<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00025
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 30, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00025
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


LIZ?1?.Y CF FLORIDA HISTORY
A LIBPRAflY wSST
uUPIV, r3IPY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611


Internet

Sites

Kid Friendly

Editorial, Page 4


Hog Heaven,

Rally, Barbecue

Scheduled

Story, page 5


Educational

Rally Draws 105

Participants

Story, Page 10


Humane Society

Seeks Vice-president

Board Members

Story, Page 12
I I


SWWednesday Morning )






Montic


1127TH VWi AD RTNC I l Lc C'V.T'Nq


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2005


Pile Of Dirt Holds Key To Past


Mound Unique in Height

And Architectural Detail


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Letchworth Mounds continue
to draw attention from archaeologists,
archaeology enthusiasts, and the
general public.
Case in point: the Panhandle Ar-
-chaeological Society recently made
the mounds their first stop on a tour
of interesting archaeological sites in
:the area.
And members of the touring group
Bike Florida, many of whom trav-
eled here from as far away as Can-
ada and Alaska, made the mounds a
specific destination point in their re-
cent visit.
A seeming large mass of tree-and-
shrub covered dirt that defies the
comprehension or appreciation of
the average person, the mounds may
% ell hold the key to understanding
the civilization that earlier inhabited
this area. .. -
Long known to area residents and
even some archaeologists as early as
1932 (an account of the mounds ap-
peared in a 1934 edition of the
Democrat and the American Legion
expressed an interest in developing
and preserving the site as a tourist
attraction even then), the state only


acquired the site in 1992.
And even then, nothing much
happened in the way of preservation
or research until the late 1990s,
when personnel from the Bureau of
Archaeological Research began con-
ducting tests.
Even so, the mounds remain rela-
tively enigmatic today, says Dr.
Ryan Wheeler, chief of archaeologi-
cal research with the Florida Depart-
ment of State, Division of Historical
Resources.
"Despite the recent work, we still
know very little about the culture
that existed here," Wheeler told the
Panhandle Archaeological Society
almost two weeks ago.
Two things, however, stand out
about the main mound and make it
quite impressive, he said.
The first is the height of the struc-
ture, which is 46 feet. And the sec-
ond is the architectural detail,
evident in the ramp (which probably
:had'wooden steps at one imel. the-
small appendages, or wings on the
side, and the apron or second sum-
mit on the back side.
Wheeler also noted the truncated
summit, which in essence forms a
four-sided pyramid if viewed from
above.
"That is incredible," Wheeler said.


"You don't usually see that kind of
architectural detail in Florida
mounds. That makes it very signifi-
cant."
Historically, a temple or the
chiefs house rested on top of the
summits of such mounds, Wheeler
told the group. And the fact that the
main mound of the Letchworth
Mounds is as high as it is indicates
that it was likely the work of a very
powerful man or woman chief, he
said.
The way Wheeler explained it, this
chief may have exacted so many
basketfuls of dirt from each of their
subjects as tribute, or a primitive
form of taxation. The mounds, in
fact, were constructed by pouring
basketful upon basketful of dirt dur-
ing until completed.
"It took an amazing number of
basketfuls of sand to make these
mounds," Wheeler said. "It also re-
quired a tremendous amount of
manpower. But experiments have
shown that with rhythm and strong
backs, you can built such mounds in
a short period."
One theory even holds that present
bodies of water near the site may
well represent barrow pits excavated
by the primitive people in their
search for the dirt to built the
mounds.
Originally believed to be part of
the Lake Jackson culture dating
from the Mississipian period, pot-
tery shards and other artifacts recov-
ered from the area actually point to





i-


the much earlier Weeden Island pe-
riod (AD 300 to AD 1200).
In fact, the majority of artifacts
found to date in the archaeological
surveys support the theory that
Letchworth was built during the
early Weeden Island period, states
the site's official brochure.
"All the evidence is to the effect
that it's the Weeden Island period,"
Wheeler confirmed.
.Interestingly, artifacts found in the


Aucilla and Wacissa river basins in-
dicate that that area was well inhab-
ited during the Weeden Island
period. It may even be, according to
Wheeler, that the Letchworth
Mounds was a religious or political
center for the culture, given the ab-
sence of villages in the surrounding
area.
At least, the recovery efforts thus
far have produced little evidence
that villages existed in the area im-


DR. RYAN WHEELER, chief of archaeologi-
cal research with the Department of State,
Division of Historical Resources, was the


mediately surrounding the mounds.
But as Wheeler made clear, the re-
search has barely begun to scratch
the surface of the site.
And much adjacent property that
may contain evidence of habitation
still lies in private ownership. The
hope, Wheeler said, is that the state
will eventually be able to purchase
the adjacent property and so pre-
serve the entire site for future re-
search.


featured speaker during the Panhandle Ar-
chaeology Society's recent tour of the
Letchworth Mounds. (News Photo)


Drop In' Crime Reflected


In Typical Court Docket


-c.~ee~ia~ls~mmac~::.' ~u.~.~pir~s~na;_
is
r ,,
'~C
~craaha~ IgHj;e ~ T

R~ itr-
.-~iII
C~ ?'e
pp~;:IS.5 .. ~"4~;c


HEAVY RAINS washed out much of this sec-
tion of Deerwood Boulevard in the Aucilla
Shores Subdivision. The tree on the side of


the road apparently toppled when the soil
became too soft to hold the roots. (News
Photo)


-'L 1




-; .~~S~ .- "


ALTHOUGH spared major damage by the
storms that swept across the area during
the weekend, dirt roads experienced flood-


ing and washouts. This section of Duckpond
Drive in the Aucilla Shores Subdivision was
almost impassable. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

If a court docket provides a sort of
snapshot of a community in terms of
the crimes affecting it, Jefferson
County is looking pretty good at
present.
That, at least, is the way Assistant
State Attorney Michael Bauer
chooses to look at the numbers and
types of crimes found on the typical
court docket of late.
.Take the county court docket for
earlier this month. A quick perusal
of the document reveals that auto-:
related violations accounted for the
greatest portion of the charges, fol-


lowed by the passing of worthless
checks.
Indeed, out of the 87 cases up for
arraignment, pretrial, motion hear-
ing or status review, 22 involved in-
dividuals driving while their license
was suspended; nine involved indi-
viduals driving with no valid
driver's license; eight involved indi-
viduals driving under the influence;
two, individuals failing to register
their motor vehicles; two, individu-
als leaving the scene of an accident;
two, failing to attach proper license
plate; and one, reckless driving.
Next in greatest number were 11
cases involving individuals with
multiple counts of passing worthless
checks.


SBattery and domestic violence bat-
tery comprised 10 cases, while the
sometimes related charges of tres-
pass after warning or in structure,
constituted seven.
The remainder of the docket con-
sisted largely of a few cases each of
possession of marijuana under 20
grams, littering less than 15 pounds,
disruption of a school function, con-
tributing to the delinquency of mi-
nor, taking or attempting to take
wildlife from a county road, crimi-
nal mischief, disorderly intoxication
and giving false information.
The point, according to Bauer, is
that the number of total cases on the
(See Crime Page 7)


County Escapes Brunt


Of Area Weekend Storms


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

County Emergency Manage--
ment Director Carol Ellerbee re-
ports her staff was busy over the
weekend, reporting to the office on
and off to follow tornado watches
as they were issued.
"There was a tornado warning is-
sued late Saturday night, but we
were lucky," said Ellerbee. "It
weakened before it got here."
She said that no damage had
been reported in the county, how-
ever, minor flooding was reported
because of large amounts of rain in
a short period of time.
"Saturday, we had 1.4 inches here
at the office and there was 1.65
inches of rain reported at Aucilla",


Heavy Rains,
Cause Minor |
Flooding

said Ellerbee.
She added that all departments
were placed on standby, at the
ready, in case severe weather did
approach.
City Superintendent Don Ander-
son said Monday morning that they
were still searching for any signs of
possible damage from the storms.
"There were some crazy problems,
but nothing that we couldn't
handle," said Anderson.
He added that the lift stations
were pumping at the maximum ca-
pacity and there was a lot of flow-


in due to the heavy rain.
"We haven't had any reports of
roads washed out or downed trees,"
said Anderson.
County Fire Rescue Chief Larry
Bates said there was not too much
storm related damage, other than
maybe a few downed tree limbs.
"We were lucky, I think Thomas-
ville caught the worst of it," said
Bates.
He added that his crews were pre-
paring Friday and Saturday, check-
ing fuel, oil and the working condi-
tion of all of their equipment.
"I think there were some county
roads washed out," said Bates.
They were hauling a lot of rock
over the weekend."
County Road Department Direc-
tor David Harvey could not be
reached for comment at press time.


I


Ii/~tlYEAKIN .Lt..'U 'hN1







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005


RESIDENT ROWENA DANIEL promotes her married to an abusive husband. (News
sister's book "From Hell To High Water," Photo)
.written as therapy by the woman formerly

Resident Promotes Book

Of Her Hospitalized Sister


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

"From Hell to High Water," a
Memoir by JoAnn Harper, is the
story of an abused woman.
Local resident, Rowena Daniel,
sister of Harper, has been promoting
the book locally.
Harper is now recouping from
major brain surgery, resulting from
a fall when she struck her head, dur-
ing a hospital visit.
This memoir is her first published
Work.
Daniel is in the process of visiting
*local businesses in the hope of dis-
:playing and selling her sister's book.
At this time, the book can be
:viewed and purchased at Monticello
:Printers and Office Supplies.
It can also be viewed and pur-
:chased on line at amazon.com or by
contacting Daniel at 997-2129.
*A book signing is in the planning
:stages at this time. And, as soon as
aHarper is able, that plan will include
*a visit to Monticello to promote the
-book herself.
"This is a book that needs to be
read. It was meant to find closure
and peace for JoAnn. She was en-
couraged to write it, as a form of
therapy.
"Maybe it can help someone by
giving them hope," Daniel com-
ments. "It's a wonderful book for
the happily married too," adds Dan-
iel.


The book contains flashbacks to system. It's about their moves and


explain Harper's flight from Florida
to Houston in 1980, to escape an
abusive ex-husband.
Harper details her experiences
adapting to life as a middle aged
single woman, and describes her life
with Irl Harper, whom she ulti-
mately marries in Houston.
Their love for each other sees
them through all the adventures in
their short but happy married life,
from their courtship and wedding
through his retirement, her return to
college and teaching in the prison

Relay Team

Plans Chicken
Dinner
Members of the First Baptist
Church Relay For Life Team will
grill chicken for dinners to be sold
as their Relay for Life Fundraiser,
11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday.
Meals are $5 and include grilled
chicken, barbecue sauce available
on the side, both white and dark
meat available, baked potato, salad,
bread, dessert and iced tea.
Tickets will be on sale at the
church office, and available the day
of the event.
Spokesperson Cathy Holiday en-
courages citizens to: "tell your
friends and come on out and get
some chicken and fight cancer in the
process."


travels, and then his death, after an
extended illness. The poems scat-
tered throughout the book reflect her
feelings at these turn of events.


Willis Teaches

Technology At
JES Club

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Regina Willis has been teaching at
the Howard Middle School for the
past two years, and working with
the JES Boys and Girls Club since
October, 2004.

Previously, Willis worked with the
Thomasville, GA. Boys and Girls
Club.
Her responsibilities have involved
the computer lab where she teaches
technology to the students, to en-
hance their learning abilities and to
prepare them for their school class-
rooms and for the standardize test-
ing.

"She is just great to work with.
She has her own agenda and incen--
tive program for the students, and
offers them rewards when they com-
plete their projects.

She is a "go-getter" and doesn't
always wait around for me to tell
her what to do and when to do it. I
like that about her," comments Club
Director Gerrold Austin.


12 noon to 12 midnight


www.jckcpokerroom.com
Must be 18 to be Admitted

Zt 'f


G d eg p I28


fuckCeb erry 's Creations,

210 W. Washiington St.


LC


S Monticello, JL 32344

(850)997~3400




SHABBY CHIC FURNITURE & ANTIQUES


w randOpeningHours:Fri.&Sat.0-5JoinsForR


2005 NISSAN 350Z
35TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION!


*Special 18" Aluminum Wheels -2-Tone Leather Trim
*Vented Brembe Brakes *Xenon Headlights
*Bose Stereo *Special "Z" Badging
SALES Ml
PARTS
SERVICE OF THOMASVILLE S
*Price plus tax, tag, title & $269 doc fee.
1630 1. Jaeklsn Thomaville. CA f 12291226.11I Toll Free 100M333.9785


Combine services and save. High-speed Internet, local and long distance.
Get Sprint high-speed Internet for Sprint high-speed Internet with EarthLink' brings you always-on access at
speeds much faster than dial-up, with free tools like spamBlocker, Virus Blocker
a month when and Pop-up Blocker." Plus, you can talk on the phone and surf the Web at
you combine with the Sprint Solutionsw
Standard plan. the same time. Purchase Sprint high-speed Internet together with the Sprint
Solutions" Standard plan and save on both. Talk all you want, surf all you want.
One-year term agreement required. All from the provider you can trust.





Sp inlt Call 1-877-Sprint-2 or visit sprint.com/local.




Service available in select areas Offer good for residential customers only who sign up for High-speed Internet and Sprint Solutions Standard plan Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice
Sprint Solutions: Services not available in all areas. Lifeline customers may purchase vertical features by certifying they have a legitimate medical or safety need for the features) requested All rates
subject to change. Restrictions apply see rates, terms and conditions at www.sprint.com. Monthly Fee: Promotional monthly rate will apply for 12 months as long as customer subscribes to both
Sprint Solutions Standard plan and Sprint high-speed Internet. After12 months, standard fee will apply. Rate applies to 15 Mbps speed, which isnot available in allareas $4999 activation fee will apply
Taxes and surcharges are additional and are based on standard monthly rate. Sprint high-speed Internet: A fee of $99 will be charged for early termination. Actual performance may vary due to
conditions outside of Sprints network control. These conditions may include variables such as customer location, physical equipment limitations, network congestion, server and router speeds of Web
sites accessed, Insidewinng or telephone conditions. Minimum level of speed is 384 Kbps. Additional restrictions mayapply. Long-Distance Plans: State-to-state, international, in-state long-distance
(including local toll) services are govemed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions of service. U.S. residents only Dial one service. Additional restrictions may apply 2005 Sprint
All rights reserved. Sprint, the diamond logo design, Sprint Privacy ID and Sprint Solutions are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L P Earth-ink is a registered trademark of EarthLink, Inc


m







i'
'f


SOUTHERN RENDEZVOUS,
Saturday features a variety of
exhibitions. L-R this Montana
couple stand in front of their
hand sewn buffalo skin
teepee. Tallahassee Couple
model their wedding attire of
days gone by. The event will
feature games and activities
for all and offer authentic
items for sale.


In Honor of Doctors' Day

BIG BEND HOSPICE
Thanks Our Caring and
Compassionate Physicians


Southern Rendezvous Planned


At Dixie PI

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Residents will be able to take a-
step back into time, pre 1840, and
observe the dress, lifestyles, living
situations and even purchase items
from that era during the 24th annual
Southeastern Rendezvous at the
Dixie Plantation April 2-10.
Spokesperson Pat Powell said co-
ordinators expect some 300-400
participants from all over the United
States for the week, who will dress,
live and cook the way it was done in
Says of old.
.Meals will be cooked in metal
pi6t Biand pans over an openTfire.
Light sources will consist of can-
dle lanterns, and furniture inside of
their tents and teepees will be repli-
cas of furniture used at the time and,
all handmade from wood.
The live-in camps will demon-
strating life skills from various cul-
tures including British, Irish, Scot-
tish, Spanish and Native American.
There will be many attractions
during the Rendezvous including a
day of Highland games (Scottish)
which will feature people dressed in
kilts and the playing of bagpipes.
There will be games for children,
traditional bow and primitive arch-
ery competition, frontier games,
black powder shooting events for
the Daniel Boone types.
The Eighth Annual Farkle Off
(1800's dice game), a myriad of
seminars on a wide variety of topics,


lantation Saturday


hawk and knife competition for the
Davy Crocket types, (tomahawk and
knife thrown at targets) and a vari-
ety of music are also planned.
Powell said that many of the
campers are musicians, and will
play older music, along with more
modern music.
During the event, there will be a
variety of food vendors, and also
vendors selling items from times of
old, everything from kettle corn to
tents, firearms to knives, beads to
moccasins and skins to primitive
clothing.
Powell added that as an event for
the children, the ,may.,even shoot
off the cad~n\ c-anrnonn daily.
': She explained that a cannon is
filled with hard candy, while chil-
dren gather at the end of a field.
The cannon is fired into the air,
and as the candy falls to the ground,

Seabrooks Named
To Coaches' Group
Monticello native, Johnny Seab-
rooks, Athletic Director for the
Dougherty County School Board,
has been elected to serve as the Ath-
letic Director Representative on the
Georgia Athletic Coaches Associa-
tion Board of Directors.
Seabrooks was selected by his
peers for this board position, ac-
cording to a letter from Ray Broada-
way, Executive Director of the
Georgia Athletic Coaches Associa-
tion.


r CASH NO
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENT .
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUT"[.


the children scamper and scurry
around picking up as much as they
can.
The Rendezvous Traders Area
will be open from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m. and admission is $2 for adults,
$1 for children from 12-17 and free
for children under 12 and no more
than $5 per family.
The event is hosted by the Jeffer-
son Longrifles of Tallahassee, who
have been planning this particular
event for the past two years.
There are no pets allowed in the
primitive area.


B. David Robinson, M.D.
Medical Director


Big Bend
Hospice


P. "i .

John T. MacKay, M.D.
Associate Medical Director
Jefferson County


205 N. Mulberry St., Monticello,
(850) 997-2827


(800) 794-7310.
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NO
for Structured Settlements!


-.- RD RAEJS
ORDE


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE


11025 EAST MAHAN


877-4550


Monticello *Border
2 Border 1-10
MAHAN


Family-owned*and


Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.

(80w 2- 2b229 Z(80S 2-2b230


FL 32344


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005 PAGE 3


Big Bend Eubanks Termite

& Pest Control, Inc.

"Let us undertake your pest control problems."
S Complete Commercial
& Residential Service








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


SMEMgq RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Internet Sites


Are Kid Friendly


Chances are the first things your
children think of when they hear the
words "mouse" or "Web" are com-
pletely different than what you
would have thought of at their age.
But regardless of how Internet-
savvy your children may be, experts
say it's still important to keep an eye
on what sites kids visit and to find
safe ways for them to have fun on-
line.
One way to do that is to find kid-
friendly sites. Some are ad free and
have parental controls built in but
at the same time, they're fun desti-
nations that kids actually want to
visit.
For instance, Disney's Blast site is
an online world enjoyed by children
of all ages. The subscription service
is full of games, stories and activi-
ties designed to be fun and age ap-
propriate.
, Parents can use the service's Par-
ehts' Guide to review the site's dif-
ferent activities and decide %\hat is
best for their children.
The site debuted in 1997 and since
then has been considered one of
most successful online destinations
for children.
* Disney recently updated the serv-
ices to include new games and ac-
tivities, more engaging graphics and
animation. It even features an area-


where kids can purchase digital
prizes with coins they have collected
while playing. Here's a breakdown
of what's offered:
Fun And Games In the site's new
Magic Mansion section, children are
challenged with strategy games such
as Abu's Tick-Tock-Toe in the Prin-
cess Court or online games they can
play with Stitch in the Heroes Hall.
In addition, kids can learn about
animals with Flounder, Timon and
Pumbaa in the Animal Arena or visit
the Enchanters Guild to download
the Haunted Mansion game.
The Value Of Fun The service
also features a section called the Bi-
zarre Bazaar. It lets children earn
"coins" when they play some
games. Those coins can then be
traded in for virtual prizes.
The Bazaar also features a virtual
market place where members can
buy and sell the items they've won
to other members.
The site provides voice-overs for
every link and environment meaning
as children navigate through a room,
a voice will announce each activity
and title as the mouse passes over it,
fun for all kids and critical for those
too young to read.
In addition, the site's silly sound
effects and musical introductions for
games can make the whole experi-
ence more fun for children.


From Our Photo File


DALE HOUSER, City Patrolman, issued a
fake arrest warrant to Kiwanians in June,
1988, as part of the Cancer Society's Jail


and Bail Fundraiser. Margo Armstead, left,
arranged for the "arrest." (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Republicans Chart New Course


Many Republicans are scratching
their heads these days wondering
what happened to their party which
once stood for fiscal responsibility
and less intrusive government.
Conservative icons like Barry
Goldwater and Ronald Reagan cam-
paigned against the federal govern-
ment's overreaching.
In fact, Reagan said "government
is not the solution, government is
the problem."
That resonated well with voters
and with help from the so called
"Reagan Democrats," the former
California governor knocked off a
sitting president and went on to win
a second term in a landslide.
Now, after being handed a surplus,
a Republican Administration has
created deficits that will take a gen-
eration or more to correct.
The problem is, the GOP is not
through spending money we don't
have, boosting the deficit even
more.
Not only are the costs for the Iraq
war off budget, and that's nearing
$300 billion, but the President is
calling for making tax cuts perma-_


Publisher's

Notebook


- bl


Ron Ciclion


nent which will add to the deficit.
Just recently Fed Chairman Alan
Greenspan, who had endorsed Presi-
dent Bush's tax cuts, said "we were
wrong," but that hasn't slowed the
drive to make the cuts permanent.
Then there's the matteri'private
Accounts taking money from the So-
cial Security fund. The number be-
ing bandied about in Washington is
$2 trillion which will have to be
borrowed.
If this spending hasn't put you in a
funk yet, consider that the changes
in Medicare benefits are going to
cost $724 billion in the first decade.


Costs are expected to rise from $37
billion a year to $110 billion.
It is no wonder those Republicans
who believe in fiscal discipline are
beginning to express their frustra-:
tion.
On the issue of smaller and less
intrusive government, long the man-
tra of Republicans, the record is the
federal government is larger now
than under President Clinton.
And, involvement in the Terri
Shiavo case by the Republican Con-
gress and President flies in the face
of less intrusive government.
What about states rights? That also


has been an area of respect for the
GOP.
But in the Shiavo case which had
worked its way through state courts
for years, states rights were tram-
pled by the push to get the case in
the federal courts.
What can one make of all these
contradictory moves?
One conclusion is campaigning
against the government and actually
running the government are two dif-
ferent matter.
The Republicans are doing the
very things for which they casti-
gated Democrats over a 40 year pe-
riod.
How will this play long term?
I think the real problem will come
from within the Republican party.
Oh sure, there are folks who
march in. lockstep and give very lit-
tle thought to these matters and
they'll be fine.
But for those party members who
give some serious consideration to
the direction of the country, you can
bet their voices will be heard.
And, I think you'll hear a clamor
for a change in direction for the
GOP.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
SThe ambulance service increased
its base fee'to $200 effective March
5 That's $70 over the previous base
fee of $130.
T. Wayne Dais, the owner of Kis-
saway Plantation who stirred up a
recent controversy with his proposal
to lease 274 acres of state land in the
Ward Creek flood plain, has with-
drawn his application.
TWENTY YEARS
March 27, 1985
School Superintendent Stephen
Walker's. announcement that he
would like to make changes in the
structure of school principals is
really just the tip of the iceberg, as
far as changes he hopes to make in
the school system.
As many people have already noti-
fied, the Monticello Police Depart-
ment is cracking down on traffic law
violations.
While normally there are around
12 arrests per month for moving
violations, 75 tickets have been is-
sued this month.
Despite protests and votes to the
contrary from School Board mem-
bers James Boland and Elizabeth
Hall, there will be a changing in
school principal and once person
,added to the county administrative
office.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 27, 1975
The summer like weather held out
as over 1,000 visitors traveled
around Jefferson County and Monti-


cello this past weekend to tour the
historically elegant homes featured
for the 11th Annual Tour of Homes.
Monticello residents named to the
Dean's List at North Florid Junior
College for Term 1 were Henry
Aman, Ike Anderson, Louis Elazer,
Sherryl Griffin, Terry Mills, Gary
Mills, Miriam Snelgrove and Mary
Wheeler.
FORTY YEARS AGO
March 26, 1965
J.F. "Jim" Yaun, insurance repre-
sentative here for the Farm Bureau
will be the Red Cross Drive Chair-
man for 1965 and the fund drive is
expected to start within a few days.
Mrs. Fondren Roddenberry hon-
ored her son, Dennis on his thir-
teenth birthday Saturday evening
with a party at the Youth Center.
Josephine Malloy visited in Cov-
ington, KY and Grand Rapids, MI,
during the spring holidays.
Mary Blow and daughter Donna
and Lynn Shiver visited last week-
end with the former's son, Frank
Blow at the Citadel in Charleston,
SC.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 25, 1955
The Ladies of the Episcopal
Church announced a tour of planta-
tions of the county,. Those to be
open for the tour were Silver Lake,
Pinckney Hill, Dixie, Bellamy, Gle-
dower and Lyndhurst.
Parkhill Mays, a student at Wash-
ington and Lee University, spend
the holidays at home.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.
500 words or less.


Vaccine Protects Tropical Fish


REBECCA L. MCGOVNEY
University of Florida

Fear of needles will not be a prob-
lem for tropical fish receiving a new
vaccine being tested by University
of Florida researchers.
Carefully injected into the body of
fish, the vaccine will prevent and
treat streptococcus infections in two
popular species the Rainbow Shark
and the Redtail Black Shark.
"These fish are important for Flor-
ida's ornamental tropical fish indus-
try, which produces, by some esti-
mates, 90 to 95 percent of the na-
tion's domestically raised tropical
fish," said Roy Yanong, an assistant
professor of aquaculture with UF's
Institute of Food and Agriculture
Sciences. "As with any disease, pre-
vention and rapid cure will help re-
duce losses for producers and bene-
fit consumers who purchase tropical
fish for their aquariums."


He said streptococcus infections
are troublesome for many species of
tropical fish. IF environmental con-
ditions such as water temperature
and water quality are not right, and
if the disease-causing strains of
streptococcus are present, the fish
can develop the disease and pass it
to other fish in the population. The
result often is a mortality rate be-
tween 50 percent and 70 percent for
the infected fish, Yanong said.

i Yanong, based at UF's Tropical
'iAquaculture Laboratory in Ruskin,
said previous treatment methods us-
ing medicated food and antibiotic
baths have not been as effective be-
cause they do not address the prob-
lem until the fish are already sick.
Antibiotics placed in the water are
not absorbed well by fish and can
also lead to bacteria resistance.
Medicated feed does not work well
because the fish often stop eating


when they are sick.


"If the analyses continue to show
good protection levels, we will en-
courage procedures to start vaccinat-
ing their broodstock against Strepto-
coccus iniae," Yanong said.
Yanong said they are working on
this particular strain of streptococ-
cus, but they hope to develop vac-
cines for other diseases that affect
tropical fish.
"By preventing this disease in-
stead of treating it after if has oc-
curred, producers can save thou-
sands of dollars," Yanong said. "In
an industry that generated more than
$43 million in farm-gate sales last
year, these are important savings for
producers."
Riccardo Russo a graduate student
who is conducting experiments on
the vaccine at the Ruskin laboratory,
said tests on different vaccines and
methods of delivery sow that injec-
tion provides the best result in both


-juveniles and adult fish.


"We are getting a 60 to 70 percent
survival rate for infected fish receiv-
ing the injection, compared to a
mortality rate that could be as high
as 100 percent for fish that do not
receive the vaccine," Russo said.
"By placing the vaccine directly into
the fish, we can make sure they are
getting the protection they need."
In addition to improving survival
rates, the vaccine protects against
streptococcus for at least eight
months in tests, Russo said. This
helps tropical fish producers save
money by reducing treatments for
the disease to once a year, compared
to other antibiotic treatment regi-
mens that do not last as long.
While the new injected vaccine
will be very helpful for adult fish,
especially broodstock, bath treat-
ments and oral treatments may be
more practical and feasible for use
in younger fish, and these delivery
methods are still under
investigation, he said.


Women Wary Of Reform Plan


Women want lawmakers to
strengthen the existing Social Secu-
rity program, but most do not want
fundamental changes to the system.
In addition the majority of women
do not support efforts to privatize
the system by allowing people to
transfer a portion of their Social Se-
curity to a private account or any re-
forr that would cut or endanger
guaranteed benefits.
These are some of the key findings
of a recent poll of 750 women vot-
ers conducted by Peter D. Hart Re-
search Associates, Inc. for the
AFL-CIO and the National Partner-
ship for Women & Families.


among women to any reforms that
would weaken Social Security and
undermine their retirement
security," said National Partnership
President Debra L. Ness. "Women
want lawmakers to ensure that they
will get the benefits they are paying
for not privatize the system." ,
The poll also found that when told
that private accounts would reduce
Social Security's guaranteed
monthly benefit, women's support
for privatization drops to just 33
percent.
According to the National Partner-
ship for Women & Families, women
are already disadvantaged in retire-


"There is broad, deep opposition -ment because they:


Live longer than men.
Earn less than men.
Often hold low-wage jobs.

Have shorter work histories due
to caregiving responsibilities.
Are less likely to work in jobs-
that offer pension plans.

Are less likely to have the re-
sources needed to save for retire-
ment or invest in defined
contribution plans.

Are more likely to deplete their
resources caring for a spouse.
Are more likely than men to live
in poverty and rely solely on Social


Security in old age.
The National Partnership for
Women & Families is a non-profit,
nonpartisan advocacy group dedi-
cated to promoting fairness in the
workplace, access to quality health
care, and policies that help Ameri-
cans balance work and family re-
sponsibilities.
It recently announced a drive to
protect women's interests in the So-
cial Security debate.
. The initiative would include pro-
viding women with information and
tools to help them engage in the de-
bate and communicate with their
members of Congress.


I --- I










Fifth Annual Hog Heaven


Biker Barbecue, Rally Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Several local churches have again
joined together to present the Fifth
Annual 2005 Hog Heaven Biker


Barbecue and Rally scheduled
noon until 6 p.m, Saturday, April 9.
The rally is a joint effort realized
through the sponsorship of both
United Methodist Churches and
Regional Christian Motorcycle


'1 j


I'f


IAR

ON


- A


wt,,I


IKE ANDERSON, resident of Jefferson Nursing, shares
Easter candy with JES Boys, Girls Club member, Charlene
Austin after the Easter Egg hunt. Residents hid the eggs
and youths hunted for them. (News Photo)


FMB Relay Team Holds Raffle


groups.
It will take place on the grounds
of the Sardis United Methodist
Church, located on Waukeenah
Highway, adjacent to the KOA
Campgrounds.
Event promoters anticipate serv-
ing more than 500 free meals to
bikers who rally there annually.
Spokesman Ron Drake said that
it's through the generous support of
local businesses, churches and
community that meals and enter-
tainment are free to attendees.
The meal will include barbecue
chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, po-
tato salad, bread, beverage and des-
sert.
Both biker and Christian musical
groups are scheduled to provide af-
ternoon entertainment, jamming
with a little bit of everything from
Blue Grass, Country, Christian,
Gospel and Rock.
"From it's conception, this event
has been viewed as a local mission
outreach to communicate goodwill
and fellowship to a broad-based
community," said Drake.
"The purpose of a venue of this
type is to showcase the fellowship
between bikers and non-bikers as a
celebration of life."
Churches participating in this
event include: Lloyd United Meth-
odist Church (UMC), Sardis UMC,
Mt. Lebanon at Lamont UMC, Wa-
cissa UMC and Waukeenah UMC
Biker participants include Spirit
Riders Motorcycle Ministries,
Christian Motorcycle' Association
and Spirit Riders Motorcycle Min-
istries.
Drake stated that a show of ap-
preciation \%as due to the man\


churches and businesses, who
through their contributions, helped
make last year's rally a tremendous
success. "We could not have done
it without you."
Those contributors include: C &
F Fencing and Fairchild Construc-
tion for ice; Jake's Restaurant, for
gift certificates; Bubba Joyner, for
the use of a gas cooker; Abundant
Life Harvest Church of Lloyd for
portable signs; and Capital City
Harley Davidson, of Tallahassee,
for a monetary donation.
Also, Your Mayne of Woodville
for gift certificates; Tallahassee
Antique car Museum for the an-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005 PAGE 5-
tique motorcycles; Coca-Cola, of see for mime and theatrical artists;
Tallahassee for beverages; Howdy's Abba Foklorico of Daytona Beach
of Tallahassee, for sanitation; for Peruvian Folk Musicians; and
Insty-Prints of Tallahassee for pro- Porche de Solomon Praise Team of
motional flyers; the Ray of Hope Waukeenah for Blue Grass and
UMC Parable Players of Tallahas- Praise music.


SRead T0ogether, F0or
March April 2005

Essay Contest for Middle
www.VolunteerFloridaFoundati

sponsored by UlP Washington
e-xxslxsxzeweeeeeeo


M,'lIImSOIwleD


rida


School
ion.org

Mutual


Weight Loss Surgery
Changed My Life.
E'erciring iat the gymr is just one of many activities DItene
Funderburti o'f Timasville enjoys now that she is over 200 pounds
lighter ilin, r,i undrr.ent weight loss surgery at Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital in 2003, and as a result, she says her quality of
life has increased ten-fold. "I haven't felt this well in years! I have
so much more energy. I'm exercising on a regular basis and eating
healthy too! And my new lifestyle is setting a healthy example for
my son and daughter."
If you're significantly overweight and ready to make a lasting
change in your life, weight loss surgery may be right for you. In
fact, for qualihed pjaent surgical treatment, combined with
behavioral modification. is a proven method of achieving long-
term weight los As A wih any surgical procedure, weight loss sur-
gery may present risks. And individual results vary. But it could
change your life, or save it.

WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SYMPOSIUM
Tuesday, April 5 6 p.m. TMH Auditorium
With Eliot Sieloff, M.D.
General Surgery, Board Certified
Park in the hospital's Main Parking Deck
Registration (850) 877-6212. Please askfor Tracy.


JL

Tallahassee Memorial
HealthCare
wwit Irr h u-.


Feel the


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Farmers and Merchants-
Bank Relay For Life team is host-
ing a raffle fundraiser.
The tickets are $5 or three for
$10 and winners will have their
choice of either a one-hour mas-
sage by Cindy Ballentine, a $50
American Express' gift card or a 12
x 15 foot room of carpeting in-
stalled by Al and Stephen Estes.
The drawing will be April 15
during the Relay and winners do
not have to be present to claim their
prizes.
For tickets or further information
contact Peggy Leight at 997-6000,
ex. 1044.






Bank-issued, EDIC-
insured to $100,000



41 5APY




'Annual Percentage Yield (APY)-lnterest
cannot remain on deposit; periodic payout of
interest is required. Early withdrawal is not
permitted. Effective 03128105. Subject to
availability and price change. The amount
received from a sale of a CD at current
market value may be less than the amount
initially invested.
Call or stop by today.
Robert Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Montiello FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com

EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'

in State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00









Get Your Annual
Subscription Today!


USDA


United States Department of Agriculture


The Tobacco


Transition Payment


Program (also called "Tobacco Buyout").




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


) Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

) Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

) Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder .tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,
at your local USDA Service Center.

Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


I


.











1VS a \d 5d E T'A1f't T VIA ?.TtUI W UJVTl ADCU( n 2fl 1fl.


Lifestyle


a N,


Baptist Youths Raise $1,000

For Annual Summer Camp


.- 1/ _




i
'"c^ -
it


f- -i>
.


jAPTIST YOUTHS served a "Taste of Italy" spaghetti din-
per recently. Hostess Ivy Galloway, greets guests as they
Arrive. (News Photo)


ELDER CARE SERVICES offer a monthly pro-
4ram at the Senior Cenrter. L-R: Edward Wil-


Elder Care Staff Visits
IMonthly At Senior Cen'


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The First Baptist Church Youth
Group held a spaghetti dinner'fund-
raiser on a recent Saturday, which


earned them $1,000 toward summer
camp.
"A Taste of Italy" was served at
the First Baptist Church Fellowship
Hall, with meals prepared to order,
with table service, or prepared to
take-out.


Deborah Speed To

Marry Sammy Leonard


The families of Deborah Ann
Speed and Sammy Lee Leonard an-
nounce their engagement.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Mary Brinson-Salter, of Quincy, FL.
and the late Mr. Wilson Speed. She


liams and Suzie Campbell, with Angel
Williams, director. (News Photo)


is the mother of Annette Speed-
Crews, Carolette and Cassandra
Speed, and Treondra Hester. She is
the sister of William "Rick" Brin-
son, who will give her away in mar-
riage.
The groom-to-be is the son of the
late Eula Mae McQuay and Eddie
Leonard, Sr., of Monticello, FL.
Surrogate parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel A. Madison, Sr., of
Monticello. He is the father of the
late Sammy Leonard, Jr. and of
Myeshia Leonard, of Tallahassee.
Speed is employed at Elder Care
in Tallahassee and Leonard is em-
ployed by Peavy and Son Construc-
tion in Havana.
A garden wedding is set to take
place at the residence of Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Madison, Sr., 4 p.m.
on Saturday, April 2, 2005.

CHILDCARE
FUNDRAISING

Director needed by
National Co.
for local area to help run
money
making programs.
Work with directors,
owners, PTA's, schools.
1st yr 46k avg 813-788-1595


tL6--


The youths sold tickets for $5
each with proceeds to be used for
their trip to the "Youth Quest Camp
2005" in Chattanooga, TN. this
summer.
The Spaghetti Dinner was served
with a fresh garden salad, bread,
dessert, and iced tea.
The meal was sold out, to the de-
light of the youth.
The event was orchestrated by the
youths but, parents, and church vol-
unteers were on hand to help out
wherever they were needed.
Minister of Music Destin DuBose
is helping the youths of the church
with their fundraising efforts and is
hoping that, at least, 12 students will
able to attend the summer camp.
The youths will stay on the cam-
pus of Hiwassee College.
The next fundraiser will be a Car
Wash in the church parking lot, on
Saturday, April 30.
More details will be forthcoming
when the time gets nearer.

RoyalCaribbean
INTERNATIONAL








New Cruisers Cruise
3-day Bahamas Sept 16
Sovereign of the Seas fr $199*pp


2522 Capital Cir NE
(across from Skate World)
386-7327
www.funseas.com r
'*rates'pp plus port charges and taxes '6
'*rates -pp plus port charges and taxes


IEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
SElder Care Services Directors An-
gel Williams and Annette Wilson,
along with Supervisor Ivy Nixon,
visited with local seniors at the Jef-
ferson County Senior Center re-
cently.
In recognition of the Easter holi-
dry, they brought holiday treats, and
prizes to share with seniors during


their monthly visit and counseling
program.
The seniors enjoyed the gift to-
kens and listened intently to the in-
formation provided.
A hot lunch followed allowing
more time to visit with the agency
representatives and fellow senior
guests.
Elder Care Services offers solu-
tions for specific needs of seniors,
during their monthly visits and pro-
grams.


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
dba
'iT, TW ana4IvFu(iera (lmoe
? tj 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
~ .07 Monticello, FL. 32344 ,
.850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


I
I I


*^*w ^ -y ^ ^ -T T r


MAIN STREET

SATURDAY MARKET


Come One, Come All!

Free for first timers, $5 after that.


Garage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
thing You Have To Sell, Including
Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2.ish.
Fund raisers more than welcome,


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


D ac kion's 7rug ytore
"Where Pharmacy is Phanily"
> lHome Health Care Free Blood Pressure
SGifts Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions |
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553



SWoodmont
13y Encore Senior Living
Tallaha.ssee .s Ori:ial Assisted Living C.'oin nil\
Assisted Living Respite & Adult Day Service
(850) 562-4123 3207- North Monroe St.-www.encoresl.con


TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US HWY. 221, GREENVILLE, FL, (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
I------ We accept Medicare, Medicaid LLraBulle. AR.'
S.4....i. atI & most insurance plans


nenlor rleule, ii. e nec


S Another Great Day!
S Happy Birthday
Dyshawn Barber
\ 03-28-05 I
t ,
You show the expression I
Ar Smiling with nothing but
4 joy
A Happy to see another day p
Blessed in so many ways
* And praying to see
, brighter days
A Showing appreciation for p
all the years
V That the Lord has blessed
Ar, you to see
A A day that you've never A
seen
Ar Being able to live life and
46 see what it means
Therefore trials and
tribulation we all may face
r He's there knowing what P
A4 we are thinking and k
saying, keep on praying u
-r Another great day that you
A are able to see. (Smile) P
A And live lifeto the fullest p
With the Lord in the plan
And you'll see the
A Greatest reward in the
1A end.
Happy Birthday again!
14 Give the Lord praise for
4, blessing you to see
A another GREAT DAY!
A Written By: 'P
A, Tiwana Miller 4



Subscribe

Today
and Save!

Monticello

News


OT LAND?


Let's uild
~ -


r,__ H dge ca
Metal Roo is optional Copyright Home Store Plans and Publicatons
Call Today! 'DWT
(850) 224-0614 PW 1F
Tl Free 1-800-771-0614 k PWHhornes.com
ll F ue 77-061 A Division of Pennyworth Home, Inc.
Visit Our New Home Design Center Todayl Opn Mon.- Fri. 9a- pm Sauray 9am- Ipm
9335 West l CTennesseetre Fl.tU CRt058s 7


PAGE 6, MOINTICELLU, (VL), NhWb, WILD, lvlam-nw, .4uu3


i. I -- i --p------~---u;-


I


Pr


Open Mon-Fri 8-5, Tue, 8-7 walkins welcome,24hr telephone coverage


I


=


'VMSf~~t







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005 PAGE 7


Triple L Club Entertained

At March Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Triple L Club
met last week and enjoyed a pro-
gram of music and story telling.


and invited audience participation
with the songs and with the stories.
This March program featured an
Easter theme, with tables were deco-
rated with spring flowers and Easter
ornaments.


Never failing to observe a holiday,
last month, the club crowned its
Valentine King and Queen.
A covered dish lunch was served.
as is customary at the meetings.
A day trip to Wakulla Springs is
planned for Friday, April 8. At-
tendees will enjoy a glass bottom
boat ride and a jungle cruise, fol-
lowed by a some leisurely shopping
and lunch at a local establishment.


TRIPLE L CLUB members
March meeting, featuring an


conduct the
Easter theme.


FILLING EASTER BASKETS at the Senior
Center are from left, Harold Murphy, Eliza-
beth Murphy and Bulah Farmer. The pro-


Refuge House Provides

Services To Seniors


' Refuge House Counselor Dessie
Harvey, MSW, and Task Force vol-
diteers joined local seniors i Imak-
ing of Easter baskets for the
holiday, at the Senior Center last
w eek.
"The seniors and volunteers had a
wonderful time interacting," Harvey
states. "The\ all enjoyed making
their o'\n baskets and took them
home afterwards. to enjoy at home
and at their own leisure."
Donated items were brought in
and distributed as part of the sched-
uled program. Harve\ talked with
.he seniors about the local services
provided by the agency.
. Some of those services include
emergency ,shelter, courthouse pro-


Homes Of

Mourning

William R. Kirkland
We regret to announce the passing
of .William R. Kirkland, age 81, of
Monticello, Fl. who passed away
Sunday, March 20, 2005 at Eden
Springs Nursing Home in Crawford-
S ille, FL.
Graieside service will be held
Monday, March 28, 2005 at 2:00
PM. at Union. Missionary Baptist
Church Cemetery with Chaplain
Darwin Box officiating. You may
sign the guest register and share
your thoughts with the family by
visiting our website at
www.evansskipperfh.com.
Mr. Kirkland was bor in Ashford,
AL, on April 13, 1923, to the late
Roy and Lillie Shelley Kirkland. His
wife Annie Elaine Whitehead
Kirkland preceded him in death. He
was a farmer and resided in South
Florida before moving to Monticello
in 1995.
He is survived by two sons Sam-,
uel Kirkland and his wife Joyce of
Crawfordville, Fl; Wilbur Royce
Kirkland of Sneads, FL; two daugh-
ters Louise Wood and her husband
John of Tallahassee, FL; Joyce Sy-
phrett and her husband Wesley of
Satsuma, AL; two sisters Louise
Thomas and her husband John and
Dutchie Lee Thompson all of Talla-
hassee, numerous grandchildren,
great grandchildren and nieces and.
nephews also survive.
Evans-Skipper Funeral Home has
been entrusted with the arrange-
ments.:
(See Homes of Mourning Page 10)


From left, Mary Connell, Betty White and
Rowena Daniel. (News Photo)


gram is sponsored for the seniors by the
Refuge House. (News Photo)


grams, sexual violence programs,
community. education and profes-
sional training,:volunteer opportuni-
ties, information and referrals,
advocacy, and indi\ idual and group
counseling.
Last year, Refuge House provided
shelter for more than 550 women
and children.

In addition, more than 2.500 calls
were answered on the domestic
abuse hotline, and more than 275
calls came :in on the sexual abuse
hotline.

The 24 Hour Hotline number is
681-2111 or 1-800-500-1 119.


.



CALL 0O8 Vl'.T OR.M
LOCAL. OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE UOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

1385.6047
Gov rnImen IF.. In.uon o GI[(O Generol Inurance Co.
-Fir,


brought to them by Sally and Sam
Worley.
The Worley's entertained with
their stringed musical instruments,

Myrtle Johnson FOR
Ordination Set
Myrtle Woodruff Johnson will be lEA D FUIRIIAR S
ordained into the Christian Ministry g g Ii
3 p.m., Sunday, April 3, at the Ever- ---- -. __ @


green Congregational United
Church of Christ, in Beachton, GA.
Rev. Dr. Artis Johnson will pre-
side the ceremony, including the lit-
urgy of ordination, and the
consecration of the ordained when
the laying of hands takes place.

Numerous clergymen and clergy
women, laymen and women will
participate in the ceremony.

Johnson is the wife of Rev. Dr.
Artis Johnson and has 13 children.

She is a licensed minister under the
United Church of Christ, and a
graduate of the United Church of
Christ's Theology Among the Peo-
ple Program.


Crime
(Continued From Page 1)
monthly dockets has dropped dra-
matically in recent years.
At the same time, the dockets are
not crowded with more serious
crimes, as they were in the not too
distant past.
Not that he is dismissing the seri-
ousness of the present types of
crime, according to Bauer. But bet-
ter these than the violent crimes and
habitual drug offenses of old, he
says.
Bauer cites statistics that show a
progressive decline in the annual
crime.index here, from 590 crimes
in 1997 to 274 in 2003, the last year
for which the statistics are available.
S And he expects an even bigger
drop in the crime rate when the
Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment soon releases its latest annual
statistics.
SIt's no coincidence either that the
Crime rate has dropped, Bauer holds.
He attributes the drop to persistent
police enforcement,.fair and consis-
tent prosecution, and stricter sen-
tences.
"The judges are being tough on the
bad guys," he says.

brighter future t
h's simple. Replace 5
lights with ones that
have earned the
S ENERGY STAR' to
reduceyour home
energy use.
To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


www.concoramortgageloans.com r

Apply Online + Pay Off Chapter 13 + Dept. of Banking
Purchase a Home Frame-Brick-Doublewides Lic. #242074
Refinance/Combine Bills Residential or Rental + Subject to Approval
Borrow 100% of Equity No Up Front Fees Some Restrictions
Cut Payments by 1/2 or More All Florida Counties Apply
Have Only One Payment Same Day Approval BBB Member

EXAMPLELOANS A' 4.875% 5.875%
AMOUNT 180 MONTHS 360 MONTHS
$50,000.00 $392.15 $295.77 ,ow-N.,
$75,000.00 (APR $588.22 APR $443.56 /
$100,000.00 5/ $784.30 6.16 $591.54 I BBB
$150,000.00 $1,176.45 $887.31 1
$300,000.00 $2,352.89 $1,774.61
LOANS FROM $50,000 TO $5,000,000

A CONCORD MORTGAGE, INC.
0 (800) 470-0014



FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2005

6:30 P.M., Lee Junior High School Alumni
Dinner at Lee United Methodist Church Hall
The dinner will be catered by
Danny Terrill.....$15.00


Lee Day 2005

Saturday, April 2, 2005

4* ALL DAY EVENTS
Live Entertainment Delicious Food
Children's Games And Rides
Arts & Crafts Creative Works Contest
Pet Contest Cake Walk & Sale
Cookbook & History Book Sales







Featuring: Randy and the Honky Tonks
Coo Coo The Clown

JOIN US FOR A DAY OF FUN FILLED
ACTIVITIES GOOD FOOD AND GREAT
ENTERTAINMENT!!!

"PAID IN PART BY THE MADISON COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
GET OUT OF LINE
services and information.
FirstGov.gov
~ The official web portal
of the Federal Government
U .S. General Service Admmistramon


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a


strong community.

307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL. 32303 (904) 414-0844


Did YOU know the average person saves
$(500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!




Find out how you can save...




Commuter Services
ofNorth FloridaX

888-454-RIDE



or visit our website at

www. commuterservices. org


Already carpooling or vanpooling?
Ask about the guaranteed ride home program.


I- rl-


I


INoma


.-M





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005
,(IC C^ ~u~ ~ ^^^c^c^c^c^c^^ii^Ci~-c~s^^^c^c^c'^'^iu ^^*T^ -^ V- ^^ L ~~ ~C ~ ~ ~LVC ~C~ CECE* U~ CI~


For
r----------------------1
I I
ICS Cremation Society, Inc.
S Pay Your Re-
spects,
Not Your
Life Savings."
CALL TO RESERVE
YOUR SEAT AT OUR
NEXT LUNCH SEMINAR,
OR
TO REQUEST A FREE
BROCHURE AND PRICE
SHEET.
I I


Our


Se


I


rs'


eeds...






A. Rehablab, Inc.
The Profenssonal Hearinog
LZROS'kAid Experlence Since 1979
24125 E Mahan Dr
L allySuite A
Financing Available
Authorized dispenser ol most
major brands of 100% digital. KMS, CCC-A, Pope,
wwwaudiorehablab.o M.S., C.C.C.-A, Owner,
www.audiorehablab.com Clinical Audiologist


Life Insurance.
Marriage changes a lot of things iri your life -
.-Like your insurance needs. Let.Farm Bureau-
Insurance take care of all the details for you.
For prompt personal attention, Give us a call!
Helping You Is What We Do Best.
AER



Serving Madison & Jefferson Counties
Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
105 W. Anderson St., Monticello
(850) 997-2213


Florida Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance
Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company


Florida Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company
Southern Farm Bureau Annuity Insurance Company


"Christopher was 19 when he was hit by a car and killed. O rgan t -,Tissue
I wish I could see my brother. I wish I could just give him a
hug, or talk to him. I can't do that. But, because Christopher I 0 I- l K lT
told us he wanted to donate, another sister will have the Share your life. Share your decision
chance to spend time with her brother."
For a free brochure about Organ & Tissue Donation, call 1-800-355-SHARE. ( i Coalition on Donation


Healthy Body-Joyful Mind!

Integrated Therapeutic Massage
510-2268
Pamela Radcliffe, Ph.D., LMT, NCTMB
325 John Knox Rd
MA 39889 MM 15277


A~Jr


Your dog recommends brisk walks on a regular basis. So do we. Our
reason is that physical activity reduces risk factors for heart disease
and stroke. (Your dog's reasons may vary.) To learn more, call
1-800-AHA-USA1. Or visit us at http:// American Heart
www.amhrt.6rg on the World Wide Web. Association.-'
Fighting HeartDisease
and Stoke
This spac prid.d a. public sarvic. Copyri ht1997, Amneicn Heart Afociatlon


C' E-' I.f -.~C - E' LI-C El E1~C~~~ ~~~ E C hC ~Vf-- C-~ hR hC~~CY~E*C ~LU ~-C ~C~CI~CICICCI~CICY~(CI~I~C*C~C~ek~











Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005 PAGE 9


Lady Warrior JVs Defeat


Madison Central 13-5


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warrior JVs climbed to a
10-1 season after defeating Madi-
son Central for a 13-5.
"They (Madison) came out ready
to play because we beat them in the
first game," said Coach Frank
Brown.
"They were ahead by two and
held on to the lead. It was a hard-
fought game but we rallied in the
fourth and started hitting the ball
really good and took the lead from
them."
He added that in the seventh in-
ning, ACA was in the field and it
began to rain rally hard. "Paige
(Thurman) was continually pitch-
ing with a muddy and wet ball,"
said Brown. "She did a great job in
that last inning.
"The girls did a great job at hang-
ing tough. They really amaze me.


Every game we play, they're real
tough girls."
Olivia Sorensen went to bat five
times, scored one run, two singles,
two RBI, one strikeout, one walk,
one stolen base; Nicole Mathis
went to bat five times, scored two
runs, one single, one RBI, one
strikeout, one walk, one stolen
base.
Mallory Plaines went to bat five
times, scored two runs, two singles,
one walk, one stolen base.
Lindsey Day went to bat five
times, scored one run, one single,
one double, one RBI and two
walks; Thurman went to bat five
times, scored two runs, one triple,
two RBI, three walks, two stolen
bases.
Tristen Sorensen went to bat five
times, scored one run, one single,
one strikeout and one walk; Han-
nah Sorensen went to bat five
times, scored two runs, one strike-
out, three walks, two stolen bases.


ACA Loses Matches

TO Monroe, Maclay
In doubles action, Connell and
FRAN HUNT Sapp lost to Cavanaugh and John-
Staff Writer son, 4-8; and Jackson and Mueller
lost-to Brooks and Sanchez, 0-8.
The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team fell to a 4-5 sea-
son after dropping their last no i oS'
matches.
In the match with Monroe, War- ,r
riors lost 1-6. -. .,-
In singles action. Amanda Sann


lost to Mandy Clark, 0-8: Courmne
Connell lost to Meg Summerford.
0-8; Kaitlin Jackson lost to Anna
Dooner, 1-8; and Rebekah Aman
lost to Jessica Joyner, -1-8.
Caroline Mueller beat Ehizabeth
Bridges, 8-6; Elizabeth Shirley beat
Mallory Taylor, 8-5; and RamseN
Revell lost to Ivie Thomas. 5-8.
In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell lost to Summerford and Clark.
3-8; and Jackson and Mueller lost
to Dooner and Joyner, 6-8.
SLady Warriors lost to Maclay
1-6.
Sapp lost to Deven Cavanaugh,
1-8; Connell lost to Carolina San-
chez, 0-8; Shirley lost to Kristy
Johnson, 3-8; and Jackson lost to
Sarah Brooks, 6-8.
Mueller beat Chennel Turner,
8-2; Aman lost to Rebecca Mayo,
5-8; and Revell lost,to Dede Meros,
3-8.


ELIZABETH 'SHIRLEY'S ball
is out of bounds during a
practice session. Shirley
beat Mallory Taylor 8-5, in
the Munroe Game. (News
Photo)


Katelyn Levine went to bat four
times, scored one run, three singles,
two RBI, one stolen base; and Mi-
chaela Roccanti went to bat four
times, scored one run, one single,
one RBI.
Comparative statistics of the team
were as follows; ACA had 15 hits,
nine RBI, four strikeouts, 12 walks
and eight stolen bases and Madison
had 13 hits, four RBI, one
strikeout, four walks and six stolen
bases.
Thurman pitched the entire game,
striking out one batter and giving
up 13 hits and four walks.


The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity softball team now stands at a
5-2 record after winning their two
most recent games last week.
In the first game, the Lady Warri-
ors blanked Mclay 15-0.
After four innings, the game was
called because of the 15-run rule.
ACA had 10 hits and one error.

Brittany Hobbs pitched the entire
game, striking out four batters, al-
lowing only one hit and giving up
no walks. She went two for three in
the batters box smacked an in-the-
park home run, had four RBIs and
two stolen bases.
Chelsea Kinsey went two for two
and had one walk, two RBI's and
rwo stolen bases, Bethany Saunders
went one for two and had one dou-
ble and t\ o stolen bases and Caitlyn
Murphy had two RBI's.
In the Hamilton County game,


ACA won .16-4.
The game was called after five in-
nings due to the 10 run rule.
ACA had a total of 11 hits, were
given seven walks and one error.
Leading the game statistics and
beating a school record, Lisa Bailey
smashed out an over-the-fence home
run, to end the game and she had
three RBI's.
According to Coach Roslyn Bass,
in recent school history, only three
over-the-fence home runs had been
hit, and one of those was also hit by
Bailey last year, giving her two of
the three.
Murphy went one for one and had
two RBI's and two walks, Shea Ea-
son went two for two and had one
RBI and Jennifer Tuten went two
for four and had three RBI's.
Saunders pitched the entire game,
striking out eight batters and allow-
ing two hits and 12 walks.


aMAZOA'SI MV SALES
I-MAZDNSOTHNEHMOVEE V E N


7322 West Tennessee St
Just 2 miles WEST of Capital Circle NW

TEST DRIVE R MAZDA TODAY.
(850) 576-7138
All paynmals/pricos include dsler ooe. eZero down WAC. does not ins


2005 Mazda Tribute I
$20,515 MSRP
-$4,720 Discount
& Rebale
*1 5,795
Mazda Credit
Air Conditioning. Power $1,000* Bonus Cash
Windows & Locks. $, -, m
5 Speed Transmission 14795
4 Cyl, Til,. Power 0 Down
Mirrors Alloy Wheels. Down
AM/FM CD 48/mo.
Ss#494
11UT I anr !I oc!s! [ll is a[]io! y-


2005 Mazda MVP LX
$24,965 M
-$3,970 Disc
& Re
$20,99
MazdaC
$1,000* Bonus
Automatic. V6 $1,000 Bonus
Air Conditioning, Power $19,99.
Windows & Locks, Power O D
Mirrors, Tilt, Cruise, Alloy D
Wheels, AM/FM CD $33579/m,
Stk#426


ISRP
ount
ibate
P5
Credit
Cash
5
n
o.'


r ACA BOYs, Girls Among
mroaft Olt% laft 5"Ne t oifte


u~~~

I.I


a,,


LADY WARRIOR BRITTANY
HOBBS shown in a practice
session, struck out 4, al-
lowed I hit, had an in park
homerun, and 4 RBIs in the
*- Maclay game. (News Photo)


I opJ Iv I u IIn i IU


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Aucilla Christian baseball
and softball teams were among the
top 10 Ranking in The Big Bend last
week.
Warrior boys place in the top two
to three with a 7-1 season compared
to NFC at 8-3, and Godby with 9-4.
ACA girls also rank in the top
three with a 9-3 season, compared to
Chiles at 8-5 and Wewahitchka at
10-0.
In baseball batting averages, Ca-
sey Gunnels, placed at number 10
with .423, and Chris Tuten and


Drew Sherrod both place at number,
14 with a .400 batting average.
In RBIs, Sherrod placed at number,.
three with nine, and Gunnels placed
at number five with seven. ;,
Gunnels is in a dead heat for sec-.
ond in home runs with two.
For pitching Sherrod ties for sec-:
ond with a 2-0 season.
Ridgely Plaines stands alone at
third with 4-1, in earned run;
average.
Sherrod placed at two with 0.45'.
and in strikeouts; Plaines is at num-.
ber four with 24 for the season; and'.
Sherrod ties at number nine with 17,
for the season.


GULF COAST
METAL
ROOFING 3'WnIE GALVALUME
Y 3; WIDE PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDE 5V
accessories in stock
*WE HA VE METAL BUILDIN(iG
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available
CO t I, i'ur ildcsi'lre Ici.n',li h lci ,./ v S 'e- r s i e illiilhi
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.


m


Package Deal! s(
Diesel Tractor Pacae
*Diesel Tractor
*Rotary Cutter
*Boom Pole
*Drawbar
.16 ft Dual Axel Trailer
*Includes Warranty
*Other Pkgs Available .
CHECKS CREDIT CARDS A''t-!


Heavy Rains Cancel

Most JCHS Track.Meets


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The recent heavy rains forced the
cancellation of three of the four
track meets scheudled for the Jef-
ferson County High School Track
Team.
Coach Harry Jacobs said the'
Madison Invitational, the Florida
Relays and the Jasper Invitational
were all canceled because of the
heavy rains.
When the Tigers went to partici-
pate in the Disney competition,
only two of the boys teams made
mention.
"The girls did zero," said Jacobs.
"They didn't place in the top three
or four. They just didn't have it
there."
Jonathan Dady placed third in the
high hurdles with a time of 15:04
seconds; and J. R. Sloan placed


Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
manatees.
myfwc.org/psm


fourth in the 100 meter with 11:00
seconds.
The next scheduled invitational
for the Tigers is set 3:30 p.m.,
April 5, in Jasper.


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


South Georgia actor, Inc.


*SUZUKI.


$67PER MONTH
V 6.9% APR FOR 36 MONTHS ON ATV's*


South Georgia Tractor, Inc.
831 First Ave. N.E.
Cairo, Georgia 39828
(229) 377-1585


S.GT. Rentals and Sales
4017 Woodville Hwy
Tallahassee, Florida 32305
(850)671-2585


* Prices do not include applicable sales tax. Financing available through Household Retail Services and require credit approval. i
See your dealer for more information on this low rate financing and more low rate options.


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening





(Located behind Langdale Ato Mall


S.G.T. Rentals and Sales EVERYTHING YOU VALUE
4017 Woodville Hwy *Tallhassee, FL32311 831 First Ave. NE Cairo, GA
(850)671-2585 (229)377-1585
SFinancing is by Kubota Credit Corporation USA. WA C SCmr e exceptions may arply See your participating theater for detais t0<:
and other low tate notions


ACA Girls Blank


Maclay 15-0


$0 Down $99/mo WAC

LASTINGER TRACTORS "IP.ACE"
Exit 11 off 1-75 1/4 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


I


I


j mun- mu I i


I www.kub


*- r ',*" :.'


NkI..







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005


Recent Educational Rally


Drew Some 105 Attendees


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

According to Event Coordinator
Mary Madison, the Educational
Rally, IV was a tremendous suc-
cess and would not have been pos-
sible without the generous dona-
tions and contributions from many
in the community.
Madison said there were approxi-
mately 105 people in attendance
during the rally and expressed her
thanks to the parents and children
for their dedicated participation.
She said that special presenta-
tions by the Boys and Girls Club's
Stubbs Musical Performers, di-
rected by Patty Callender, were dy-
namic. "They performed on the
xylophones and shared a new ren-
dition on drums (plastic buckets).
They are called "Jammers," and
performed for the first time in pub-
lic.
She expressed the fact, that due
to a couple of funerals, some par-
ents and others were not able to at-
tend, "But the show went on with
extreme enthusiasm and success."
Madison said the Karate team
came arrived late, but entertained
the group with a stellar perform-
ance of kicks, jabs and commands.
The team's director is Kirture
Burke.


After the group's performances
and partner's presentations, the
group heard from guest speaker
Miami Dolphins All-Pro Comer
#29, Sam Madison, Jr. He im-
pressed upon the children the need
to stay focused and stay in school,
to continue to join programs such
as the partner's group and other ac-
tivities that will positively impact
their minds and bodies.
He encouraged the parents and
supporters to "Keep doing what
you're doing."
To the parents, his message was,
"Interact with your children a lot
and continue to support them in
their activities. As a token of his
appreciation to all of the parents, he
will send each, one of his auto-
graphed jerseys.
As special thanks to all present,
Madison Avenue For Kids founda-
tion supplied and educational
"SOAR" T-shirt.
Madison added that special
thanks goes to City and County
supporters which included Judge B
obby Plaines, Sheriff David Hobbs,
Vice-Mayor and Boys and Girls
Club Director Gerrold Austin, Su-
perintendent of Schools Phil
Barker, Dick Bailer, Debbie Snapp
of the News and Warner Wilson.
Through special donations from
the Home Foundation, Inc. Dr.


Homes Of Mourning


(Continued From Page 7)
Lela Elizabeth Langston
Cook
Mrs. Lela Elizabeth Langston Cook
age 90 a retired clerk died Sunday
March 27, 2005 in Tallahassee,Flor-
ida.
: Graveside Funeral Services will be
Thursday March 31, 2005 at 11:00
A.M. in the Evergreen Cemetery,
Greenville Florida. No visitation is
planned. Donations may be made to:
Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd.Tallahassee.,FI 32308.
- A native of Liberty County, Flor-
ida, Lela had lived in Monticello,
FL, for the past 6 years, and in


Greenville, Fl. for 60 plus years. She
was employed at Greenville Drug
Company for 43 years, where she
filled many roles in the running of
the store.
She is survived by: 4 Grandchil-
dren, Evelyn Swickley, Billy Hat-
field, and Douglas Hatfield all of
Monticello, FL, Robert Hatfield of
Tallahassee, FL, 8 Great-
grandchildren; Kristen Edwards,
Jackson Hatfield, Melanie Foster,
Nikki Hatfield, Amy Hatfield,
Tomas. Swickley, Nicc.las Swickley
and Jordan Swickley. She was proud
of the 1 Great-great grandchild on
the way.


Ka:


Rosa Home of Quitman, Madison
Avenue For Kids, VFW Post 251
and the Ladies Auxiliary, Judge
Robert "Bobby" Plaines, Camenez.

LEGALS


Brown and Hardee and Brian T.
Hayes, PA Attorney's at Law and
from Chancey-Stoutamire Insur-
ance Agent, every youth in atten-
dance received a gift bag filled
with a combination of items such
as pencils, notebook paper, color-
ing and activity books, work books,
and Bibles, fun bubbles, bubble
bath, chips, hair bows and socks.

LEGALS


The City Council of the City of Monticello proposed to adopt the
following entitled ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, ANNEXING PROPERTY
CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 3.87 ACRES ON
BORDERED ON THE NORTH BY EAST PEARL STREET
AND ON THE SOUTH BY EAST WASHINGTON STREET
(U.S. 90 EAST) TO THE CITY OF MONTICELLO;
REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID PROPERTY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


,'~~ F I


Donations also supplied apprecia-
tion gifts to the youth presenters, a
goodie bag for all the youths and
all attendees, and an all you can eat
pizza lunch with drinks and
cookies.
"For the last three years every
rally has been unique in its own
right and they just seem to get bet-
ter each year," stated Madison.

LEGALS


"I'm already looking forward to
planning the fifth one."
She concluded that they are al-
ways looking for more partners to
join the partnership and that new to
the partnership this year is Jeffer-
son County Retired Educators.
If you would like to join hands or
make a contribution, call Madison
at 997-4504 or 534-0200.

LEGALS


This property is further identified on the map below. A complete
metes and bounds description, as well as the entire text of the
ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5
p.m., Monday through Friday. A public hearing will be held on
the adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday, April 5, 2005 at 7:00
p.m. at City Hall.


A BOUNDARY SURVEY FOR RUTH K. SCHMIDT,,.,
L" LOCATED IN SECTION 29
TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE 1 OF 3

i,..


'i


POINT OF COMMENCEMENT "
A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY R/W
OF PEARL STREET EXTENDING 26.10
CHAINS EAST OF THE NE CORNER OF
LOT 13, PALMER LYONS ADDITION
R/W 70' COUNTY ROAD 146
\___ (PEARL STREET) _
23"D 3"X3" CM I=N89' 20"E ,79 N89'5('17';'
.N'3223"E N89'31 51 E 36 S ERRI 298.73'
R/W 91.77' 91.77' .n 91.77' 91-77' TERRAa
NO IP DC50 OB A POD B OB C OB D c 1TA CM
no c APn


a




I oc-
\N8932'E


to
0))




z

.0 h


t


0
1)F,-7
4. onr


tn
I; -


P

4,.


a


C-)
0- '?l
p


01


R/W


R/W

R/W


r





DARN WELL
R 73 P 489


92I F") (l I) .. ..
2 00 '' 5 7
D':oo st. .' EASMENT 8000 .B T
(c D.Oa' 2"E 7 8 -O4 430 0 P311.55 4s.0,'

NE CORNERIF LOT 1>< iO21 0
LOI4A ALTA 0.fVIS.ON o P 0
PLAT BOOK .B PAG 5 *




S8911'2W BEARING BASE DC=409.27



14. 23 -- ..n -
S(WASHINGTON STREET) R/W'
R/W QLEG) END -R/W
(YASR480N SRE) P 44







R/W LEGEND


BUSINESS Cal3,

List y,'368t



_____D IRECTORY _Vice ere


BURNETTE PLUMBING &

WELL SERVICE
-Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All!
"Call Andy"


997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT



41 ) 850-997-5808


850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911

155 JOHN COLLINS RD.


I


I


REALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance


Iree Removal eea lrots


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Licensed & Insured
CAC 058274


John A. Kuhn
Owner


J & K Air Conditioning, LLC
A/C System and Pool Heaters
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations
Over 25 Years Experience

(850) 997-4577
30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


i i i


Curis orgn' Gaage,, nc


ecial Fuel Injector t
$98.99 plus tax
Not valid with any other offer.


1538 N.Jeffe


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Barbwire Field ~ Wood





Jim Phillips

850-973-8117


COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE


Norman L. Barf
Exclusive Agent
Bartbot Insurance Gro


Allstate Insurance Company
3551 Blair Stone Road, Suite 130
(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cntr.)

oot 878-8077
()PI'N Munday-f rday 8 30-5 30
up Ikmail NORMANBARI-001] ,allslal com


NOTICE OF HEARING ON
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE 2005-03


I


I '


-bo, r-7'


nn -,K ;


]


9k4


5m








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00 -
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
C.. 997-3568
***


LEGALS

Public Notice For Legal Counsel. The
North Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. is issuing an Invitation to
Negotiate for legal counsel services. North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is a nonprofit organization, is the
administrative entity for certain job
training and job placement provisions of
the Social Security Act, Title IV (Excess
Temporary Assistance to Need Families
funds) the federal Workforce Investment
Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-165, Laws of
Florida; et al. Among other things, North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is responsible for the operation of the
Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison counties.
Instructions: Parties may apply by
submitting a letter of interest which:
Describe Their Qualifications to provide
appropriate legal services: Contains a
summary of applicable experiences.
Provide appropriate references: Indicates
their ability to perform the work; and
Contains a schedule of fees. Submit letter
of interest to: William M. Deming,
Executive Director, North Florida
Workforce Development Board, Inc., P.O.
Box 267, Madison, FL 32341-0267 by 4:00
p.m. on April 30, 2005. Late submittals
will not be accepted or considered. North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. reserves the right to reject any or all
submittals in the best interest of the North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is an equal
opportunity training provider/employer.
3/25, 30, 4/1, 6 chg

Notice of Application for Tax Deed:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
Andrew Alexander, Jr. the holder of the
following certificates has filed said
certificates for a tax deed issue thereon.
The certificate numbers and years of
issuance, the description of the property,
and names in which it was assessed are as
follows: Certificate No. 461, Year of
Issuance 2000. Description of Property
Lying and being in the Northeast of the



PLEDGING OUR

ALLEGIANCE


1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


L~GAJLS ,1


Southwest '/ of Section 38, Township One
South, Four East, commencing 275 yards
North from the Northwest corner of
Pucker, Thomas and Cole. Continue at a
certain corner up said forth line, and
running North (70) yards, thence East
(140) yards, thence South (70) yards,
thence West (140) yards to its initial
starting point, containing two 2 acres
more or less. Name in which assessed
Jane Crumity Hrs. All of said property
being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such
certificates or certificates will be sold to
the highest bidder at the courthouse door
on the 14th day of April, 2005 at 11:00
a.m. Dated this 17th day of March, 2005.
Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit
Court of Jefferson County.
3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13 chg


_4RAGE *.4,FOR FL t


WILKINSON a manufacturer of Fashion
Bedding & Accessories WAREHOUSE
SALE. Factory Overruns and Seconds.
Decorator Print Fabrics Comforter Sets
~ Bedspreads Window Coverings ~
Pillows ~ Decorator Chairpads &
Placemats. SATURDAY, APRIL 2ND -
DOORS OPEN 8 AM 12 NOON ~ 1701
West Gordon St., Valdosta, GA

AUTOMQ'IE 'W YE
,. -'- ., q 4 7 '


FOR SALE: Brown Yard Eggs $1 Dz.
FOR SALE: Baby Chicks, Ducks, Geese,
Prices vary with age. Location: 4473 Lake
Road. Wanted: Egg Cartons, will pay 5
cents per carton.
3/16,18,23,25,30,4/1 chg.
1995 Snapper Rear-Engine SR1433 riding
mower. Kohler motor, 33" deck, electric
start. Runs well, sturdy machine, good
mower for less than 2 acres. $390 Call
997-4253 M-F 6pm 9pm, S-S 9am 9pm.


1987 Suzuki Samurai JX 4wd convertible 3/30, tfn
190k mi., runs OK, CD player, fiberglass Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
top, toolbox, new 8' suspension (Rancho), Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
new 33" mud tires, new 15 x 10 steel to sell $1, $2, $5, $10. Call Nathaniel after
wheels, LOW gears, rear Lock-Right 4:30 p.m. @ 342-3246.
locker, other goodies. Needs some work,
but unbelievable off-road! $18000 obo. 3/30, 4/1, 8, 15, 22, 29, pd
Call 997-4253 between 6pm 9pm M-F, Briggs & Stration portable generator
9am 9pm Sat.- Sun. 55 .tartino wtt 3 running watts.


;J


The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a workshop at
10:00 a.m., on Monday, April 4, 2005, at
the Jefferson County Emergency
Management Traiping Room, 1240 North
Jefferson Street, Monticello, Florida, to
review the Government Services Group
Impact Fee Study. Felix "Skeet" Joyner,
Chairman.

HELP:WANTiED
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.
Veterinary Hospital seeking part time
help. Must have caring, professional
attitude. Front* office experience a plus.
Flexible hours; must be willing to work
some Saturdays. Apply in person, or send
resume to: Veterinary Associates, 1599
North Jefferson, Monticello. No Phone
Calls Please.
3/16 tfn.


CAPITAL CITY BANK
OFFICE MANAGER


Capital City Bank is seeking an Office
Manager for our Monticello location, to
efficiently operate the office by meeting
sales goals as well as coordinating sales
activities. Responsibilities include
supervising retail service audits, handling
office maintenance as well as hiring new
associates. Ideal candidate must have
-dffice management and banking
experience; loan experience is a plus.

Interested applicants should send their
resumes to:

Capital City Bank, 1860 Capital Circle
NW Tallahassee, FL 32308
Fax: 850-878-9139,
E-mail: jobs@ccbg.com. Please reference
SP in all correspondence. CCB offers
competitive benefits package.
EOE/Drug Free


The Jefferson County Road Department
will be accepting employment applications
for the following position: Truck Driver
with a CDL class "A" Florida license.
Must have excellent driving record, have
at least 2 years experience driving and
also experience with road equipment such
as backhoes. For application please stop
by the Road Dept. Office any week day
7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Jefferson County is
an equal opportunity employer and a drug
free workplace. Phone number 997-2036.
Closing Date will be April 1, 2005.
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1 chg
Drivers home every night. Shelton
Trucking seeks 15 driver having CDL-A, 2
years experience, No Felonies.
800-877-3201.
3/30, 4/1, c


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St
Downtown Monticello
(8O5)-997-5516 ww.cbkk.cmn


Do yol WamI t to Own tawud i

;MFFsoN OUNTY

* Casa Bianca 5 AC: High & Dry, Site
Built Homes Only. Wont Last!$48,000
* 30 Acres on Still Road Spectacular
Land Setting of Woods, Pasture and
Hardwoods!......................... $240,000
* Johnson Road 8.62 Acres Next to
Plantation, High Hill & Pasture with
Some Oak Trees ............ $52,000
* Gamble Road 9.25 AC Lots of
Privacy, Paved Road Access, Field
& W ooded .......................138,750


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571


IdII o I 10 FordafitNN~mur Id s

0\ ckI: 5 'ilil i rc Ml Tr fui' jt.I S4-50

d I a) 2\2or2\4\ In 1 13rRo\ndin i I lri i iic% spaip rs mI Icit h
o\ ki 4 MV IIioun icadurs -.

NN S. 110 rjdn.-CbISi 11 flcS.CO Il


16x80 or 2 or 3 Bedroom





1055 N.W. CAPITAL CIRCLE ....

S576-3007 WynF
105S HomeICRC Cente


I


I -


I


- -------------------------- ---------- -------- ----


"1 i


Reah ver4 ilionRedes b cllng hi nwsppe o
I FlridaPres Serice 866)42-173







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 30, 2005
0^L.:~~r L 3 1SbHH--'FI


CENTER President of the Resident council (center) counts
the eggs after the Easter egg hunt by JES Boys, Girls Club
Members, Corday Dukes, left, and Marquis Jones, right.
(News Photo)



Humane Society Ne

Vice-President, Volt


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Humane Society is in need
of a vice president and at least two
additional board members.
President Caroline Carswell said
additional board members and vol-
unteers are needed to assure that
the shelter can move up to the next
level in better serving the animals
and the community.
"We're in desperate need of a
vice president and at least two
more board members," said Car-
swell. "Right now, were are too
few to do what needs to be done."
She added that each board mem-
bers has specific responsibilities
and there were presently too few to
handle all that needed to be done at
the shelter.
"Many hands make light work,"
said Carswell. "The quality of
work goes up when you're not
overwhelmed with too much to do.
"There are some people who just
want to volunteer for one thing or
another and we need them," said
Carswell. "But there are some who
also like to have responsibilities up
to their necks, and we need them
also."
Fundraisers are necessary for the
shelter, but without the bodies to
help make these happen, it's just
not possible.


As the animal population grows
and the needs at the shelter.
heighten, the need for conducting
ongoing fund raising event is a
must to keep the shelter running
adequately.
"More people add up to more
hours, we need more hands, more
minds, more ideas and more people
with loving hearts," Carswell
stated.
"Also, with the pet population
getting ready to boom, we're going


tc
ft
tc
b
e
ii
u
P


BETTY LANAHAN, is Easter Bunny to children each year
just completed her deliveries. She resides at KOA and
probably leaves an Easter basket or two for special people
at the campground. (News Photo)

CLARIFICATION
e d s In the March 25 News story on C.
P. Miller, it states that "opponents
te e rs made political hay of the incident, a
L[j| Icontributing factor in Miller's
ntee s defeat."
"Opponents" was used in the
o need many more foster homes broadest sense of the word, meaning
or them," said Carswell. citizens opposed to Miller's candi-
"Our foster homes are like gold dacy, not necessarily his Republican
o us and can make the difference opponent, the present-day Commis-
ietween being adopted and being sioner Jerry Sutphin.
euthanized Sutphin disavows any knowledge
Hopes are high that citizens wish- or participation in the literature that
ng to become board members, vol- was mailed out to potential voters
nteers or foster homes, will be prior to the election to discredit
present during their next Board of Miller's candidacy.


Directors meeting, April 4, 7 p.m.
at the shelter.


go1



MODULAR HOUSE






r t :
b ,'i" ,.*. ,,






UNIVERSITY .
HOMESat
5' ,, 7 6 '
jn ^J ri *
+.?g++ :1 I+",


OPEN HOUSE!
Friday & Poker Run
Refreshments
Saturday Customer
Appreciation Sale
April 1 & 2
0,NEW 2004
VTX'1300C




OPEN HOUSE SPECIALLY PRICED
MSRP $9,199 $7999
Dealer Discount $1,000 *

STST BONUS
BUCKS
Available now on Honda VTX1300C/R/S models.

W Interstate

CYCLES
580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
(386) 758-2453
Toll
Fre: 1-877-596-2453
Open: Tues. Fri., 9-6; , ToVaIdosla
Saturday 9-4 11'3.
Free cyd'1 5W Ei8
Meosolaryl eede sb
Offer ends May 31 I ona ~ I I MHO IDA
honda.com BE A RESPONSIBLE RIDER. ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET. EYF PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND PLEASE RESPECT
THE ENVIRONMENT. OBEY THE IAW AND READ YOUR OWNER'S MANUAL THOROUGHLY '200 Boms Bucrks ofle iud oil any new 2W05 ald
pior year VTX1300C/RrS models. Bonus Bucks can ony be used or purchases at the deallhip and mus a be redeenan on Ihe dale ol purchase
Oner has no cash value and Is not transerable. Redemption value not to exceed $200 lor V-X13OGC',S Customers may apply cniicate to pails
accessories, riding gear or other purchases. and ae responsible or related sales ta. Bonus Bucks offer good through 5r3 IO. Check Vlh parcipatung
dealers foi complete program details VTX is a registered trademark of Honda Molor Co. Ltd 12005 Amercan Honda Molor Co, Inc (2)05)
155259DH-F


Keeping You Informed In Our Growing Community
Monticello News


f*


Do you have better things to do than / r
cleaning Gutters? Golfing...Gardening...Fishing....
Have Gutter Helmet installed and have more time to
do the things you enjoy!


-In-

S*r iii


2, 2005 4PM TILL CLOSE


CONTINUOUS LIVE ENTERTAINMENT


L

., ...- a, ,o.... ,. .._ '
: ; ROCK THE STAGE



i. YES, HE WILL.BE HERE!!!
JIMMIE AT THE GRILL :
SMOKING HIS FAMOUS
S' RIBS
SAND CHICKEN!!
i; srfry


Q WD1


M41D


PRIMITIVE,


RV PARKING


I~leduce home maintenance and protect
your investment
4 Recommended by friends and neighbors as
the Number One Gutter Protection System
4 Installs over existing gutters
' Lifetime, transferable manufacturer's warranty



GutterHelmet+
-L:-rm


GUTTER


PROTECTION


SYSTEM


848 Blountstown Highway

850-576-3222 877.240.7200
ob www.gutterhelmet.com/bigbend en


SPRING IS IN THE AIR


SATURDAY APRIL


''' --r~ .i