from $14,082 to
$24,983 per acre, except in the
southeast region of the state where
transition land values were $62,500
per acre.
The value of transition land more
than five miles from a major town in
metro counties ranged from $7,950
to $14,352 per acre, except in the
southeast where the value was
$36,250 per acre.
In non-metro counties, the value
of transition land with five miles of

(See Farmland Page 5)


Forests Vital To State Economy


A study released recently by the
Florida Forestry Association and the
University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences re-
veals that Florida's forests and for-
est products industry are among the
largest agricultural commodities in
the state, with total output above
$16.5 billion.
The findings were announced by
Agriculture Commissioner Charles
Bronson and the Florida Forestry
Association.
Titled, "Economic Impacts of the
Forest Industry in Florida," the land-
mark study also shows that the in-
dustry supplied Florida with over


133,000 jobs in 2003. In addition to
providing jobs, Florida's forestry
community manages forests that
provide wildlife habitat, clean air,'
clean water, recreation and more
than 5,000 products that we use
daily. -
"The report confirms what those
in the agricultural industry have al-
ways known that our forests and
products derived from then have a
tremendous economic benefit to
Florida," Bronson said. "And the
recreational value they provide, as
well as the clean water and air,
make the millions of acres of forests
in Florida one of the state's most


treasured resources."
The forest industry continues to
grow in Florida. Yesterday,
Georgia-Pacific Corporation an-
nounced it expects to open its new-
est oriented strand board (OSB) mill
in Hosford, Florida, this summer.
The operation will employ more
than 100 people and will bring more
revenue to Liberty County through
taxes, utilities and local businesses.
Keeping a healthy forest products
market is essential to keeping Flor-
ida green. Florida's forest industry
constantly works to sustain the
state's forests, ensuring that the re-
source stays abundant for years to


come.
"The Nature Conservancy has al-
Sways recognized the important eco-
logical value of Florida's managed
forests," said Vicki Tshinkel, The
Nature Conservancy's Florida direc-
tor. "This study confirms the eco-
nomic benefits of those ecological
values, which are best maintained
by preserving forest lands for future
generations."

Forests also have a significant im-
pact on tourism and recreation in
Florida. Over half of all Florida visi-
tors engage in some type of nature-
based activity during their visits.


I I


II LI IL I


re II Is


Ilac-- :


I







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005 PAGE 5


Shelter Caretaker Reports
Stolen Pit Bull Inquiries


J. B.. 7J1 M.. s. t ,
GERALDINE WILDGOOSE, director, of St. don Campbell about health foods and how
Phillip's Boys and Girls Club instructs Bran- they are grouped. (News Photo)


Farmland Values Increase


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
It's that time of year again when
people of the community begin re-
porting the theft of their Pit Bulls.
Shelter Caretaker for the Humane
Society Cheryl Bautista said the
shelter has received several calls
from people inquiring about their
animals. "They were taken out of
their yards and one was even taken
off the chain," she added.
Sheriff David Hobbs said his de-
partment has only received one re-
port of dog theft so far. "But they

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIALS &.TRIBUTES
w-wm a rd


to the shelters trying to find their.
animals."


Police Chief Dnvid ri-,hv nai L11o


u v ".. ilei ..i-aVilu 1.tiUy b ills U 11
may not be reporting it to us." said department has not yet received any
Hobbs. "They might just call around reports of animals theft.


AD CORRECTION


Creative Pursuits, Inc.


Training, Technical Services

& Success Products


P.O. Box 1243

Monticello, FL, 32344
850.997.2837

www.creativepursuitsinc.com


(Continued From Page 4)
a major town ranged from $4,793 to
$6,778 per acre. Transition land
more than five miles from a major
town ranged from $3,921 to $5,446
per acre.
For the 2004 study, six counties
were reclassified. Reynolds said the
changes in the northwest include
moving Jefferson and Wakulla
counties into the Tallahassee metro-
politan statistical area (MSA), which
is a federal designation for urban or
urbanizing areas. In the northeast re-
gion, Gilchrist County was moved
into the Gainesville MSA, and Fla-
gler County was removed from ad-
jacent MSA counties. In the
southern region, Indian River
County was designated as the Vero
Beach MSA.
"It is important to emphasize that
the value of a specific tract of land
may vary substantially from the sur-
vey estimates.because of the physi-
cal characteristics of the tract, its
location and the economic or institu-
tional factors that restrict its use,"
Reynolds said.


"The survey measured land values
up to May 2004, and it does not in-
clude any changes in land values
that may have occurred after last
year's hurricane season."
The 2004 Florida Agricultural
Land Value Survey also shows:
Last year, the value of cropland
and pastureland in the south region
increased from $1,100 to $1,400 per
acre. The value of improved pasture
was higher in the central region than
in other regions. The lowest agricul-
tural land values were reported in
the northwest region, ranging from
$1,450 per acre for unimproved pas-
ture to $2,193 per acre for irrigated
cropland.
The value of irrigated cropland
was $3,901 per acre in the south re-
gion, $3,709 in the central region,
and $3,428 in the northeast region.
The value of non-irrigated cropland
was $3,237 in the central region,
$2,657 in the northwest region and
$1,983 in the northwest region.
The value of improved pasture
ranged from $3,608 per acre in the
central region to $1,783 per acre in


North Florida Community College


Artist Series Ang


North Florida Community College thanks the 2004
Artist Angel Patrons for supporting and enhancing
the 2004-05 NFCC Artist Series season.

Corporate Sponsors
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates, Inc.
Madison County Community Bank

Gold Sponsors
Beggs Funeral Home
Madison Veterinary Clinic
Morris & Judy Steen
Norris Pharmacy & Ladybug Cafe
The Rosery Florist
Thomas P. Moffses, Jr.

Silver Sponsors
AFLAC C.E. "Bill" Russell
A Gentle Touch
Bronze Spnsors: Arden & Dorothy Brown, Dr. Rebecca Burkart, Jim Catron,
Mr. & Mrs. William B. Clark, Patricia Hinton, Sue Krause, Roberta 'Bobbie"
O'Hara, Elizabeth C. Rotter, Myra Valentine and Margaret Wilkerson


the northwest region. The value of ;T o-o--raB-o-o-s-o- O-O B r rTO "-arre se oo o o ooo ns oiron annnm --O-o o -o a o oo
unimproved pasture ranged from
$2,605 per acre in the south region
to $1,451 in the northwest region.
The value of farm woods in-
creased by 18 percent in the north- "
west region of the state and by 16
percent in the northeast region. "
Survey respondents were asked if 1
they expect'agricultural land values
to be higher, lower or remain un-
changed during the next 12 months. C
Eighty-five percent of the respon-
dents in northern areas and 67 per-
cent of the respondents in south
region expect land values to increase The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
during the next year. Only 2 per- the following items for recycling:
cent expect lower land values during
the next 12 months, respondents in
the southeast region said that they All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
expect land values to increase by 30 laundry detergent bottles, etc.
percent, primarily because of strong
urban demands. All 1 .... ; ..- Ti- ;-.f-i i-n fQr,- ,-I ,,r ? n-t fri r an-,
f,1 d.,i~-*.JJu~mo ~~~ d-~ f~ d ca food I cas,


ENERG Ri AA no
by ALU.. 't

Protectin Agenc and th


0










dO
c;j


S lil wVpe cans ,tin cansii loou cans U0, 9nyIVV <^an.->, udl I >VU k'nv
III 'etc.
Aluminum cans- soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc. ,
6
; ~ All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

^ All glass bottles. jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)
c
SResidents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the -
Scollection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong? ,


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
Household garbage

S *Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

P *Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters P

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents) -

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
S accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
o collection site for the proper disposal of above items.
o C

SThe City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
; information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
0 Don Anderson at 342-0154.
0 *C,


SPlease visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
Operation for each individual site. For further information please call the .
SSolid Waste Department at 342-0184.


V t w a ', b ar9 g Rcy nfo a 0..0b pa
i-' ; Visit the www.Earth9_.1 .org Recycling Information web page
.'b6 o a 0'-o-o6-o o -o o bo-ono C-o o oiro o o-o o'o oo o-'o-oo-o'o o 0- b BT B oo B oo-' a a a o r1F6-b' a- ,


1 9











PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005


Lifestyle


'i


Shaundala Brown


Honored At JCHS


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

In conjunction with Boys and
Girls Clubs Week, the Clubs of the
Big Bend held a celebration in
honor of Shaundala Brown, named


Florida Boys and Girls Club Youth
of the Year, Wednesday, at Jeffer-
son County High School.
Students, teachers, staff, School
Board members, parents, and
friends, and Club members were on
hand to hear President Buddy Streit
speak.


Streit spoke highly of Brown and
highlighted some of her accomplish-
ments over the past 12 years and en-
couraged the students to follow her
path to success.
He stated that the walk down the
Road to Success would not be an
easy one. "But, if you work hard,
apply yourself, keep your nose
clean, and stay straight, you can
make it."
Brown, who is also the JCHS
Valedictorian, and received a $2,500
scholarship from the Club, took the


podium to thank all those who
helped her achieve her success and
to express her appreciation for the
award.
"We are what we are today be-
cause of the teachers and mentors
we had as we grew up," was a recur-
rent theme of the program.

JES Club Director and City Coun-
cilman Gerrold Austin read a Proc-
lamation by Mayor, Julie Conley,
proclaiming April 3-9 as Boys and
Girls Club Week, here.


Shakeira Norton Named

JCHS Club Student Of Month


CONGRATULATING Shaundala Brown for her selection as
Florida Boys and Girls Club Youth of the Year, is President
Buddy Streit. (News Photo)



Learning Center To Offer

Basic Computer Classes


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Learning Center, 490 S.
Marvin Street, is offering Basic
Computer Classes from 6-8 p.m. on
Tuesday.
Geared towards the senior adults
in the community, the classes will
run for a six week period.
: Installing the computers for this
new program is Elder Cedric


;-..

':"- ''*"


MADRY


Spradley, Pastor of Friendship
Primitive Baptist Church.
Innovative Partners and Mt. Ararat
AME will be hosting other educa-
tional programs for seniors.
As a part of the program, regular
calls will be made to the seniors in
the program, to make sure that their
needs are being met.
To inquire about this and other
classes offered at The Learning
Center call Byron Barnhart at 251-
0386, or Ted Houston at 576-4929.

Madry To Earn
AA Degree

Jarodric DeJuan Madry will
graudate for Tallahassee Commu-
nity College Saturday, April 30.
He will receive his AA degree in
Business Administration and plans
to continue his education at FSU.
He is a 2002 graduate of Jefferson
County High School.

He is the son of Sylvia Brinson
and Andrew Madry of Tallahassee.
He is the grandson of Clyde and
Etta Brinson of Monticello.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

March STAR of the Month for the
Jefferson County High School Boys
and Girls Club is Shakeira Norton.-
She is an 11th grader at the Jeffer-
son County High School, a member
of Junior Leadership, FBLA, and
Beth Page MB Church.
She is the daughter of Kathryn and
Jimmy Speed, and Melvin Norton.
She is the granddaughter of Mar-
tha and Abraham Robinson, and Ed-
die Lynn, Sr.


Her hobbies include: reading, lis-
tening to music, and talking on the
telephone.
Norton plans to attend a commu-
nity college, after high school, and
then transfer to a university. She
plans to pursue a career in Nursing
or Cosmetology.

S IN MEMORY
Wille Webb
4/12/68 12/11/84
My Dear Son,
So many years have passed since
the Lord called you home.

You have been truly missed by
your little sister and big brother and 'i'
the rest of the family.

We love you.
Mom, Barbara, Dunnell


"We are very proud of her here at
the JCHS Boys and Girls Club, and
congratulate her for a job well
done," said Director Sandra Saun-
ders.






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If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read About It In The

Monticello News

'You Can't Be Without It'


to. CHAMBER Op


S24th Annual Four Freedoms Festival 'C(
April 15th & 16th
April 15th 6:00 p.m. Street Dance & Food. April 16th 5k Run/
Walk, Parade at 10:00 p.m., Arts/Crafts, Food, with scheduled
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005 PAGE 7


Hattie Jordan Club

Enrichment Leader


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Enrichment Leader Hattie Ruth
Jordan, has been with the St. Phillip
Boys and Girls Club since its incep-
tion in March of 2003.
"She is a real asset to the after
school program," states Director
Geraldine Wildgoose.
"She is capable of filling in wher-
ever needed, and because of her
sports background, and her involve-
ment in recreation, she coordinates
the Club tournaments," Wildgoose
said.
Jordan is an Assistant Coach for
softball, at Howard Middle School,
where she is also a paraprofessional.
She has been employed by the
school system for many years.
She is SWAT Coordinator for


HMS and has a knack for integrat-
ing this into the SMART Move Pro-
gram, a part of the Club curriculum.
Both programs deal with Drugs, Al-
cohol, and Tobacco Prevention.
She is a member of the Union Hill
AME Church in Wacissa, and in-
volved in her church youth group.
Her talents at the church, and
with the youth, are carried over to
the activities she shares with the
youth at the Club.
"She is experienced in the fine arts
of acting and drama, and has a natu-
ral talent for teaching the art to her
students," explains Wildgoose.
"As part of the Boys and Girls
Club Week, the Club gave Teachers
Recognition to Ms. Jordan. They
recognized her by writing pen-pal
letters to her s6n in Iraq,"
Wildaoose said.


Scholarship Program Helps

Students Get To College


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Learning Center Director, Byron
Barnhart explains that "Take Stock
in Children" is a nonprofit program
which provides deserving low in-
come children in the community
with scholarships to college or voca-
tional school and guidance for car-
ing mentors.
To qualify for the program, chil-
dren must: be selected between the
sixth and ninth grades by a commit-
tee of teachers and community rep-
resentatives; sign a contract


agreeing to stay drug and crime free;
maintain satisfactory grades; exhibit
good behavior in school; and have a
financial need; and be determined to
succeed.
To register and/or for additional
information, contact Barnhart at
251-0386.
Upon graduation from high
school, each student who has hon-
ored the 'Take Stock in Children'
commitment receives a full tuition
scholarship to college.
By becoming a "Take Stock in
Children" sponsor or mentor, citi-
zens can help students contribute to
the future of the community.


JORDAN

Local Residents
To Perform At
NFCC Concert

County residents Janis Course
and Russell Courson will perform
the North Florida Community Col-
lege Spring Concert 4 p.m, Sunda
at the First Baptist Church of Mad
son.

The concert will be directed b
Dr. Rebecca Burkart, of Monticello
It will feature a Requiem Ma
showcasing the work by 19th cer
tury composer, Luigi Cherubini.
Also included will by several St
phen Foster songs and sprititua
"As I Went down to the River
Pray," from the movie "Oh Brothe
Where Art Thou?"
There is no charge for admission

AA, Alanon
Meetings, Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The County Health Department
will host the first meeting of the Do-
ers Club Diabetes Support Group
noon, Friday in the Conference
room. ...
The meeting is free of charge and
all participants will be provided ma-

Commissioner Hall
Call District II
Meeting

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Commissioner Gene Hall has
scheduled a District II Community
Meeting 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16,
at Ford's Chapel AME Church on
West Lake Road.
Hall called the meeting to listen to
concerns, and answer questions of
his constituents.
Among expected topics of discus-
son are county roads, and public
safety issues.
Hall can be contacted at
321-6673, or online at:
ghallboard@yahoo.com


Police
(Continued From Page 2)
rant and for giving a false name to a
law enforcement agent.
A check of the vehicle, moreo-
ver, produced a bag of powdered co-
caine and a bag of marijuana, which
resulted in the arrest of the three
other occupants, according to the
MPD.
Additionally, a search of Miller al-
legedly produced a bag of
marijuana, a bag of powder cocaine
and a small container with several
crack cocaine rocks.
All the occupants were charged
with possession of marijuana and
possession of cocaine. Miller, in ad-
dition, was charged with possession
of cocaine with intent to distribute
and sell.


OPPORTUNITIES FOR GIVING

Your Gift
is a way to conquer
lung disease
Find out how you can help.
Call your local
AMERICAN- LUNG ASSOCIATION.
A 1-800-LUNG-USA


trials.
Spokesperson Bonnie Mathis said
attendants may feel free -to bring
their lunches if they wish.
Timely diabetes information will


Lamont Baptist Members

Face Another Setback


?RAN HUNT
staff Writer

As the one year anniversary of
the Lamont Baptist Church fire ap-
proaches, the congregation suffered
Syet another setback.
Spokesman Gerald Bailey attrib-

Poetry Contest
Seeks Entrants
The Talent Literary Guild is spon-
Ssoring a free amateur poetry contest.
There are 50 prizes total, with a
grand prize of $1,000.
.To enter,, send one poem, 21 lines
Sor less to: Free Poetry Contest, 1257
., ,Siskiyou Blvd, PMB 4, Ashland,
OR. 97520.
Poems may be written on any sub-
on ject, in any style.
in Deadline for entering is April 30.
The editors reserve the right to
y publish the winning poems online.
Li- A winner's list will be sent to all
entrants.
"We are delighted to sponsor this
contest," says Thomas Grey, poetry
Director. "Poets deserve opportuni-
Sties to exhibit their work and get
Recognition.
S "We hope our contest will encour-
age new poets to share their art."


e-
al,
to
,r,


?RAN HUNT
3taff Writer

AA and Alanon meetings will be
hosted at the Episcopal Church of-
fice, located on Cherry Street.
All meetings are at 8 p.m.
Mnndavs arep rino thp Rio


Citizens Complete
Center CPR Class

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Residents recently completed a
CPR class at the Learning Center,
490 S. Marvin Street.
This was the first class to be of-
fered at the center.

Citizens completing the course in-
clude: Mary Alice Howard, Linda
Glenn, and Agnes Brooks.'


utes the latest barrier as the sky-
rocketing prices of building
materials.
"The price of a sheet of 4 x 8
plywood is up to $30," said Bailey.
"It's a case of either having to scale
back on our plans or going into
debt, which we don't want to do.
We're basically back to square
one."
He added that with the rising cost
of building supplies, the church
does not have enough funds to pro-


ceed with the construction.
"It's just been one setback behind
another," said Bailey. He added
that the architect who had been
working on the plans for the build-
ing had already submitted what was
about his 30th plan for the church
"The plans have to keep being
changed to keep within our
budget."
He concluded that the members
of the congregation have not given
up on rebuilding. "If God wants
that church to be built, it will be
built."
The church was totally destroyed
by fire April 27 last year.


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be presented each month during the Book; Thursdays,are 12 Steps and:.
meetings. 12 Traditions; and Saturday niglnhs ,* r ,
SPrticipanr t will be able to .net-- are open ..
work with other diabetics, share in- Also, te L d's W n's
Also, the Lloyd's Women's Club NO' I"
formation, learn new ideas; give and hosts AA and Alanon meetings
receive support, and ask questions. Wednes s an lan ad Fridys
"Take betWednesdays at 8 p.m. and Fridays
tesTa nrtoot condo your a-at 7:30 p.m. Now Enrolling For The 2005 2006 School Year
tes, and plan to attend and take ad- at:730p.m. O2005 2006 School Year
vantage of this new diabetes support For further information contact
group in your community," Mathis Rolina a 997-2129.
encourages. Rolina at 997-2129.
ea SOVEREIGN GRACE ACADEMY

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c.







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005


AALIYAH MARTIN waves before preparing
to cash her tickets in on one of the many
games at Family Fun Day. L-R: LaTonah


Martin, Chaplin Mills, Denise Butler, at the
ticket booth. (News Photo)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
A Family Fun Day, sponsored by
the Jefferson Correctional Institute,
as a Relay For Life fundraiser, was
held Saturday at the old Jefferson
County High School.
All the JCI staff participated, and
raised $1,582 for the fight against
cancer.
The event featured games for the
children and activities for adults.
Among the activities were: a cake
walk, sack race and 3-legged race,
finger printing, fishing, ring toss and
bean bag toss, a dart throw, and a
puppet show.
Foods available included: ham-


burgers, hot dogs, chicken sand-
wiches and dinners, bake sale
items, and cold drinks.
The rummage sale offered a wide
variety of items including: furniture,
tables, board games, books, lamps,
clothing, glassware, and dinnerware,
all at affordable prices.
The parking lot area was com-
pletely full of items for sale. A lot
of JCI employees did some early
spring cleaning to make for a very
successful sale.
The JCI staff would especially like
to thank Aramark Corp., Petco,
Sam's Club, Winn Dixie, Monti-
cello Florist, the Marzuq Shrine
Temple in Tallahassee, County
School Board, and the JCI Employ-
ees Club.


1..


:..


PLUCKING DUCKS is Alaina Garrison, who won a mask,
necklace and ball at the Family Fun Day Relay For Life
Fundraiser, sponsored by Jefferson Correctional Institute.


SAMIRIA MARTIN displays displays the goldfish she won
in the "Go for the Gold" booth at JCI Family Day. Sherry
Waters manned the game.


,r .



DEBORAH JONES cooks bur-
gers for the JCI Relay for Life
fundraiser.


Family Fun Day Relay

Team Raised $1,582


ACA Spring Auction Set

I May 7 At Country Club
Aucilla Christian Academy plans Finlayson suggested
its Annual Spring Auction, to be creatively about donations
held at the Jefferson County Coun- unique items often create
try Club, Saturday, May 7. interest.
S"We will need assistance
"In order for this event, our big- for setup and securing it(


gest fund raiser of the year, to be a
success, we must have strong sup-
port from our volunteer base," Prin-
cipal Richard Finlayson said. "Any
donated goods or services, will be
greatly appreciated," he added.


thinking
Because
the most

e that day
ems. and


selling tickets for the event," he
said.
Tickets for the dinner and auction
are $25 per person. Call the school
office for further information at
997-3597.


.t~k


STAFFING the Rummage Sale on Family Fun Day, was
Rhonda Peters and Mike Maloy. (News Photos)


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FEVER PITCH (PG13)
Fri. 4:15 7:30 10:10
Sat. 1:15 -4:15 -7:30- 10:10
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Sports


Warrior JVs Lose Last Four


Games; Drop To 2-10 Season


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005 PAGE 9


* ACA Ladies Down


Maclay, Taylor


7RAN HUNT
;taff Writer

The ACA junior varsity baseball
team fell to a 2-10 season after
dropping its last four games.
Coach Daryl Adams said the War-
riors have a lot of talent between
them, but they are just unable to
bring it all together as a team.
When ACA went up against
NFC, they were stomped for an
11-1 loss.
The game ran five innings be-
cause of the 10 run rule.
Stephen Dollar pitched the first
three innings, striking out no bat-
ters and giving up five hits and five
walks; and Kyle Barnwell pitched
the final inning, striking out one
batter and giving up four hits and
three walks.
Barnwell went one for two,
scored one run; and Elliott Lewis


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School baseball
team climbed to a 2-2 season after
winning two of their last three
games .
When the Bumblebees faced off
against Trinity Catholic, they stung
them for a 10-2 victory.
Demontray Johnson had one sin-
gle and struck out four; D'Vonte
graham hit three doubles and two
triples.
Amrnez Ammons had one single
and two doubles; Markeys Leonard
hit one triple and one single; An-


also went one for two.
When the Warriors played Madi-
son Central, they lost 8-3.
Barnwell pitched four and two-
thirds innings, striking out two bat-
ters and giving up six hits and three
walks.
Casey Anderson pitched the final
two and one-third innings, striking
out no batters and giving up four
hits and two walks.
In the batters box, Anderson had
two walks and scored one run;
Brandon Dunbar scored one run;
and Dollar went one for three and
scored one run.
In their second game against
Madison Central, the Warriors fell
for a 9-4 defeat.
Dollar pitched all six innings,
striking out five batters; giving up
seven hits; three walks.
Anderson went O for three and
had one walk, one run; Barnwell


10-5 by Florida High.
Graham had one triple, two dou-
bles and struck out three; Broxie
struck out four; and Ammons and
Johnson each hit a double.
The Bumblebees swarmed Taylor
County 13-3 in their most recent
game.
Curtis Hightower had two singles
and one RBI; Broxie had two sin-
gles and struck out five; Ammons
had two singles and one double;
and Johnson had two singles and
one double.
Graham had two doubles, three
RBI and struck out four; Telvin
Norton had one single, one triple
and one RBI; Leonard had one sin-


:hoLn[, 1\Darih;.l liii .-.C, ini-ad.... e.and-one double, and McDaniel
Shayne Broije,h.ad t'vo.singles and, went t\ o for three with one single.
struck out four. Their next game is against Trinity
The Mightl, Bees were defeated Catholic, 4 p.m., April 12.


Roberts won't Attend

State Competition


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
ColbR Roberts. \\ ho represented
Aiucilla Christian Acadenl\ in
weightlifting this year, wrapped up
the season after not qualifying for
the State Competition last week.
He competed in the four seasonal
meets and placed first in his class of
199'pounds, twice, and placing sec-
ond in his class, twice.
Roberts won first place in the Re-
gional Competition. He had a com-
bined lift of 500 pounds, 190
pounds on the cling and jerk and
310 pounds on the bench press.
"He's been working hard and
pretty much blowing the other com-
petition away in the bench press,"
said Coach Dave Roberts.
"He's won the bench press at all
the meets; he just needs to work on
the cling and jerk a little more,"
Rob'trts said before going to the
Sate Qualifying meet.
During that meet, Colby had a
combined lift of 500 pounds, 310 in
the bench press to place third in his
weight class (only 15 pounds less
than the first place winner), and 190
in the cling and jerk, to finish fifth
in his class.

Cheerleader
Training Set

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County High School
Boys and Girls Club is offering
Cheerleading Training and Recruit-
ment beginning Tuesday, April 12
and running through April 28.

The training will take place in the
new gym every day at 4:30 p.m.

For more information contact Club
Director Sandra Saunders at 528-
3995.


Roberts has set a goal towards be-
ing able to lift 345 in the bench
press and 220 in the cling and jerk.
"He's starting to gear up for foot-
ball season now," Dave Roberts
nnrclnded


went one for three.
Luke Whitmer had one walk and
scored one run; Rob Searcy went
one for three with one double, Dol-
lar had one walk and scored one
run; and Will Hartsfield went one
for three.
In the Florida high game, the
Warriors fell for a 9-7 loss.
Dollar pitched most of the in-
nings; and Anderson pitched the fi-
nal inning.
Anderson batted one for three;
Reggie Walker went one for one
and scored one run; Dollar had one
walk and scored one run; Barnwell
went two for four and scored one
run; and Daniel Greene went one
for three and scored one run.

Searcy scored two runs; Matt
Bishop went three for three with
two triples, one single, one run;
and Hartsfield went one for two.


SRI*e~a
qfz .
IBM


"- 4


LADY WARRIOR
Saunders shown in
pitched a 7 inning
against Maclay and
4.0 for the season
Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity softball team climbed to a
S 12-3 season after winning their two
most recent games.
In the first game, the Ladies
downed Maclay 5-1, in a makeup
game.
The Lady Warriors had six hits
and one error.
3' Bethany Saunders pitched the
seven inning, no-hitter and faced
off 22 batters.
:- Lisa Wheeler went one for three.
with one triple, two RBI; Brittany
Bethany Hobbs went one for two and
practice, smacked an in the park home run;


no hitter
stands at
n. (News


and Jennifer Tuten went one for
two.
In the second game, the Ladies
blanked Taylor 11-0, in five inn-
nings.
Hobbs pitched the game, intriing
out three and giving up two walks.
She currently has -a 7-3 season re-;
cord.

Kayla Gebhard went two for three:
with one double, two stolen bases-
and three RBI; Joanna Cobb went
one for one with one RBI and two
stolen bases; Chelsea Kinsey went
one for one with one RBI and two,
stolen bases; and Tuten went one.
for one with one RBI.
In pitching, Saunders carries a,
4-0 season.


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HMS Wins Two Of

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Group Fitness Schedule


-I *e-'


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


TUESDAY


MONDAY


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005

Humane Society To Host


Adoption Training Class


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

SThe Jefferson County Humane
Society will be hosting an adoption
booth training class, 6 p.m., Mon-
.day, April 18, at the shelter.
S Director of Kennel Operations
Tina Ames stresses the importance
of these adoption booths and en-
courages more involvement from
members of the community.
"A good number of our adop-
tions come from the adoption


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
: Warriors are at number one, on the
Big Bend Leaders, tied with Port St.
Joe with an 11-2 season.
- In batting averages, Casey Gun-
nels is at number eight, up from
number 14 last week, with 19 hits
out of 39 times at bat. He averages
S 87.
SChris Tuten is at number 13, up
from number 23 last week, with 18
hits out of 39 times at bat. He aver-
iges, .462.
2 Drew Sherrod stands at number
18, down from the number eight po-
sition last week, with 15 hits out of
35 times at bat. He averages .429.
SRidgely Plaines is at number 50
after being added to the list of lead-
ers this week.


booths and adopt-a-thons," said
Ames. "We need more people to
participate to help these unfortu-
nate animals of the community."
The adoption manual for the class
discusses adoption fees and re-
quirements, talking with potential
adopters, understanding and proper
filing out of required paperwork,
setting up and taking down the
booth and care of the animals.
Do's and Don'ts included in the
manual are not requiring a fenced
yard for all canine adoptions, no


In RBI, Sherrod is tied for second
place, up from last week's third
place, with 21.
Glen Bishop remains tied for ninth
place with 12.

Sherrod is again tied for second
place in home runs with four, and
also remains tied for second place in
pitching with a 4-0 season.

In earned run average, Sherrod is
in at number eight, down from num-
ber four, with 1.31 per game.

In strikeouts, Plaines stands at a
firm number six, down from last
week's four, with 33.

In innings pitched, Sherod is in at
number nine, up from 14, with 26.2


Waukeenah Fencers Drop

First Game Of Season
SThe Waukeenah Fence & Deck went to bat three times and struck
Co:,ed Softball team lost its first out.
;game of the -season to Coosh's Erin Boyd went to bat twice and
Bayou Rouge, 10-7 in the bottom hit one single; Darcia Hewitt went
if the sixth inning, to bat three times and hit two sin-
: Spokesman Nick Flynt said the gles; and Michelle Bronson went to
Ioss was possible\ due to first game bat; twice. :hitting singles both
jitters and errors. "We didn't play times.
-real well. We're not in shape yet Nick Flynt went to bat three
:and kind of rusty," he added, times, had three singles, scored one
S "The hitting probably could be run and brought in two RBI; Kyle
better, but that will come in the Shaw went to bat three times and
Pext game," said Flynt. struck out; Steve Lohbeck went to
: Out of a total of 32 times at bat as bat twice, hitting two singles; and
: team, Waukeenah had 19 singles, Andy Telefsen went to bat twice,
Four RBI, one double and two hitting two singles.
-home runs and a .594 batting aver- Matthew Addison went to bat
.age. for a home run and one RBI;Casey
2 Alison Flynt went to bat three Chance went to bat twice and hit a
:imes, had one single and scored single; and Matt Grant went to bat
ibne run; Lucy Buzbee went to bat three times, hit a home run, had a
.;three times, had two singles and double, scored two runs and had
Scored two runs; and Lani Bedsole one RBI.


chained dogs are allowed and cats-
or kittens adopted are not to be
transported to the home of the
adopter in any other way than a se-
cure carrier or box.
An explanation of everything
covered by the shelter adoption
fees is also given. The fee includes
current vaccinations for both dogs
and cats, rabies vaccination is pro-
vided once the animals reach four
months old, spay or neuter of the
animal, dogs are tested for heart
worms and are negative, cats and
kittens are tested for feline leuke-
mia and aids, and are negative.
Other than those to work the
adoption booths, Ames also advises
of additional needs associated with
the adoption booths.
Volunteers are also needed before
and after the adoption booths and
adopt-a-thons. "On Thursdays we
need at least three volunteers for
bathing and grooming of the ani-
mals," Ames explained.
The next adopt-a-thon is set
April 29 through May 1 at
Petsmart.
For this event, volunteers required
include bathing and grooming serv-
ices on Thursday, April 28.
At least one person at the shelter
10 a.m. Friday, to assist with load-
ing the van for approximately one
hour.
At least one person to meet her at
Petsmart at 11 a.m. to assist with
unloading and setup for approxi-
mately several hours.
Two people in the evening from
5 p.m. until approximately 8 or 9
p.m. to help with running the
booth.
Saturday at 7:30 a.m. one person
is needed for about one half hour to
help load the van.
One is needed to meet her at
Petsmart for about one hour at 8:30
a.m. to help unload the van, and at
least two people from 10 a.m. until
9 p.m. (not an all-day requirement).
Help needed on Sunday includes:
at least one person at 10 a.m. at the
shelter to assist for about one hour
with loading; at least one person to
iieet hlie-t Petsimart at I I a m. for
about one hour to help with unload-
ing.
Also, at least two people from 11
a.m. until 6 p.m. to help run the
both and help load up in the eve-
ning (not an all-day requirement).
At least two people at 5 p.m. to
assist with breakdown and load up
and one other person to be at the
shelter for helping unload the ani-
mals from the van at 7 p.m.
To volunteer before, after or dur-
ing the adoption booths or for in-
formation pertaining to the class,
call the shelter at 342-0244.


CHEF LEIGHTON LANGFORD, Diane Clark, Langford collects the money from custom-
Susan Connell, help customer Shari Dono- ers at the Sheriff's Department Relay for
van make a sausage sandwich as Jackie Life fundraiser, recently. (News Photo)


Warriors Win Three Straight,

Catapult To 12-2 Season


BILL BROWN


After winning their past three
games last week, the Warriors var-
sity baseball team was catapulted to
a 12-2 season.

In distract play against
Carrabelle, the Warriors emerged
with a 13-5 win.
Drew Sherrod pitched the first six
innings, striking out five batters
and giving up five hits and five
walks. His record is 4-0 for the
year and Chris Tuten worked the
seventh, facing three batters and re-
cording the save.

Casey Gunnels had three hits at
four times to the plate, including a
triple and one RBI. He led the 14
hit attack of the Warriors.
Tuten had two hits and one sto-
len base; Sherrod had two hits and
one RBI; Justin Payne had one hit;
Glen Bishop and Dustin Roberts
each had one hit, Josh Carswell had
two hits and three RBI; and Daniel
Roccanti had two hits.

Also noteworthy were four base
on balls issued to Ridgely Plaines.
Following the Carrabelle win, the
Warriors returned home to face
Apalachicola on Tuesday. The re-
sult was an 11-1 win in five
innings, elevating their record to
11-2 and 5-0 in district play.
Gunnels was on the mound for
the first four innings to get his re-
cord win of the year. He gave up
one run, five hits and struck out
seven.


Bishop worked the fifth, struck
out one and allowed no runs or hits.
As in the Monday game, Warrior
bats were active, racking up 10
hits, led by Tuten with a single, one
triple and two RBI; Gunnels also
had a high single, a triple and two
stolen bases.
Others hitting singles included
Sherrod with two RBI; Plaines with
two stolen bases; Austin Roberts
and Kyle Peters.
Carswell had a double and two
RBI, and Bishop, the other War-
rior to hit safely, belted a home run
and two RBI.

On Friday, the Warriors took the
field at Tom Brown Park in Talla-
hassee to face John Paul II, another
district opponent.

When the dust cleared, Aucilla
had recorded its most lopsided win
in recent memory, a 28-0 rout, col-
lecting 20 hits.
Plaines pitched the first four in-
nings, allowed no runs, one hit and
struck out eight. Bishop came on
the fifth to wind it up.

With balls flying everywhere,
Sherrod gets credit for leading the
Warriors with three doubles, a
grand slam home run and 10 RBI.
Gunnels had a double, two sin-
gles and three RBI; Tuten follow-
ing closely with three singles and
two RBI.
Bishop had two hits; Plaines had
one hit and one stolen base; Car-
swell had two singles and one RBI;


Roberts had one hit one RBI;
Payne and Peters each had one hit;
and Roccanti had two singles, one
sacrifice fly and two RBI.
The Warriors will face Echols
County 4 p.m., Thursday, here in
their next game.
r


CALL OR VIlS T o
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

S385-6047
Gowm rnnt Employees Ic liuroce o ( G1([C Gtnro Iniurone Co.
G.tlO Indt enity o C0 [ os uolly ( o. ... olonlol County M utl Ins to
(l[(O,. Wohlnglon., ( 0 16 W 200 6tl(O




It Pays
To Advertise!
Monticello News
997-3568


BU.., .S INESS Ca t
1us IlRSR99 3568 to




_DIRECTORY ___ervice
U U UCT~ll%,


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www.TimPeary.com


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For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
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DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE I I


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


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(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


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COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE

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(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cnt


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exclusivee Agent
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad






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Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
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LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Application for Tax Deed:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
Andrew Alexander, Jr. the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and names in which it was assessed are as
follows: Certificate No. 461, Year of
Issuance 2000. Description of Property
Lying and being in the Northeast of the
Southwest '1 of Section 38, Township One
South, Four East, commencing 275 yards
North from the Northwest corner of
Pucker, Thomas and Cole. Continue at a
certain corner up said forth line, and
running North (70) yards, thence East
(140) yards, thence South (70) yards,
thence West (140) yards to its initial
starting point, containing two 2 acres
more or less. Name in which assessed
Jane Crumity Hrs. All of said property
being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificates or certificates will be sold to
the highest bidder at the courthouse door
on the 14th day of April, 2005 at 11:00
a.m. Dated this 17th day of March, 2005.
Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County.
3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13 chg

Notice of Public Hearing: The Jefferson
County Planning Commission will review
and make a recommendation to the Board
of County Commissioners regarding a
proposed major residential subdivision.
The subdivision is to be located on the
south side of Basset Dairy Road
approximately 2.5 miles south of the
intersection with Ashville Highway on
approximately 131 acres and includes
about 26 single family lots. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Planning Commission


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997-3568



Monticello
News
'You Can't Be
Without It!'


LEGAL NOTICE

meeting on May 12, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in
the courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. The meeting
may be continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any meeting
or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing
is required of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. Interested persons may contact
the Jefferson County Planning and
Building Department at 850-342-0223 or
written the Department at P.O. Box 1069,
Monticello, FL 32345, and provide
comments. The development proposal may
be reviewed during business hours at the
Department office located at 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344.
4/13, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE
OF JERRIE L. NICKERSON
DECEASED. File Number: 05-28-PR
NOTICE TO CREDITORS The
administration of the Estate of JERRIE L.
NICKERSON, deceased, File Number
05-28-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
Florida 32344. The decedent dies intestate.
The name and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. ALL INTERESTED PERSON
ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of
the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is
served within three months after the date
of the first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE,, OF, A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors
of the decedent and persons having claims
or demands against the decedent's estate
must file claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of the
first publication of this Notice is April 6,
2005. Attorney for Personal
Representative Robert S. Hightower,.
Florida Bar No. 199801, P.O. Box 4165,
Tallahassee, Florida 32315, Telephone:
(850) 222-3363; Personal Representative
Janes Nickerson, 800 Broward Road,
#N-203, Jacksonville, Florida 32218.
4/6, 13, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday, April
19, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the Doctors
Memorial Hospital, 333 N Byron Butler
Parkway, Perry, FL. A copy of the agenda
may be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office
of the President, 1000 Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related
accommodations, contact the NFCC Office
of College Advancement, 850-973-1653.
NFCC is an equal accss/equal opportunity
employer.
4/13, c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE
OF WILLIAM E. BIPPUS, Deceased, File
No.: 05-23-PR Division Probate NOTICE
TO CREDITORS The administration of
the estate of William E. Bippus, deceased,
File Number 05-23-PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Probate Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Clerk, County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth


LEGAL NOTICE

below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date
of the first publication of this Notice is
April 13, 2005. Attorney for the Personal
Representative: Eric W. Ensminger, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 673341 Smith Hulsey &
Busey Post Office Box 53315 Jacksonville,
FL 32201-3315 (904) 359-7700,
CO-Personal Representatives: William E.
Bippus, Jr. 810 West Washington Street,
Monticello Florida 32344; Margaret
"Sunny" Bippus, 284 Queens Court, West
Palm Beach, Florida 33401.
4/13, 20, c

NOTICE

Clothing Give Away. 8 am 2 pm,
Saturday, April 16 at Harvest Christian
Center 1599 Spring Hollow Road off
Hwy. 259. 997-4859, 342-1486.
4/13,15, pd


The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a workshop at
9:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 14, 2005, at
the Jefferson County Courthouse,
Courtroom, Monticello, Florida, to discuss
the future of the Grants Office and discuss
the Road Department's construction of
driveways. Felix "skeet" Joyner,
Chairman.
4/13. c

HELP WANTED

A Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking: SECRETARY #2173
High School Diploma + 1 year of
secretarial/office clerical experience.
Typing score of at least 35 'wpm. Starting
salary $6.43. Shift: 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. For more information
and. a complete listing of available
positions: www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or 1-800-226-2931, Human
Resources, 2634-J Capital Circle N.E.
Tallahassee, FL. Pre-hiring drug screen &
FDLE background check. An equal
opprotunity/affirmative action employer,
drug free workplace.
4/13, c
Part Time Stock/ Customer Service Clerk:
must be available to work all day
Wednesday and Saturdays. Additional
Hours Flexible. Apply in person to
Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn
If you've got drive and ambition and want
above average earnings, we'd like to talk
to you about joining our newspaper team.
Please call Ron Cichon 997-3568


HELP WANTED

Child Care: "Our Blessings" Now hiring
for full and part time Teachers.
Requirements: 40 hr., CPR ,First Aid.
Please Call 342-1111 Wed. Sat.
4/6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, pd

AUTOMOTIVE
'86 Toyota PU Great work Truck 2nd
engine. Body Fair $1100 obo. 997-5771
eve.
4/8, 13, pd

FOR RENT
RV/Mobile Home Lot for rent @
Monticello Meadows 19' South.
850-997-1630 Park Manager Liz.
1/7 tfn, chg.
Small quiet family looking for nice quiet
home to rent in western Jefferson Co. call
(850)566-2090
4/13,15,pd
1 Large/ 1 small room Rustic House on 4
acres. Large Screen Porch. 1 year min.
lease $550 month. Call 342-1324/997-8175
LV. Mess.
tfn
3 Bedroom 1 Bath with storage Shed.
$600.00 month Plus Deposit. Call 997-8295
or 352-514-7101
323, 25, 30, 4/1, 68, 13 pd

REAL ESTATE


Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd

FOUND
Male Dog, maybe 4 months old, buff
colored. 2101 Old Lloyd Rd. 997-2555.
4/8, 13, pd

SERVICES

Jesus' resurrection changed the world. It
could change you. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks North of the
courthouse. Sunday service at 10:00 AM.
997-4116
3/23 tfn Weds.
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29
chg
Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn


Looking for licensed Jefferson County
Real Estate Rep for our firm. College Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
Degree preferred. Excellent training: ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
scholarship for the right individual. Fax Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
resume to 850-421-0027 or call, 4/8 tf
Contract Laborer. Maintenance, fences,
850-421-0020/www.premierpropertiessold. yard work, cleanup, home repairs. By day
net. or week. 342-1486, 510-0998
4/13, tfn. 4/13, 15, pd


Part Time Lumberyard Customer
Service/Grounds Maintenance person.
Must be available to work Saturdays,
additional hours flexible. Apply in person
at Jefferson Builders Mart.
4/8, tfn
Wanted: 23 more people to lose up to 30
pounds. 30 day $$ back guarantee. Dr.
recommended. Call Laurie
1-800-607-7040. website:
HOMEBUS45U.COM
4/6, 8, 13, 15, C

Experienced painter. Full time position,
transportation required. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.


Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd, 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates Call
551-2000
3/9,11,16,18,23,25???


Buy, Sell, Rent With A
SMonticello News Classified


KELLY & KEL
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson
(850) 997-5516


New Home

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Great Buyl Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah
Highway easy access to Tallahassee high,
dry, fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per
acre
Nice Home 3 bedroom 2 bath home on Vir-
ginia Street with deck, fenced backyard and
single car garage priced to sell $87,500
Sweetfield Forest-under contract 5
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just off the Old Lloyd Road (SR 158) north of
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Check this Out Like new home, built in
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Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
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pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this and
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Very Nice 29 acres near town with big oaks,
fields and forest asking $10,000 per acre
Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
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in remote location only $295,000
Hiqh on a Hill Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double
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$40,000
Fulford Road 4 bedroom 2 bath home with
garage, out building, and kennel on 1.55
acres in the Country near the Georgia line
$96,000
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as a
bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough hunt-
ing land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions 12
rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space very
versatile lots of possibilities for the investor
Great cash flow only $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19 South
near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Builders 6+ ac
sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo Leased new insurance
agency coming soon
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road frontage
$14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate






Buyers looking for Homes and Land
6L._1 .Clml~-- nl e~I ~rlr/r Ir ltlrl!=ilxlIl !lrr 'rr


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides &
Double Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @
$895, $50 dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571


Wori t r-im


;--~--------------------t-------------









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 13, 2005


Waste Staff Sees WW I Bomb


Brought To Waste Day


AN UNUSUAL items which showed up at Squad was called to detonate the device
Wakulla Hazardous Waste Days, was this safely.
live WW I bomb. The Tallahassee Bomb




Rescued Puppies Available


For Adoption At Shelter


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As Spring arrive, and the canine
and feline population swells, Hu-
mane Society officials stress the
importance of spaying and neuter-
ing pets, as they prepare for an in-
evitable overpopulation at the
shelter, which may result in many
unnecessary euthanasia's of
animals.
SThis overpopulation too often re-
sults in "Dumpster Dumping," of
animals, authorities say.
/ Major Bill Bullock, of the Sher-
iffs Department, warns that ac-
cording to regulations, 828.12,
subsection 12, any person who, in-
tentionally commits an act to an
animal that results in a cruel death,
(such as dumping of animals,) is
guilty of a third degree felony, pun-
ishable with up to five years in
prison and/or a $10,000 fine.
"We'll sure prosecute, too," Bul-
lock vowed.
Society members urge those in
the community, who see anyone
dumping an animal, to get their tag
number and report it to the Sher-
ifffs Department.
* "It's the only way we're going to
be able to stop this kind of treat-
ment to the animals," said Shelter


Caretaker Cheryl Bautista.
Just recently, a litter of four pup-
pies, three males and one female,
approximately six to eight weeks
old, were abandoned at the Bassett
Dairy Dumpster.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
said that Robert Mills and Zack
Cleamel found the animals and
brought them immediately to the
shelter.
"There's no need to dump these
animals at the dumpsters," said
Bautista. "We're just a couple
miles further down the road. "They
were found the same day they were
dumped because they were not seen
at the dumpster earlier that day.
"They're clean and healthy and
don't have what I call "dumpster
gut", so they couldn't have been
there for very long.
The breed of the puppies is un-
known, so they are just good old
"Monticello Mutts".
Three of them, two of the males
and one female are light cocoa
brown. All of them have tan noses.
One has brown eyes; one has blue
eyes; and one has silver eyes. The
other male is brindle in color with a
black nose and muzzle.
They have been spayed and neu-
tered and did receive their rabies
vaccinations and worming but will


require additional puppy boosters.
The adoption fee is $100 and
they will be ready for adoption
April 14.
To adopt the puppies or any of
the other many available animals to
loving homes, contact the shelter at
342-0244.


"~"'"`''
~;z


~- ~~J
i, ~8~n
~e~~;~."- I ~il:


"While the W.W.I era is gone,
the ordinance is still live, said
Langston. "Even though is has rid-
den in the back of a truck, we will
-err on the side of caution.
"This was all very exciting," said
Thorne. "But we had a cleanup go-
ing on. It had been six months
since the last cleanup, and since it
was misty and totally humid, with
huge puddles, and since it was part
of the Easter weekend, we did not
expect many residents to come out
with their old paint cans, batteries,
florescent bulbs and oils, but we
were wrong."

More residents showed up at the
event than in any of the last four
years, totaling 160 residents and
four businesses.


She added that Bottcher sorts the
various incoming liquids and pow-
ders into vats for proper disposal
and had two very interesting finds,
one being a small bottle of organic
mercury.
According to Bottcher, about 50
years ago, organic mercury was
used as an additive in paint to pre-
vent mildew.
After collection of the hazardous
waste, Thore explained, special-
ists come in to take and recycle
whatever may be usable.

At the end of the day, Sam Flow-
ers and John Peck loaded up every-
thing to bring back to Jefferson
County where Bottcher comes and
lab packs it for shipment.


RELAY
FOR LIFE

,,,. ,. .... ...


After dark, the Relay For Life celebration will include a special Luminaria Ceremony.

Encircling the track with lights of.hope, the Luminaria Ceremony reaches for tomorrow with each
candle of life and touches the stars for only a moment to remember those of yesterday.

Your donation will place a luminaria along the pathway to memorialize or honor someone you love.
The bags will stay lit throughout the evening, reminding us that HOPE LIVES among us. The Luminaria
Ceremony begins just after dark. Please complete the form below to honor or remember a loved one
who has battled cancer.

r------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------------------------------------


April 15 16, 2005
Your name: at Jefferson County
High School Track
Address:
Return your order form to:


City: State: Zip:

Phone (H): (W):


Email:


Credit Card: Visa


MasterCard


AMEX Discover


SAmerican Cancer Society
241 John Knox Road, Suite 100
Tallahassee, FL 32303
Or fax 850-297-0592
Or take it to:
Jefferson County Health Dept.
1255 West Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Account #:


EXP: Signature:


Name In Memory In Hor
Li Li
SLi
U 0
i Li Li
S l
Total Dona


, "WHY did you dump me in a dumpster? I will be your best
,friend, if you show me a little TLC. I'm just a puppy, but I'll
be a good doggie." (News Photo)


ior Donation Amount


tion:


THE MINIMUM SUGGESTED DONATION IS $5 PER BAG. Please make checks payable to the American Cancer Society.
* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
I A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION
* OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL- FREE, 1-800-435-7352, WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION
DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.
*. ** ..,**_** **.. e.J.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County Solid Waste per-
sonnel recently attended the Wa-
kulla County Hazardous Waste
Days, and were taken aback when a
live bomb was brought in for dis-
posal.
County Solid Waste Director
Beth Thorne produced unusual
danger to workers when a live
W.W.I bomb showed up. As
Throne described it:
When her turn in line came up, a
woman pulled the device out of the
back of her truck and plopped it
into the waiting arms of Chemist
Rosemary Bottcher.
When it was thought that the de-
vice might be a bomb, Thorne said
Marj Law of Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful, and inmates assigned to
help at the site, ran in the opposite
)direction.
The device was placed on a pic-
nic table and the authorities were
called.
Arriving on the scene were Cap-
tain Steve Ganey and Lieutenant
Pat Smith, who drew yellow crime
scene tape around the area, as on-
lookers began to gather.

They put on protective padding
and walked over to the table with
their flashlights pointed at it," said
Thome. "It's live, they announced,
-;and retreated behind the yellow
tape." Thome recalled.
Major Maurice Langston arrived
on the'scene and called for the Tal-
lahassee Bomb Squad. The bomb
Swas detonated about 300 yards
away in their containment unit so no
.one would be injured.
When Langston was asked what a
citizen should do should they dis-
cover such a device, he responded,
"Any time a citizen finds ammuni-
tion from WW I to the present,
rather than bringing it to us, let-us
come to you.
"We have an explosive ordnance
(large scale explosive device) divi-
sion available to us to examine or
to take custody of the device or to
explode it in place.


We invite you to become

part of the celebration at




T A i C et


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