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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00024
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 25, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00024
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text








Rooster Town
Garden In
Bloom For Spring

Story, Page 3
I


L. -:.;,'L P? FLORIDA HISTORY
^ LIBRARY VEST
U ,,;:.-;TY .r FL0 9TD4
INESVILLE, FL. 32611

Abundant

Supply Of
Natural Gas

Editorial, Page 4


Thigpen

Named MSU
Hall Of Famer

Story, Page 8-


Coalition

Discusses Services
Available Here

Story, Photo Page 12


QC! Friday Morning D





Montic


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ws


134TH YEAR NO.24, 50 CENTS Pu blished Wednesdays & Fridays


Expert Completes




Impact Fee Study


Snafu Delays Release

Of FindingS One Week


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer\

A representative of a consultant
tirm that ie county is' paying
$10,000 to prepare an impact fee
study stood 'up, commissioners on
Wednesday.
Melissa Proctor, of Government
Services Corporation, was supposed
to meet with commissioners 9 a.m.
Wednesday to discuss the findings
of the study.
At least, that was the understand-
ing of commissioners, who sched-
uled the meeting specifically to
address the issue.
The way it was represented to
them. commissioners had to act on
the ime siie ahlo'st iifimediately, ii*
they wanted to implement tay kind
of impact fee by the end of the cur-
rent year.
In fact, commissioners were sup-
posed to recei e copies of the report
Monday; so they could hate time to
review the findings in preparation
for a decision' atWednesday's meet-
ing.: .
The expected report never materi-,


TIFFANY HOUCK chooses this Easter Iilly for her mother.
(News Photo)


Culvert Fees


May Be Upped


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Leave it to Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin to stir the pot.
Last month, Sutphin suggested
the imposition of. an, assessment
against loggers to compensate the
county for the alleged damage that:
logging rigs cause to county roads.
The proposal went nowhere, but it
sparked a lively discussion.
Now Sutphin is recommending
that the Road Department cease its
long-standing practice of installing
culverts in private driveways.
Either that or the department
needs to begin charging the property
owners an adequate and compensa-
tory fee for the service, Sutphin
said.
"The county needs to get out of
the private enterprise of installing
driveway culverts," Sutphin said.
"County employees have plenty of
other work to do besides this. We
need to let private contractors do the


I.






I


wo rk and free our county emplo ees
to do what they're supposed to be
doing."
Sutphin cited some statistics pro-
vided to him by Road Department
David Harvey.
According to those statistics, it
takes county employees four days to
do each driveway, in addition to the
several loads of lime rock, gravel
and other materials that the county
supplies.
By. his estimation, Sutphin said,
the county was, losing money on
each driveway. The fact, he said,
was that the county was charging
$500 for a service that it was costing
it $1,200 to provide.
What's more, nowhere in his re-
search of the issue did he find that
the county required property owners
to install the culverts, he said.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner remarked that it had always been
his understanding that the county-
charged property owners enough to
compensate for the service. But
(See Culvert Fees, Page 12)


alized Monday, however. And come
Wednesday, Proctor didn't show up
for the meeting either. Nor did she
call, to commissioners' consterna-
tion.,
When Clerk of Courts Dale Boat-
wright telephoned her office well
into the meeting time, Proctor re-
portedly informed him that the re-
port was not yet ready. It seemed
that last-minute adjustments in the
numbers had necessitated a revision,
Boatwright reported back to com-
missioners.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner offered to call Proctor following
the meeting and get to the bottom of
the confusion.
-Commissioner Gene. Hall asked
Jo ner to convey to Proctor that if
she couldn't attend a meeting in the
future, "she should let us know well
in advance, out of courtesy."
Commissioners briefly discussed
what the delay might do to their
timeline, given the 'consultant's al-
leged representation that they had to
act almost immediately if. they
wanted to enact any'impact fees this


DEVELOPMENT, commissioners have real-
ized, is no longer a will-o'-the-wisp dream
in the future, but a present reality that they


year. Absent the consultant and the
report, however, commissioners had
little choice but to adjourn.
"With the professionalism of the
people doing the survey and the
groundwork for us, it may be a long
time (before we implement any im-
pact fees)," said a visibly disgusted
Commissioner Junior Tuten.
Joyner contacted Proctor subse-
quent to the meeting and reported to
the News that a communications
breakdown between Proctor, Boat-
wright and Chief Larry Bates ac-
counted for the confusion. He didn't
elaborate.
Joyner said Proctor promised to
have the report to commissioners by
next Friday, with the board sched-
uled to meet on the issue April 21.
Commissioners approved the im-
pact fee study last November, with
the understanding that the project
would ultimately cost $15,000 --
$10,000 upfront for the study and
another $5,000 for help in the im-
plementation of any impact fees the
commissioners decided to pursue.
Impact fees, by definition, are
one-time charges levied against new
construction -- both residential and
commercial to help pay for the
cost of the increased government
services demanded by growth.
Specifically, county officials are
focusing on fire protection and am-


I


must address if they don't want it to over-
take the county. (News Photo)


State Drops TWO Battery Charges

In Incident involving C. P. Miller


.L 7
DAVID HARVEY, Road Department superintendent, left,
provided Commissioner Jerry Sutphin with a list of the
hours and materials it requires to install culverts in pri-
vate driveways. The county reportedly is losing money on
each installation. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The state has dropped the domes-
tic battery charges against C. P.
Miller, stemming from an incident
last summer.
In the No Information filed by As-
sistant State Attorney Jason Jones
on Feb. 8, the state gives as the rea-
son for its action that "victim re-
fuses to participate in the prosecu-
tion and has filed a sworn affidavit
saying the incident did not happen."
In the sworn affidavit dated Sept.
3, 2004, Sandra Miller essentially
states that she was in error when she
accused her husband of attacking


her and her son.
"Having (had) time to think
clearly as a rational human, I know
that things were blown out of pro-
portioned (sic)," Sandra Miller
states. "We had a family situation
that obviously got blown way out."
In her affidavit Miller reiterates
her statement to deputies that she
pulled a gun on her husband at the
time of the altercation, for fear he
would hurt their son.
The incident occurred July 6,
2004. According to the official re-
port, Sandra Miller told deputies
who responded to her call from the
Wendy's/Exxon that her husband
had grabbed her by the chest and
thrown her against the wall when


she had tried to leave the residence.
When her son, C. P. Miller Jr.,
tried to intervene, the elder Miller
struck him in the chest and held him
around the neck, she told deputies.
Three days later, on July 9, Sandra
Miller recanted her statements to
deputies and asked that the charges
be dropped.
She expounded on the reason for
her recant in the Sept. 3 affidavit.
When she had told the deputies what
she had said, she had been confused,
under duress, and concerned about
the welfare of her son, who was be-
ing taken to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for treatment, she said.
(See State Drops, Page 3)


bulance as areas of potential impact
fee imposition.
According to the experts, every
new residence imposes actual and
potential demands on county serv-
ices, as well as adding to traffic con-
gestion and increasing the wear and
tear on roads.
Impact fees.are a compensatory
tool that allows governments to re-
coup a certain portion of the cost
they incur to provide the additional
services required by an increasing
population.
Impact fees, moreover, are consid-
ered politically palatable, as they
principally affect people'who are
not yet part of the community and
so can't take out their outrage on
current office holders.
The consultants report is supposed
to answer the questions of which, if
any, impact fees are warranted here
and how and where they may best
be implemented.
The study is a mandatory first
step, before a government entity can
implement an impact fee.
Motivating commissioners' consid-
eration of the issue is the perception
that growth is no longer a future
possibility, but a present reality.
"We're not getting ahead of the
growth (with the imposition of im-
pact fees)," Tuten said at an earlier
meeting. "We're already behind it.
But with this ordinance, we can hit
the ground running."

County Okays

School Revised

Lease Contract

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The County Commission last
week approved the revised contract
offered by the School Board for the
lease of the former' high school
buildings, bringing to an end a mat-
ter that has been reverberating for
more than a year.
The revisions call for a 25-year
lease of the several buildings for the
amount of $1 a year, with the
county having the option to renew
the contract upon expiration.
The revisions further stipulate that
only the library can occupy the me-
dia center; that the buildings revert
to the School Board if they go un-
used for a 24-month period; and that
the county will contribute 50 per-
cent to the funding of the school re-
source officer, instead of the 25
percent the county has historically
contributed.
The total annual cost of the re-
sources officer, including salary and
benefits, is $41,230.
The final revision calls for the
county to provide free annual fire
inspections of all school facilities, a
cost commissioners estimate to be
about $700 per year.
In a related action, the commis-
sion awarded a $3,000 contract for
the appraisal of the four buildings
the county wants to sell as surplus
properties. The four buildings are
those housing the operations of the
tax collector, property appraiser, as-
sistant state attorney and the library:
Commissioners want to use the
monies realized from the sale to
renovate and reconfigure the former
(See County OKs, Page 2)


FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 2005


I E-


- I I I I I r







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005


SHealth Department Offers

I Diabetes Management Classes
Ask your doctor whether you *Do not smoke, and maintain a
FRAN HUNT should reduce the amount of pro- healthy weight and participate in
Staff Writer tein in your diet. daily physical activity.


CUTTING the ribbon at the dedication of the Washington, volunteer, Juliette Jackson,
newly constructed softball field at HMS are principal, William Saffo, athletic director,
front to back, left, Hattie Jordan, assistant Julie Conley, mayor, and Kim Barnhill,
coach, Corinne Stephens, coach, Charles Health Department administrator.



Ribbon Cutting At HMS


Softball Field Last Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Through the combined efforts of
the County Health Department,
County School Board, Howard
Middle School, and the County
Road Department, the girls at HMS
now have their own softball play-
ing field.
Representatives of each entity,
and Mayor Julie Conley, along
with student athletes, attended a
ribbon cutting ceremony last week,
after which, the girls played their
first home game on the field.
Girls will no longer have to be
bussed to the Recreation Depart-
ment for home games and
practices.
In addition, the school now com-
plies with the Title 9 law, which re-
quires equal facilities for both boys
and girls sports.
The field will also be available
for use by the physical education
classes and students after school.
"It is important to be physically
active atall ages if you want to be
healthy and prevent disease," said
Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill.
Chronic Disease Health and Edu-
cation Coordinator Marianne Goe-
hrig said, "Having access to this
field was also designed to help de-
crease the overweight and obesity
rates of students at HMS by giving
them another facility to use to in-
crease their physical activity."


During the ceremony, Barnhill
and HMS Assistant Principal Cur-
nell Henry, took the opportunity to
emphasize that partnerships and
team effort that it took to create the
softball field, and how it would not
have been possible without this
partnership.
Goehrig said the group had taken
a piece of land behind the school's
gymnasium and converted it into
the fully-functional softball field.
"There were a great number of
people who helped bring this soft-
ball field to the school and I would
like to thank everyone who has
been involved," said HMS Athletic
Director Willie Saffo.
"We have needed it for a long
time. We didn't have anything be-
fore now, and now we have some-
thing we can be proud of."
The Health Department donated
$5,700 through a mini-grant from
the Chronic Disease Health promo-
tion and Education Program to pro-
mote physical activity, for the
contractor to lay out the softball


field and install the bases, the back-
stop and fencing and the player
benches.
The School Board donated
$1,724, through the assistance of
the School Board Maintenance De-
partment (Donald Johnson and Lor-
raine Howard) for tree removal,
clay, a portion of the contractor bill
and clearing the area of debris.
Others recognized include: HMS
Principal Juliette Jackson, Henry
and Saffo for dugouts, sod donated
by Earl Merritt, and maintenance
and preparation of the field by*'
community volunteer Charles
Washington, and the Road Depart-
ment staff. David Harvey and Wil-
liam Noble, for the leveling of the
field.
During the ceremony, Barnhill
presented Henry with nine basket-
balls and two metal basketball nets
for use at the school.
Goehrig concluded that HMS is
also hopeful that they will be able
to add a fence around the perimeter
of the field.


County OKs Revised Contract


(Continued From Page 1)
high school buildings for county
use. At the same time, commission-
ers are pursuing a legislative appro-
priation for the renovation and


reconfiguration project.
Officials' aim is to move as many
county operations as possible to the
former high school site by the end
of the year, with the library having
the top priority.


ADVERTISE in the Monticello News!!!


Presents
"Down at the Depot"

One Night Only Benefit Performance
For the Thomasville Music and Drama Troupe

Thursday, March 31st at 7:30 PM
Thomasville Municipal Auditorium
General Admission Seating
Orchestra Level $15, Balcony $10

Tickets Outlets:
Monticello Chamber of Commerce
Thomasville Cocroft Music Co. and Rayann's Christian Bookstore
Box Office at Thomasville Municipal Auditorium
opens one hour prior to curtain

Call (229) 558-9470 to purchase tickets by phone and for further ticket information
Group Packages Available


F


I


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CASH N
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEME
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYO

(800) 794-7310'

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NO
for Structured Settlements!


March is National Kidney Month,
designed to raise awareness about
kidney failure and to urge early
screening for the disease.
In addition, March 22 was
American Diabetes, the most com-
mon cause of kidney failure, Alert
Day.
County Health Educator Bonnie
Mathis said that about 12.4 percent
of residents in the county have
been diagnosed with diabetes.
The County Health Department
offers free diabetes management
counseling to county residents who
are diabetic.
Among the services discussed
are: medications, nutrition counsel-
ing, and case management.
To participate, ask your physi-
cian to fax a Comprehensive Dia-
betes Management Program
referral form to the Health Depart-
ment at 342-0257.
Mathis reports that a diabetes
support group is offered monthly
for county residents who are dia-
betic or are interested in diabetes.
The DOers Club Diabetes Sup-
port Group meets at the Senior
Center 10:30 a.m., second Monday
of every month.
A series of three diabetes classes
will be offered by the Health De-
partment in June, free of charge, to
county residents who are diabetic
or interested in learning more about
the disease.
Classes will be conducted 9 to
11 a.m. on the Saturdays of June 4,
11 and 25, at the department.
Topics will include overview,
medications, monitoring, psychol-
ogy, exercise, complications, foot
care and nutrition.
To register, contact Mathis at
342-0170, ext. 218.
According to the National Insti-
tute of Diabetes and Kidney Dis-
ease, good care practices for people
who do have diabetes include:
Ask your doctor to measure
your AlC level at least twice a
year, then aim to keep it at less than
seven percent.


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In today's rapidly changing healthcare environment,
nurses have more career options than ever before.
They also have flexible work schedules and attractive
starting salaries. And nursing is both personally and
professionally rewarding. Nurses
really do make a difference
in people's lives.
Join us for a seminar and
hospitality hour to discuss
the career opportunities in nursing. Staff from all
areas of nursing will be available to provide a
wealth of information about the many different
careers in nursing. Also, representatives from area
colleges and the technical college will be present to
discuss educational opportunities.

Tuesday, April 5

6:00 p.m.
John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital
Auditorium A & B
Tines have changed, and so have you...and the lime has never been
better to make the new advantages qoa nursing career your own.
Archbold Scholarship
information will be available.
For more information please call (229) 228-2713.


Your Newspaper

Serving Your Community







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005 PAGE 3


STUDENTS recently completed the Junior
Leadership Course sponsored by the cham-
ber of Commerce and Coordinated by Jerry


Boatwright. At Left is Mary Frances Drawdy,
chamber director; back right is Boatwright.


v 0 U -. wm,.,m-..-,ri... .- sf M.ecf.' a .. *
JERRY BOATWRIGHT, coordinator of the tha, asst. superintendent, acting on behalf
Junior Leadership Program, right, receives of Superintendent Phil Barker.
a plaque of appreciation from Cindy Sheres-



Rooster Town Garden Awash


With Colorful Blossoms


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

S.Colorful spring blossoms adorn
.the Rooster Town Garden relecting
the attention it receives twice
weekly.
. Spokesperson Judi Persons said
That much work has been done re-
Scenit, including the planting of 15
:rose bushes donated by Green In-
gdustries and a Loquat tree donated
,by Debbie Snapp in memory of her
Brother.
4:-
S "We have planted six more
.Spirea bushes and now we have
;12," she said.
S"Sra\\ berries from last year are
coming back and we got some
'more strawberries to plant today,"
'she said Monday.
Tulips and daffodils are begin-
!ning to come up along with carrots,
radishes and lettuce. "The perenni-
als are coming back. Azaleas are
\still blooming, and I found a ginger
:,sprig out there this morning," Per-:
;sons said Monday.
S"The kids are now beginning to
see the plants that .were dormant
over the winter coming back, and
that's a learning experience for
them," she added.
When they are not planting, the


Help With

Utility Bills

Available
The Area Agency on Aging for
North Florida announces the avail-
ability of Emergency Home Assis-
tance Program for the Elderly funds
for eligible households in the
county.
To qualify, the applicant must by
60 years old or older, have a discon-
nection notice for the interruption of
utility service, and has not received
any prior assistance towards the
payment of utility/gas bill, from
Oct, 2004.
A benefit of $300 will be allowed,
if the applicant is approved.
Eligibility criteria includes, but is
not limited to:
*At least one person 60 or older
.must reside in the home.
*Household must receive a dis-
connection notice.
*Income must not exceed 150 per-
cent of the federal poverty level.
*Proof of income for all house-
hold members must be verifiable.
*Assistance has not been received
on any utility bills since Oct., 2004.
To access the program, call the
Elder Helpline at 1-800-963-5337,
or contact the senior center.


State Drops
(Continued From Page 1)
The charges, and the resulting
negative publicity, occurred at a
time when C. P. Miller was running
for elective office. Opponents made
political hay of the incident, a con-
tributing factor in Miller's defeat.
Millet maintained at the time, and
still maintains, that the handling of
the incident was politically moti-
vated.




News Without

Fear or Favor

Monticello News


youth from the Boys and Girls
Club go to the garden every Mon-
da,, and Wednesday, the, ,keed,
mulch and perfonnm \hate\er
-chores are necessary.
Persons said they were also get-
ting ready to plant an herb garden.
and potatoes.
A volunteerwill be working with
the children on the planting of larger
crops such as corn and greens.

Youths and adults involved in the
_project have already made man\
improvements. These included- a
new day lilly bed; the rescue of
dozens of "Paper Whites", which h
had grown wild and x\ere
replanted; and creating a hex. daf
fodil and tulip bed.

Also, work has begun on the
southwest quadrant of the garden.
creating a slhde bed, and a sutn-
shine bed.
Additional fruit trees and blue-
berry bushes wre also planted.
The Monticello Garden Club do-
nated $210 toward the project for
rakes, shovels, two 100-foot garden
hoses, two heavy duty sprinklers.
20 one-gallon Azalea plants and
additional bulbs.
"The kids are really enioying
working in the garden, and the;, are
learning so much," Persons said.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

SMEMBE4 RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



Abundant Supply


Of Natural Gas


When it comes to one energy
source, the U.S. may be more self-
sufficient than some might expect.
The majority of natural gas con-
ssumed in America is produced in
;America. In fact, natural gas is
,abundant in the U.S. -- enough to
.cover American needs for years to,
come -- and experts say it's safer,
,less expensive and better for the en-
,vironment than many other sources.
They argue that natural gas has a
:proven record of safety and reliabil-
ity.
It's been used to heat American,
homes and generate power for
!years.
Every day in the U.S., several mil-
lion cubic feet of natural gas travel
'through a high-tech underground
pipeline delivery system. to more
than 64 million customers. Here's a
closer look:
Natural gas flows from deep in-
side the earth into producing wells.
From there, itenters gathering pipe'-
linies ahid'the~n"lfge transmission
pipes that crisscross the nation.
After traveling up to 700 miles in
a day, the natural gas arrives at the
local utility. Some of the gas is
stored underground for later use.
The rest is sent through a network of
pipes to homes or businesses.
The American 'Gas Association
says the normal pressure for sending
the natural gas through these pipes
is less than the pressure created by a.
child blowing bibbbles through a
straw in a glass of milk.
The natural gas pipeline infra-


structure, which includes 1.4 million
miles of pipeline, is the nation's saf-
est energy delivery system, accord-
ing to U.S. government statistics.
One reason may be that gas utility
and pipeline companies'spend close
to $7 billion annually on safety
measures.
Experienced personnel routinely
inspect, and: maintain natural gas
service lines and service crews are
available to respond to emergencies
24 hours a day.-
The groups have also sponsored
"Call Befotire You Dig'' programs
and tihe 'e installed ab-'ovearound
natural gas markers, (no% required
by federal law). T'he pipelines
themselves are mostly made'frbm
high-tech plastics that are corrosion
resistant and flexible.
Natural gas is produced in 20
states. High-strength pipelines act
like interstate highways, moving
huge amcklts 'of naturall "g s'thou-
sands of miles." : .
SComputerwed system's tell pipe-
line companies where gas is needed
most, then find the most efficient
way to get it there.
To help avoid interruption of serv-
ice, pipelines are equipped with
shutoff valves that let companies re-
route gas to other lines. while a spe-
cific line is being serviced. In
addition, many gas companies store
natural gas during warmer months
to help ensure that home-heating
customers can depend on the fuel in
the colder months. (NAPS).


From oto File.
^^-MHIa^l^^^HW^^Hik^ M


JUNE, 1988 Watermelon Festival Little King
and Queen were Jerod Joyner and Lora
McCoy. First Runner-up was Cody Connell,


left. Erin Boyd, Rebecca Barfield, right,
were First and Third Runners-up. (News File
Photo)


Opinion & Comment


P :: IShort Takes & Other Notions
-2


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

Our Town did a super job of-
v.elcomnng the Bike Florida folks
with a 'jare, of activities and
services. ''The visit of some 1,000
cyclists had a significant economic
impact here with 'restaiirants and
stores reporting increased sales. A
hat tip is in order to the steering
committee that helped us get ready
for the cyclists. ,
'The Terri Schia'o case i heart
wrenching no matter .what :your
views may be about the courts and
Congress.
Ministenal Assocjation will host a
Community Good Friday: service
noon today at First Presbyterian
Church.
I Opera .House supporters are con-
tfibuting to 'a "Raise the Roof Fund"
to help'defray the $50,000 needed
for a new roof.


Relay for Life walk-a-thon set for
April 15 and 16 at the JCHS track.
This has become a major commu-
nity event with hundreds of people
walking and many clubs and organi-
zations'participating.
Wes Scoles did the cooking for
the Rotary lunch cart which served
cyclists Saturday. So, he's a physi-
cian by day and cook by night.
Bob Dickson, Transportation Se-
curity Administration of the Kansas
Cit\ International Airport, is send-
. *" i i '. '1 ,, L .1 ".) 5 "' '
ing e-mails asking people ot to buy
gas imported from Middle:,Eastern
countries. He claims Citgo, Sunoco,
Conoco, Sinclair BP/Phillips, Hess
and ARCO don't import Middle
Eastern oil.
According to the U.S. Department
of Labor, health care jobs will ac-
count for 10 of the 20 fastest grow-
ing occupations from now to 2012.
Thanks to Merry Ann Frisby for
writing Short Takes last week. The
late Robert Shepherd was my regu-


lar back up writer when 1 was out of
town and he really enjoyed himself.
Didja know in 1799, Congress es-
tablished the nation's highest mili-
tary title, General of the Armies of,
the United States, to honor George
Washington, First commander of the
Army, but he never received it. It
was awarded posthumously by a
special act of Congress in 1976.
Life expectancy for a 65 year old
in 1940 was just under 78, today it
is just over 83 and expected to get
longer.
Kiplinger estimates by 2005, sen-
iors will spend about 30 percent of
their income on Medicare.
Most effective deterrents to home
burglars include a burglar alarm,
having your mail and newspapers
picked up when you are away, auto-
matic time switch to turn on exterior
lights, having a car in the driveway,
and deadbolt locks.
Gas prices are climbing with no
let up in sight. By Memorial Day


they are expected to hit $2.30 per
gallon.
Domestic auto makers see their
market share slipping while Nissan,
Toyota, and Honda sales are con-
tinuing to climb.
Daylight saving time begins at 2
a.m. Sunday, April 3...This is the
time to change smoke alarm batter-
ies.
Some 40 percent of Americans
own guns including one third of
,American women. The average gun
*owner has four or more weapons.
New National Park: Great Sand
Dunes National Park and Preserve is
spread across the eastern side of
Colorado's San Luis Valley, flanked
by some of the highest peaks in the
Rocky Mountains. Congress re-
cently upgraded it from a national
monument to a national park after
the federal government gained con-
trol of 97,000 more acres. Some of
its dunes are the tallest in North
America.


Internet Alcohol Sales Opposed


Advance Of Secularism

Danger To Culture


BY REX M. ROGERS

Our enemy today is not primarily
an evil regime, nor foreign power.
It's not Nazism. It's no longer secu-
lar humanism, modernism, foreign
imperialism or maybe even 'com-
munism. Certainly our enemy is not
other Christians who believe in Je-
sus Christ and biblical Christianity.
Our enemy today is Secularism,
the idea that says there is no God, no
eternal absolute values and no mo-
rality except personal preference.
Secularism is more difficult to
fight than other kinds of enemies.
It's more subtle, more pervasive.
Our enemy has no country, no po-
litical party, no army. Secularism
offers no immediately recognizable
threat to our physical safety. But
the idea of secularism is just as
threatening as any past enemy has
ever been. Indeed, secularism may
be a greater enemy because it at-
tacks the mind and the heart.
The degree to which cultural secu-
larism is allowed to deny the su-
pernatural is the degree to which our
culture no longer acknowledges a
higher law.


If there is no higher law, then
there is no basis for saying the one
act is "Right" and another act is
"Wrong."
If there is no higher law, no God,
no standard outside ourselves, then
everyone is able to do what is right
in their own eyes. What we have
left is culture in some stage of moral
chaos.
Cultural secularism is now the
emerging worldview in the United
States. Evidence for this assertion
includes a list of moral issues like
abortion, rising divorce rates, in-
creasing person-on-person crime,
substance abuse, and moral relativ-
ism.
To make a difference, biblical
Christians must know their enemy.
Secularism wears many disguises,
but it's the wolf at our cultural door.
To fight it, we must know the Bible,
and we must work to advance Chris-
tian ethics in every sphere of life. If
we don't fight secularism, well lose
our culture by default.
Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., book
author and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
pens this column, which appears in
89 newspapers.


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.


A poll of Florida voters released
today by Mason-Dixon Polling &
Research shows that Floridians
overwhelmingly oppose ,p proposals
to allo\\ alcohol products to bek
shipped directly to homes in Florida..
There are now at least three bill
filed in their state Legislature that-
would legalize currently prohibited
methods of shipping alcohol prod-
ucts, such' as wine, directly to homes'
-- SB 906, SB 480 and HB 975.
The Florida Coalition to Prevent
Underage Drinking maintains that
opening the door to direct shipping'
will inevitably make it easier for mil-


type of alcohol product it is," said
John Fleming,.. a spokesman for the
Florida Coalition to Prevent Under-
age Drinking.
S"Out-of-state vendors are already
illicitly shipping alcohol products
directly to homes in Florida, and mi-
nors are taking advantage of this
loophole to buy alcohol Legalizing
direct shipping makes the problem
worse, not better."
According to a summary of the
poll provided by Mason-Dixon, the
poll found that a strong majority of
Florida voters oppose allowing beer,
wine and liquor to be sold directly


nors to order beer, wine and liquor to consumers -over the Internet of
through their computers and have it through the mail. Statewide, 65 per-
delivered to their homes, bypassing cent indicated they would oppose
Florida's system of alcohol control. ;,such alcohol sales, while only 22
"Floridians clearly recognized that percent were in favor and 13 percent
shipping alcohol products directly were undecided.
to homes-is risk), no matter what A majority also opposed allowing



Glades Mercury
Smay also shed light on the ongoing
BY TIM LOCKETTE debate over expanding emissions
University of Florida controls to other industries.
"This is a triumph of regulation,
By analyzing nearly a century of:. which is something you don't hear
data, University of Florida research- 'about very often," said Peter Freder-
ers have been able to prove defi- ick, an associate professor of wild-
nitely that mercury levels in the Ev- life ecology at UF's Institute of
erglades have dropped dramatically Food and Agricultural Sciences.
during the last decade after reaching Frederick, a specialist in wetland
dangerously high levels in the early ecology who has long been con-
1990s. cered about wading birds in the
The researchers say the study con- Everglades, led a team of research-
firms what earlier findings had sug- ers who measured mercury levels
gested: that controls on emissions over the past century using feathers
from waste incinerators, combined from museum specimens of Ever-
with a reduction in the use of mer- glades wading birds. Their findings
cury in household items, are helping 'appeared in the June issue of the
eliminate the toxin from the massive journal Environmental Toxicology
wetland. They say their findings and Chemistry.


only wine to be sold over the Inter-
net. Statewide, 55 percent were op-
posed to allowing the sale of wine,
31 percent were in favor and 14 per-
cent were undecided.
When presented with arguments
from each side about the issue, voter
opposition held firm, with 68 per-
cent saying that the sale and ship-
ment of beer, wine and liquor over
the Internet or ,through the mail di-
rectly to consumers should not be
allowed, compared to only 24 per-
cent who said it should be allowed.
A majority of Florida voters 57
percent also indicated they would
be "less likely" to vote for a political
leader who wants to change state
laws on alcohol sales to make it le-
gal for brewers, wineries and distill-
ers to ship beer, wine and liquor
directly to consumers who place or-


ders over the Internet or by tele-
phone.
The poll was conducted February
24-27 by Mason-Dixon Polling &
Research of Washington, D.C. A
total of 625 registered Florida voters
were interviewed statewide by tele-
phone. All indicated they voted
regularly in state elections. The
margin for error is plus or minus 4
percent.
The research was sponsored by the
Florida Coalition to Prevent Under-
age Drinking a group of law en-
forcement agencies, clergy, business
leaders and community groups. The
Coalition is opposed to proposals to
legalized currently prohibited ship-
ments of alcohol products such as
wine directly to homes in Florida
because such shipments would give
(See Alcohol, Page 5)


Level Dropping


Bird populations in the marsh de-
clined by 90 percent between the
1950s and the 1980s, and Frederick
believes high mercury levels played
a part in that decline.
Mercury, which is found in a wide
variety of products from medical
thermometers to electrical switches,
is a toxin that causes reproductive
and behavioral problems in birds.
The metal also is toxic to humans,
causing serious neurological dam-
age in people who ingest it.
When materials containing mer-
cury are burned, particles of that
metal are released into the air. But
mercury becomes most hazardous
when those particles settle into wa-
ter bodies. When fish ingest mer-
cury, either by absorbing it through


their gills or by eating smaller con-
taminated fish, the element is stored
in their bodies for life. Wading
birds, which consume large amounts
of fish, are particularly at risk from
mercury contamination.
In the late 1980s and early 1990s,
various states and the federal govr
ernment tried to stop the contamina-
tion of the Everglades and other wa-
ter bodies by imposing limits on
mercury emissions from medical
and municipal waste incinerators.
Use of incinerators io bum garbage
-- including mercury-laden house-
hold products such as flashlight bat-
teries -- boomed nationwide in the
1980s.
But there was still some doubt
(See Mercury Level, Page 5)


ol I I L Lr drral


I







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005 PAGE 5


13 Animals Adopted Last


Month From Humane Society


JERRY PORTER, of Menomonie, WI, has his service people travel with the Bike Florida
bike tire fixed by repair vendor Paul Group. (News Photo)
Schmidt of Gainesville, FL. Vendors and



Area Host Families Sought


For Exchange Students


Foreign high school students are
scheduled to arrive soon for the aca-
demic semester and year program
home stays, and local host families
are sought.


Pacific Inter-cultural Exchange
(PIE) Director John Doty notes that
the students are between the ages of
15 and 18, speak English, have their
own spending money, carry accident


Mercury Level


(Continued From Page 4)
about whether South Florida's waste
incinerators were to blame for the
rise in mercury in the Everglades.
Because airborne mercury particles
can travel hundreds or thousands of
miles before settling to a body of
water, scientists said it was possible
the pollution was coming from
smokestacks in other countries.

One way to settle the question,
Frederick said, was to look at the
history of Everglades
contamination. A slow, steady in-
crease over the course of the 20th
century would reflect the global in-
crease in the use of mercury, indi-
cating that global sources were to
blame., If levels increases: sharply
during the, incineration boom,, local
.sources were probably to blame, he
.said.
To construct such a history, the
researchers took feathers from
specimens of Everglades wading
birds stored in museums around the
country. They tested the feathers,
73 in all, for mercury content.
"When birds ingest mercury, some
of it will bind in a durable form with
their growing feathers, which leaves
a record of their (birds') exposure,"
Frederick said.
The museum specimens were
fom four species -- anhingas, great-
egrets, white ibises and great blue


herons -- and were collected be-
tween 1905 and 1990. The re-
searchers examined feathers they
collected from live birds in the Ev-
erglades of the same types after
1990.

They found mercury levels re-
mained consistently low in the
feathers of the Everglades birds un-
Stil the 1970s. They increased
sharply during a period beginning in
the late 1970s arid ending in the
early 1990s, roughly coinciding
with the nationwide growth in the
use 'of incineration, Frederick said.
And they dropped sharply after
1994, reflecting the delayed effect
of emissions regulations, he said.

"There's a certain amount of lag
time, up to seven years, between the
passage of the regulations and the
changes we observed in the field,"
Frederick said. "But that lag time
was actually predicted because it
takes some time for existing mer-_
cury to cycle through the environ-
ment."

Tom Atkeson, coordinator of the
Mercury program at the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protec-
tion, said the study presents "very
convincing" -evidence that reduced
incinerator emissions are responsi-
-ble for the drop in mercury levels in
Everglades birds.


and health insurance, and are eager
to share their cultural experiences
with American families.
PIE has programs to match almost
every family's needs, ranging in
length from a semester, to a full aca-
demic year, where the students at-
tend local high schools.
PIE area representatives match
students with host families, by dis-
covering common interests and life-
styles through an informal in-home
meeting.
Prospective host families are able,
to review student applications and
select the perfect match.
There is no typical host family,
and PIE can fit a student into just
about any situation, whether it is a
single parent, a childless couple, a
retired couple, or a large family.
Families who host for PIE are eli-
gible to claim a $50 per month
charitable contribution deduction on
their itemized tax returns for each
month they host a sponsored
student.
Students are available from Ger-
many, the former Soviet Union,
Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Mace-
domnia, -tppgary, Korea, Mexico,
Australia, Yugoslavia and China.
Doty encourages interested fami-
lies to contact the program immedi-
ately, to allow time for the students
and hosts to get to know one another
before they meet for the first time.
To learn more about the program,
contact PIE at 1-800-631-1818.
The agency also has travel/study
program opportunities for American
high school students, as well as pos-
sibilities for community volunteers
to assist and work with area host
families, students and schools.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Among the topics of discussion at
the Humane Society meeting Mon-
day, were: foster homes, adoptions
and current needs of the shelter.

Relay Team

Sets Hot

Dog Lunch

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


A Relay For Life Hot Dog Lunch-
will be held noon 2:00 p.m., Fri-
day, March 25, Sponsored by the
Jefferson County Health Depart-
ment team, at the facility.
Besides the hot dogs, this fund-
raising event will include a variety
of chips (BBQ, plain, sour cream
and onion,) a drink selection of
Coke, cherry Coke, diet Coke,
lemon/lime, and orange, a dessert of
brownies or cookies, and grapes.
The meal will cost $5 with pro-
ceeds to benefit the American Can-
cer Society.
For more information or to call in
orders, call the Health Department
at 342-0170. Deliveries will be
made for five or more orders. Or-
ders may be faxed to 342-0257.



Alcohol
(Continued From Page 4)
minors easier access to alcohol'
products.
Mason-Dixon is an independent
polling firm that conducts voter sur-
.veys for news media, lobbyists, in-
terest groups, trade associations and
political action committees. Mason-
Dixon is the nation's most active
state polling organization, conduct-
ing copyrighted public opinion polls
for news media organizations in all
50 states.



Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'

In State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00






Get Your Annual
Subscription Today!


Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
reported that during the most recent
adoption booth held at Petsmart,
five animals had been adopted and
four more were adopted at the shel-
ter last week.
In total, 13 animals had been
adopted since the Society last met.
Bautista added that the shelter is
still currently filled to capacity with
dogs. However, there was still
some room available for cats.
Foster home Chair Martha Jean
Martin advised that there were cur-
rently eight animals in foster care,
including four dogs, two puppies
and two cats.
"We currently have 12 active fos-
ter homes and six that are inactive.
Four foster homes were removed
from our list and now we have 18."'
She explained that two of the fos-
ter homes adopted animals they
were fostering and didn't wish to
foster any others; and two other
homes chose not to foster any more
animals.
Martin stressed the importance of
the foster homes to the animals and
the urgent need to recruit more.
"Our foster homes are like gold to
us," added President Caroline Car-
swell.
Membership ChairMartha Ca-


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HOYT'S CYCLE STORE
539 Smith Ave.- Thomasville
229-226-5222
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w


nady stated that the membership
remained at 205.
In other news, Carswell advised
that the past files are currently be-
ing labeled for storage and that la-
bels for future files to keep the
process consistent.
George Carswell said that the de-
cision was made to use wire, buried
18 inches, to two feet deep, around
the dog kennels to keep them from
digging out. He said it would take
approximately seven rolls.
Martin said that Mary Birch, an .
expert in animal behavior, agreed
to come to a future meeting and of-
fer her services to the shelter. Mar-
tin was asked to set up a date for
.Birch to attend.
Treasurer Leland Canady advised
of the need for conducting ongoing
fundraising events.
Suggestions included the sale of
Humane Society T-shirts, a dog
walk, and some kind of event dur-
ing the Watermelon Festival.
Caroline Carswell concluded that
in order to make these events hap-
pen, the society would need more
volunteers to pitch in, otherwise,
there wouldn't be eno-ugh hours in
the day to make these happen.
"More people add up to more
hours," she stated.













"PAGE 6,.MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005


________I


Lifestyle


. -


.,manager of Movie Gallery, purchases a hot
idog and coke Saturday during the fund-


























Shaquitha Lott Wi
Sa'r'laL~t'i


DEBBIE SNAP
Staff Writer

SThe regular monthly meeting of
,he Azalea Garden Circle was held
at the Monticello Chamber of Com-i
iperce, recently and members dis-
iussed the meaning of Easter and
the related music.
I Rita Uhlenberg and Jessie Creigh-
ton were hostesses.

,Chairman Ardis White reported
the End-of-Year Circle party will be
held in May.

' In addition, the Garden Club gen-
eral meeting is set 11:30 a.m.,
Thursday, April 21, at the Woman's
iub on East Pearl Street. The cost
is $10 per member.

SThe Azalea Circle will attend this
general meeting.
The position of President is still
open for the new Garden Club year.
'Members are asked to give of their
'time and consider taking on this po-
'sition.


The District III Club Meeting will
be held in Carrabelle, Friday, May
13.
It was reported that former Circle
Chair Ruth Krebs is convalescing
well, as is her husband, Jim, after
recent surgery.
White shared scrapbooks with
news articles and photographs.
Amanda Ouzts led the group in
the invocation before enjoying re-
freshments prepared by Mary Fran-
ces Drawdy.
Among those in attendance were:
Ardis White, Amanda Ouzts, Con-
nie Sulephens, Illeane Vorce, Mary
Nowell, Uhlenberg, and Creighton.


Weekend Movie Gallery

Fundraiser Successful


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Movie Gallery held a very suc-
cessful Hot Dog and Pizza fund-
i raiser this past weekend, from 10
a.m. until 9 p.m. serving hot dogs
arid pizza slices with a cold drink


for the cost of a donation.
The fundraiser was an annual
event for the Helen Keller Founda-
tion, which strives to make losing
vision or hearing less likely to hap-
pen to any one of us.
Last year, the Monticello Movie
Gallery was recognized by their


raiser for the Helen Keller Foundation. Ja-
mie Diehl and Alan Lennon are behind the
counter. (News Photo)


'FIELD


II


Marry Bryan Whitfield


.Together with their parents,
8haquitha Renae Lott and Bryan
Datore Whitfield will, exchange
marriage vows ,on Siaturday, April
50, 2005.
SLott is the daughter of the late
Simmie Lott and -Sarah Lott of
Beaufort, SC., and Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Smith of' Madison. FL.
She is a 1995 graduate from Madi-
son County High School. and a
2003 graduate from North Florida
Community College.
' She is currently enrolled at NFCC
where she is working towards her
Associate in Applied Science degree
'tn Computer Systems Technology,
And she's also enrolled in the Parale-
gal and Legal Secretary program.
froni which she will graduate from
in May, 2005.


She is employed by Nestle Waters
North America in Lee, FL.'
Whitfield is the son of Stephanie
McBride of Rochester, NY. and
Johnny Whitfield of Monticello.
He is the grandson of Roosevelt
and Eva Mae Whitfield, also of
Monticello.
He is a 1997 graduate of Jefferson
County High School, and is em-
ployed by Smithfield Packing in
Madison.
The wedding will take place 3
p.m., Saturday, April 30, 2005, at
New Zion MB Church in
Greenville, FL.
SThe Reception will follow at
Howard Middle School in Monti-
cello.
No local invitations are being sent.
SFamily and friends are welcome.


Firefighters
Hold Fundraiser

DEBBIE.SNAPP
Staff Writer

County Fire Rescue and and Wa-
cissa Volunteers held a fundraiser in
front of Edenfield Hardware Satur-'
day, while' the bicyclists were in
town.
Shelby Lynn Rawlings, was on
hand to smile and sell bottles of cold
water to passersby for fifty cents.
Helping Team Captain and Fire
Chief Larry Bates are team mem-
bers Sardy Chapin and Carla Pig-
gott. They took turns helping
Rawlings With the sales.
The next scheduled fundraiser for
the Fire Rescues will be on Friday
and Saturday, April 1 and 2. This
will be a Boot Drive and the collec-
tion will take place around and
,about the Courthouse circle.

CARD OF THANKS
We the family of the late Lil' Dan-
ielle Shanay Wade would like to
take this opportunity to express our
sincere appreciation for the many
acts of kindness shown to us during
the recent loss0ofour "Little Angel."
Your cards, visits, food, flowers,
and gifts of love are greatly appreci-
ated.
A special thanks to nurse and
caretaker Mrs. Petrea Schrader
along with the entire staff at TMH
Newborn ICU, Tillman Funeral
Home staff, Videographer Ms. Mae
Eva Wilson, and Rev. Dr. and Mrs.
Melvin Roberts,
We pray that God will continue to
bless and keep each of you.
The Wade Family

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to thank everyone
for the sympathy they showed the
family of Justin Tucker, who was
killed in an auto accident by a DUI
driver.
The food, flowers, cards and
phone calls of love and support
were such a great comfort to Jamie
and Georgia Cosper in their time of
need.
God bless you all and again thank,
you from our hearts.


Sincerely,
H.C. and Theresa Murphy


SHELBY LYNN RAWLINGS sells bottled water Saturday to
benefit Relay For Life, sponsored by County Fire Rescue
iand Wacissa VolunteerFire Department. (News Photo)


IChurch News

Elizabeth MB Church in the Dills
Community will hold an Easter Sun-
rise service 6 a.m., Sunday., Break-
fast will follow the service.
***
SSt. Rilla MB Church celebrates the
third anniversary of Pastor Rev.
James Mack, with a program, 2 p.m.
Sunday. Rev. Abron Marshall and
New Bethel MB Church, of Green
Cove Springs, FL., are in charge of
the program.
*** .
Sons of Allen Worship Service for
scholarships set 6 p.m., Saturday, at
New Bethel AME Church. Several
female speakers will be on hand.
***
Easter Sunrise service 6 a.m., Sun-
day at New Bethel AME Church.
Breakfast will follow. Sunday wor-
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***
Wacissa United Methodist Church
celebrates its Homecoming, and 155
years of Ministry, 11 a.m. Sunday.
Dinner will be served on the
grounds.
***
Bethel AME Church will host an
Easter Sunrise Service, along with
Greater Fellowship MB Church, and
Memorial MB Church 6 a.m., Sun-
day. Breakfast is served after the
service.


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"Thank you for your generous
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PArf. R MONTICELLO. (FL. NEWS. FRI.. MARCH 25, 2005


Sports


ACA JV Girls Down


River Springs 8-2


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA JV Girls defeated River
Springs 8-2, Monday, and stand at
11-1 for the season.
Despite being short one starter
Coach Frank Brown said the other
girls stepped in to fill the void and
did what they had to do to win the
game.
Brown said there were two situa-
:tions which won the game for
Them: Since River Springs had the
:amazingly fast pitcher, the Lady
Warriors had been putting a heavy
.emphasis on their ability to hit
Speed. "We increased the speed of
the pitching machine one mile per
hour each day and it paid off," said
Brown. "Their pitcher was still
Very good but we had made enough
progress to get our bats on the ball.
"Aside from that, we played out-
;standing defense and were able to
:hold them down. Our defense was
.sharp from the get-go."
Brown said another factor in the
*game was the Lady Warriors' abil-
'ity to steal bases. "We had 16 to
-their three," said Brown. "Stealing
:bases is a big part in softball."
Olivia Sorensen went to bat five
:times, scored one run, one single,
.two strikeouts, one steal; Nicole
.Mathis went to bat four times, scor-


Taylor County

Lady Tigers 9-1

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Tigers fell to a 1-5 sea-
son after Taylor County squeaked
by them last week for a 9-8 victory.
Coach Earline Knight said the
girls played a great game.
Kim Gilley went three for four,
scored three runs, six stolen bases;
Ashli Washington went two for five,
scored one run, two stolen bases;
Tiffany Walker went two for four,
scored two runs; and Stephanie


ing three runs, one single, three
walks, four steals; and Mallory
Plaines went to the batters box four
times, scored one run, two singles,
one strikeout, and three steals.
Lindsey Day went to bat four
times, scored one run, two singles,
one double, two RBI, one strikeout,
one steal.
Paige Thurman went to bat four
times, had two walks, one steal,
one ground-out, one fly-out; and
Tristen Sorensen went to bat four
times, scored one run with two sin-
gles, one RBI, two strikeouts and
three steals.
Hannah Sorensen went to bat
four times, had three strikeouts, one
ground-out; Michaela Roccanti
went to bat four times, had one sin-
gle, two strikeouts, one walk, one
steal; and Erin Kelly went to bat
four times, scored one run, one sin-
gle, two walks and two steals.
Thurman pitched the game, strik-
ing out two batters and giving up
no walks and eight hits.
The Lady Warriors will face off
against Madison 4 p.m., Tuesday,
here. in what Brown predicts is go-
ing to be a very tough game.
"They're going to be tough to
beat," said Brown. "They were
madder than a bunch of wet bob
cats the last time we beat them, so
they'll be coming over here with
blood in their eyes."


Squeaks By

8 Last Week

Pohle pitched the game.
,When the Lady Tigers faced
Rickards, the game was halted at the
top of the fifth inning because of in-
clement weather.
Knight said the game would be
concluded when they meet again.
The next scheduled meeting be-
tween the two teams is 4:30 p.m.,
April 12, here.
The game that was to be played
against North Florida Christian last
Thursday, has been rescheduled for
4 p.m., April 4, here.


CATCHER OLIVIA SORENSEN with Hannah Sorensen at bat
during an ACA practice session. In the River Spring game,
Olivia scored 1 run, 1 single, had 2 strikeouts and 1 steal.
(News Photo)

Bobby Thigpen Joins

MSU Hall Of Famers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local resident and former Missis-
sippi State University Pitcher/Out-
fielder Bobby Thigpen was in
Starkville, MS., where he was the
guest speaker at the First Pitch
Baseball Banquet.
Friday morning he went rabbit
hunting with Football Coach
Sylvester Croom, and that afternoon
threw out the ceremonial first pitch
in the season opening win over East-
ern Illinois.
Saturday, Thigpen joined six
other players on the MSU outfield








DIARY OF A MAD BLACK
WOMAN (PG13)
Fri- 4:55-7:35-10:05
Sat-2:15-4:55-7:35-10:05
Sun-2:15-4:55-7:35
Mon-Thurs-4:55-7:35

ROBOTS (PG)
Fri-4:30-7:05-9:05
Sat- 12:05-2:15-4:30-7:05-9:05
Sun-1 2:05-2:15-4:30-7:05
Mon -Thurs- 4:30-7:05
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Fri- 4:40- 7:20 -9:45
Sat-l:40 4:40-7:20-9:45
Sun-1:40-4:40-7:20
Mon-Thurs. 4:40- 7:20
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MISS CONGENIALITY
2 (PG13)
Fri- 4:20 -7:00 9 :25
Sat. 1:25 -4:20 7:00 9:25
Sun- 1:25 4:20 7:00
Mon. -Thurs. 4:20 7:00
NO PASSES

PACIFIER (PG)
Fri-5:15-7:25-9:40
Sat-12:45-3:00-5:15-7:25-9:40
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Fri-5:00-7:30-10:00
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Sun-12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30
Mon-Thurs-5:00-7:30
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Fri-5:05-7:15-9:30
Sat-I 2:30-2:45-5:05-7:15-9:30
Sun-I12:30-2:45-5:05-7:15
Mon-Thurs-5:05-7:15
NO PASSES


Hall of Fame.
The Bulldogs retired Thigpen's
#13 jersey and hung it between
Will Clark's #23 and Unser's #21.
"This is something I'll always re-
member," said Thigpen, the Major
League Baseball single season saves
record holder.
Coach Ron Polk presented Thig-
pen with a replica of his MSU Jer-
sey.
SThigpen now coaches at a high
school in St. Petersburg, FL.
In Starkville on Saturday for the
special occasion was his mom
Donna Smith, sister Barbara Thig-
pen, and his aunt Shirley Williams.


The Lady Warriors climbed to a
9-3 season record after after win-
ning their last two games.
In the first game, ACA defeated
Apalachicola 11-1.
The team had seven hits and two
errors. ___ -

Lisa Bailey pitched the no-hitter,
:giving up three walks, and striking
out seven batters. She went three
for three at bat, with one RBI.
Bethany Saunders went two for-
:four with one triple, one RBI; and


Shaye Eason and Lisa Wheeler
each had one RBI.
In the second game, ACA de-
feated Oak Hall 5-3.

ACAhad six hits and two errors.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the game,
giving up six hits, two walks, and
striking out three batters.

At the plate, she went one for
three, with three stolen bases;
-Kayla Gebhard went two for three;
and Bailey had two stolen bases.


Instructor.


.. Hamilton County Blanks

Warriors 9-0 Monday


BILL BROWN

The Aucilla Warriors baseball
team's quest for an undefeated sea-
son ended Monday at the hands of
Hamilton County.
The Trojans, beaten by the Warri-
ors 4-3 in an earlier game, un-
leashed a 13 hit, three home run
attack and notched a 9-0 win in Jas-
per.
Aucilla bats were effectively
handicapped by Austin Gaver, the
Trojan pitcher, who pitched the en-
tire game giving up only three hits:
two singles by Casey Gunnels and
one by Glen Bishop. He also
struck out 12.
Pitching chores for Aucilla were
shared by Ridgely Plaines, Dustin
Roberts and Chris Tuten.
Plaines started, pitched three in-
nings, gave up seven runs and was
charged with the loss, his first of
the year.
Roberts worked two and one


third innings and was charged with
two runs. Tuten closed, faced four
batters and gave up no runs.
The Warriors are 7-1 for the sea-
son and were scheduled to play dis-
trict at Carrabelle, Tuesday.

Tennis Team
Wins 3 Matches

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 6.0 mixed doubles tennis
team stand in third place, after win-
ning all three of their matches in re-
cent action.
Team #1, Doug Wainright and
Jennifer Ellis won its sets, 6-4 and
6-2.
Team #2, David and Cathy Jack-
son won its sets, 6-4 and 6-4.
Brad and Pam Mueller won their
sets, 6-1 and 6-2.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005 PAGE 9

ACA JV Girls Down

Madison 13-5


Lady Warrior JVs
10-1 season after defe
son Central 13-5.
It was a hard-fought
rallied in the fourth an
ting the ball really go
the lead from them."
He added that in the
ning, ACA was in the
began to rain really
(Thurman) was contir
ing with a muddy an
said Brown. "She did a
that last inning."
"They did a great jol
tough," Brown said.
amaze me every gam


climbed to a They're real tough girls."
eating Madi- Olivia Sorensen went to bat five
time, scored one run, had two sin-
game but we gles, two RBI, one strikeout, one
d started hit- walk and one stolen base; Nicole
od and took Mathis went to bat five times,
scored two runs, one single and one
e seventh in- RBI, one strikeout, one walk, one
field and it stolen base; and Mallory Plaines
hard "Pa went to bat five times, scored two
hard. "Paige
nually pit- runs, two singles, one walk and one
lually pitch-
d wet ball," p stolen base.
Sreat job in Lindsey Day went to bat five
times, scored one run, had one sin-
gle, one double, one RBI and two
b at hanging walks, Thurman went to bat five
"They really times, scored two runs, had one tri-
te we play. pie, two RBI, three walks and two


stolen bases.
Tristen Sorensen went to bat
five times, scored one run, had one
single, one strikeout and one walk,
Hannah Sorensen went to bat five
times, scored two runs, had one
strikeout, three walks and two sto-
len bases, Katelyn Levine went to
bat four times, scored one run, had
three singles, two RBI and one sto-
len base and Michaela Roccanti
went to bat four times, scored one"
run, one single and one RBI.
Comparative statistics of the team
were as follows; ACA had 15 hits,
nine RBI, four strikeouts, 12 walks
and eight stolen bases.
Madison had 13 hits, four RBt:
one strikeout. four walks and six.
stolen bases.
Thurman pitched the entire ganie/
striking out one batter and giving
up 13 hits and four walks.


Carr Named Student

Of Month At JES Club


CARR


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
JES Boys and Girls Club member
Javondre Carr, 11, has been se-
lected as Student of the Month for
February.
He is the son of Christina Carr.
And, is the oldest of two brothers;
Andre Wood and Anthony Thomp-
kins. He also has a sister, Jaquisha
Thompkins.
Carr is a fourth grader at Jefferson
Elementary School.
He has been attending the Boys
and Girls Club since the second
grade, and has made a lot of im-


provement in school since he has
been attending the Club.
Club Director Gerrold Austin says
"Javondre has received many com-
pliments for his outstanding job on
the Welcome Station at the Club.
We all congratulate him "
He attends Mount Morilla' Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in Lamont.
His hobbies are: riding his bike,
playing video games, and helping
his mom around the house.

n Case Of Emergency
Dial 911


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www.Tim Peary.com i o' :(.Co l OMPIJK', ;' I LI I.,A.
1 REMOVAL Of V'IRESF, ACAVAREA, SFYV'/.KF


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Kayak $.99 + tx Timberwolf $1.99
Longhorn $1.19 + tx Red Seal $2.89
Grizzly $1.59 + tx Kodiak $4.41
Copenhagen $4.58 + tx
Ice 4#.60, 8# .93, 20# .2.25 + tx

.A very nice selection and good quality
T-shirts Christian, Florida and others
$3.99 each or 3 for $10 + tx
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all
manufacturer'souon


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Tree Trimming
Stump Grindir
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Aerial Device
Tree Removal




For Free Estin
Call Gene I


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Fax: (850) 997-7450
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Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
W Website: Jxie Thompson Wholesale.Com


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or
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-- Lady Warriors Drop 2

i Recent Tennis Matches


SRANDY TINKER purchases two meals to during a recent Saturday Hot Dog and Coke
take out from Rotary Relay For Life team fundraiser. (News Photo)
members, John Gebhardt and Don Taylor,


F AN HUNT
Siaff Writer

SWhen "Baby" arrived at the Hu- -
irane Society Shelter, she was in la-




Camp Woe-Be

Plans Grief 0


JEBBIE SNAPP
iaff Writer

SCamp Woe-Be-Gone, a commu--
4jty outreach of The Caring Tree
I*Eogram of Big Bend Hospice, will
ibld a "Grief Odyssey: An Explora-
tibn of Inner and Outer Space," 8
?Am. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 23,
ti the Challenger Learning Center.
: :This will be a special day for chil-
dren aged 5-12 who have experi-
enced the death of a loved one.
Pre-registration is required by




Homes Of

SDERRAC D. HAMPTON
Derrac Dononna Hampton, 43,
:passed away Friday, March 18,
-21005 in Houston, Texas.
- Derrac was born in Monticello and
:giew up in Greenville, FL. Follow-
ing high school, he joined the
United States Air Force and served
.his country with distinction for four
years before being honorably dis-
,charged. He had been a resident of
Port Arthur, Texas since 1985.
STo cherish Derrac's love are his.
;two daughters, Jessica Hampton of
'Crestview, Fl. and Jessica McGinlay
aihd daughter, Cierra of Wheeling,
West Virginia, his mother Cora
Hampton Minton of Monticello, his
ifther Ulysses "Bob" Hampton of
iGreenville, Fl., his stepfather, Henry
?Minton of Monticello, Fl., his broth-
eis LaPadre (Joyce) Hampton of
Rochester, NY., and Ulysses Bruton
jyf Greenville, Fl., his sisters, Jacki
.H. Gilmore of Port Arthur, TX.,
:Wanda H. Bailey of Greenville,
lPaLesa (Ceasar) Hampton and
2Gheree Bruton, both of West Palm
iBeach, Fl., Monique Bruton of
Greenville, FL., and his stepsisters,
:j'ois Minton of Orlando, Fl., and
Juanita M. Crumity of Monticello,
*'Fl. along with numerous other rela-
tives and friends.
: The service will be at 1:00 p.m.,
Saturday, March 26, 2005 at Eliza-
;beth (Dills) Missionary Baptist
:Church in Monticello, Florida with
.burial at St. Matthews Cemetery in
7Greenville, FL.
The viewing will be from 2:00
p.m. 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March
:25, 2005 at Tillman Funeral Home.

SROBERT NORTON, JR.
,Robert Norton, Jr., 79 died Friday,
'March 18, 2005 in Tallahassee,.
:Florida.
: He was a retired Truck Driver.
SMr. Norton was a native and life-
Jlng resident of Monticello. Before
:retiring he was a truck driver for
"Maples Concrete.
:. Among those to cherish his love
?and his legacy are his companion
:and special friend, Irene Jackson of
I$'Ionticello, Fl., his sons, Shelton
(Azulee) Norton and Dederick
(Tammy) Norton, both of Tallahas-
ske, Otis (Essie) Norton, Robert
Norton III, and Curtis Oliver, all of
Monticello, Fl., and Tony Norton of


bor and heavy with kittens.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
said it didn't take long before it was
evident, Baby needed emergency as-
sistance, immediately, because "she
just couldn't do it on her own."




e.-Gone

dyssey
April 1.
There is a $15 fee per camper, $20
per family. Fee waivers are avail-
able upon request.
SSpace is limited. Call Candace
McKnight or Pam Mezzina at 878-
5310 or 800-772-5863 to register.
Bus transportation to and from the
Challenger Center, snacks, lunch, T-
shirts, and other goodies will be pro-
vided.
In addition, a mandatory
parent/guardian meeting is sched-
uled 6 p.m., on Wednesday, April
20, at Big Bend Hospice.




Mourning

Havana, Fl. His daughters, Doris
Norton, Vero Beach, FL, Loretta
(Greg) Jennings, Orlando, FL,
Blanche Jennings, Lake Worth, FL.,
Juanita Norton and Lagiescha (An-
dre) Woods, Tallahasse, FL and Lo-
rene Norton of Monticello, FL. His
brothers, Joseph (Rosa) Norton of
Tampa, FL., Roosevelt Norton, St.
Petersburg, Fl., and Ansel Norton
and Daniel Norton, both of Monti-
cello.
The service will be at 11:00 a.m.
on Saturday, March 26, 2005 at Mt.
Olive AME Church in Monticello,
FL., with the Rev. Emma
Henderson, Pastor, officiating. Bur-
ial will follow at the church ceme-
tery.
The viewing will be held from
2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday,
March 25, 2005 at Tillman Funeral
Home

WILLIAM WASHINGTON
William Washington passed away
Monday, March 21, 2005 in Talla-
hassee, Florida.
A native of Jefferson County, Mr.
Washington was a graduate of Jef-
ferson County High School. He was
employed as a Route Salesman for
Dairy Fresh, Inc. He was a member
of Mt. Pleasant Primitive Baptist
Church and he was an avid car en-
thusiast and enjoyed fishing and me-
chanics.
William's love will live on forever
in the hearts of those he has tempo-
rarily left behind including his wife
of 28 years, Brenda Williams Wash-
ington of Tallahassee; his father Ben
Washington, Sr. of Monticello, Fl.,
his sisters, Mary Helen Parker of
Miami, Fl., Sally Washington of
Monticello, Fl., and Cecil Washing-
ton of Ocala, Fl.
The service will be at 3:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 26, 2005 at Mt.
Pleasant Primitive Baptist Church,
4101 Thomasville Rd., Tallahassee,
Fl., with burial at Ashville Commu-
nity Cemetery in Monticello, Fl.
The viewing will be from 2:00
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March
25, 2005 at Tillman Funeral Home
in Monticello, Fl., and from noon
until the service on Saturday at the
church.
Mr. Washington was preceded in
death by his mother, Lizzie Gallon
Washington and in 2004 by his
brother, Ben Washington, Jr.


Dr. Jodie Spencer of Veterinary
Associates worked her in and per-
formed an emergency C-section. "If
the surgery had not been done, Baby
surely would have died," Bautista
said.
"The four kittens were huge," she
added. "Each one was the size of a
new born puppy or a six week old
kitten, and none of the kittens sur-
vived."
Baby is now well. It took longer
than usual for the incision to heal,
because of its size.
She is two years old an a medium
length hair Calico. Baby is de-
scribes as being a real lover, though
she doesn't really like to be picked
up, because she is still tender from
the surgery.
"She loves attention, being talked
to and petted and she's playful," she
added.
"Baby just loves sitting in your
lap," said Bautista. "She's happy,
healthy and ready for adoption."
Bautista extends a special thanks
to Veterinary Associates staff, Dr.
Spencer, Diana, Nancy, Patricia and
Terri for working Baby in and sav-
ing her life.
To adopt baby or any of the other
many adoptables at the shelter, call
342-0244.


LEGAL NOTICE


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team fell to a 4-5 sea-
son after dropping their last two
matches.
In the first match, the ladies lost
1-6 to Munroe.
In singles action, Amanda Sapp
lost to Mandy Clark, 0-8; Courtney
Connell lost to Meg Summerford,
0-8; Kaitlin Jackson lost to Anna
Dooner, 1-8; and Rebekah Aman
lost to Jessica Joyner, 4-8.
Caroline Mueller beat Elizabeth
Bridges, 8-6; Elizabeth Shirley beat
Mallory Taylor, 8-5; and Ramsey
Revell lost to Ivie Thomas, 5-8.
In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell lost to Summerford and Clark,
3-8; and Jackson and Mueller lost
to Dooner and Joyner, 6-8.
In the second match, AC ladies,




Entrants

Sought For

Poetry Contest

The International Library of Po-
etry will award $58,000 in prizes in
its Open Poetry Contest.
Poets from the area, particularly
beginners, are encouraged to try to
win their share of more than 250
prizes.
Contest deadline is May 31, 2005,
and entry is free.
"Any poet, whether previously
published or note, can be a winner,"
states Christina Baylon, contest di-
rector.
"When people learn about our free
poetry contest, they realize that their
own poetic works of art can win
cash prizes, as well as gain national
recognition," Baylon said.
To enter, send one original poem,
any subject or style, to: The Interna-
tional Library of Poetry, Suite
19922, 1 Poetry Plaza, Owings
Mills, MD, 21117.

LEGAL NOTICE


EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
Veterinary Hospital seeking part time
help. Must have caring, professional
attitude. Front office experience a plus.
Flexible hours; must be willing to work
some Saturdays. Apply in person, or send
resume to: Veterinary Associates, 1599
North Jefferson, Monticello.
No Phone Calls Please.
3/16 tfn.
Max Miles & Max Money!! Wanted Solos
& Teams To Run S.E. To Southwest. No
Hazmat, No N.Y. Or N.E. 1-800-367-2640.
Brandy or Jim.
3/23, 3/25 chg

LEGAL NOTICE


This property is further identified on the map below. A complete
metes and bounds description, as well as the entire text of the
ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 South Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5
p.m., Monday through Friday. A public hearing will be held on
the adoption of the ordinance on Tuesday, April 5, 2005 at 7:00
p.m. at City Hall.


PAGE 1 OF 3
ctI .

"!'.I '. '-
';-i ,;l "'
I 2 i:'


POINT OF COMMENCEMENT
A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY R/W
OF PEARL STREET EXTENDING 26.10
CHAINS EAST OF THE NE CORNER OF
\ LOT 13, PALMER LYONS ADDITION R/W
R/W 70' COUNTY ROAD 146 .
(PEARL STREET)____ ::;
-- -DC=N89'2 .'0E .. -79 N89'5017"E '
N89'32'23E Nr c N89'31 51 E 367.0 5' SIOEWA^ 298.73';' -'
R/W 9177' 91.77' 91.77' 91.77' TERRA .' R/W
D ip D50' 91.77' 9177' C OBD CA CM
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14.23'1- S HWAY 90
80' U.S, IJlGHIAY 90
S(WASHIGCTON STREET) R/W
R/W LE GEND' R,


PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 25, 2005


lost 1-6 to Maclay.
Sapp lost to Deven Cavanaugh,
1-8; Connell lost to Carolina San-
chez, 0-8; Shirley lost to Kristy
Johnson, 3-8; and Jackson lost to
Sarah Brooks, 6-8.
Mueller beat Chennel Turner,
8-2; Aman lost to Rebecca Mayo,
5-8; and Revell lost to Dede Meros,
3-8.
In doubles action, Connell and
Sapp lost to Cavanaugh and John-
son, 4-8; and Jackson and Mueller
lost to Brooks and Sanchez, 0-8.

HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MORE PAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
3/25, fcan
Wanted: Experienced Duct Mechanic and
Service Technician. Excellent pay and
Benefits available. Valid driver's license a
must. Apply in Person at 3015 Nathan
Lane, Tallahassee.
33/18,23,25,30 chg.
Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers
Needed Now! Run SE Only or SE,
Mid-Atl, MW Regional, O/O's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel
(866)250-4292.
3/25, fcan
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com.
3/25 fcan
Yard Handyman for Professional Office
Paid Weekly
Please call 997-8111
3/18,23,25,30, chg.


HELP WANTED

Panhandle Restaurant looking for
experienced waitress. Apply in person, 2-5
p.m. M-F 322-6600.
3/23, 2/25 chg

UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
3/25, fcan


LEGAL NOTICE


Baby Seeks Home After

Surgery Saves Her Life


NOTICE OF HEARING ON

PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE 2005-03


The City Council of the City of Monticello proposed to adopt the
following entitled ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, ANNEXING PROPERTY
CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 3.87 ACRES ON
BORDERED ON THE NORTH BY EAST PEARL STREET
AND ON THE SOUTH BY EAST WASHINGTON STREET
(U.S. 90 EAST) TO THE CITY OF MONTICELLO;
REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID PROPERTY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


A BOUNDARY SURVEY FOR RUTH K. SCHMIDT..
LOCATED IN SECTION 29
TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


-~-lri
1
''' '


The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners and the Jefferson County
Planning Commission will hold a joint
workshop at 6:30 p.m., on Tuesday,
March 29, 2005, at the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, Monticello, Flor-
ida, to review proposed revisions to the
Land Development Code and Comprehen-
sive Plan.
3/25 chg


Public Notice For Legal Counsel. The
North Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. is issuing an Invitation to
Negotiate for legal counsel services. North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is a nonprofit organization, is the
administrative entity for certain job
training and job placement provisions of
the Social Security Act, Title IV (Excess
Temporary Assistance to Need Families
funds) the federal Workforce Investment
Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-165, Laws of
Florida; et al. Among other things, North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is responsible for the operation of the
Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison counties.
Instructions: Parties may apply by
submitting a letter of interest which:
Describe Their Qualifications to provide
appropriate legal services: Contains a
summary of applicable experiences.
Provide appropriate references: Indicates
their ability to perform the work; and
Contains a schedule of fees. Submit letter
of interest to: William M. Deming,
Executive Director, North Florida
Workforce Development Board, Inc., P.O.
Box 267, Madison, FL 32341-0267 by 4:00
p.m. on April 30, 2005. Late submittals
will not be accepted or considered. North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. reserves the right to reject any or all
submittals in the best interest of the North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc. North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is an equal
opportunity training provider/employer.
./25, 30, 4/1, 6 chg

LEGAL NOTICE


T

I





BE









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
Opening at Monticello News for person
with computer skills, good typing, people
skills and a willingness to learn. Will
train. Call Ron Cichon 997-3568.
3/23 tfn

The Jefferson County Road Department
will be accepting employment applications
for the following position: Truck Driver
with a CDL class "A" Florida license.
Must have excellent driving record, have
at least 2 years experience driving and
also experience with road equipment such
as backhoes. For application please stop
by the Road Dept. Office any week day
7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Jefferson County is
an equal opportunity employer and a drug
free workplace. Phone number 997-2036.
Closing Date will be April 1, 2005.
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1 chg

NOTICE
Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read
DIANETICS by Ron L. Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722 or send $7.99.to Dianatic's,
3102 N. Havana Ave., Tampa FI 33607.
3/25, fcan
LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake
Placid, FL 11 AM, Sat., Mar 26 443.9+/-
Total Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
Preview: 1-5 PM, Sat., March 19 Call for
details: (800)257-4161 Higgenbotham
Auctioneers www.higgenbotham.com ME
Higgenbotham, CAI Fl Lic
#AU305/AB158.
3/18, fcan

SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.,
tfn
Avon's calling. If interested, Please call
representative Mary Seabrooks at
509-4481.
3/23, 25 pd
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing Work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates -
551-2000
1/7,14,21,28,2/4 11,,18,25,3/4,11,18,25, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/1-tfn
EAMRNY 1R DPEGRF f iii-
home. Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance, and.
computers provided. Call, free
(86K)858-2121.
3/25, fcan

Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational .names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call:,997-3466..
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
1958. Call for a free Brochure!
1-800-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
3/2,4,9,11,16,18,23 25,30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13, 15,
20, 22, 27, 29 chg

$ CASH ADVANCES $ Personal Injury
Lawsuits-Structured Settlements -
Annuities Pensions Inheritances Lot-
tery Prize Winnings We buy Mortgages,
Real Estate, Business notes. Se. Habla
Espanol. Jerry (866)767-2270.
3/25 fcan
Loans By Phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No
Credit Check! Bank Account Reg.
(888)350-3722 www.paychecktoday.com
3/25 fcan

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
3/25, fcan
Ambitious? $500-1,000/Day Returning
Calls. No selling, Not MLM, No Boss.
Call Only If Serious. Toll Free
(866)850-7364.
3/25 fcan

. Online Job Offer eBay Workers Needed.
Come Work with us online.
$$$$$Weekly. Use your home computer
or laptop. No experience necessary.
(800)693-9398 Ext. 1856.
3/25 fcan


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
(800)836-3464#BO2428.
3/25, fcan

AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn

GARAGE SALE

COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET. Spon-
sored by the Lloyd Lions Club and held at
the U-Hauls Sales & Storage Warehouse
located at 73'37-A Old Lloyd Rd. from
8a.m. 4 p.m. of Saturdays. Space avail-
able, call 997-5505 or 997-1754. Dona-
tions appreciated.
3/4,11,1, 25. pd.


FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26, tfn,c

One Room Efficiency Apartment, $450.00
Per Month, including utilities. 997-6492.
Leave Message.
3/23, 25 chg

3 Bedroom 1 Bath with Storage Shed
$650.00 Month Plus Deposit. Call
997-8295 or 352-514-7101.
3/23, 25, 30, 4/1, 6, 8, 13 pd.

Rustic I 'Bedroom Cabin. Completely
furnished including Amenities Located on
4 Acres At end of Dirt Road only 6 miles
to Monticello & 25 to Tallahassee, Electric
& Satellite TV included $750.00 a month +
Sec. deposit 6 month minimum lease. Call
342-1324 Lv. Mess.
/ tfn

FOR SALE

Church Mahogany Baldwin Piano with
Seat 1,000.00 or best offer.
Call 850-997-4104 leave message.
3/18,23,25,30 pd : t ,

FOR SALE: Brown Yard Eggs $1 Dz.
FOR SALE: Baby Chicks, Ducks, Geese,
Prices vary with age. Location: 4473 Lake
Road. WANTED: Egg Cartons, will pay 5
cents per carton.
3/16,18,23,25.30,4/1, chg.

Briggs & Stratton portable generator
4,550 starting watts. 3,250 running watts.
Used once. :,,120v only..- $550 firm.
997-8604.
3/25,30 pd

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335. ,
3/25, fcan

Unclaimed storage articles @ KOA
Campground. Saturday, March 26, 2005
fr,..; 8-10 am.
3'35

Bedroom Set: Dresser w/mirror, Full size
bed w/mattress set, nightstand. Dining
room table w/6' chairs. Entertainment
center. Lighting Flight II bow w/arrows.
Call 997-2474 after 6 p.m.
3/18,25, pd.

1995 Snapper Rear-Engine SR1433 riding
mower. Kohler motor, 33" deck, electric
start. Runs well, sturdy machine, good
mower for less than 3 acres. $390. Call
997-4253 M-F 6 pm 9 pm, S-S 9 am 9
pm.
5/25 tIn

1987 Suzuki Samurai JX 4wd convertible
190k mi., runs OK, CD player, fiberglass
top, toolbox, new 8" suspension (Rancho),
new 33" mud tires, new 15x10 steel wheels,
LOW gears, rear Lock-Right locker, other
goodies. Needs some work, but
unbelievable off-road! $1800 obo. Call
997-4253 between 6 .pm-9pm M-F,
9am-9pm Sat-Sun.
3 25 tfn


FOR SALE


BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn

Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 ,can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed'&
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn


Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted'china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine Steel
Master Buildings factory direct at HUGE
Savings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50, Perfect
Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. ww.SteelMasterUSA.com.(
3/25 fcan

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE 50+ Premium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limited time offer.
S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
3/18 fcan

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person
Spa-Loaded! Includes cover, delivery &
warranty. $2999, 'was $5999.
(888)397-3529.
3/25 fcan '

REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of West.g@a
NC Mounlainis. Cabins. Acreage. &
II S _EV NTS, _Chcrote.. M 4 qusalP p
Realty GMAC Real Estate, Murphy Call
for Free Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
3/25, fcan

NORTH CAROLINA I LAKEFRONT
ONLY $39,900. Great All-sports lake. tpo
fish, boat, swim or just relax. Call for
details, MLC (866)920-5263.
3/25, fcan.i '


LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free'
boat slitp!: High elevation beautifully"
wooded-,. parcel. Across from national'
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in
,TN. Paved roads, u/g utils, central wanted,
sewer,; more; Excellent financing. Call nowvv
(800)704-3154, ext. 608. Sunset Ba). LLC.
3/25, fcan'


FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No.
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings,
(800)501-1777 ext.1299.
3/25, fcan .

FREE LAND LIST-NC MOUNTAINS-
Custom built log homes, -river frontage
and beautiful secluded land off Blue Ridge
Parkway. Call now (800)455-1981 ,ext.
133.
3/25 fcan '


REAL ESTATE

LAND WANTED Land Investment
company seeks large acreage in Florida
and Georgia. Interested on waterfront,
timber, and agricultural lands. Must have
road frontage or good access. Cash buyer
with quick closings. Call (877)426-2636 or
e-mail:landyetiveg@aol.com.
3/25, fcan

COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA. Phase I
sold out. Now offering new home sites in
Phase II at Shine Landing, a gated
waterfront community. Be a proud owner
in this upscale community with boating
access to the Neuse River, Pamlico Sound
and Atlantic Ocean, plus clubhouse, fitness
center, tennis, swimming pool and private
marina. Homesites as low as $29,900.
Financing available. Coastal Marketing &
Development Company, New Bern, NC
(800)566-5263, www.shinelanding.com.
3/25, fcan

Grand Opening Land Sale! FLORIDA 10+
ACRES Only $294,900. Huge savings on
big ranch acreage in Souty Florida!
Gorgeous mix of mature oaks, palms, &
pasture. Miles of bridle paths. Near Lake
Okeechobee. Quiet, secluded, yet close to
1-95 & coast. Also, 5 acres $174,9000.
Great financing, little down. Call now.
(866)352-2249 x379.
3/25, fcan


ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront
lots in the Foothills of NC. Deep water lake
with 90 miles of shoreline. 20% pre
development discounts and 90% financing.
NO PAYMENTS for 1 year. Call now for
best selection.
www.nclakefrontproperties.com
(800)709-LAKE
3/25, fcan

40 AC w/creek near Peace River. '/
pasture; 2. pines. Street ends at preserve
Power, well; 3400 sq. ft. house foundation
and kit house, ready to go. $485,000
(239)340-0501.
3/25 fcan

COASTAL GEORGIA- GATED
COMMUjNITY Large. wooded water
access. and marshfront homesites. Ancient
Live oaks, pool, tennis, golf. Water access.
From $64,900. Pre-construction discounts.
www.cooperspoint.com (877)266-7376.
3/25 fcan

SERENE MOUNTAIN GOLF
HOMESITE $208.03/ MO. Upscale Golf
Community:st6rmii d Dye designed 18 hole
,jyxse gjjgar Mg.ntaiaS 8 to^e
taking views. Near Ashville NC. A
sanctioned Golf Digest Teaching Facility!
Call toll-free (866)334-3253 ext. 832
www.cherokeevalleysc.com Price: $59,900,
10% down. balance financed 12 months at
4.24%, fixed, one year balloon, OAC.
3/25 fcan


Lake View Bargain! 2 Acres $19.900. New
waterfront community on one of largest,
cleanest, mountain likes 'in America!
Hardwoods, views, common area w/beach!
Country road, water,-, utilities. Low
financing. Lakefront' available. Call
(800)564-5092 x96.
3/25 fcan ,


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


Housing Vouchers;


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2-@ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, FreeLawn Care, Security


575-6571


I 7-...L a ..u. .fi


SUB-ZERO wine cooler under counter
width 24" 34" high depth 24". Never
'used Handsome Appliance Call
850-997-3!63 price $2,000
3/18 pd

Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
3/25, fcan


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


215 N. Jefferson St
Downtown Monticello
(850)-997-5516 ww.cbkk.cnm


Doyom aIstf to O0en tauid k

7MFf6SON dOuNwy 7

* Casa Bianca 5 AC: High & Dry, Site
Built Homes Only. Wont Last!$48,000
* 30 Acres on Still Road Spectacular
Land Setting of Woods, Pasture and
Hardwoods!........................ S240,000:
* Johnson Road 8.62 Acres Next to -
Plantation, High Hill & Pasture with
Some Oak Trees ................ $52,000
* Gamble Road 9.25 AC Lots of
Privacy, Paved Road Access, Field
& Wooded.....................$138,750


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Great Buyl Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8,500 per acre
Just Listed-Under Contract 6.67 wooded
acres on graded county road in eastern
Jefferson County $23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
'New Listing 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
- pe- n in remote:location only $295,000 -'
Repo Bi'g4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
SOLD Wonderful Home nice 4 bedroom 2
bath double wide with fireplace on 1.9
acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
fot rent $650mo
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Sales are very qood we have a
shortage of listing for uvers looking


for Homes and Land


Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Associate


Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


Buvers looking for Homes and Land
I^.-~~LgI~I~ --,-B-r 51~Ugal


-








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 25, 2005


DEBRA HERMAN, executive director of Light recent Community Coalition Meeting. (News
Invisible, Inc. and Gene Hall, county cor- Photos)
missioner were among the attendees at a



Coalition Outlines Community


Services Available In County


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Community
Coalition met recently, and provided
a forum for social service providers
that serve pregnant women,
children, families, and the aging
population.
The purpose of the meeting is to
network, share information about
upcoming events, and to facilitate
referrals.
The group uses this forum to solve
client related issues, match appro-
priate resources to the client's need,
and identify barriers to care for the
identified population.
This forum is also used to develop
strategies and action steps to address
identified community issues that im-
pact services to pregnant women,
children, families, and the aging
adult.
The Healthy Start component may
be reached by phone at 948-2741.
The Coalition is conducting a sur-
vey to solicit feedback on the date
and time of the JCCC meetings, cur-
recently held at 9:30 a.m. on the
second Friday.
The coalition seeks more partici-
pation and is interested in accom-
modating citizen's schedules so that
they can attend and participate in
this networking opportunity.
Among activities at the recent
meeting: Donna Hagan, of Healthy
Start, distributed position papers for
Medicaid Reform issued by the
Florida Association of Healthy Start
Coalition.
She also gave an update on the
City Shuttle Service and distributed
a tentative map of the projected
pickup stops. The shuttle is expected
to start on or about April 15.
Margie Jessup works with the Par-
ent Education Network and states
that her agency operates more than
eight different projects related to


parents with disables children. Call
1-800-825-5736 for referrals.
Curtisha Randolph announced that
the month of April is Fair Housing
Month and that the agency will fo-
cus on Family and the Fair Housing
Law in presentations slated for the
month. She discussed HUD require-
ments and its relation to the pro-
tected class of family status.
Debra Herman noted that she is
working with the Renaissance Insti-
tute to open a prenatal clinic. The
Institute offers doula training, (for
medically elect support personnel
for women in labor in a hospital set-
ting,) midwifery classes, childbirth
education and lactation consultants.
She further explained that the In-
stitute is collaborating with Healthy
Start to provide a grant to fund
doula services for the women in-
volved in the Group Prenatal Pro-
gram, Healthy Start participants, and
non Healthy Start expectant
mothers.
Brenda Landrum, of Big Bend
Community Based Care, distributed
information on the Relationship
Strengthening classes available
through her agency. These classes
focus on communication skills and
positive parenting and are free of
charge.
She also reminded members of a
networking opportunity noon, each
third Thursday, at the School Board
Office, with the Juvenile Justice
Council.
I andrum added that the group has
become well organized and has writ-
ten a strategic plan, setting some
goals to address six problems in ju-
venile issues for the county.
Stephanie Shepherd, of Tallahas-
see Coalition for the Homeless, dis-
tributed a current newsletter issued
to members as well as a flyer illus-
trating the basic functions of the
Coalition she represents.
She also distributed a schedule
for the Outreach Social Worker,


Erika Beachy as well as referral
forms for the agency's new residen-
tial facility, HOPE. The agency in-
tends to outpost Beachy at the
outlying counties on Fridays. The
federal grant that funds this project


I


MARGIE JESSUP, multicultural outreach co-
ordinator with Family Network on Disabili-
ties of Florida, left, and Curtisha Randolph,


will also include a coordinator to
perform the screening process to ac-
cess these monies.
Currently the only services avail-
able to outlying county residents are
HUD funding, which provides rental
assistance for up to 11 chronically
homeless families for two years.
The next Coalition meeting is
scheduled for Friday, April 8. Ha-
gan can be contacted at 948-2741
for more information.


specialist with Big Bend Fair Housing Cen-
ter, Inc. discuss clients' options.


GULF COAST
METAL
ROOFING04


3'WiD)E GALVALUME
3' WIDE PAINTED


Full line of 2' WDE 5V
accessories in stock
rWE HA HVE METAL B UILDIN(iG
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available

Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.


NISA NISSANN


Culvert Fees May Be Upped


(Continued From Page 1)
Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
confirmed that, in fact, the county
was losing money on each
driveway.
"If we go the private route, we'll
have to set up standards," Joyner of-
fered.
"The Road Department already
has standards and specifications,"
Sutphin said.
C. P. Miller, who ran for the office
Sutphin currently holds, thought the
latter's suggestion would put a bur-
den on property owners.


"I don't see it being a hardship on
the county," Miller said. "In the
long run, it's actually cheaper for
the county, because of the property
taxes generated."
"I disagree," Sutphin said. "We is-
sue building, electric and septic tank
permits, but we don't do that work."
The commission deferred further
discussion on the issue until the
April 21 meeting. In the interim,
Joyner said he would research the
matter, to be better prepared to dis-
cuss it next time.


VR State Plan Public Meetings
Come share your thoughts on the proposed draft
2006 Federal State Plan for Vocational
Rehabilitation services.

March 22, 2005
4 6PM (CST)
Student Union East SUE 232
(Conference Center)
Gulf Coast Community College
5230 West Highway 98
Panama City, Florida

March 31, 2005 "
4- 6PM (EST) I, 1
Crowne PlazaTampa-East
10221 Princes
Tampa, Flori a
If you would like to send us your comment
vrplan(@,vr.doe.statefl.us or call 1
Please note that the following accommodations will be provided: e
Asse rint, iskie tening Devices
Large Print, Disk, and Braille Saterials.


All prices lus tax, title and $269 dealer fee. Sale price is after rebates. 24 months, $199/mo., $1699 initial payment. Excludes tax, title, license and
opoons. $1699 initial payment required at consummation. (includes) $1500 consumer down payment, $199 first month payment, $0 securitdep