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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00022
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 18, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00022
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
    Classified
        page 15
        page 16
Full Text







Extension Agent

Offers Tips For

Using Eggs

Story, Page 3
'I


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNI ERSITY OF FT;ORTDA
GA IESVILLE, FL. 386X1

More Gambling

Profits Go To

Religious Groups

Editorial, Page 4


JES Boys, Girls Club
Places In

Area Competition

Story, Page 6
I I


Simply Smashing

Wins 4 Of 6

Tennis Matches

Story, Page 9
I IIr I


Qf Friday Morning )





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.24,50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MARCH 18,


I'E


MOVIN' ON depicts a Miccosukee family
walking in single file along an imaginary
path. The pieces, which took, the Cooleys a


Cooleys Unveil



- First Sculpture



Of Major Series


Project Honors State's

Indian Cultural Heritage


year to complete, are rich in detail -- a
trademark of the father-and-son sculpting
team. (News Photo)


1: -


-.
e -
1


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

"An honor and a privilege" is the
way Lamont sculptor Bradley
Cooley on Tuesday described the in-
stallment of his and his son's latest
piece, Movin' On, on the northeast
. : lawn of the R. A. Gray Building in
Tallahassee.
Notwithstanding the display of
smaller pieces by the Cooleys in
Tallahassee -- and the general rec-
ognilt,,n of their works inaiiunall
S-. and internationally -- Movin' On is
the first of their major pieces to be
on permanent exhibit in the capital
city.


Movin' On, moreover, is but the
first of what is to be a series of Brad
Cooley Sr. and Brad Cooley Jr.
sculptural.pieces that will grace the
R.A. Gray Building lawn in the
coming three years.
Movin' On depicts a Miccosukee


family of the 1930s walking single
file along an imaginary path.
First comes the father, carrying a
sack and wearing a typical patch-
work shirt. Next comes the mother,
wearing a long skirt and carrying a
small boy. And last comes a young
girl, dressed in similar fashion as the
mother and carrying a doll.
Like all pieces by the father-and-
son team, the figures are rich in
symbolic meaning and accurate in
representation down to the smallest
details, including the absence of ear-
lobes on the man, the hairstyle on
iie woman, and the traditional:de-
signs on the clothing.
"We try to pick up the features
that are exclusive to Native Ameri-
cans," explained Cooley Sr., adding
that the extensive research dedicated
to the depiction of the facial and
other characteristics on the three fig-
ures is typical of the attention they
give to every project.
It took the Cooleys a year to


complete Movin' On, which project
the Miccosukee Indian Tribe of
Florida funded for an estimated
$100,000. Funding for the second
and third pieces of the four-piece se-
ries, meanwhile, is already assured,
according to Cooley Sr.
When completed in 2008, the four
groupings of sculptures will repre-
sent Indian life from Paleolithic to
modern times. The Cooleys, in fact,
expect to produce a sculpture a year
for the next three years, with the
second in the series scheduled for
unveiling in March, 2006.
The intent of the project, as Secre-
tary of State Glenda Hood and Flor-
ida Supreme Court Justice Harry
Lee Anstead made clear Tuesday at
the unveiling ceremony, is to honor
the state's Indian culture heritage.
Credit Anstead with the idea. A
history buff with a deep apprecia-
tion of Florida's rich cultural heri-
tage, Anstead met Billy Cypress
several years ago while doing re-
search on the state's legal traditions.
Cypress is chairman of the Micco-
sukee Tribe of Florida, which group
was the federal government for-
(See Sculpture, Page 5)


BRADLEY COOLEY SR. and Bradley Cooley
Jr. visit with Florida Supreme Court Justice
Harry Lee Anstead following the unveiling


,I 'I

.i .. i ..


ceremony in Tallahassee on Tuesday morn-
ing. Anstead is credited with coming up
with the idea for the project. (News Photo)


City May Begin Charging For


Police Overseeing Parades


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

What should have been a routine
matter at a recent City Council
meeting turned into a lengthy dis-
cussion of the city's policy relative
to the issuance of parade permits.
The long and sometimes testy dis-
cussion was triggered by Charles
'Parrish's request for a parade permit
to stage an Emancipation Day cele-
bration on May 16.
SRight off the bat, Parrish ques-
tioned the city's rumored intent to
begin charging parade applicants a
fee to help finance police supervi-
sion of such activities.
He found it ridiculous that city of-
ficials would even contemplate
charging a fee for parade permits,
given the taxes people already paid,
Parrish said. Such services should
be standard practices of
government, he maintained.
Mayor Julie Conley explained
that the problem was that the city
lacked the funds for police overtime
.at present. Meaning that, absent out-
side funding, the city couldn't af-
ford to assign .officers to close the
necessary streets and redirect traffic.
At this point, Clyde Simpson,
chairman of the Jefferson County
Republican Pam, stepped torward-


with an offer of $500 from his party.
Simpson said the money was in-
tended to alleviate some of the city's
_financial problems.
"This whole issue was predicated
upon the problem of the city being
unable to pay for police overtime,"
Simpson said, explaining how the
idea for the donation had come
about.
The issue might well have ended
there, had Police Chief David Frisby
not taken Parrish to task for the lat-'
ter's alleged misbehavior during the
MLK parade in January.
"Last time, Mr. Parrish decided to
hold .a protest, and disrupt the
parade," Frisby said. "I'd like assur-
ance from the NAACP that they can
control Mr. Parrish and that the pa-
rade will begin and end on time."
His point, he said, was that $500
would go only so far in overtime.
Should the parade be delayed and
exceed its expected running time, it
could well mean that the $500 was
insufficient to cover his officers
overtime, he said.
Parrish retorted that the NAACP
had nothing to do with the present
parade, which was being sponsored
by the MLK Center.
As for his alleged misconduct, it
was no stunt, but concern for the
overall safety of parade participants
that had caused him to act as he had,


Parrish and another representative of
the MLK Center argued.
The fact was that police control of
the MLK parade route had been in-.
adequate, they said. Consequently,
only the southbound lanes of US 19
had been closed to traffic, creating
an unsafe situation for pedestrians in
the parade.
"We have a right to have full pro-
tection," one of the participants ar-
gued.
"I was chairman of that parade
and it was unsafe," put in Council-
man Gerrold Austin.
The events of the January parade,
in fact, were largely responsible for
underlying.tension of the recent dis-
cussion.
Councilman Tom Vogelgesang
next offered that a policy was
needed to avoid future mishaps. He
had concerns about the safety of
some present parade practices, such
as the tossing of candies to children,
he said. He worried that sooner or
later, some child was going to be se-
riously injured.
"We need to adopt guidelines that'
control these events," Vogelgesang
said. "Some safety measures need to
be adopted. I feel that we need to
have a level playing field."
"I don't think it's appropriate to
adopt a policy now," countered
(See Parades, Page 2)


BEVERLY SLOAN, chair, and School Board
Member Franklin Hightower, examine the

School Board Oka)

With County; Acts


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Among the highlights of the
School Board meeting, Monday,
was the approval of the lease to be
offered to the County Commission
for the use of buildings at the former
Jefferson County High School site
on Water Street.
By a 3-2 vote, the Board voted to:
offer a 25 year lease at $1 per year,
and split with the county the salary
of the high school Resource officer.
Heretofore the Board has been
paying 75 percent of the officer's
salary.
In addition the county would
waive the annual fire inspection
fees.


Voting in favor o
Board Members Fr
Vollertsen, Franklin
Voting nay were
Sloan and Member C
In other news, the
contribute $750 to
County Legislative
representing its intel
islature.
Concerning Ca
was suspended for
on campus with a
and the minor, com]
pensions, and 'the
mously approved the
the Opportunity Scho
The Opportunity
students who have b
or otherwise barred
attend school and c


details of an agenda item at the recent.-
School Board meeting. (News Photo)


fs Agreement

On Hill Matter
f the lease were ments from their regular teachers,
ed Shofner, Ed under the'supervision of the Oppor-
Hightower. tunity School personnel.
e Chair Beverly In an earlier conversation, JCHS
:harles Boland. Principal, Michael Bryan stated that
board agreed to both were serious students.
the Jefferson In a subsequent conversation
Committee for Monday, Superintendent Phil Barker
rests to the Leg- stated that if Hill completed the re-
quirements for graduation, he would
rlton Hill, who arn a high school diploma.
consensual sex
minor, both he Hill signed a letter of commitment
pleted their sus- for a full scholarship to the Univer--.
Board unani- sity of South Florida, in Tampa, to
eir attendance at play football as a quarterback, Feb,-.
ool. 9.
y School affords Asked how recent developments
been suspended, would affect Hill's scholarship at the
from classes, to University, Barker replied: "It's their
omnlete assign- call."


2005.


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005


School District Seeking


Surrogate Parents


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The County School District needs
volunteers to serve as Surrogate Par-
ents for students in our schools.
A surrogate parent is an individual
appointed to act in the place of a
parent in safeguarding a child's
rights in the special education deci-
sion making process.
The surrogate parent, after appro-
priate training, acts in the place of
the natural parent or guardian to en-
sure that the child receives a free,
appropriate public education in all
areas relating to the exceptional stu-
dent education process.
.A child is m need or a surrogate
parent when the parents are un-
known, or the child is a ward of the
state or court, or when the where-
abouts of the parent is unknown,
and the child is, or is suspected to be
an exceptional student.
Qualifications of a surrogate par-
ent are: US Citizen, Florida resident,
and more than 18 years of age.


Also a non-employee of the local
board involved with the child, be an
adequate representation for the
child, free of conflicting interests,
and trained in utilizing materials.
The surrogate parent knows the
child and is knowledgeable about
the child's handicapping condition
and educational needs.
The child is represented in all mat-
ters concerning identification,
evaluation, and placement child in
the exceptional student (ESE) pro-
gram.
The surrogate parent represents
the interests and safeguards the
rights of the child in ESE decisions
affecting the child.
Likewise the surrogate parent rep-
resents the child in all matters con-
cerning a free and appropriate pub-
lic education.
The responsibilities of the ap-
pointed surrogate parent do not ex-
tend to areas not specifically related
to the education of the .child, or to
the identification or evaluation of
the child that does not specifically
Relate to special education.


Activities of a surrogate parent in-
clude:
*attending training sessions.
*becoming familiar with the dis-
trict's procedures for providing serv-
ices to exceptional educational
children.
*attending IEP and other meetings
regarding the child's special educa-
tion.
*exercising all due process rights
under state and federal law.
*meeting the student.
*meeting the student's teachers and
others who know or work with the
student.
*observing the student's school
day.
*becoming familiar with the stu-
dent's background, disabling condi-
tion, and the student's potential.
A surrogate parent enjoys all the
rights a parent may have related to
the student's special education needs
and services.
Contact Linda Hewett or Sherry
Boland 342-0100, to learn more
about becoming a surrogate parent.


Experts warn Of Dangers Of

Plant, Pesticide, Food Poisoning


preparations.
Do not leave perishables out of
the refrigerator for more than two
hours.
Cook meat, seafood, eggs and
poultry thoroughly.
Keep picnic foods properly
cooled and stored.
Never thaw food and meat at
room temperature.
Dispose of all canned foods
with bulging lids, dents or cracks.
Symptoms of food poisoning in-
clude: nausea, vomiting, abdominal
(See Pesticides, Page 3)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With the coming of spring,
citizens are alerted to the poisoning
that can occur from exposure to
outdoor plants, pesticides, and
garden chemicals.
Food poisoning also becomes
more prevalent in spring.
Deborah Smith, education
coordinator for the Florida Poison
Information Center, Jacksonville,
warns that "Chewing or
swallowing a small amount of
certain plants or pesticides can
potentially lead to serious
consequences for young children."
SHowever, parents can protect
their children and prevent
accidental poisonings by reviewing
a few simple prevention guidelines.
For Outdoor Plants:
S* Learn to identify your outdoor
landscaping plants, by their
common and botanical names.
S* Remove any poisonous plant
and replace it with a safer,
nonpoisonous plant.
Keep plant food away from
children.
Teach children that it is
dangerous to put any part of a
plant, berry or wild mushroom into
their mouth.
Call the poison information
center to obtain a list of toxic and
nontoxic plants.
Symptoms of poisoning from
plants include: burning in the
,mouth, vomiting or diarrhea.
For pesticides and garden Chemi-
cals:
i* Store pesticides and other chemi-
-cals in locked cabinets out of sight
and reach of children.
Read manufacturer's label for
instructions -for use, precautions
and restrictions.
Never transfer pesticides to
other containers, especially old
drinking containers.
Avoid the use of pesticides
,products that require leaving pow-


der or pellets in areas where chil-
dren and pets play, or may other-
wise get to them.
Never reuse pesticide contain-
ers.
Symptoms of pesticide poisoning
include: dizziness, headache, chest
discomfort, vomiting, sweating, di-
arrhea, weakness, difficulty in
breathing, pinpoint pupils, and
even death.
To Avoid Food Poisoning:
Wash all countertops, utensils
and hands with warm, soapy water
before and after food handling and


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NATHAN ANTES, seventh grader at Howard Middle School,
locates the North American continent on the globe. (News
Photo)


Parades
(Continued From Page 1)
Councilman Brian Hayes.
But he agreed that the issue war-
ranted further discussion and that
the establishment of a fee at a later
day was unavoidable.
"When a parade permit is submit-
ted, the chief can estimate the cost
of the parade and the City Council
can inform the applicant that we
need $1,000 or whatever," Hayes
said. "I guess I'm proposing an in-
formal policy that at the time'of an
application, the applicant has to
pay."
In the end, the council voted to ac-
cept the GOP's $500 contribution
and use the money to provide police
supervision of the Emancipation
Day parade, with the issue of the
policy to revisited at a later day.


LCAL .OFFICE
:FRb I f~ia re vn. 9 1.


GEICQ


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

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THE COMMUNITY IS INVITED

TO EASTER WEEK WORSHIP SERVICES
AT

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


* Traditional Easter Musical on Palm Sunday March 20th at 11:00 a.m.
Led by Jeff Whitty, director of Music.

* Easter Egg Hunt and Family Picnic on Palm Sunday Afternoon March
20th. Call 997-5545 for directions.

* Free Thursday evening March 24th pancake dinner at 6:00 p.m. in the
Family Ministry Center. Come and enjoy the fun!

* Thursday evening Communion Service March 24th in the Church
Sanctuary at 6:30 celebrating The Last Supper of Jesus Christ and his
disciples.

* SUNSHINE SERVICE at 8:30 A.M. Easter Sunday March 27th outside in
front of the Family Ministry Center. Praise and Worship music.
Chairs provided.

* Free Easter Brunch at 10:00 a.m. Easter Sunday March 27th in the Family
Ministry Center.

* TRADITIONAL EASTER WORSHIP SERVICE March 27th at 11:00 a.m.
in church sanctuary.

For more information and directions call First United Methodist Church
Office 997-5545 Child Care provided.








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 3


THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY held a St. Pat- was the guest speaker. Here, Eleanor Hawk-
rick's Day Dinner fundraiser Tuesday night ins, chair of the Democratic Party, chats
at the Chamber of Commerce. Senator Rod with Smith. (News Photo)
Smith, a Democratic candidate for governor,


Extension Agent Copeland


Offers Tips For Using Eggs


FRAN HUNT..
Staff Writer

With Easter on the horizon, Famn-
ily 'and Consumer Sciences Extein
sion, Agent Heidi Copeland shares
some facts and tips about how to
use.and prepare eggs.
SAccording to the American Egg
Boatdieggs are back.' There is no
longer, a recimmnendarion on the
number of egg folks s a person nma\
consume per week.
Accumulated data from decades of
research has shown that it is the to-
tal number of fat a person,eats each:
day that affects blood cholesterol
levels.
Copeland said "Go ahead and en-
joy some eggs.this Easter and be-
yond." Eggs are nutrient dense and
contribute a good proportion of
needed putqients ,to :he dietv cpgn,
paqed to its calorie count. Eggs pro-
vide high quality, protein, itaminsn
and minerals along with fat.' All nu-


trients contained in, eggs are needed
in the daily diet.
Copeland said that eggs are also
economical to purchase and prepare'.
"They are quick and, easy, and can
be scrambled, fried,. poached, baked,
boiled, broiled and-r ierowaved (the
egg must be removed from'thee shell '
and the yolk pierced).
Eggs can be made into omelets
Iritlatas. stratas, quiches.- casseroleS
and custards. It has been stated thai
"Eggs are the cement that holds lthe
castle of cuisine together" becausti
.of the ability to -eaven, thicken,
emulsify clarify, and more, in all
types 'of recipes.:
She cautioned, ho\ e\ er, some egg
safety information fiust be observed
to prepare favorite egg ,dishes.
Most eggs are entirely safe if they
are properly handled, stored and
cooked, and cleaned.
*ULie onlyI.lein. iic; racked e%:L'
'Uise clean utensils and equipment.
SPraclice proper hand washing be-
fore, during and after using eggs.


*Refrigerate at 45 degrees or be-
low but do hot freeze.
*Never leave egg dishes at room
temperature more than one hour.
*Institute a "first in, first out" pol-
icy of your egg purchases.
*A good rule of thumb is to cook
the whole egg until the white is
completely set and the yolk begins
to thicken. No visible liquid should
be .remaining..
'If yodi'use a thermometer, the
center of a'negg dish should be 160
degrees.
*Containers that have held raw
eggs must be washed and sanitized
before being used again.
Don't cross contaminate.
"Have some fun with your famiil;
this Easter and 'Eggspress'
yourself," said Copeland. "And re-
member, if hrd-cooked CeLs are on
.tr menu: i.r E i'r., a hard-c.-ked
cgcg \ril peel more eas.ilI it it is a
v.eek or ro.c'. ld before it is
cooked


Crop Disaster

Aid Signups

Ongoing Here
Mark Demott of the Farm Service
Agency, 1244 North Jefferson Street
alerts citizens that signups for eligi-
ble producers for the Crop Disaster
Program (CDP) began March 14
and continues.
Local telephone number is 997-
2072.
The CDP authorizes crop loss as-
sistance for producers who suffered
2003 or 2004 and certain 2005 crop
losses from damaging weather.
Producers suffering a greater than
35 percent production loss and/or
more than a 20 percent quality loss,
are eligible.
Payment rate for CDP has been in-
creased to 65 percent of the estab-
lished commodity price for insured
crop- and noninsured crops, and 60)
percent of the price for uninsured
commodities
Producers nma apply for CDP for
any crops that are eligible for co\er-
age under the Federal Crop Insur-
ance or the Noninsured Assistance
Program
This program results from Con-
gressional passage of the NMlitarn
Construction Appropriations and
Emergency\ Hurricane Supplemental
Appropriations Act. 2005
Under the Act. eligible losses are
those resulting from hurricanes.
tropical storms, and other ,weather
related disasters that occurred dur-
ing the calendar year 2003
For additional information, con-
tact the local office.




Pesticides
(Continued From Page 2)
cramping and diarrhea.
For poisoning emergencies, call
the Poison Information Center t ll
free, 24 hours a dai3, at 1-.i1-222
1222.

The health care professionals at
the center v. ill immediately\ respond
'to poison emergencies and answer
ipoison-related que';fiions about
these potential spring poisoning
hazards and other potential\ dan-
gerous substances.


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- S I S SI


E' K'


BUILD, BUY, or SELL


SRead Together, Florida
P.March -Aprl 2005

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"IF YOU buy me Alpo, I
promise I'll be the best dog
in the county. Also, a flea
collar will keep me lovable
forever." (News Photo)

Terri Named

Society's

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Humane Society has
named "Terri" as its adoptable ca-
nine of the week.
Terri is a shepherd/lab mix
female, born, 9-9-04 She is
spayed, with all vaccinations
current and she is heart worm nega-
tive. i
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes Terri as one very "excit-
able pup", a real wiggler and lover.
She loves to play and she loves to
run.
She is also very intelligent and
easily trainable for tricks.
Bautista said she would be perfect
for a child to run and play with, and
would-enjoy fetching.
Terri gets along well with other
dogs and she's OK with cats, under
supervision at first, because she has-
n't been exposed to them that often.
To adopt Terri or any of the other
many lovable animals at the shelter
cal 342-2044.
i


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HOLY WEEK
j ";

Community Worship

Services

Sat First Presbyterian Church

SSponsored byThe Ministerial Association


.MONDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. David Hodges
Special Music: Rebekah Aman
Speaker: Rev. Dr. Mark Ashworth


TUESDAY
Worship Leader: Rev, Carl Hanks
Special Music: Edna Eleazer
Speaker: Rev. Howard Adams


WEDNESDAY-
Worship Leader: Rev. John Dodson
Special Music: Sissy Kilpatrick
Speaker: Rev. Ron Cichon


THURSDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. Twana Edwards
Special Music: Christina Young
Speaker: Rev. Thurmon Moore


FRIDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. Phillip Cook
Special Music: Mandy Self
Speaker: Rev. John Dodson

Joan Watson'is organist for Holy Week services and Nancy Banks is pianist
Lunch offered Monday Through Thursday in the church fellowship hall.
Cost is $5 with proceeds going to the Historical Society.








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005
.% :-.- -*----- ': .-.-- .


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

C, MEM RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net



More Gambling Profits


GENE COOKSEY, then Commissioner, exam-
ines exposed drainage tubes at Lake Micco-
sukee spillway, in June, 1988. Tubes were
designed to prevent washout and collapse


of structure, but did not, and emergency
draw down was necessary. (News File
Photo)


Go To Religious Groups rn
A nnrninn R rnemmpnt*


BY REX M. ROGERS

Not all charitable gambling is for
religious purposes. But the portion
of the take going to religious organi-
gations is increasing. "Gambling for
Jisus" is now a common part of the
landscape. Many church groups
have developed a more tolerant atti-
t;de toward gambling generally.
Consequently, more religious or-
ganizations are sponsoring charity
gambling events.
; Those who argue that it is morally
defensible for the church to support
clarity gambling are those who
want charity gambling to support
the church. They say that the end
justifies the means. But does it?
How can any church justify an ac-
fitviy that contributes to the debilita-
tion of people, whether economi-
cally, psychological. or spiritually?
..Gambling~acti\vit,. whatever its
frm or purpose, always contributes
to social disruption and evil. There's
o record otherwise. In former uni-
versity president David McKenna's
,vords, "Gambling is a corrupting
yeast that contaminates the loaf
from core to crust." So the gambling
"practices of institutions whose pur-
'ose is "moral betterment" is a curi-


ous one.
The good causes of church-
sponsored gambling cannot displace
biblical principles condemning
greed or covetousness. Churches
that gamble lose the moral high
ground in dealing with a culture en-
amored by money and materialism.
The church that embraces morally
debatable activities has lost its pro-
phetic voice. It no longer has any-
thing to say to a needy culture. Or
when the church does say
something, it's lost its credibility.
The Salvation Army, the church-
related charity receiving more dona-
.tions than any other in the United
States, refuses to accept donations
from the gambling industry. Others
should follow.
Gambling for Jesus is still gam-
bling. It violates all the biblical prin-
ciples that any other kind of
gamblhn' violates. Financial stakes.
are usually\ lower in the church than
in -the casino, but the moraistakes
for the church, or at least moral re-
sponsibility, are far greater.
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., book
author and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
pens this column, which appears in
89 newspapers.)


Head Start Center


-Plans Parent Meeting


,DEBBIE SNAPP
S taff Writer

': The Jefferson County Head: Start
Center will hold a Parent Meeting
j6-8 p.m., Tuesday, March 22, at 396
East Washington Street.
- This month's topic, "Linking Our
.l iceis," will be presented by An-
,gela'Mitchell, Family Advocate for
;the Center.
SThe meeting will include a video
presentation and feedback from the
Attendees with a question/answer
session Sitters will be provided for
those requiring that service.
I''


Also, the Center has an opening
for a Prenatal/Homebased Family
Advocate for the Jefferson and
Madison counties.

The responsibilities of the position
will require assessing the needs in-
families, linking those families in
need to the social service providers
in the community, and to serve as a
liaison between the varying pro-
grams of this organization and fami-
lies that those programs serve.
Mitchell can be contacted at 997-
4736 for more information about
this job position or about the up-
coming meeting.


Grants Director Reports

,,n Phone Use Issue
SDear Editor, was used by a person hired to com-
L Thank you for the article that your plete work on the Community De-
paper published on March 11, 2005, velopment Block Grant, and perhaps
I regarding possible misuse of Nextel by a member of that person's family.
:phone b) a former staff member of I have moved forward and negoti-
'he Grants Office. ated a settlement amount with the
' Having further discussed this mat- firm.
jer ith the staff of the office, it is I will be presenting this informa-
wjrudent to clarify that the possible tion to the Jefferson County Board
misuse of the phone was not done of County .Commissioners as soon
^by any current staff member of the aspossible.
,' Grants Office. I appreciate the opportunity to ex-
The past director and members of press these thoughts.
,Iher family were not directly in- Sincerely,
.wolved. Cory Burke (Yacovone),
SRather, I am told that the phone CGFM Director


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
SThe Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.

S500 Words or Less
SP.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


' ~PJ~JI IiiI'~ E u uu EtI uw


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

At the Chamber of Commerce po-
litical forum several years ago, Jr.
Tuten stood up and announced "My
wife dressed me". Last week I at-
tended a Jefferson County Legisla-
tive meeting with Jr. Tuten, and
many others.
.I kno\ Jr. would rather be in his
farm clothes, but this evening he
was dressed to a "t". His wife is still.
doing a stellar job! When I was in
college there was a band called ZZ
TOP. One of their most recogniz-
able songs is called "Smart Dressed
Man". I found myself hunming...
"Coz every girl's crazy 'bout a:
sharp dressed man".
The DOT has really out done
themselves with the new traffic
signs around the Courthouse. They
are really BIG. They have really,
BIG letters. I wonder if they think'
folks around here go too fast to read
the small print. Possibly they know
we are all getting older and need the
larger print.
They paid particular attention to
people headed for St. Petersburg.'
Reminds me of a photo I saw in a;
magazine. The sign is in Alaska and


shown as. a snow covered sentinel
saying "Miami 8000 miles".
I do rely on the lovely rolling sign
by the Opera House to know what
shows are coming to The House. I
think Lalo Robles made that sign
years ago. I read in the paper that
he was back in,town recently to give
more free work. This community
owes lots to a number of people
who donate their time
A \visit to the cheese section is al-
iways a mystery ffag veteran cook
like me. Sometimes there are simple
cheeses, and at other times the
cheeses are specialty store quality. I
guess it depends on who the cheese
buyer is on any particular day. It
passes for a thrill in the grocery
store. See how easily amused you
are when you are over 50?
Several weeks ago Goodwood
Plantation next to TMH was selling
old garden roses. The plantation has
been in the restoration process for
some time, and the cuttings from the
roses are now just ready for sale. I
thought these roses would be perfect
for me.. After all they lived a long
time on neglect. Tending fussy
flowers that require lots of attention
does not fit in my schedule. I like


the idea of these roses, sort of Dar-
win roses, survival of the fittest.
Well, hundreds of other folks felt
the same way. The parking lot was
swarmed with gardeners pulling lit-
tle red wagons. My Mom and I man-
aged to snag a few plants, but most
were sold by 10 a.m.. I hope they
live up to their billing as fragrant.
Nothing smells as nice as a fresh
rose. I 'pposefh'at' is wiy siomahny
ar given freely ofn ''leiuine'-. D..
'i personally do .not know any
woman who does not like roses.
More nature news. Apparently
Monticello has lots of people that
are enthusiastic bird watchers. Many
Monticellans registered to partici-
pate in the Saturday Backyard Bird
count sponsored by the National
-Audubon Society. The bird count
was on a weekend and I decided to
count on Saturday.
Especially eager to do my part in
the bird count, hubby and I put out
many bird goodies on Friday. A
veritable bird bathing and fussing. A
good time was had by all.
I got up early on Saturday to count
my bird buddies. The punks! No
show! Failure to Appear! My bird


count was quite unimpressive. Next
year I am starving them out on Fri-
day.
There may be an alternative expla-
nation. There are a number of cats
that retreat down the sewer drains
when you chase them. I do not know
if they live in the drains, but they
certainly hang out there often.
STey. are attracted by the bird go-
ipgs ,on, in our yard and we chase
them off on a regular basis. I think I
have seen Garfield so the Wasicca
Mafia can cancel the BOLO.
The Friday night bird party had
broken up and the birds flew off to
sleep off the bird hangovers. Way
after dark there was a World Wres-
tling Federation Cat Slap down in
our front yard. Yowling, scooting
around and howling were the main
events.
Each cat seemed to have a place
staked out as if some unseen hand
had put out place cards. Each cat
took a position and held it until the
larger guy bumped him off from the
sewer. A cat slap down is a danger-
ous proposition for a bird. Maybe
the birds decided to take a powder
on Saturday morning.


Owl Dung Attracts Beetles


experiments of tool use dung as
BY AARON HOOVER bait, in this case by wild animals, a
University of Florida hot .issue because of the enormous
difficulty of interpreting animal be-
An old adage says you can catch, havior.
more flies with honey than vinegar, An article about the research will
But the burrowing owl has come up appear Thursday on the journal Na-
with another alternative: manure.
University of Florida scientiststure.
have a new explanation for burrow- "What makes this study unique is
ing owls' odd habit of collecting and its experimental approach, docu-
scattering animal feces within and- meeting how effective tool use is.
around their shallow burrows: The Tool use in general is a very contto-
owls are simply using the feces as versial field because it's often diffi-
bait to attract a favorite insect meal cult to know whether an animal is
dung beetles. doing what you think it's doing,"
The findings are significant be- said Doug Levey, a UF professor of
cause they are based on what the zoology and the lead author of the
scientists say are the first controlled' paper. "Tool use has aroused a lot of


controversy because of this problem
of interpretation and because it's
fairly rare to see it. Consequently,
most the reports are descriptive or
anecdotal."
Burrowing owls, known scientifi-
cally as Athene cunicularia, range
from Canada to Chile, with a hand-
ful of small populations in Florida.
Observers throughout their range
have long noted their curious habit
of hoarding cow, horse, buffalo, dog
and other dung in and around the
entrance to their nesting burrows,
shallow holes that may reach 3 feet
in depth and 6 to 9 feet in length.
There's a general consensus that
these birds use the dung as nesting


material. Butsome scientists also
have advanced another theory: The
owls rely on the dung to mask the
Scent of their eggs from snakes, rac-
-coons and other would-be predators.
Levy said a UF undergraduate or-
nithology class' routine outing to
view a burrowing owl population in
North Florida led to the beetle hy-
pothesis. He and others noticed what
the indigestible pellets the owls had
regurgitated contained large num-
bers of dung beetle parts.
That jibed with the owls' other
odd behavior. Unlike most other
types of owls, burrowing owls are
active during the day, when they of-
(See Owl Dung, Page 5)


Blueberry Marketing Deal Inked


Blueberry varieties developed by
Florida's Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) will be
marketed on- the European Union
under a new licensing agreement
signed by Florida Foundation Seed
Producers Inc. And the Royal group
of Sevilla, Spain.
The new licensing agreement does
not affect nurseries in Florida and
other states that already have access
to UF/IFAS-released varieties
through Florida Foundation Seed
Producers Inc.
Berry Treat, germplasm property
manager for Florida Foundation


Seed Producers Inc. in the European
Union, North Africa and central
Asia.
"This means that the plant propa-
gation material of the protected va-
rieties cannot enter this territory
from other parts of the world with-
out a prior authorization from
Royal," Treat said. "Both Royal and
UF's Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences will make sure that
the plant breeder rights to property
protection are respected."
He said Royal has a long history
of supporting UF research on stone-
fruit (peaches, nectarines,.plums and


apples), and the firm is "uniquely
positioned" to promote UF southern
highbush blueberry variety propaga-
tion and marketing throughout their
territory. Florida Foundation Seed
Producers Inc. is a non-for-profit
corporation that acts on behalf of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, which is part of UF/IFAS.
He said the master marketing li-
cense allows Royal to perform sales
within the EU, planting varieties in
production fields, offering for sale
and/or selling fruit or fruit products
containing special southern high-
bush blueberry varieties. The blue-


berry varieties include Bluecrisp,
Emerald, Jewel, Millennia,
Sapphire, Sebring, Southern Belle,
Southmoon, Star and Windsor.
The licensing agreement may
eventually include three new blue-
berry varieties released by UF this
month: Abundance, Springhigh and
Springwide.
Jean-Clement Marcailou, research
director at Royal, said The UF blue-
berry varieties "will allow us to be
marketers of the highest quality fruit
available within Europe."
(See Blueberry, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


I L I --L L III I = I =I i


_ CT~ L 1- 19 ii


i

Ise-











Owl Dung
(Continued From Page 4)
ten can be seen seemingly standing
sentry outside their burrows. Many
dung beetles also forage during the
day, flying about 3 feet off the
ground and sniffing the air for their
next meals.
"You can go out there and see
these owls standing in front of their
burrows and it looks like they're not
doing anything," Levey said. "But I
think it's pretty clear that they've
got that old line in that water, fish-
ing for these beetles."
To test the hypothesis, the re-
searchers removed all the dung from
the ground surrounding about a
dozen of the owls' burrows at the
sites of two separate North Florida
populations. They then added simi-
lar amounts of cow manure to half
the burrows, leaving the others with-
out any. After four days, they col-
lected all the pellets and prey
remains near the burrows, then re-
peated the experiment by switching
the control and experimental bur-
rows, putting manure by those that
had none in the prior test.
Examinations of the pellets and
beetle parts around the burrows re-
vealed that at those with dung, the
owls "consumes 10 times more dung
beetles and six times more beetle
species than when dung was not pre-
sent," according to the Nature paper.
The researchers also tested the
theory that the owls use the dung to
mask their eggs' scent. The re-
searchers dug 50 artificial burrows
and inserted five quail eggs into
each, then scattered dung around
half to the burrows. The researchers
used commercially available quail
eggs to avoid damaging the owl
populations. Far from avoiding the
eggs, predators quickly plundered
all but one nest, showing that the
dung made no difference to preda-
tors.
The researchers do not believe the
owls evolved their behavior solely
to attract dung beetles, Levey said.
For one thing, the birds collect the
most dung in the spring, largely
abandoning the behavior in the other
seasons. For another, they collect a
variety of other material. Among the
oddest items the UF researchers dis-
covered: squashed toads apparently
peeled off nearby roads.
Levey also cautioned that the re-
searchers make no claims the owls
are consciously using the dung as
bait, but rather that it has simply
proved to be an effective and lasting
behavior from an evolutionary
standpoint.
"Even though the common per-
ception of owls is that they're wise,
I don't for an instant believe that
these owls are aware of the connec-
tion between the dung that they
bring and the beetles that they eat,"
he said. "There's no evidence of
that. A simpler explanation is that
those owls that bring back dung get
more dung beetles, have higher re-
productive success and pass that be-
havior on to their offspring."
The research was funded with a
$500 grant from UF's University
Scholars undergraduate research
program. The paper's other authors
are R. Scott Duncan, a faculty mem-
ber at Birmingham-Southern Col-
lege in Alabama who earned his
doctorate at UF, and Carrie Levins,
who earned her bachelor's degree in
zoology at UF.

JCI Team Sets
Fish FrY
The Jefferson Correctional Insti-
tute (JCI) Relay for Life team will
hold a
Fish Fry Friday, in the Winn Dixie
parking lot in front of Advance
Auto Parts.
It will begin at noon and con-
tinue to 6 p.m.
The meal will be $6 and will in-
clude the fish, cole slaw, grits,
bread, and iced tea.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 5






12 noon to 12 midnight


EMILY KNOWLES stops to pet one of the Hu- adoption event. The society seeks foster
mane Society's adoptable cats, at a recent homes for adoptable pets. (News Photo)


Sculpture
(Continued From Page 1)
mally recognized in 1962, despite
the tribe's presence in the state since
the mid 1700s.
Anstead and Cypress got to talk-
ing about the lamentable lack of
symbolic representation of Florida
past in Tallahassee, and so the pro-
ject was born.
As for selection of the Cooleys for
the work, Cypress said there was
never any question of commission-
ing any other artists. He said the
Cooleys enjoyed the tribe's trust,
based on the two earlier sculptures
of Native Americans, their under-
standing and respect of tribal ways,
and their attention to detail.
"They're 300 percent accurate,"
Cypress said of the figures in
Movin' On. "The Cooleys do the re-
search. They do.not do anything to
offend. Rather, they do everything
to enhance."
The 10 a.m. unveiling ceremony
was attended by about 200 people,
including several state dignitaries
and council leaders of the Micco-
sukee and Seminole tribes.
The Cooleys' studio is on a 120-
acre wooded tract south of Lamont
that Cooley Sr. purchased in 1978
when he moved into the county. A
self-taught artist, the older Cooley
has been sculpting wildlife and Na-
tive American pieces 'since the
1960s.
His son, Bradley Cooley Jr.,
joined the enterprise in 1986 and the
two began producing life-size and
monumental liieces. Their sculptures
are displayed in various parks, mu-
seums, corporations and private col-
lection around the country.



Blueberry
(Continued From Page 4)
Paul Lyrene, a UF professor of
horticulture who has developed
many blueberry varieties, said Royal
is a major producer of low-chill
peaches, nectarines, plums and
strawberries. Royal has previously
worked with Florida Foundation
Seed Producers Inc. To commercial-
ize UF peach and nectarine varieties
in Europe.
"The emphasis of the company is
on high fruit quality," Lyrene said.
"Their location in southern Spain
enables them to ship fruit to Ger-
many, France and other European
markets before local production is
available further north."
Lyrene said UF has been a leader
in the development of blueberry and
peach varieties that can be grown
where winters are too mild to grow
most deciduous fruits. In addition to
adapting fruit to mild winters, the
Florida blueberry breeding program
has emphasized larger berry size,
better flavor and improved ability to
withstand long-distance shipping.
These characteristics make the
Florida varieties of great interest to
Royal.


SCapri Lounge


Is Having Karaoke Night

St Patrick's Day

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Come Join In On the Fun.

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.997-5712


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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEIv
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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005


Lifestyle


U- --l


Kelly Langford To

Marry Frederick Pitts


JES Boys, Girls Club

Places In Competition


Dr. David Langford and Libby
Langford of Bessemer, AL, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Kelly Elizabeth, to Freder-
ick Burton Pitts of Monticello.
He is the son of Freddy and
Brenda Pitts of Madison, Florida.
Langford is a 1991 graduate of
Oak Grove High School in Besse-
mer, and a graduate of Troy State
University in Troy, AL. She is em-
ployed at UAB Hospital in Besse-
mer, AL.


Pitts is a 1991 graduate of Madi-
son County High School, and is also
a graduate of Troy State University.
He is employed with Florida Farm
Bureau.
Langford and Pitts were both
members of the Sound of the South
Marching Band under the direction
of Dr. Johnny Long at Troy State
University.
The wedding will take place April
9, 2005 at Sandestin Hilton Beach
Resort in Destin, FL.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Educational Competition, a
competition for the Boys and Girls
Club of the Big Bend, was held in
Tallahassee recently at the Bethel
Baptist Club.
Jefferson Elementary School Club


Relay Team

Sets Raffle


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Educational Leader Shirley Wash-
ington announces that three students
from the JES Club won First Place
and will be heading to the State
Competition in Tampa on Educa-
tional Day, Saturday, April 2.
They'll leave on Friday.
Winning First Place for the Club
are: Emily Howell for Public Speak-
ing; Simone Williams for Essay
Writing; and Emanuel Finn for
Spelling. The First Place winners
are all 5th grade students.
Winning Second Place for the
Club were: LaNorris Footman, a 4th
grader, for Florida Trivia; and Ke-
shonta Aikens, a 5th grader, for
SStates and Capitals.


KELLY LANGFORD AND BURT PITTS


Janelle Day To Marry

Paul Frederick


JANELLE DAY AND PAUL FREDERICK


Church News Notes


Holy Week Services for Wacissa
United Methodist Church are 7 p.m.,
Thursday and 7 p.m. Good Friday.
Homecoming will be observed 11
a.m. Easter Sunday. Dinner on the
grounds will follow the service.
***
Salem AME Church adult choir
will observe its anniversary 11 a.m.
Sunday. Guest Minister is Rev.
Owens Moore.
** *I
Union Hill AME Church will hold
an appreciation program for Minnie
Robinson, 6 p.m. Saturday. Guest.
Speaker is Trina Wiggins. St. Phillip
AME Church and congregation is in
charge.
***
Bethel AME Church observes its
140th church anniversary 11 a.m,
Sunday. Guest Speaker is Rev. Mil-
ton Stubbins and the Holy Ghost
Revival Center Congregation. The
afternoon service is at: 3 p:m. with
Rev. Willie Hagan and congregation
of Arnett Chapel AME Church of
Quincy. Dinner will be. served after
the program.
***
Greater Fellowship MB Church
will hold Palm Sunday,services 6
p.m., Sunday with the seven last


words of the cross. Music and choir
will be from the Holy Ghost Revival
Center..

Calvary Baptist Church will hold a
revival 7 p.m. nightly, March 24-27
Supper is served nightly at 5:45
p.m. at no charge. Bro. Bob Sanders
of Knoxville, TN will be the
Evangelist.
Easter services begin 7 a.m. with
a sunrise service and breakfast fol-
lowing in the fellowship hall. Morn-
ing worship is at 11 a.m.
***
Casa Bianca Youth Dept. presents
its first Youth Explosion, 11 a.m.
Sunday. Speaker is Elder Terris
Thomas of Athens, GA. Ford
Chapel Choir will minister in song.


Union Bethel AME Church in the
Bolen Community will hold a spe-
cial Men's Day Program 3 p.m. Sun-
day. Rev. Rudloph Neely will
deliver the sermon and St. Phillip
AME Choir will render selections.
Union Bethel Circuit Male Chorus
will render a special selection. La-
Donte' Randle is chairperson for this
program.


Homes Of Mourning


JOHNNY LEE FOUNTAIN
Johnny Lee Fountain, 46 a Com-
puter Operations Supervisor, with
the Department of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicle for 26 years died
Monday, March 14, 2005. in
Havana.
Born in Thomasville. Ga. October
2, 1958, he lived most of his life in
Monticello, before moving to Ha-
vana. He was a member of the Cal-
vary Baptist Church in Monticello.
He was earning his Black Belt in
TAEKWONDO. He was a Coach
for many years with the little league,
and Babe Ruth league baseball
teams in Monticello. He enjoyed the
outdoors, fishing, hunting, horse
back riding, and ATVs. He was a
big fan of FSU football, and Nascar
Racing.
The Funeral Service will be 1:00
P.M., Friday, March 18, 2005 at
Calvary Baptist Church in Monti-
cello, Florida. With the internment
at Mt. Zion Church Cemetery in Jef-
ferson County.
Family received friends from 6
'till 8 P.M., Thursday, March 17,
2005 at the Church. Online guest
may sign the guest register at
www.faithfuneralhome.com.


Mr. Fountain is survived by his
Father; Luther Fountain, Jr. (and
wife Margie), Three sons;.Johnny L.
Fountain, Jr. And Justin Fountain
both of Monticello, Jason Fountain
"U.S. Marine" stationed in Califor-
nia. Two daughters; Christina Foun-
tain and Stephine Fountain, both of
Monticello. Three sisters; Cynthia
Spector, of Howey-N-Hills, FL. Ma-
ryJo Duncan of Havana, and Dine
Key of Monticello. Four step-sisters;
Cathrine Curry, Havana, Jeanie
Henson and Betty Sue Toole both of
Tallahassee, and Cindy Oliver of
Monticello. Two' step-brothers;
Marty Toole of Sartell, MN and
Ronnie Toole of Orlando. His Fian-
cee; Susan Bradley, and her daugh-
ter Amber.
He was preceded in death by his
mother Virgina W. Fountain.
Faith Funeral Home in Havana
(850-539-4300) is handling the
service.
DANIELLE SHANAY WADE
Baby: Danielle Shanay Wade, in-
fant, died March 12, 2005 in Talla-
hassee, Florida.
The service will be at 3:00 P.M.
(See Homes, Page 9)


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Day of
Monticello, and Mr. and Mrs. James
R.Frederick of Flora, IL. announce
the engagement of their children
Janell Montine Day to Paul Andrew
Frederick.
The bride is the granddaughter of
the late Mr. and Mrs. Vernon T.
Sasser of Monticello, FL., and the
late Mr. and Mrs. William J. Day of
Boca Raton, FL.
Day is a 2001 graduate of Light-
house Christian School in Valdosta,
GA. and is a senior at Crown Col-
lege of the Bible in Powell, TN.
The groom is the grandson of Pas-
tor and Mrs. Jacob L. Frederick of


1st UMC Team
Golf Tourney,
Fish Fry Monday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The First United Methodist
Church Relay for Life Team will
sponsor a Golf Tournament and Cat-
fish fry on Monday, March 21 at the
Jefferson County Country Club.
The Tournament format is a three
person scramble with an entry fee of
$50 per person. Tee time for the-
event is 1 p.m. And those wishing
for more information should con-
tact Clee Collins at 342-3374.

The Catfish Dinner is open to eve-
ryone, not just golfers, and will be-
gin at 6 p.m. and last to 8 p.m

Cost is $10 and includes catfish,
grits, baked beans, hush puppies,
dessert, and a drink.


Gays, IL., Mr. Stanley White of
Neoga, IL., and Ms. Carol White of
Brownstown, IL.
Frederick is a 2002 graduate of
Flora High School in Flora, IL. and
is a senior at Landmark Baptist Col-
lege in Haines City, FL.
He is currently employed by Wal-
Mart Stores, Inc.
The wedding will take place at
Victory Baptist Church in Thomas-
ville, GA., 7 p.m., May 20, 2005.


CARD OF THANKS
The family wishes to express its
deepest and sincerest thanks to our
friends and co-workers and church
family for their many expressions of
concern and care for our beloved
Rodney M. Hamm.

We are also grateful for, your
visits, telephone call's, food, exp'res-
sions of sympathy, condolences,
flowers, and all other acts of kind-
ness shown to us during our time of
bereavement.

Your kindness and thoughtfulness
will forever remain in our hearts.
Katie and Roosevelt Hamm,
and the Hamm Family

Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.



American
Red Cross


State Farm Relay For Life Team
is selling raffle tickets for a trip to I
Destin Beach, as one of its fundrais-


ers.
The trip is for two and includes a
three night stay on the beach and a
day long deep sea fishing trip.
Tickets are $10 each, six for $50.
Only 300 tickets will be sold to keep
the odds favorable.
The winning ticket will be drawn
at the Relay For Life event, April
15. The winner does not have to be
present to win.
Checks or cash are accepted and
checks should be made payable to
American Cancer Society or ACS..
To purchase tickets Email:
lisa.reasoner.j6ic@statefarm.com or
call Reasoner at 997-8282.



CHILDCARE
FUNDRAISING

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National Co.
.: f0 local are'a to help run,')
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S making programs.
Work with directors,
owners, PTA's, schools.
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Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Trust in the
Lord with all
your heart and
lean not on
Syouir own
lilnderstaltdifig.
Proverbs 3:5
Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 7


How


TO


TO


YOUR


ABUT


DRUGS.


The best thing about this subject is
that you don't have to do it well. You
simply have to try.
If you try, your kids will get the
message.
That you care about them.
That you understand something
about the conflicts they face.
That you're there when they


It's never toe


need you.
The alternative is to ignore the subject.
Which means your kids are going to be listening
to others who have strong opinions about the
subject. Including those who use drugs. And
those who sell them.
ACCEPT REBELLION,
At the heart of it, drugs, alcohol, wild
hairstyles, trendy clothes, ear-splitting music,
outrageous language ar different ways of.
expressing teen-age rebellion.
That's not all bad. Part of growing up is to
create a separate identity, apart from parents a
process which ultimately leads to feelings of self
worth. A step along that path is rebellion of one
kind or another which is to say rejecting
parental values, -and staking out new ones.
You did it. They're doing it. And that's the
way it is.
The problem comes when kids choose a path
of rebellion that hurts them, destroys their self
worth, and can ultimately kill them.
That's the reality of drugs.
DON'T GET DISCOURAGED.
When you talk to your kids about drugs, it may
seem as though nothing is getting through.
Don't you believe it.
The very fact you say it gives special weight to
whatever you say.
But whether or not your kids let on they've
heard you, whether or not they play back your
words weeks or months later, keep trying.
START ANYWHERE.
"Have you heard about any kids using drugs?"
"What kind of drugs?"
"How do you feel about that?"


KIDs


PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE AMERICA
PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE FLORDA
c/o Bush Chismark and Associates, Inc.
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"Why do you think kids get
involved with drugs?"
"How do other kids deal with peer
pressure to use drugs? Which ap-
proaches make sense to you?"
S"Have you talked about any of this
in school?"
However you get into the subject,
Early to start. it's important to state exactly how
strongly you feel about it.
Not in threatening tones. But in matter-of-
fact, unmistakably clear language:
"Drugs are a way of hurting yourself."
"Drugs take all the promise of being young
and destroy it."
'I love you too much to see you throw your
life down the drain."
SOME DO'S AND DON'T.
The do's are as simple as speaking from the
heart.
The biggest don't is don't do all the talking.
If you listen to your kids really listen and read
between the lines you'll learn a lot about what
they think.' About drugs. About themselves.
About the world. And about you. They'll also
feel heard and that, too, is a step along the path
towards self esteem.
There are other do's and don't: Don't threat-
en. Don't badger them. Don't put your kid on
the spot by asking directly if he or she has ever
tried drugs. They'll probably lie which under-
mines your whole conversation.
If you suspect your child is on drugs there
are all sorts of symptoms that's a different
matter. Then you've got to confront the subject
directly. (This will be another ad in this contin-
uing series.)
In the meantime, just talk to them.
It's okay if you don't know much about drugs.
Your kids do.
But they need to know how you feel about
the subject.
And whether you care.
For more information on how to talk with your kids
about drugs, ask for a free copy of "A Parent's Guide to
Prevention." Call 1 -800-624-0100.






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005
















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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 18, 2005


Sports


Coach Reports Results Of


Recent JCHS Track Meets


~RAN HUNT
taff Writer

JCHS Coach Harry Jacobs re-
ports the results of the Tigers most
recent track meets.
- In the Madison Invitational, Rob-


ert Nealy took first place in shot
put with 45 feet, six inches and first
in discus with 114 feet.

In the long jump, the boys didn't
place, but Jonathan Dady went 21
feet, eight inches; Darrell Young
went 20 feet, 11 inches; and Fred-


die Scott went 20 feet, 11 1/2-
inches.
In the 100 high hurdles, Dady
took first place, and Tremaine
Parker took second.
Young took second place in the
100 meters with 11.2 seconds; Des-
rick Jones took third with 11.3 sec-
onds.
Scott took second place in the
400 meters with 54 seconds; and
the team took first place in the 4 x
400 with 43.5 seconds.
Dady took first place in the 30,0
low hurdles with 42.1 seconds;
Parker took second with 43 sec-
onds; Jones had a time of 23.4 sec-
onds in the 200 meters; and Young
had a time of 23.3 seconds.
The boys finished first in the 4 x
400 with a time of 34.5 seconds.:
Dady finished first in the high
hurdles with 14.6 seconds; Parker
finished second with 15.0 seconds;
Jimmy Sloan had 10.5 seconds in
the 100; Dady had a time of 10.2.
Darin Mills had a time of 5:20 in
the 1600; and James Shiver had a,.
time of 5:28. The 4 x 100 team


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Warrior JVs fell to a 2-6 season
after losing their last two games.
When the Warriors faced off
against Brookwood they suffered
a 9-3 loss.
Coach Daryl Adams explained
the loss: Warriors were winning
going into the sixth inning so he
put a lot of his nonstarters in and
they ended up giving up six un-
damed runs.
S Casey Anderson went one for
three; Kyle Barnwell, one for four;
Dianiel Greene, two for three; and
Elliott Lewis, one for three and one
run.
SWill Hartsfield went two for
three, scored one run; Casey
Wheeler went one for three, scored
ohe run; and Michael Kinsey, two
f6r three.
N


Barnwell pitched the entire game,
striking out five batters, and giving
up eight hits and three walks.
When the Warriors faced off
against Madison, they lost 9-4.
"We just can't seem to get it all
together," said Adams. "Either we
have good offense and bad defense
in a game, or we have bad offense
and good defense. We just can't
seem to get our heads together on
it."
Anderson scored one run and had
one walk; Barnwell went one for
three, had one RBI; Rob Searcy
went one for three, scored one run;
and Stephen Dollar had one walk,
scored one run.
Hartsfield went one for three and
had one double and one RBI, and
Greene scored one run.
Dollar pitched the entire game,
striking out four batters and giving
up five hits and four walks.


took second place; and the 4 x 400
team took first place.
Freddie Scott had a time of 53.3
seconds in the 400; Jones had 54.6
seconds; and Parker had a time of
43.6 seconds in the 300 hurdles.
The girl's track team finished in
first pace overall during the meet.
Coach Harry Jacobs said, "The
girl's track team has been doing a
very good job this year."
In the 100 meter Irene Hamilton
took first place with 13.2 seconds;
Rashon Miller took second with
13.3; and Shanice Brooks took
third with 13.7 seconds.
In the 200 meter Miller took first;
Hamilton took second; and Krystal
Wilson took third.

In the 100 meter hurdle and the
300 meter hurdle Mills took first
place in the 400 meter.
Wilson took first place and
Alexia Huggins took second, in the
4 x 100 relay; Hamilton, Wilson,
Huggins, and Miller took first
place, in the shot put.
Chelsea Hampton took first
place, Ceata Crumity took second
and Michelle Allen took third and
.in the discus.
During-the Forbes Relay, the
Lad, Tigers took second place
overall as a team over five other


teams.
In shot put, Hampton took second
place; Crumity took third; and Al-
len took fourth.
In the discus Hampton took
second; Crumity took third; and Al-
len took fourth.
In the 100 meter, Shatoria Men-
chan took fourth place; Santana
Mitchell took third; and Shakelia
Davis took fifth place.
In the 100 hurdles, Mills took
second place. In the 200 meter Wil-
son took third; and Qauaneshia
Franklin took fourth.
In the 400 meter Wilson took sec-
ond and Huggins took third. In the
long jump Wilson took second and
Franklin took fourth, and in the tri-
ple jump Wilson took second place.
In the 300 meter hurdle Mills
took second place; and in the 4 x
400 relay Huggins, Mitchell, Men-
chan and Wilson took third place.
In the FAMU Invitational, Ham-
ilton took third place in the 100
meter; Shaumese Massey, Huggins,
Brooks and Hamilton took third
place in the 4 x 400; Brooks took
fourth in the 40 meter; and Mills
took third place.
Chandra Tucker took fourth in
the 100 meter hurdle.
Massey placed sixth, and Frank-


lin placed tenth in the long jump;
Massey placed seventh in the triple
jump; Hampton came in fifth in
shot put; and Crumity came in sixth
and Hampton finished fifth in the
discus; and Crumity finished in
sixth place.
The next meet will be hosted here
for the boys and girls teams 3:30
p.m., Thursday.
Pfo



"
^^a^:. Jt --*.
'T *w -


TREMAINE PARKER won 2nd
place 100 high hurdles in
Madison Invitational. (News
Photo)


Simply Smashing Wins

4 Of 6 Recent Matches


ERAN HUNT
Staff Writer
-.For the first time since joining thd
"A" league, Simply Smashing la-
cies tennis team, lived up to their
iiames winning four of six matches
last week against the Killeam
Lucky Stars.,
IThe wins broughthe ladies up to
third from last in the rankings.
where they had been standing'in
lpst place.
; "Our goal is to not finish last,"
s.id captain Patty Hardy. "We
need to hold on to our ranking and
start playing better."
STeam #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie
Brock won the first set, 6-1; lost the
second, 0-6 and came back to win
the tie breaker, 6-2.
Team #2, Maxi Miller and Patty
Hardy, lost their sets, 0-6 and 3-6.
;Team #3, Paula Joiner and Cindy
Wainright won their sets, 7-6 and
-7-5.
STeam #4, Trisha Wirick and
Laura Phillips-Kirchhoff won their
fets, 6-2 and6-3.
S Team #5, Judy 'Faircloth, and
Jennifer Ellis, lost the first set, 2-6;
won the second, 6-3; and lost the
tie breaker, 2-6. .
;Team #6, Angle Delvecchio and
Susan Scarboro won their sets, 6-0
and 6-1.
The ladies go up against the


Tigers Lose

To Rickards
The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team lost
tQ Rickards 9-4, last week.
Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
tliat the game wasactually one of
the Tigers better played games. It
was hard fought and pretty well-
matched until the sixth inning when
the Tigers lost their attention in the
game and the pitching dissipated.
S"We suffered five runs mostly on
walks and wild pitched," he added.
"And we only had few defensive
errors."
Major contributors to the game
were Markyce Larry who went
three for four, had two doubles, one
single, two stolen bases, one run;
Scotty Norton went two for three,
had two singles, one stolen base;
Clark Latson went one for four and
scored one run; and Dionte High-
tower went one for four.


Glen Arvin "Aces" Thursday, 9:30
a.m. at Tom Brown Park.
"Hopefully it won't rain us out,"
said hardy. "I think we stand an-
other good chance of winning."
After that match, the ladies will
have two weeks off for Spring
Break.



Church TO
Host Fish Fry

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Steward Board of the Be- ,
thel AME Church will host a fund-
raising fish fry 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
April 9 from. 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.

'Dinners are $6 and include
mullet, baked beans, coleslaw and
bread. Funds raised will go toward
the church operations fund.
The church is located at 410 E.
York Street. For further informa-
tion, call Thomas Saunders at 997-
2450.

Homes
(Continued From Page 6)
Friday, March 18, 2005 at Greater
Fellowship MB Church,
Monticello, FL, with burial at Tur-
key Scratch Cemetery in Monticello,
FL.
Her survivors include her Motler,
Fawnisha Wade, Her sister; Karish
Wade, a brother; Jalan Wade, Her
Grandparents; James and Carolyn
Wade, Her paternal Grandparents;
Leroy Frazier and Carolyn Wilker-
son, Her Great Grandparents, and a
host of other Relatives and Friends.


Protect

Your Douh

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inflation with the new Series
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Call 1-800-4US BOND for
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Jv warriors Lose


Two Recent Games


L-1 1
lI SSA N.. .NNISSSA
. .. Mi -.


II





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 11


--- -- --- -- --- -- -- --- --- -- -- ---- ------ -- -- --- -- -- --- -- --


WE


K


RI


A


'05


You've Come To A Place Of Open

Spaces And Beauty. Enjoy Our

V Corner Of The World!


4


Ride Smart Ride Safely
i,


I .
I-




Monticello Days Inn
Highway 19 at 1-10 -
997-5988 i *


I


Hope You Enjoy Bic
ic
Your Stay in Monticello

Be:

IW
Dr. Artis Johnson and Staff T
Jefferson County Adult School
& Jefferson County Opportunity School
342-0140 E l M
Water Street, Monticello
I
Irrrrrrrdrr llrrrr---


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Be Safe


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Welcome to
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Corner of Dogwood St.
and
North Jefferson
997-1990


Welcome tour
Beautiful Town

Farmers
erandt
Merchants Bank


997-2591

o-Ll'~


Bicyclists Welcome
To Our Small Town




Of Monticello
.--- -----------,
I Buy a regular 6" and 22oz I
I Drink and get a second [
S regular 6" free
L-------- ------ ----- --- -J


555 ~ North Jefficrson Str*cc ollti(..cllo


clists Welcome to
Our
autiful Historical


Town
rendy's Exxon


'ravel


)N


Center
S. Highway
(Just past I-10)
997-9628


850-997-2511


Our AMledical Staff7 includes:
James T Brown,lr, M.D.
Jacquelvn A. Davis, M.D.
,.'Ao /,'ai/ahble:
H omen lietalth ServicI
Outpatient Rehabilitation Sret'-es

^c


Sat: 8:0(0 .V\I 12:00 NON()\
or all appoiiliticlnt. Call 850-997-25 11.
rho, 11. a,,l. Ph" ~oI;,~I Ph" '1,,i


19


Welcome Cyclists


Welcome
Cyclists
to
Jefferson County
I a 1 I



County Judge
Robert Plaines


:


---


I


?rB-l i:~
~kt






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005
1 a aaa aa aaa aaa aa aaa aa aaa aaa aa a -a -a --a-------0------------- aa a a b a a a a


WE


K


'05


We're Proud Of Ou Town And Are

Happy You'll Be Spending Time

With Us


Have A Great Time
In Our Town


Farm Bureau
Ins.

Freddie Pitts


Agency Manager


Welcome to our
Great Small Town

Branch Street
FUNERAL HOME,


I 997-2024 I
THOMAS GRIlFIN
licensed Fuenral Director 750 Branch
KATHI SLOAN HANSBERRY n
Licensed Funeral Director Monticello


105 W. Andrew Srreet. Nloiniello, Florida
997-2213
Helping You Is \What \" e 1) Best |


Ride Safely






. Pizza Hut
1403 S. Jefferson St.
997-8533


(Circa 1890)


Welcome
to
Monticello
Be Safe
Register's
Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah 1/


Hwy.


US


Avera-Clarke


4 Mile off
S19 South


997-2535


Welcome

Bike Florida

2005

Little Angels In Training
Head Center 997-5656
Annex 997-5676
Enjoy our town


House


Bed & Breakfast and
Special Occasions

Welcome to our Home Town


580 W. Washington St. (Hwy 90)
Monticello, FL www.


(850)997-5007
bnb.carrieann.net


Reservations Required


INC.
(850) 379-3700 1
P.O. Box 216.
Hosford, FL
:| W E-mail: aphillips(,vmsom.con, 620 Y
IB WXVV.' \Ill'UIIIS l M Ut11

Welcome Bike 2005
Hope you enjoy
our town
-jI Ia a I I Ia a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a ----- -


Ride Smart

A..L. fallfunerafDirector Inc.
aUlmM/ Fuiera/ -( Home/
ork Street, Monticello, Fl. 32345
997-5553


BICYCLING


Hope You Have
A Wonderful Stay
In Monticello

S'lfHI HOME
I -4 rFURrNISHINGS
1317 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, Fl.
342-3201


"\ -.. *l,'-
/~i i,
^"K (


i~_






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 13
______________ -1 .


229-228-0555 15757 US Hwv 19N Thomasville, GA


O YOll


Fff f: r-.-

gfS4u 2006

003 CHEVROLET TAHOE
.'riA LT, Rear Ait; 3rd Row, Leather


2005 TOYOTA CAMRY
LE, Roof, Auto
i~5 iGC YUKON 5 2-005 CHEVYTRAILBLA;



3rd Row Seat. Rear Air 'r Rear.Air: 3rd Row Seat

TTRa 23'TOj~Ifi wfiHLAN


S D\. -6. 41lov Iheels
Angn gof


DEN


A \uto. All Power, Certifid -,i

2004 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER.



CD.. Auro. Power Pkg.
ef' yl s aga's 1 E


003 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
- ^- --,, ,










iAll Poi ..r- Auto Alo vItheEsA

HOMOR TAURUS'
tf.'













Sr lloy l-b Auto. All Powe'r I
S2002 C ONDA CRVETT



' -, .A io. A.tll Power .I


^ ":!


.A/ Power SE-R Edition. 175HP Coup'. 6 Spd.

0fPONTIACGRAND PR 3-''-i- N350I R r --Z'' I


lawto ii -Sea
Leather. Roof. All PollEr i #1 Selling Sport, Car! orAir. 3rdRowSe

ea!0hiRDrPERoE1 .41DPoE wer


2001 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER



1-6, Certifi/ .All Powe'r

,2002 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
ii illI llir fial i


7 3rd Roiw cat. Rear Air. Leather -






Certtiied, Auto. LE

2003 TOV r -CAM Y Pie



Certified. Leather. Aulo .






I.AIltO. 3r d Row Seat. All Power
.. Im fifflu


2005FORD PEDITION



Rear .ir, 3rd Roi, 5eat. \LT. Leathel'

S2004 TYOTA SEQUOIA

-.' .. .-. ,. .

rCertitifid, SR5, 3rd Row Stat, Rear ,ir

2002 OLDSMOBILE ALERO


S Auto. CD. All Power -

2005 NISSAN ALTIMA



- -- .... .
S uito. 2.55. Poir PA.
," ;2001 TO NNA I
oa
2X


ICeinfied. 3rd Row Seat. Rear Air :

1 PONTIAC MONTANA l
ria A


7K ,tliles. Certified


15757 IU


Elu;


.IA
PpH G


PKingCab.A/Power.4Ar2 l II rI ,1 ow. SS Pci, r R Eat.RRar Air

bile .Alro-l 12 mo. at $99.'ino. and then 60 reinamlint payments at 239'iro. Pi'nirc oar.: or Illuttnoraio O ul/Y'


IASVILLE TOYOTA

I 229.228-0555
I.AR.lfe TOYOTA


114 H'O A VCC


!


"II


~. s
gC4 I
T`r


0 ww ww EWNWE


I .








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY. THE BANK, an
Alabama banking corporation, Plaintiff,
vs. JEFFERSON POWER, L.C. and
BESCO, INC. Defendant. NOTICE OF
SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment and
Foreclosure dated the 28th day of

S The First Step

STo Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


LEGAL NOTICE

February, 2005, entered on Case No.
04-341-CA in the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit of the State of
Florida, in and for Jefferson County,
Florida, wherein The Bank is Plaintiff,
and Jefferson Power, L.C. and Besco, Inc.,
are Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the North Door
of the Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock on
the 31st day of March, 2005, the following
described property situated in Jefferson
County, Florida, and set forth in said final
judgment and foreclosure, to-wit:
Commence at a concrete monument set at
the intersection of the South boundary of
the North half of Section 12, Township 1
North, Range 4 East, Jefferson County,
Florida and the West right-of-way line of
US 19 and run East 877.10 feet along said
half section line to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, said point being on the
center line of the Old Pinhook Road and
on the North right-of-way line of a .100
foot Florida Power Line Easement, said
point being 1293.8 feet East of the


LEGAL NOTICE

Southwest Corner of the Northeast
Quarter of Section 12; thence North 2
degrees 05 minutes East 800.0 feet along
said Pinhook Road to a point; thence East
544.86 feet to a point; thence South 2
degrees 05 minutes West 800.00 feet to a
point on the North Boundary of the
aforementioned power line easement and
the South boundary of the North half of
Section 12; thence West 544.86 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING. Being a part of
the Northeast Quater of Section 12, 1
North, Range 4 East, Jefferson County,
Florida (the "Property"). WITNESS my
hand and the official seal of this
Honorable Court, on this 28th day of
February, 2005. In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities Act, persons
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should
contact the Clerk of Circuit Court,
Jefferson County, not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding at Telephone
850-342-0218. Clerk of Circuit Court By
Jeri B. Pearson, Deputy Clerk.
3/11,18


LEGAL NOTICE
DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children,
etc. Only one signature required!
Excludes govt. Fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-2000, ext. 600. (8am-7pm)
Divorce Tech. Established 1977.
3/18, fcan
Notice of Auction to the Highest Bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been seized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit A3
Marsha Jones Household goods; Auction
Date: March 26, 2005 at 10:00 A.M. at
Register Mini Storage 315 Waukeenah
Hwy. Monticello Florida.
3/11,18


HELP WANTED
Veterinary Hospital seeking part time
help. Must have caring, professional
attitude. Front office experience a plus.
Flexible hours; must be willing to work
some Saturdays. Apply in person, or send


HELP WANTED
resume to: Veterinary Associates, 1599
North Jefferson, Monticello.
No Phone Calls Please.
3/16 tfn.
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
3/18, fcan
POSTAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE!!
Federal, State, Local. $14.00-$48.00+hr.
No Experience necessary. Paid Training
and Full Benefits. Entry Levels. Call 7
days for information. (888)826-2513
ext.111.
3/18 fcan
Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
.and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MORE PAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
3/18, fcan


HELP WANTED
Wanted: Experienced Duct Mechanic and
Service Technician. Excellent pay and
Benefits available. Valid driver's license a
must. Apply in Person at 3015 Nathan
Lane, Tallahassee.
33/18,23,25,30 chg.
Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers
Needed Now! Run SE Only or SE,
Mid-Atl, MW Regional, O/O's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel
(866)250-4292.
3/18, fcan
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com.
3/18, fcan
Yard Handyman for Professional Office
SPaid Weekly
Please call 997-8111
3/18,23,25,30, chg.
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


Interior Exterior
JON
WILSON


Residential & Commercial

Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.

Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


f


*Sand
*Top Soil

Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


1830 Th
Tpllahas
(850)
(800:
Fre
Tallah;
Fu


;. g/ 0/'J


Allyn Sikes
Owner


omasville Road
ssee, FL 32303
)224-3473
541-8702
e Delivery To
assee Hospitals &
mineral Homes


;Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa &'Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D. O.H Lic.
#SR0971265


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. I Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


DANNY'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING ALL OF'YOUR' .
ti PAINTANDB Ns bk '-" i"'


S997-15E60
765 E. WASHINGTON S:


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T TARTER
M.


r.


Aj
V
I Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing


*Removal
*Maintenance


*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hoggirg

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Register's

Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah
Hwy.

1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


I -' -


D.L.'S


GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Loans ,
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682


Jamie's Body Works


Group Fitness



All Classes taught by Jamie
Cichon Rogers,

.Certified Personal Trainer and
Group Fitness Instructor.

Call 997-4253


Appliance

Service

of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


r


850-997-6023


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOUr'

997-6500

WHEN YOU NEED 1-O SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
REALTOR SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
(850) 997-4340 DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UPCADLS
S- ISTALLRTIONS COJSULArTIONS
www.TimPea ry.com CUSTOM COMwPUTERS' UIoA
www.TimPea ry.com REMOVAL Of VIRUSES, AWARE, SPYWARE


i I-
Kayak
Longhorn
Grizzly



A



Ice 4u
Free


10
$.99
$1.19
$1.59


-t


Copenhag
Ice 4# .60

very nice s
r-shirts Chri
$3.99 e;

B .60, 8LB
Crystal Lighter
man


Chevron

+ tx Timberwolf $1.99 + tx
+ tx Red Seal $2.89 + tx
- tx Kodiak $4.41 + tx
gen $4.58 + tx
, 8# .93, 20# .2.25 + tx

selection and good quality
stian, Florida and others
ach or 3 for $10 + tx
,93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Sw/carton purchases. We accept all
nlfitlorpr'c recoon


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389 z 9!
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Got an idea?


Have a concern':


Gene Hall

F. County Commissioner



(850) 321-6673 (cell)
or
ghallboard@yahoo.com


SI U I


DAY'S TREE
&
TRACTOR SERVICE

Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal
Mowing,
-^L Bush Hogging
fi nHarrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots
For Free Estimates
Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


RE.L GOOD P.ANTr
RE.L GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
I. Gnlln .Milumumi

342-3288


L,ocall Glass C-omipany

MAiD -iQ


Accepted by All Insurance
Companies
NO INSURANCE?
We'll find you a windshield at
a reasonable price!
We Install Quality
624 Range Si.

464-2500
973-4527


Border 2 Border

Allhhg


La%%n & Landscaping


r Mention This
Ad & Receive
A 10%
L Discount

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE

Rough-sal\n Oaks.
Cherry, Pecan, and
Pine available.

Also Plainning Available
-,-


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-5808
850-545-9964
850-251-2911

155 JOHN

COLLINS lR).


- lir -L- Ii


- II -I~- L I


- I


I .a.7-


I


I


I mom


I


imms


-- -


r


I I


I


- ~- I cir


I' I __ I I I


1 I


I I I -


. f I I -- r ,


-4-


s r. -r


1 -


I


cI country Mile'i


I .


I


-


[Ul.It LUIL


~~ee~~,








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 15


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Coinmnunity Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines. Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...7,00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


NOTICE

/s Stress Ruining Your Life? Read
IANETICS by Ron L. Hubbard Call
-813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianatic's,
102 N. Havana Ave., Tampa FI 33607.
/18, fcan
LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake
lacid, FL 11 AM, Sat., Mar 26 443.9+/-
'otal Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
previeww: 1-5 PM, Sat., March 19 Call for
details : (800)257-4161 Higgenbotham
-iuctioneers www.higgenbotham.com ME
.iggenbotham, CAI Fl Lic
IAU305/AB158.
/18, fcan


SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing Work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates -
551-2000
1/7,14,21,28,2/4 11,,18,25,3/4,11,18,25, pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
EARN YOUR DEGREE Online from
home. Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available, job placement assistance, and
computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.
3/18, fcan

Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home' Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
1958. Call for a free Brochure!
1-800-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
3/2,4,9,11,16,18,23,25,30
$ CASH ADVANCES $ Personal Injury
Lawsuits-Structured Settlements -
Annuities-Pensions-Inheritances-Lottery-P
rize Winnings We Buy Mortgage, Real
Estate, Business notes. Se Habla Espanol.
Jerry (866)767-2270.
3/18 fcan
Loans By Phone. Up to $1000 in 24hrs. No
Credit Check! Bank Account Reg.
(888)350-3722 www.paychecktoday.com
3/18 fcan

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
3/18, fcan
$$$$$ Weekly Use eBay to get Paid. Get
$250 in FREE products to Start No
Inventory Required Training Provided
Call Online Supplier For More Info
(800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.
3/18, fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
(800)836-3464#BO2428.
3/18, fcan
INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY!!!
Looking for a few exceptional people to
make an above average income. Call
(800)489-8930.
3/18 fcan
AUTOMOTIVE

1991 OLDSMOBILE ELITE GOOD
CONDITION, $2,500.,Call 997-3080
3/16,18 pd.
Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn


GARAGE SALE

COMMUNITY of Courthouse FLEA
MARKET Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions
Club and held at the U-Haul Sales &
Storage Warehouse located at 7337-A Old
Lloyd Road from 8am-4pm. on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
997-1754. Donations appreciated.
3/4,11,18,25, pd.

FOR RENT
Booth rental space for stylist available at
the Retreat Salon and Day Spa, Madison.
Incentives for both new and established
stylists. Contact Linda 251-4828.
3/11,18 pd.


Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26, tfn,c

3 Bedroom 1 Bath' with Storage Shed
$650.00 Month Plus Deposit. Call
997-8295 or 352-514-7103.
3/4,9,11,16,18, pd.

Rustic 1 Bedroom Cabin. Completely
furnished including Amenities Located on
4 Acres At end of Dirt Road only 6 miles
to Monticello & 25 to Tallahassee, Electric
& Satellite TV included $750.00 a month +
Sec. deposit 6 month minimum lease. Call
342-1324 Lv. Mess.
% tfn

FOR SALE
Jenn-Aire Drop-in Range with / Extra's,
(Down Draft) $399.
Amana, 25 Cu. Ft. Side by Side, Excellent
Condition, Ice/Water in Door. $399. Call
(850)997-4350 if not in leave name and
number.
3/9,11,18,25, pd

Bed, King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic, $295 can
deliver 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn

Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name .brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Couch & Love seat: Brand new, still
packaged, w/ warranty. Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china
cabinet, can deliver. $3K list, sell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

PIONEER BUILDING SALE! "Rock
Bottom Prices!" Beat Next Price Increase.
Go direct/save. 20x26. 25x30. 30x40 30x44.
35x50. 40x60. 45x90. 50x100. 60x180.
Others. Pioneer (800)668-5422.
3/18 fcan

Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine Steel
Master Buildings factory direct at HUGE
Savings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50, Perfect
Garage/Workshop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. ww.SteelMasterUSA.com.
3/18 fcan

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE 50+ Premium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limited time offer.
S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
3/18 fcan

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person
Spa-Loaded! Includes cover, delivery &
warranty. $2999, was $5999.
(888)397-3529.
3/18 fcan
ST. PATTY'S RV SALE! March
17th-20th. Nation's #1 Selling RV's! Low
Sale Prices! Giant Recreation World *
Melbourne- (800)700-1021. Orlando-
(800)654-8475. Daytona- (800)668-5422.
3/18 fcan

BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Retail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 tfn


FOR SALE

Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K,
5th-Wheel, Fiberglass 3-slideouts. Priced
for quick sale. Book Price, 997-5441
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11,16,18 pd.

Church Mahogany Bald win Piano with
Seat 1,000.00 or best offer.
Call 850-997-4104 leave message.
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PAGE 16, MONTICELLO,(FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 18, 2005

'Swamp Gravy' On Stage In

Thomasville For One Night


Don't miss the train to Thomas-
ville's Municipal Auditorium to ex-
perience a one night only showing
of "Swamp Gravy," Georgia's Offi-
cial Folk Life Play.
The Thomasville Music and
Drama Troupe will host this cele-
brated musical play, with proceeds
to benefit the Troupe, 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday, March 31.
This single performance is subti-
tled "Down at the Depot."
General Admission is $15 at or-
chestra level, $10 balcony, with
tickets available 'at ihe Mbniicillo


GA's own train depot.
Audience members will travel
along with two young men who
"hop a freight" for a short train ride,
but end up traveling all over south
Georgia.
The characters they meet along the
way are sure to delight all who "git
on board."
Now in its 12th year, "Swamp
Gravy," sponsored by the Colquitt
Miller Arts Council, has received
critical and national acclaim for
crating a new genre of theatre--
:Cofmmunity Performance--literally


Chamber of Commerce, or at the putting Colquitt, GA on the map.
box office, one hour before curtain. Each year stories are collected
from the residents of Miller Counrn'
"Swamp Gravy is a play that is and the surrounding area. This
sure to entertain audiences of all unique form of "theatrical storytel-
ages and backgrounds, as the cast ling" has become the hallmark of
ells stories that focus on Colquitt, "Swamp Gravy."

* **w** *** *********
* *. *

S$1000 REWARD ;

* : r '* I. \ 1 1 .., ]
For any information leading to
the recovery of the stolen i
4 Wheeler at New Leaf Farms ,
onMn nday night. (3-14-05) *
* *
SDescription: Realtree Camo Colored
* Bombardier 400; *
* li.* ...
SCall Peter Rossi with any

* i: information. *
*: ;' NoQuesions Asked. .. :'

j 997-8188 *
* :* ; .... ,, .
* ***** ** ** **** *** ** ** *


Local playwright Debra Jones puts
the stories into a script form, weav-
ing a storyline that celebrates a cul-
ture that is uniquely rural South
Georgia.
Through the stories and events


,resident at Washington DC's Ken-
nedy Center, and at the Olympic
Games in Atlanta.
The show has been featured and
critically praised in such national
publications as "USA Today,"
"Southern Living," "Drama
Review," and "American Theatre."
"Swamp Gravy" has also become
famous for its music--a unique
blend of traditional favorites and
original new songs especially writ-
L1 f101 cs -1,I va-- r 1 us- o---- 1--1


ten tor each show by various local
from local history, each play ex-; artists.
plores universal themes, such as The musical score features
The musical score features
family, community, love and death. uniquely Southern musical nl
uniquely Southern musical influ-
Audiences, young and old, love
A fences, young and od, love ences, such as Gospel, Negro Spin-
the show's "down home" Southetr i
he ho o hom ouh tuals, Blue Grass, Fold, Country,
brand of humor. Blues, and Jazz.
Blues, and Jazz.
In recent years, "Swamp Gravy "Blues an.az
In recent years, "Swamp Gravy"i- This music makes it especially ap-
has been presented for' the Vice-


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propriate for the Thomasville Music
and Drama Troupe to partner with a
similar production company show-
casing local talent.
Maghan Malloy, of Monticello,
performs with the Troupe, often as a
featured soloist.
Winnie Allen, who serves as Mu-
sic and Drama Troupe Show Coor-
dinator, along with her husband,
Fred, Troupe Director, is enthusias-


tic about the collaboration she
shares.
The show's cast of more than 60
is made up of volunteers form
Colquitt and surrounding communi-
ties, acting under the direction of
professional directors, musicians,
choreographers, lighting designers,
and stage managers, who come form
across the country.


Calico Spring

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Saturday 9:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. ~ 4:00 p.m.

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