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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00021
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 16, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00021
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text








Eliminate Threat
Of Electrical
Fire

Editorial, Page 4


LI.ARY OP FLORIDA HISTORY
4C4 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611

Luminaria Bags
At Relay Will
Be Personalized

Story, Page 6
E II


Azalea Circle
Learns To

Create Vases

Story, Page 10


Stubbs Music
Group Performs
For Legislators

Story, Photo, Page 14


Wednesday Morning
I


Montic


137TH YEAR NO.23, 50 CENTS


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY,. MARCH 16, 2005


County Commission's Action


Raises Ire Of Planning


"I feel like we've been done a disservice
for the commission to appoint a committee
to circumvent what we have been doing
here for years,"
Planner Bud Wheeler

"I thought we advertised so people would
come before us, not wait until the process
is finished,"
Planner Wendy Moss

"Gentlemen, we can't deny anyone to have
input into our process,"
Commissioner Skeet Joyner






Issue Of Allen's


Comes Up Again


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The issue of Allen's Liquors --
antd its alleged disturbance of area
residents with its noise nmking ---
has once again come up before the
City Council.
Rather than Police Chief David
Frisby bringing up the issue, how-
ever, this time it was Mayor Julie
Conley.
"e been getting calls at all
hours of the night for the last six
weeks," Conley said. "Apparently,
they're (Allen's) not complying
with ourrequirements."
Conley said she had encouraged
the residents who had called her
house to attend the council meeting
and voice their complaints. 'But
looking around the council chamber,*
she could see that no one had taken
her advice, she said.
"People are afraid of retaliation,"
Conlev said.
Frisb reminded the council that
it had had an opportunity to close
down Allen's Liquors more than a
year agb and it had chosen not to do
so.
He was referring to his request in
November, 2003, that the council
revoke the establishment's occupa-
tional license. Instead, the council
chose to negotiate an agreement that
called, among other things, for the
neighborhood bar to install security
and for the police department to
monitor the situation.


At the time of the hearing, one
area resident spoke out against the
bar, while several others spoke in
support of it.
Following implementation, of the
agreement, Frisby began making
monthly reports to the council,
based on his officers monitoring'of
the bar.
Those reports fluctuated over
time, in terms of the progress Frisby
ascribed to the bar in complying
with the city's requirements.
But in October of last year,
Frisby reported that he was satisfied
the business was finally in compli-
ance.
"In the last three months, Mr. Al-
len has been compliant," Frisby told
the council. "He has had security
and has been issuing no trespassing
notices. Mr. Allen knows how to be-
have and how to keep his place
quiet. He has done it the last three
months." '
As far as the mayor's reported
complaints, Frisby said he was un-
aware of any such complaints. He'
said every time his officers visited
the area, the noise was at a reason-
able level. It could well be that the
noise level went up after his officers
left, but barring people coming for-
ward and making a complaint, there
was little he could do.
"We don't hear complaints from
the area," Frisby said. "The leader-
ship has been painfully lacking."
"Well, I've brought it up," Conley
said. "I don't know what else to do.
It's a quality of life issue."


Body


Boards To Meet Jointly

TO Resolve Differences


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A proposal made to the Planning
Commission by a steering commit-
tee made up of developers and real-
tors got off to a rocky start Thursday
night.
Instead of discussing the proposal,
which .seeks to mitigate, the plan-
ners' own proposal to do away with
the five-lot exemption, the planners
questioned the committee's makeup,
its alleged circumvention of the
process, and the County Commis-
sion's very appointment of the com-
mittee.
But first, a step back in time is
necessary, to explain the circum-
stances that led to the Planning
Commission's recommendation to
do away with the five-lot exemption
and the "steering committee's"
counter proposal.
A rule that has been on the books
since the formulation of the Com-
prehensive Plan in the early 90s, the
five-lot exemption essentially re-i
moves from planners' review those
subdivisions that are composed of
five lots or less.
SAs a consequence, according to
planners, what has happened over
the years is that many such subdivi-
sions have grown haphazardly, with
little or no standards applied for
roads, drainage and culverts, among
other things.
Not only does the upkeep of these
substandard roads put a burden on
the county, planners say, but often
they are the recipients of the wrath
Sof neighboring property owners,
who question how and why the sub-
divisions got approved in the first
place.
"It makes us look stupid when we
say we don't know," Planner Bill
Tellefsen said. "I don't want to be
put in the position of looking stupid
because we didn't know what was
going on. There's a lot of things that
need to be addressed and they're not


addressed if the project is
exempted."
Another problem, planners say, is
that some people abuse the provi-
sion by developing large parcels
piecemeal -- five acres at a time --
thus evading a formal review.
The planners' solution is to elimi-
nate the exemption -- one of numer-
ous recommendations they make in
the revised Development Code, a
document that has been bouncing
back and forth between planners and
commissioners going on four years
now.
It was at the point that commis-
sioners again began reviewing the
planners' recommendation -- with
ja' eye to. finally adopting the re-
vised document -- that the realtors
and developers entered the picture.
Concerned about the proposed
elimination, which realtors and de-
velopers say will make small devel-
opments cost prohibitive, Doug
Wainright asked commissioners to
be allowed to come up with an alter-
native to the planners' recommenda-
tion.
As Commission Chairman Skeet
Joyner explained it to the planners
Thursday night, the commission had
no say in the makeup of the commit-
tee. But as upholders of democratic
principles, commissioners had no
choice but to allow the input, he
said.
"Gentlemen, we can't deny any-
one to have input into our process,"
Joyner said, countering planners'
accusation that commissioners es-
sentially had helped circumvent the
process by soliciting the committee's
recommendation. "We had no input
into the forming of the committee.
But in a democratic process, we
have to allow all input."
'Planner Wendy Moss was the first
to express concern about the com-
mittee's makeup.
While personally acquainted with
each of the committee members and
appreciative of their individual in-
(See Commissioners' Page 12)


Police Department Gets FDLE Grant


: The Monticello Police Depart-
ment has been awarded a $990 grant
:from the Florda Department of Law
Enforcement.
Police Chief David Frisby in-
formed the City Council of the
FDLE award at the last council
meeting. He said the money is ear-
marked for officers' overtime in the


investigation of crimes.
Although the $990 would not go
far and would not make up for the
loss of the department's other over-
time grant, Frisby said the money
would help nonetheless.
The council approved acceptance
Sof the grant without discussion.


MAYOR JULIE CONLEY recently attended a meeting in
Madison that consisted of female mayors from surrounding
small communities. Among the topics the group discussed
were economic'development and downtown revitalization.
Conley says the meeting helped the mayors realize that
they share common problems and need to work together
for regional solution. (News Photo)


DOUG WAINRIGHT, right, chaired a committee composed
of realtors and developers that came up with an alternative
to the Planning Commission's recommendation. Here
Wainright talks with Planning Commission Attorney Scott
Shirley. (News Photo)


WENDY MOSS, a member of the Planning Commission,
took issue with the committee's makeup, as well as with
the alleged end run the group made around the planners to
get' its agenda before the County Commission. Here she
-talks with Commissioner Danny Monroe. (News Photo)


4 Female Mayors


Share Experiences


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Mayor Julie Conley is stepping
out and finding common ground
with mayors of similar sized com-
munities in the area.
Make that women mayors of simi-
lar sized communities, although the
emphasis on the female part of the
equation is not supposed to bar their
male counterparts from participating
in the process, should they desire to
do so.
"We're not discriminating against
any man who wants to buy our
lunch," Conley said tongue-in-
cheek.
Be that as it may, Conley recently
met with Mayor Ernestine Kinsey of
Lee; Mayor Myra Valentine of
Madison; Mayor Pam Seagle of
Perry; and Nan Brown of Tallahas-
see, a legislative and funding spe-


cialist with a reported wealth of
information on government funding
sources.
Conley attributed the idea of the
meeting to Valentine, who is report-
edly impressed by the number of fe-
male mayors in the area.
"She has been trying to get us to-
gether for some time," Conley said.
One outcome of the luncheon,
she said, was the participants' ap-
preciation of the many issues that
small communities share.
"All of us realize that the issues
we face in small communities are
similar," Conley said. "Our deci-
sions have impact outside the geo-
graphic boundaries of our
communities. We realize that we
have to think more regionally when:
we make decisions."
Among the issues the group dis-
cussed were revitalization of the
downtown area -- which Madison
(See Mayors, Page 3)


I


COr








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005


2 Cyclists Will Begin


385 Mile Ride Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


BANNERS welcoming cyclists for Bike Flor- and a similar one flies downtown on North
ida were erected in the City last week. Ban- Jefferson Street. (News Photo)
ner shown is on West Washington Street,


Bike Florida Weekend Events

Include Food, Entertainment


macaroni salad, fruit salad and de-
FRAN HUNT sert from 5:30,7:30 p.m., for $6.
Staff Writer Other Saturday lunches include the
Jefferson County Historical Asso-
Preparations continue for the up--ciation's gumbo, rolls and iced tea


coming Bike Florida Weekend,
scheduled for March 18 and 19.
Many local businesses are partici-
pating, some staying open for spe-
cial or extended hours and some of-
fering a wide variety of food and en-
tertainment .
Courtyard Cafe will be open from
'6 a.m. until 8:30 p.m., featuring
breakfast, lunch and dinner buffets
along with an open menu, Friday
and Saturday.
Rare Door will also be open both
days, from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m., fea-
turing breakfast, lunch and dinner
menus.
LaConcha will be open Friday,
from 7 a.m., featuring Cuban spe-
cialties all day and Christ Episcopal
Church will be offering a spaghetti
dinner for $6, from 5-7:30 p.m., also
on Friday.
Avera-Clarke House will be of-
fering a barbecue pork sandwich
dinner with French fries and dessert
for $6, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday.
Saturday, the Avera-Clarke House
will offer grilled hamburgers with
chips and brownie for lunch, at $6,
and a smoked chicken dinner with


at the Wirick-Simmons House from
11 a.m. until 2 p.m. for $6; First
United Methodist Church chili with
all of the trimmings from 10 a.m.
until 2 p.m. for $5; and First Pres-
byterian Church Jambalaya from
11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. for $4.50.
American Legion Post 49 will be
hosting a fried grouper dinner with
all the trimmings from 4:30-6 p.m.
behind the old high school for $8;
and Altrusa of Monticello will be
hosting a biergarten at the Opera
House beginning at 3 p.m., featuring
domestic beer, wine and light snacks
and the possibility of live entertain-
ment.
Available weekend entertainment
includes: the famous haunted history
tours by the Big Bend Ghost Track-
ers, Friday and Saturday for $10.
Tours are at 7 and 9 p.m. and tick-
ets will be available at the Chamber
of Commerce all day both days.
Friday, the Monticello Country
Jamboree will be performing blue
grass, country and gospel music at
the American Legion Hall from 7-
11 p.m., with donations accepted;
and the Opera House will be pre-


senting "Melon Patch Follies," an
old-time Vaudeville Revue' at 8 p.m.
Adult tickets are $12., members and
seniors, $10 and students, $5.
Saturday entertainment will in-
clude: an art show at Jefferson Arts,
Inc., from 10 a.m.-6 p.m., no admis-
sjon; County Historical Association
tours of the Wirick-Simmons House
from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. for $3; and
a shortened version of the Melon
Patch Follies 3 p.m, at the Opera
House, for $5 for adults and $3 for
students.

Scholarship

Available Here
Local students are invited to.apply
for scholarships through "Drive
Your Future: The Mercedes-Benz
USA Scholarship Program."
Supported by Mercedes-Benz
dealers nationwide, $1 million has
been committed to the program in
2005, and 500 students will receive
a one time $2,000 scholarship.
Students can access the website:
www.mbusa.com/drivefuture to
learn more about the program and to
access' application materials. Appli-
cation deadline in March 31, with_
winners to be announced in May,
2005.


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT
CHANGES

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA,
PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING
FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN, BY AMENDING POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL
AREAS OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT;
PROVIDING ADDITIONAL PERMISSIBLE LAND USES
IN AREAS DESIGNATED AGRICULTURAL;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


Jefferson County proposes to adopt text changes in the Comprehensive Plan
for the agriculture 20, agriculture 5, and agriculture 3, land use
classifications that will add agricultural related activities, outdoor recreation,
bed and breakfast inns, and hunting lodges and clubs as land uses allowed by
ordinance in Comprehensive Plan Amendment 95-01. All of the agriculture
areas of Jefferson County are included in the proposed changes. See map
below:


















JEFFERSON COUNTY



A public hearing on the ordinance will be held on April 21, 2005 at 6:00
p.m. at the courtroom of the county courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highways 90 and 19.


The Bike Florida 2005; Red Hills-
To The Sea tour scheduled for this
weekend, is a seven day, fully-
supported bicycle and tent camping
tour which will pedal between 315-
385 miles among along the rolling
hills and along the beautiful Gulf
Coast of the Florida Panhandle.
This year's ride will begin and
end in Monticello and cyclists will
ride between 45-75 miles per day,
with no shorter routes available.
There will be a century option
one day and a lay over day mid-
week with an optional ride of up to'
45 miles.
Saturday, the cyclists will ride
12-40 miles around Monticello.
Sunday, they go a distance of 68
miles from Monticello to Quincy,
and Monday they will ride 55 miles
from Quincy to Blountstown.
Tuesday, cyclists will ride 75-100
miles from Blountstown to Apala-
chicola.
Wednesday will be the layover
day with a distance of between 0-
45 miles.
Thursday, they pedal a distance
of 55 miles from Apalachicola to
Sopchoppy.
Friday, the cyclists ride 60 miles
from Sopchoppy back to Monti-
cello.
While in Monticello, cyclists will
have opportunities to relax, partici-
pate in various activities and enjoy
the Monticello cuisine and laid-
back lifestyle.
The tour is leisurely paced, but
challenging and is designed to be a
fun and relaxing vacation for cy-
clists of all ages. It is for the adven-


Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'

in State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00





SGet Your Annual
Subscription Today!


turous and hardy.
Some local park facilities and
school grounds will be used along
the route for tent camping, with
Port-o-lets and shower trucks.


NOTICE

The Water Committee of the Monticello City Council
will Meet on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 at 10:00 a.m.
to discuss possible water main extensions.

The meeting will take place at City Hall, 245 S. Muberry
Street, Monticello, Florida


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Ask about the guaranteed ride home program.
I III


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAND USE
CHANGES


AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA,
PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY
AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP; RE-
DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 55 ACRES FROM AGRICULTURAL 5
TO RESIDENTIAL 1 ON THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR INCORPORATION INTO
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


Jefferson County proposes to adopt the following land use change by
ordinance Comprehensive Plan Amendment 95-01. The land use map
change proposed is from Agriculture 5 to Residential 1 for the area on the
map below.

























A public hearing on the ordinance will be held on April 21, 2005 at 6:00
p.m. at the courtroom of the county courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highways 90 and 19.


"


m































JACQUELINE HUGHES, Pampered Chef
Consultant, explains the ease of using the


Pampered Chef Sl

Raises Funds For

Library Programs


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
A Pamperd Chef Kitchenware
Show, benefiting the County Li-
brary, was held at the Library Satur-
day.
Consultant Jacqueline Hughes


demonstrated the
the variety of item
chopped, and dic
food items used ii
from the Pamperec

The microwave
that she demonstr
handy and most u


Staff Writer

Am-Iercarn Legion Post 49 earned-
its 100 percent membership ribbon
and were congratulated by Post
Commander Ron Slik at last week's
meeting.
The Black Ribbon was added to
the collection of past years' ribbons
atop the flagpole.
The Post was also given a leirlher-
bound nioebook, which in turn was
passed on to member John Hr, nIciV.'
for his dedication and hard work to
the memrber- hip drive. The Post has
92 members.
Slik awarded certificates of recog-
nition to Gerald G. Jouhison. aind
Charlie Mercer, for 60( Contirmui.us


I -i
m *:


:".:', -.3
'-r
-^
.


micro cooker to guest Debby Dumais, at the
library fundraiser, Saturday. (News Photo)



ho iw a selection of knives and sharpeners,
glass bowls, metal utensils, decora-
tive serving dishes and. trays, and
classic stoneware for perfect, even
cooking.
The proceeds from this fundraising
event will be used for the Summer
ease and care of Reading Program, put on by the Li-
as for sale. She brary every summer for the
ced, and scraped, children. It will be used to purchase
n recipes prepared prizes, crafts, and the like.
d Chef cookbooks. Many from the community at-
tended the event and enjoyed tasty
e cookware items morsels of prepared dips, desserts,
ated proved to be appetizers, and chocolate candy,
seful. She brought along with fresh fruits and chips to
"dip" with.
It proved to be a fun way to sup-
port the Library and to purchase
S some handy aids to cook with or to
I use in the kitchen.
Orders will continue to be taken
and home demonstrations will con-
S tinVe to be scheduled through
.?: Friday, March 26, for those inter-
S ested in helping the Library. Cata-
-~ : logs can be picked up at the Library
S during Library hours.
"Every little bit will help with the
Library Summer Program," ,com-
ments Library Director Linda Hum-
edani.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005 PAGE 3




HOLY WEEK


Community Worship

Services

at First Presbyterian Church

Sponsored by The Ministerial Association


MONDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. David Hodges
Special Music: Rebekah Aman
Speaker: Rev. Dr. Mark Ashworth


TUESDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. Carl Hanks
Special Music: Edna Eleazer
Speaker: Rev. Howard Adams


WEDNESDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. John Dodson
Special Music: Sissy Kilpatrick
Speaker: Rev. Ron Cichon


THURSDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. Twana Edwards
Special Music: Christina Young
Speaker: Rev. Thurmon Moore


FRIDAY
Worship Leader: Rev. Phillip Cook
Special Music: Mandy Self
Speaker: Rev. John Dodson

Joan Watson is organist for Holy Week services and Nancy Banks is pianist

Lunch offered Monday Through Thursday in the church fellowship hall.
Cost is $5 with proceeds going to the' Historical Society.



., ..'.: .':* _;-'ITM-a~ g-~MaW;'Am Ma~t-,l'Swa


The awards read: "Issued in
grateful appreciation for faithful and
dedicated allegiance to the ideals of
the American Legion."
Guest Speaker was Tom
Wallace, Enrollment Representative
for Universal Healthcare.
He spoke about the Medicare
Masterpiece Plan and it's Advantage
Plan, and compared it with other
plans.
A Pot Luck dinner was served,
followed by a cake, in celebration of
the Legion's 87th Birthday.
Members have planned a Grouper
Fry 5-7 p.m. Saturday, at the Legion
Hall. They have enough Grouper for
140 servings at a cost of $8 each.


Troop 803 Earns

Ribbons At Jamboree


FAANN HUNT
Staff Writer

Boy Scouts Troop 803 placed
third over the weekend during the
annual jamboree, hosted at George
Carswell's Hay Pond.
Of the approximately 167 partici-
pating scouts, Troop 803 had 10,
who brought home a total of 11 rib-
bons for the rroo'p.
Placing third in night time orien-
teering (using a map and compass)
was Larry Blake and Tyler Mur-
dock.
Placing third in the bucket bri-
gade was Phillip Payne and Mur-
dock and placing first in daytime
orienteering was Blake, Cody Bell
and Murdock.
Troop 803 took first, second and
third place in rope climbing,
Holden last name unknown) took
first, DamianJohnson took second
and Tyler Lacy took third place.


Wining second place in the Dutch
oven cook-off was Blake, Murdock
and Bell, placing first in the Dutch
oven dessert was Stevie Wydell and
Johnson, winning third place in fire
starting with a flint steel was Bell
and Murdock.
Taking third place in the three-
man carry was Johnson, Payne and
White.


Mayors
(Continued From Page 1)
has done successfully -- and the lack
of adequate parking spaces, which
Conley said appears to be a more
common problem in small commu-
nities than one would think.
She said the group plans to con-
tinue meeting quarterly if at all pos-
sible.


TOM WALLACE, enrollment representative for Universal
Healthcare, spoke to the American Legion Post 49 Ladies
Auxiliary about the Medicare Masterpiece Plan, at a recent
meeting. (News Photo)


Post 49 Awarded


Membership Ribbon
Years with, the American Legion
DEBBIE SNAPP Post 49.


U-


''










:-".,



1.








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

'E MEMBR RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Eliminate Threat


Of Electrical Fire


Eliminating the top electrical
safety hazards could help prevent
40,000 electrical fires and hundreds
of injuries and deaths annually, ac-
cording to the Electrical Safety
Foundation International (ESFI).
Data from the U.S. Consumer
Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
indicates that the top electrical
safety hazards include electrical
fires caused by aging wiring and
misuse of surge suppressers and
electrocutions from wiring systems
and large appliances.
S"While many of these electrical
hazards can be eliminated, we often
'fail to take steps to avoid injury,"
Michael G. Clendenin, executive di-
rector of ESFI noted. Electrical
safety tips include:
I Your appliances and equipment
;should be approved by an independ-
lent testing laboratory, such as Un-
,derwriters Laboratories (UL), Cana-
idian Standards Association (CSA)
for ETL-SEMKO (ETL),. .
Use appliances and equipment
'according to manufacturer's instruc-
'tions.
Replace damaged electrical
:equipment or take it to an authorized
repair center. Replace frayed cords,
broken plugs or cracks, which are
hazards; cut and throw out damaged




From Our

TEN YEARS AGO
March 22, 1995
As expected, two proposed
changes to the Comprehensive Plan
L-- one relating to the Truss Plant in
ILloyd and the other to the Jefferson
Nursing Center on US 19 North --
generated their share of objections
kvhen the County Commission took
'them up for consideration Thursday
night.
S The School Board recently ap-
proved an application for a $60,000
community Juvenile Justice Part-
nership Grant.
The fund is to provide for a com-
bination of disciplinary
alternative/youth services dropout
preventionn program. The On Track
program provides educational serv-
ces for students 10-17 years of age
who are on indefinite suspension.

-TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 20,1985
After nearly two agonizing hours
of studying seven redistricting plans,
the county commissioners decided
o submit three plans to the judge.
State Sen. Bill Grant will be the
guest speaker at the Monticellb Ro-
Jary Club meeting Friday, at the Ca-
ri Restaurant, according to club
president, Tim Peary.
I To celebrate their second annual
inner, the Monticello Players, their
friends and guests, will meet at
gentley's Lake House on Friday,
UIarch 29.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 20, 1975
State Comptroller Gerald Lewis
warned today the untold millions of
public dollars are being wasted be-
icause of insufficient safeguards on
tthe expenditure of state funds.
i,


cords.
Use ground fault circuit inter-
rupter (GFCI) protection to avoid
shock when working where water is
near electricity, such as your
kitchen, laundry room, bathroom or
outdoors.
When using a generator, plug
appliances directly into the genera-
tor or use a heavy duty outdoorrated
extension cord, free of cuts and
tears, with a three-prong plug.
Never plug the generator into a
wall outlet, a dangerous practice
known as backfeeding. If you must
connect the generator to house wir-
ing, have a qualified electrician in-
stall a power transfer switch in
accordance with local electrical
codes.
Use licensed electrical inspec-
tors to check wiring in homes over
40 years old or those with major
renovations. Flickering or dimming
lights can be signs of problems.
Install a new electrical safety de-
vice'- an arc fault circuit interrupter
(AFCI) to stop electrical arcs,
which cause fires. Arcs are not de-
tected by most breakers and fuses.
Use power strips and surge sup-
pressers designed to handle the
loads for their intended use. Avoid
overloading circuits by plugging too
many items into one outlet. (NAPS)




Files

Lewis, in office only two months,
said he :plans to accentuate his of-
fice's responsibility to audit all state
expenditures before they are made.
Jonathan Byrd, JCHS's high scor-
ing basketball star, and Horatio
Watkins, the Tigers' tenacious court
leader, recently brought more post
season honors to their team. Byrd
captured the Big Bend high school
scoring race with his 22.6 points per
game a erage, edging out Robert
McNealy of Greensboro. Byrd, a
5' 9" guard, totaled 430 points for
the season.

FORTY YEARS AGO
March 19,1965
Mr. And Mrs. Carr Settle and Miss
Sally Settle attended the Florida Cit-
rus Exposition and Press Breakfast
in Winter Haven over the weekend.
Mr. And Mrs. A.M. Patterson left
this week for their summer home in
Hiawassee, Ga.
Mrs. Summers Jarrett and sons,
David and Mark, of Pensacola spent
the weekend with her mother, Mrs.
Clyde Sauls.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 18, 1955
FSU's Dean's List included: Fran-
ces Neely, Stephen Walker, Nancy
Rainey, Hubert Clayton and Shirley
Cox.
The Coca-Cola Company, J.B.
Keen, owner presented new school
signs to the city.
- Nate Curtice arrived in Germany
to serve 18 months with the Army
Medical Corps.
Listed on the first semester "A"
honor roll were Dollie Brock, Curtie
Williams, Virgie Buzbee, Darlene
Delp, Frances Flewellen, Linda
Grambling, Peggy Wells, Pauline
McClellan, and Dorothy Mathers


From Our Photo File


KIWANIAN BILL GUNNELS presented the
Club's scholarship to JCHS Honor Graduate
Natalie Bragg, in June, 1988. L-R: Kiwanis


President Mark Raciappa, Gunnels, Bragg.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


'Oops' Moments Embarrassing


Life sure has its share of embar-
rassing moments. Few of us can
claim we haven't been embarrassed
by something we said or did or did-
n't do.
Key, I think, is how we handle
these things. Most often a little self
deprecating humor will ease the em-
barrassment.
I have my share of these moments
like the time I spotted my shirt in an
Italian restaurant and marched to the
restroom to try to remove the spot.
While working on my soiled shirt,
I heard what sounded like high heels
on the tiled floor and it occurred to
me I was in the Ladies Room.
I quickly shut the water off in the
sink and headed for the door and
back to my table. As I passed by, a
woman nudged her husband and
'said, "He's the one."
Years ago I was walking out of the
Dade County Courthouse when I
saw my car being driven from the
parking lot. I ran over to a cop,'
shouted and pointed, "somebody's
stealing my car." He grabbed his ra-


Publisher's

Notebook


'.4'

Kt-


,Ron Cicfon


dio and gave the tag number to the
dispatcher.
When I calmed down and looked
at the parking lot again, I realized
my car was right where I parked it.
So I went back over to the cop and
said, "Oops, I made a mistake."
Then there was the time I took one
of my. young daughters with me to
the store. I had been so accustomed
to holding the hands of both of my
daughters when we were out, that,
after my purchase, I reached down


and grabbed the hand of a little girl
and with my daughter on one side
and the stranger on the other headed
for the car.
When I got to the door I looked at
that little girl and went running back
to find her mother.
The mother had a good sense of
humor and immediately put me at
ease. I've screwed up with babies
complimenting a parent on the
pretty girl when, in fact, it was a
boy.


I've muffed names I should know
or stumbled over a name I couldn't
recall. I've said Freddie when I
meant Eddie and Sally when I meant
Dolly.
these things, did you? Ha!
I'm afraid embarrassment is uni-
versal and we've all had our share.
Tomorrow may bring more of it.
And, it may not be a good idea to,,
laugh at some body else's embar-,
rassing moments 'cause we will.
probably be next to commit a faux
pas.
pretty klutzy and they leave a trail,.
of broken or rearranged stuff in their
wake.
They can't help it that they are.
_lymsy. .
,,;, should we laugh at 'em?.
Nope, not me. .
I'm the guy who spilled his salad;
on a friend's mother when she ,
reached out to hug me.
The good news is I apologized,
she said it was okay and we're still
friends.
Spilled salad, not withstanding!


Poverty Boosts Islamic Terror


called mudaraba that financed a
BY STEVEN SCHLOSSSTEIN traveling merchant who agreed to
join a caravan. The partners split the
"How can the march of history fa- profits of the short-term venture and
vor the Islamic agenda if that then had to dissolve it when the
agenda has been repeatedly frus- caravan completed its run.
treated for Second, the succession system
ridical scholar Timur Kuran in a re-_spelled out in the Qu'ran limited the
cent monograph titled The Islamic partners' flexibility when one of
Dead End. "And why should anyone them died. To continue their busi-
believe in the viability of Islam's ness, they had to create new limited
economic agenda if its proponents partnerships. Islamic law did not
cannot cite a single contemporary permit individual partners to be-
example of its successful implemen- queath ownership of a mudaraba to
station family members or friends and thus
Dr. Kuran has written at length perpetuate its life.
about the constraints inherent in Is- Third, the mudaraba was poorly
lamic development. While Islamic, suited to large and longer-lasting
partnerships may have suited the business ventures like stock compa-
needs of the caravan trade quite well nies that were being incorporated
on the 10th century, they soon be- under commercial law in Europe at
came a source of serious economic the time. These new organizations
disadvantage, morphed into quite large trading en-
There were three primary reasons, terprises like the Dutch and English
for economic decline in the Middle East India Companies; they were
East, all related to internal contra- publicly listed and attracted large
dictions under Islamic law. First, numbers of passive investors.
commercial partnerships consisting Over time, starting around the
of two or three individuals or fami-- 16th century in Antwerp, specialized
lies formed single-purpose ventures markets emerged for the shares of


these big companies that formed the
beginnings of today's stock ex-
changes, as commercial and finan-
cial techniques became more com-
.plex and sophisticated. But this
transformation bypassed the Islamic
world, and the absence of institu-
tional change in the Middle East
was apparent even before the Ren-
aissance.
Once the Dutch, and the English
after them, mastered the art of build-
ing fleets of ocean-going ships that
discovered new and distant markets
in the Far East, they could bypass
the Arabs' overland caravan trade,
which soon shriveled up and died.
Waterborne transportation was not
only cheaper but safer than the de-
sert caravans, where the Islamic mu-
daraba were unable to adapt and
grow as global trade expanded.
The high-speed economies of East
Asia, on the other hand, have none
of the limitations imposed by relig-
ion. Confucianism and Buddhism
are completely role-neutral where
economic strategy is concerned and
pose no constraints on firm size,


laws governing inheritance, or long-
term economic development strate-
gies. Directly contradicting the
western concept of original sin,
Confucianism created the concept of
original virtue. The little dragons of,
East Asia never had to suffer
through the separation of church and
state because they were never joined
at the hip to start with.
In 1963, when I left undergraduate
school, half of Singapore's popula-
tion of 1.6 million people lived in
squatter huts and fewer than ten per
cent owned flats in public housing
estates. By 1996, Singapore had be-
come an "advanced developing
country;" its standard of living was
on a par with Switzerland.
In 1963, average per capital in-
come in the 22 countries of the Arab
world was higher than the per capital
income of South Korea. Today, it is
half that if Korea, which is now the
11th largest industrial economy in
the world.
Even worse, during the past
twenty years, growth in per capital
(See Poverty, Page 5)


Putin's Actions Suspicious


BY JAMES P. HILTON
Columnist

It has been mere months since-
George W. Bush reassured the
whole world that he had looked
deeply into ex-KGB agent Vladimir
Putin's blue eyes and stared into the
"soul" of a man he felt sure could be
trusted. Funny that.
Now fast forward and witness
Russia publically slapping us across
the face, first by snubbing President
Bush's legitimate condemnation for
very real democratic reform slip-
page (but then in the era of the Pa-


triot Act, who are we to criticize?)
And again, by formally signing an
agreement to supply nuclear fuel to
"axis of evil" member, Iran. Fear
not; it's only for "energy" purposes
they said, attempting to quell the fu-
ror. Yeah right!
Additionally thanks to this ad-
ministration's cowboy foreign pol-
icy we now have either strained dip-
lomatic relations or weakened trade
ties with scores of previously
friendly nations and important allies
like France and Canada.
Add to this disheartening mix a
sinking dollar, record breaking debt,
and a draining war with no end in


sight and it all spells for America
growing isolationism which could
easily manifest into a genuine crises
(as opposed to the artificially cre-
ated variety).
Furthermore, it has been revealed
just weeks ago, that under Mr.
Putin's leadership Russia is now of-
ficially conducting joint military
training exercises with none other
than the world's other sleeping to-
talitarian giant, Communist China.
Every American ought take pause
to consider the ominous implica-
tions of this and other newly forged
global alliances.
When the world's second most


powerful nuclear nation suddenly
joins forces with by far the world's
largest land army, a light needs to
begin flashing.
This is especially true at a time
when America is preoccupied at war
and steering a sharp right turn to-
wards nationalism / isolationism.
Prudence dictates that someone had
better take notice.
Judging from recent world events,
other nations have not only noticed,
but are in fact paying very close at-
tention. It is no stretch to say that
America's competitors and adver-
(See Putin, Page 5)


L Is


I ~s~srW -r







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005 PAGE 5


JEANNE DARIOTIS CEO Southeastern Community Blood
Center spoke to Kiwanians Wednesday about the impor-
tance of donating blood, and requirements for same.
(News Photo)


JCHS Class Of 1955

Reunion Set Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Jefferson County-
High School graduating class of
1955 met Thursday to finalize the
plans for their 50th reunion, sched-
uled at Malloy's Nursery Saturday.
The celebration will begin at 3
p.m. at the old JCHS campus where
classmates will have an opportunity
to tour the building and see the pro-



Poverty
(Continued From Page 4)
income for Arabs at 0.5 percent per
year has been the lowest in the
world except for sub-Saharan
Africa. At this rate,, it will take the
average Arab 150 years to double
his or her income compared to about
ten years for the average Korean.
The high-performing little dragons
like Singapore and Korea can sup-
ply more useful strategies for mod-
ernization while protecting valu-'
able historical traditions than either
the United States or Europe, given
the widespread hostility that charac-
terizes the Arab world's relation-
ships with the West.
But in order for effective strate-
gies to take root and flourish, Islam
must first confront the demon that.
leaves it paralyzed: separation of
church and state. Visionary leaders
like Ahmed Nazif, Egypt's new
prime minister, and Recep Tayyip
Erdogan. prime minister of Turkey.-
understand Islam's internal contra-
dictions.
Turkey disestablished Islam in
1923 and has 80 years of experience
as a secular Muslim state. Prime
Minister, Erdogan's Justice and De-
velopment Party achieved control of
the National Assembly in 2002. It is
poised to create the kind of "soft
authoritarian" stability that has long
characterized Singapore an Japan. In
his previous post as minister of
Technology into his country's
mosques, libraries, and schools.
The future of the Middle East is
inextricably linked to courageous,
contrarian, and visionary leaders
like Erdogan and Nazif, not to the
Arab world's autocrats, tyrants, or
repressive rulers, regardless of their
sycophantic relationships with
Washington.
Our preoccupation with the region
today revolves around oil, Islamic
terror, and the transplantation of de-
mocracy. Economic development
has all but been overlooked. But if
the underlying conditions of pro-
very, illiteracy, and underdevelop-
meit cannot be eliminated, the
threat from the supply side of Is-
lamic terror will continue to grow
unimpeded.
Put another way, either the failed
Muslim economies of the Arab
world learn to create more jobs for
heir overpopulated pool of under-
educated and unemployed males, or
they will continue to create more
suicide martyrs, with violent and
predictable consequences.
The Middle East is locked in a
hostile death-dance with the West.
ere are critical lessons that the re-
-ion can learn from Singapore and
2eoul, not from the neoconservative
Washington consensus.
(Steven Schlossstein is author,
,.ost recently, of Endangered Spe-
-ies: Why Muslim Economies Fail
Stratford Books. March 2005). He
ives and works in Princeton, New
lersey.)


gress being made in the renovations,
and to relive old memories.
After the tour, members will re-
turn to Malloy's for a catered dinner
provided by Carrie Ann Tellefsen,
followed by more time to visit and
get reacquainted.
Class President Buddy Clark will
preside over a brief business meet-
ing to discuss further reunions and
to report any pertinent events that
have occurred over the last five
years.
Response to letters sent out earlier
in the year has been very promising
for a well-attendeq reunion, and
those on the planning committee are
enthusiastic about the upcoming
.event.


Sampling 0

Dates In Me
Each month, The National Well-
ness Institute, recongized by the
County Health Department, has a
series of observances assigned to
that particular month.
A sample of such observances
for the months of March and April
follows.
March is named as: American
Red Cross Month, Hemophilia
Month, National Colorectal Cancer
Awareness Month, National Kid-
ney Month, National Nutrition
Month, National Poison Prevention
Month, National Professional So-
cial Work Month, Save Your Vi-
sion Month, and Workplace Eye
Health and Safety Month.
In addition, several weeks dur-
ing March have been named as par-.
ticular health observances weeks.
These include: National Colle-
giate Health and Wellness Week,
March 8-12; National School
Breakfast Week, March 7-11; and
National Pulmonary Rehabilitation,
March, March 13-19.
Also, National Poison Prevention
- Week, March 20-26.
April has been designated for its
own share of health related obser-

Putin
(Continued From Page 4)
series are taking bold steps to encir-
cle us militarily and de-throne us
economically. Like a wild cat stalk-
ing it's prey, could they be lining us
up for the kill? '
It is time to wake up Mr.
President. When it concerns Russia
generally and Vladimir Putin spe-
cifically, you had better take
another, much harder look into those
cold blue eyes!


If Health Observance

)nths Of March, April
vances. during April have also been desig-
These include: National Alcohol nated for particular issues.
Awareness Month, National Cancer These include: Alcohol-Free
Control Month, National Child weekend, April 1-3; International
Abuse Prevention Month, National Building Safety Week, April 3-9;
Humor Month, National Minority National Public Health Week, April
Health & Health Disparities Month, 4-10 World Health Day, April 7;
4-10; World Health Day, April 7.
and National Occupational Therapy and Ntional Alcohol Screenin
Month. and National Alcohol Screening
Month.Day.
Alr n~~l i QnP-h


Also, Nationallil 3 iJ rsamily
Planning Awareness Month, Na-
tional Youth Sports Safety Month,
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Awareness Month, and Women's
Eye Health and Safety Month.
Some specific days and weeks


Also, Kick Butts Day, April 13;
International Moment of Laughter
Day, April 14; National Library
Week, April 10-16; National Vol-
unteer Week, April 17-23; and Na-
tional Minority Cancer Awareness
Week


Your Newspaper

Serving Your Community


National TV-Turnoff Week,
April 25- May 1; Earth Day, April
22; National Children Immuniza-
tion Week, April 24-30.
'Bear' Register
Earns Silver
Beaver Award
Recently, Trop 803 boy scout
leader "Bear" Register was
awarded with the Silver Beaver
Award.
When Register was contacted for
comment he was unaware of the re-
quirements are to earn the award.
"I do know that it's supposed to
be a top award," said Register. "I
was surprised that I even got it."
He added that he was nominated
for the award by Atty Buck Bird
and John Botcher.

To o A Y I- r r o r
1-i 15 FI RST \Vo 0 R D5
NOT BA D1 FOR
AN r x -N A, A R i r


iCa





Stroke can take away a lifetime
of speech and language skills.
*A certified speech-language
pathologist can help patients
find them again. For more on
stroke, contact the American
Speech-Language-Hearing
Association at 1-800-638-TALK
or visit www.asha.org.
SAMERICAN
SrfCH-ILANGUAIGE
HEAImNw
ASs:OIATION
't%" ANNIVERSARY


USDA


, United States Department of Agriculture





The Tobacco Transition Payment


Program (aSso called "Tobacco Buyout").




You've heard about it.


Now be a part of it.


This is it. The Federal tobacco marketing quota system is over. No more plant-
ing restrictions. No more marketing cards. No more price support loans.
Instead, the USDA's new Tobacco Transition Payment Program will provide
money to eligible tobacco quota holders and producers to help in this transi-
tion that ends the old system. But sign up now or you will not get a 2005 payment.


> Did you own a farm as of October 22, 2004, with a 2004 basic
marketing quota?

) Are you an owner, operator, landlord, tenant, or sharecropper who
shared in the risk of producing tobacco anytime between 2002 and
2004?

) Do you grow Flue-cured, Burley, Fire-cured, Dark air-cured, Virginia
sun-cured, or Cigar filler/binder tobacco?


Please sign up between March 14, 2005, and June 17, 2005,

at your local USDA Service Center.


Call 1-866-887-0140 or visit http://offices.usda.gov
to find your local county Service Center.


Farm Service Agency

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer


~ --


I _
r --


mu u .













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16,2005


Lifestyle


I I--


4-Hers Attend Public

Speaking Workshop


4-H WORKSHOP was held at the Extension Nikki Bai
Office recently, featuring presentation of row L-R:
Ippics. Participants include: L-R: Ya'Tyra BrandonV
Howard and Delysia Davis. 2nd row, L-R:


Luminaria Bags TO


Be More Personal


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SThis year's Luminaria Ceremony,
at the Relay for Life, is planned to
be unique and especially meaningful,
Everyone has a reason to "Relay
For Life," as we have all been
touched by cancer. Either' we have
lbst a loved one to cancer, or we
lnow a friend, coworker, family
member, or maybe even yourself.
Everyone has a story to tell, relates
Joyce Steele, luminaria chairperson.
This year, instead of just writing
oh the Luminaria bags a name under
'!'r memory otf or "In honor of,"
they are offering the option of deco-
raring the bags as the donor sees fit.
A picture can be glued to the bag,
or a poem, or a special drawing.
: "I have a Luminaria that I made in
honor of my dad, who lost his battle


Homes Of
t HENRY ORLANDO ALFORD
SHenry Orlando Alford. age 80, a
heavy equipment operator, passed
away Wednesday, March 9. 2005 at
ie Hospice House in Tallahassee,
Florida.
; Mr. Henry was a native of Alex
City, Alabama. A former resident on
Milton, Fl., he had made Monticello
fis home since 1972. He was of the
Baptist faith.
SA graveside service was held at
Ebenezer Cemetery on Friday,
March 11, 2005 at 1'la.m. Donations
1nay be made to: Ebenezer Baptist
Church Building Fund, S. Hwy. 19,
Monticello, Fl. 32344 or Big Bend
HIospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd,
Tallahassee, Fl. 32308.
, He is survived by: 1 son: Ronnie
Alford of Milton, Florida, 1 daugh-
iter: Wanda Faye Watts of Monti-
cello. Florida, 1 brother: Kayron
fordd of Montrose, Georgia, 2 sis-
ters. Conola Fuller of Alex City,
Alabama, Mary Mahan of Alex
Ci ty, Alabama.

SMARY LUCILLE BECKWITH
Mary Lucille Beckwith, age 93, a
homemaker, passed away March 13,
7095 in Thomasville, Georgia,
SMrs. Beckwith was a native of Jef-
ferson County, Florida, She lived all
her life in Monticello, Florida. She
Sas a member of Sardis Memorial
methodist Church.
i' Graveside services will be
Wednesdayy March 16, 2005 at
,ardis Church Cemetery at 2pm.
'Pamily will receive friends Tuesday,
March 15, 2005 from 6 'til 8pm at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel.
i She is survived by a sister: Ger-
tb-ude Smith of Perry, Fl. Several
pieces, nephews and many, many
friendss .
,' Donations may be made to Sardis
1Tlemorial Methodist Church, 10 Ra-
'con Rd. Monticello, Fl. 32344.
RUBY OTHAL PHILLIPS
Ru FULFORD
Ruby Othal Phillips Fulford, a
homemaker, age 81 passed away


with cancer at the age of 57. I have
our picture on it and a little letter on
the back," Steele said.
"My kids also made one for their
grandpa, and it's special from them
to him," she adds.
If the community is interested in
personalizing their Luminarias, drop
boxes have been placed around
town to "drop off' finished bags.
A few of the locations are: Jack-
son's Drug store,. The Courtyard
Cafe, and the Movie Gallery.
Luminarias can be purchased from
-any team member. They can also be
purchased at the Health Department
on Saturday, March 19 at the Hot
Dog Luncheon and Old Time Pho-
tos Relay' For Life.event. A.table
v.11l be set up for anyone interested
in personalizing their Luminaria.
The Luminarias are $5 each and
all the money raised goes directly to
The American Cancer Society.


Mourning
Saturday, March 12, 2005 in Tho-
masville, Georgia.
Mrs. Fulford was a native of Coal
Hill, Arkansas. She had lived in
Monticello since 1945 nmo ing here
from Arapaho, Oklahoma. She was
a member of Olive Baptist Church
where over the years she has been
very active as a Sunday School
teacher, a choir member and also
served as the church social director.
She was also co-owner of Fulford
Farms.
Her funeral service will be Thurs-
day, March 17, 2005 at 3pm at Ol-
ive Baptist Church in Monticello,
Florida. Interment will follow the
service at Olive Church Cemetery.
Family will receive friend's Wednes-
day, March 16, 2005 from 5:30 'til
8:30pm at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel.
She is survived by her husband of
61 years C.A. Fulford of Monticello.
Two sons: Bury Fulford and wife
Frieda of Monticello, Gary Fulford
and wife Pam of Montiecllo. Two
daughters: Patsy Fulford Reams and
husband Rev. Harold Reams of
Perry, Florida, Vivian Fulford Al-
britton and husband Re\. Lamar Al-
britton of Lakeland, Florida. One
brother, Hoyt Phillips and one sister
Frankie Hill, both of Clinton, Okla-
homa. She has 12 grandchildren and.
7 great-grand children.
JUSTIN KENDALL TUCKER
) Justin Kendall Tucker, age 18, a
recent high school graduate, passed
away March 13, 2005, in Havana,
Florida.
A native of Blountstown, Florida,
Justin had lived most of his life in
Monticello, Florida. He was of the
Baptist faith.
Funeral Services will be Wednes-
day, March 16, 2005 at 11 am at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel. Interment will follow the
service at Oakfield Cemetery. Fam-
ily received friends from 6 'til 8 at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel on Tuesday, March 15,
2005.
(See Homes, Page 10)


rrington and Angela Scurry. 3rd
Coordinator Gladys Neely and
Whitfield. (News Photo)


MITCHELL


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

County 4-Hers attended a Public
Speaking workshop last week, at the
Extension Office.
The workshop was aimed at 4-H
members who were planning to
present a demonstration/illustration
talk, at the 4-H County Events.
"Speaking to an audience can be
very intimidating," explained 4-H
Coordinator John Lilly, who taught
techniques of presenting an excel-
lent demonstration/illustration talk.
County Coordinator John Lilly
conducted a power point presenta-
tion and video. Both the presenta-
tion and the video were packed full
of tips that would help the students
with the preparation of their presen-
tati6ns and how to give a demon-
stration.
Posters from last year's County
Events were shown and discussed,
as students preparing for the differ-
ent categories this year took notes
and asked questions.
Students attending the Public
Speaking Workshop include:
Ya'Tyra H:,i ard, Delysia Davis,
Brandon Whitfield, Alana
Chambers, Alex Farmer, and Ar-
senio Bright.
Students planning Food Prepara-

IN LOVING MEMORY
Ruth Mitchell
March 13, 1938 Nov. 8, 2001
We miss you
From:
Your Husband, Harrison Mitchell,
Daughter Rosetta Atkins,
Grandchildren Jimarko Crumitie,
and Ta'Jiria Howard



^ t -, .- ;
!' 1 "

U. *

CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE BUOTE.


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March AprI 2005

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tion Demonstrations include: Janelle
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rington, Lena Odom, Kevin Hill.
Students at the event ranged in age
from 10 to 17. On hand to help an-
swer questions were Extension Of-
fice personnel Gladys Neely and
Heidi Copeland.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005 PAGE 7






SpringintoThe







Great Out oors





Why Own A Boat? "
Freedom Boat Club Offers:
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005


Spring into the





great outdoors


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA JV Girls Defeat


Madison, Undefeated 8-0


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JVs climbed to an
undefeated 8-0 season after edging
Madison Central, 10-9.
Coach Frank Brown called the
game a "real squeaker". "We Were
first at bat, got the first run and
they came back hard with a big
rally," said Brown. "They were up
on us by six runs."
He added that the Lady Warriors
did have a lot of errors on the field.


"That's one thing about my team,"
said Brown. "You can count on
them coming back when they have
to, and not giving up."
He added that Madison was a
well-disciplined team and they
knew what to do with the ball when
they had it, "They came to play,
and they did," said Brown.
He attributed the win to the ag-
gressive base stealing of the Lady
Warriors.
Both' teams were evenly
matched. ACA had eight stolen
bases,, 11 hits including nine sin-


ACA Girls Fall To


Riverspring 9-5


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


a practice ses-
Madison game.


warrior Boys


Undefeated 5-0


BILL BROWN

After taking the field three times
last week, the Aucilla Warriors
have a 5-0 record and 1-0 in
district.
On Tuesday, Maranatha came to
play at ACA as their field was too
wet.
ACA used five pitchers to record
a no-hitter. Glen Bishop pitched the
first inning,-, faced three batters,
struck out two, walked one and hit
one. Casey Gunnels faced three
batters in the second, striking out
all three, Chris Tuten pitched to
three batters in the third, striking
out two and Ridgely Plaines and
Drew Sherrod worked the fourth
and fifth innings, striking out three
batters each.
Offensively, ACA batters ac-
counted for 11 hits, led by Sherrod
who had a home run and two RBI
in three at bats. Gunnells went two
for four and stole three bases,
Tuten went one for one with a dou-
ble, Plaines went one for two and
Justin Payne went one for one.
Josh Holton went one for one
with one RBI, Chris Boykin went
two for two and Jim Stephens went
two for two with one RBI, game
winner in his first varsity appear-
ance.
Thursday saw the warriors travel-
ing to Quitman to face Brooks
County. When the seven-inning-
game ended, ACA racked up a 9-3


Dustin Roberts pitched the first
three innings, gave up three runs
ion three hits and struck out two.
Gunnels came on in the fourth and
fifth, gave up one hit and struck out
one, Tuten finished, striking out
two and giving up no hits .
Offensively, the Warriors plated
nine runs in nine hits, the big blow,
a grand-slam home run by Sherrod,
who also had a double in four at
bats. He was supported by Gun-
nells with two doubles and one RBI
in four plate appearances, Tuten
went one for three with one RBI
and Bishop had one double in four
at bats. Plaines, Daniel Roccanti
and Josh Carswell each had one hit.
The final game of the week saw
the Warriors returned home to face
district rival Munroe The seven-
inning game resulted in a 5-1 win
in the first district game of the year..
Sherrod pitched the first four in-
nings, exiting with a 3-1 led and
the win, his first of the year.
Plaines worked the last three in-
nings, striking out four and giving
up two runs,
ACA was out hit 5-4, butt he hits
came at the right time. Sherrod hit
safely twice and scored two runs,
Plaines hit safely once and drove in
one run and the other Warrior hit
was Bishop, who hit a double, scor-
ing two.
The next home games are on
Tuesday (today) and Thursday
-against Apalachicola and John Paul
Catholic, 4 p.m., respectively.


'Happy St.'Paddy's 'Day


Join Us For a


Corned 'Beef

&


Cabbage Dinner
Available Starting at 11:00 a.m.


1 S


.4 Tallahassee Tradition for Orer 25 Years


IL I I 386-718


/
First on the play), two stolen bases;
and Nicole Mathis went to bat four
times, had one single, two
strkeouts, one fly-out, one stolen


Lad) Warriors J\' toppled from base
their undefeated position last x eek Mallory Plaines went to the batters
when they lost to Riversprings, 9-5. box four times and scored one run,
They now stand at 8-1 season. smacked one triple, had one strike-
Coach Frank Brown said the two out and two ground-outs; and Lin-
teams were very evenly matched in sey Day went to bat four times,
the beginning of the game, running scored rtmo runs, had two singles,
neck and neck, first one team scor- one strikeout, one walk, four stolen
ing and then the other. bases.
"Both teams played hard ball." Paige Thurman went to bat three
said Brown. "But then in the middle times and had one single, one RBI,
of the game, they put in another one strikeout and one stolen base;
pitcher. We thought it was the sec- Tristen Sorensen went to bat three
ond string pitcher and come to find times, scored one run, hit two sin-
out, she was the first string pitcher gles, two RBI and stole three bases
and the best I have ever seen. and Hannah Sorensen went to bat
"She was extremely fast, x rsit) three times and had two strikeouts
pitchers don't have the speed she, and one ground-out.
did," Brown continued. "She was Katelyn Levine went to bat three
very fast apd we couldn't hit .ier times, had one strikeout, one walk
pitches, nothing more than tip-ups and one ground-out; and Erin Kelly
and outs. She was very accurate 3ind ent to bat three times, had one
could tihro.', those consistent RBI, two strikeouts., one
strikes." round-out.
He added that the Lady'Warroios Thurman pitched the entire game,
had a total of 11 strikeouts and most striking out three batters and giving
of them were due to Riversprings', up eight hits and one walk.


second pitcher.
Olivia Sorensen went to b1a four
times, scored one-run, had one-
strikeout, one walk, one fly-out (out
.on a pop-up), one ground-out (out at

ACA Tennis

Team Beats

NFC 6-1
The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team now stands at a
4-3 season record after trouncing
North Florida Christian, 6-1.
In singles action, Amanda Sapp
lost to Allsion Harte, -3-8; Court-
ney Connell beat Alex Harte, 8-3;
Kaitlin Jackson won over Kim
McClure, 8-2; and Rebekah Aman
blanked Christy Cribley, 8-0.
Elizabeth Shirley clobbered Var-
shime Shidar, 8-0; Ramsey Revell
beat Kaiare Griffin, 8-0; and Dana
Jane Watt won over Courtney
Black, 8-0.
In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell won over the Hartes, 8-4; and
Jackson and Caroline Mueller beat
McClure and Cribley, 8-2.


Lffa;


HMS Softball

Roster Told
Howard Middle School reports its
roster for the 2005 softball season.
There are 17 girls on the team.
These include: Ashley Allen, De-
vonna Arnold, Marissha Barrington
Chanta Brooks, Keneshia Coates,
Melissa Crumity, Jemaria Cuyler,
Ireshia Denson and India DeLoach.
Also, Shanka Farmer, Latoya
Footman, Majetta Jefferson, Am-
ber Kirkpatrick, Kaylynn Matthew,
Amanda Mitchell, Lena Odom and
Cardrecia Walker.
Working with the "Mighty Lady
Bumblebees" are Head Coach Cor-
Sinne Stephens and Assistant Coach
Hattie Ruth Jordan.

American Heart
Association.9^
Rghting Heart Disease
andStroke

A Call to Arms:
Check Blood
Pressure.


gles, two doubles, seven RBIs, four
walks and four strikeouts.
Madison had a total of 12 hits, in-
cluding seven singles, four doubles
and one triple, four RBIs, four sto-
len bases, two strikeouts and seven
walks.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat four
times, scored one run, one single
and one double, two RBIs, one sto-
len base and two ground-outs (out
at first); and Nicole Mathis went to
bat three times, scored two runs,
one single, two walks, four stolen
bases and two ground-outs.
Mallory Plaines went to the batter
box four times and scored one run,
one double,one strikeout, two


Capri Lounge


Is Having Karaoke Night
St Patrick's Day
Thursday 3/17/05
Come Join In-On the Fun.
Hwy 19 North
997-5712


' Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.









12 noon to 12 midnight


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LADY WARRIOR JV Lindsey Day shown at
sion, gave up 2 hits and 7 walks in the
(News Photo)


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ground-outs; Linsey Day went to
bat three times, scored one run,
three singles, two RBIs; and Paige
Thurman went to bat three times,
one run, one single, two RBIs and
two stolen bases.
Tristen Sorensen went to the bat-
ters box three times, scored one
run, one single, one strikeout and
one pop-out (out on a pop-fly);
and Hannah Sorensen went to bat
three times, had one RBI, one
strikeout, one pop-out, one ground-
out.
Katelyn Levine went to bat three
times and scored two runs, two sin-
gles, one walk, and one stolen base;
and Courtney Brasington went to
the batters box three times, scored
one run, one strikeout, one walk,
one stolen base, one ground-out.
Thurman pitched the first four in-
nings, striking out no batters and
giving up 10 hits and one walk.
Day pitched the fifth inning, strik-
ing out two batters and giving up
two hits, seven walks.


"" _,.- ,'=


I







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005


Lady Warriors Split

Recent Games
seven hits, three walks and no
FRAN HUNT strikeouts.
Staff Writer Lisa Bailey went two for three,


had two triples; Kerry Brasington,
two for three with one triple; Hobbs
went one for two, had one RBI, one
stolen base; and Jenny Tuten and
Kayla Gebhard each had ohe RBI.
Hobbs pitched the entire game,
striking out five batters and giving
up seven hits and three walks.


ROTARY Relay For Life Team Members
John Gehbard and Don Taylor cooked and
hot dogs and served cokes Saturday at one


of their weekly fundraisers. At Right Com-
missioner Gene Hall and son Travis enjoy
the food. (News Photo)


After splitting their last two
games, Lady Warriors are 6-3 sea-
son.
The ladies blanked Maranatha
17-0.
As a team, ACA had 11 hits, 10
walks and no errors.
Leaders in hitting include: Brit-
tany Hobbs who went two for two,
had two walks, two RBI; Shaye Ea-
son, two for two, two RBI; and
Chelsea Kinsey, one for three, one
triple and two RBI.
Hobbs and Bethany Saunders
pitched the perfect no-hitter game.
Hobbs struck out two batters and
,gave up no walks, no hits; and
- Saunders struck out three batters,
giving up two walks and no hits.
Lady Warriors lost to Florida
High 8-6.
As a team, ACA had three errors,


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Azalea Circle Leans To


Create Decorative Vases


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Azalea Garden Circle met
recently, at the home of hostess
Ardis White, who demonstrated
:how to decorate plain jars to use-as
vases.
Using coffee mixer straws, the
jars can be dressed up for a special
occasions, as-a gift, or for the
kitchen window sill.
The jar is covered with double
sided tape and the colorful straws
are added.
Straws can also be glued v. ith a
glue gun to the jars. Ribbon and a
bow is added for flare, and the vase
is ready to display an array of spring,
flowers.


White reported about the Monti-
cello Garden Club Board Meeting.
The club has filled the positions
of Secretary, Treasurer, and 2ncd
Vice President for the new year. The.
position of president has not yet
been filled.
White also said that there %kia a
.good showing of Club members to
the Arbor Day planting at the Oak-
field Cemetery.
The Board is still looking for
benches for the Cemetery, and the
City has asked for help in the Ceme-
tery landscaping.

White relates that Green Industries
had offered a Design Landscaping
Session free to Garden Club mem-
bers.


Homes Of Mourning


(Continued From" Page6) .
He is survived by his parents,
Georgia and Tamie Cosper bfMonti-
Cello, FL., and Donald Tucker of
Blountstown, FL.: Brothers, Dwight
Long of Tallahassee and Pete
Tucker of Blountstown. Sisters,
Bridgette Eades, Melody Cosper,
Chelsey Hopkins all of Monticello
and Salena Tucker of Blountstown.
Nieces, Brittany, Victoria. Madison
Kelley, and Savannah Tucker all of
Blountstown. Nephews, Joshua
Eades of NMonricello. Grandparents
Harold and Elizabeth Murph) of
Monticello. Several aunts and uncles
and a host of cousins.
He was pre-deceased by grandpar-
ents Cletter and James Tucker.
RICHARD ARTHUR "DICK"
SAUER
Richard Arthur; "Dick" Sauer, 58,
a long-time resident of Monticello,
Florida died Saturday, March 12,, af-
ter a brief battle with cancer. He was
the owner of Dick Sauer Builder,
LLC, built and designed numerous
custom homes; and was instrumen-
tal in many remodeling projects in
Jefferson County. All of his projects
were quality design and
construction, and his motto was
"building for the future and restor-
ing the past" Dick was a popular
chef for over 10 years for Jefferson
County Seminole Boosters
meetings. He planned and prepared
themed menus such as serving Gator
Tails before FSU/UF football
garAes. One of the community's fa-
vorite meals was his prime rib din-
ner served at the annual Bobby
Bowden Golf Tournament. Dick
was a Melbourne (Florida) High


School and Florida State LUnlersiry
graduate where he was a member of,
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. He
was a board member for the Jeffer-
son County Seminole Boosters for
10 years and a former Director of
the Jefferson County Humane Soci-
ety. He was also a member of the
FSU, Alumni Association, Tallahas-
see Dog Obedience Club, Tallahas-
see Hunting' Retriever Club, and
Lumber River Retriever Club.
A private family service was held
Sunday, March 13, 'presided over by
the Reverend Dr. Dick Bailar in the
Bavarian' Chapel at Mr. Bailar's
residence. A memorial service and
celebration of Dick's life will be
held on Sunday, April 24, 2005 for
family and friends.
Dick will be greatly missed by his
family and many friends, clients,
and business associates in the com-
munity.
Dick leaves behind his loving
wife, Mary Ann; daughter Christi
(Andy) Chilton of Cumming, Geor-
gia; son Dan Augustyniak of
Gainesville; mother Virginia Sauer
of Melbourne; sisters Jean Sauer
DeFrances of Boca Raton and Pat
Sauer of Cape Canaveral; nephew
Bryan (Tracey) DeFrances of Delray
Beach; grandchildren Caitlin and
Matthew Cuhlton and great grand,
nieces Jenna and Jamie DeFrances.
Dick was presided in death by his
father, Arthur W. Sauer.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorial contributions be
made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308, or the Eagle's Nest En-
dowment'Fund, 1023 Main Avenue,
'Monticello, FL 32344.


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In related news, a Course I
Flower Show school will be held in
Tallahassee on Oct. 3-5, and Fun
with Flowers was held Feb. 26
SFormer Circle Chair Ruth Krebs
and Ann Price sent thank you cards
for the farewell gifts they received
when Tie\ moved out of the area.
A thank \ou from Hospice for tlhe
memorial for Annie Mlac Halchet
was also read to the group.
With a sad heart, White conveyed
the news that after this year, the
Azalea Garden Circle will be no.
more.
Some members will join other Cir-
cles.
Louise Chitwood opened the
meeting with a devotional enitiled,
"Dots and Donut Holes."
This theme accented keeping one's
eye on the donut, rather: than the
hole, during life's journey.
Refreshments, including chocolate :
dipped fresh strawberries.
Ann Price and her lraeIling com-
painoi'n attended the nmeetin. '.. li
were visiting from the Carolinas.
Rita Uhlehbeig and Jessie Creigh-
ton n'ill host the March mireetin
1:30 p.m., Monday, March 21.







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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005

Commissioners' Action Raises ire Of Planning Body


(Continued From Page 1)
tegrity, she questioned "why wasn't
a better cross-section selected?"
"It looks like it's a self-serving
committee," Moss said.
Planner Bud Wheeler went farther.
He questioned not only the commit-
tee's makeup, but it's timing -- com-
ing into the process at a juncture
When the document was ready for
adoption. Why hadn't these same in-
dividuals gotten involved in the
process during the last two or so
years of discussion? he asked.
:"I feel like we've been done a dis-
service for the commission to ap-
point a committee to circumvent
what we have been doing here for
years," Wheeler said, getting to the



-hoasileGori
March11 -M rch 1 200


DIARY OF A MAD
BLACK WOMAN (PG13)
Fri-Sun .2:15-4:55-7:25-10:00
Mon2:15-4:55-7:25 Tue-Thurs 4:55-
7:25

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Fri-Sun 1:40-4:35-7:35-10:15 Mon
1:40-4:35-7:35 Tue-Thurs 4:35-7:35
NO PASSES

ROBOTS (PG)
Fri-Sun 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:15-9:30
Mon 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:15 Tue-Thurs
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NO PASSES

HITCH (PG13)
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Mon2:00-4:40-7:30 Tue-Thurs. 4:40-
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(PG13)
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5:10
NO PASSES

BECAUSE OF WINN
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Tue-Thurts7:50

BE COOL (PG13)
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Mon 2:05-4:50-7:40 Tue-Thurs
4:50-7:40
NO PASSES

PACIFIER (PG)
Fri-Sun 12:10-2:25-4:45-7:00-
9:15 Mon 12:10-2:25-4:45-7:00
Tue-Thurs 4:45-7:00
NO PASSES
*


heart of the grievance. "It seems like
they come before us at the behest of
commissioners, instead of coming
like regular folks. Why didn't they
just get on the agenda like everyone
else?"
"I thought we advertised so peo-
ple would come before us, not wait
until the process is finished," Moss
said, adding that it wasn't fair to the
people who had attended workshops
regularly and followed the estab-
lished procedures throughout the
drafting of the document.
"It (the issue) has been here every
month for the last 2 /2 years," Plan-
ner Pat Murphy put in.
Wainright explained that the rea-
son he hadn't gotten involved earlier


was because it hadn't concerned
him earlier. He had only gotten into
development in the last year and had
only become aware of the recom-
mendation when it had hit the
County Commission level, he said.
"We were trying to bring clarity
and format to the issue," Wainright
said, adding that the guidelines his
committee was recommending
would curb the abuses planners had
cited as reasons for the elimination
of the exemption. *
Developer Alan Saucier, a mem-
ber of the committee, had a more
philosophical explanation for the
group's late involvement in the is-
sue.


"The quickest way to get people's
attention is to take away their-
rights," Saucier said, adding that
planners had certainly gotten the de-
veloper's attention. "Ninety percent
of the people don't care if it doesn't
-affect them directly. Yes, everyone
on this committee has a vested inter-
est and it's about money. Everything
is'about money. I don't think you're
going to put something in the paper
as nebulous as the Comprehensive
Plan and it's going to bring out a
Crowd. But take away someone's
right, you get their attention."
Realtor Barry Kelly, also a mem-
ber of the committee, took issue
with the committee's alleged end
run. The legislative process was a
two-tier one, he said, and people had
a right to enter the process at any
point.
"Going to the County Commission
was not meant to go around any-
body," Kelly said.


As for the alleged self-serving na-
ture of the committee, "anyone who
comes before (either commission) is
self serving, and I don't think that
should be mud on anyone's face,"
Kelly said.
At one point, Planning Official
Bob Arredondo was asked his opin-
ion of the issue.
"I have a real problem with there
being an exemption," Arredonido
said, adding that in 32 years of pro-
fessional planning experience in
several states he had never encoun-
tered a similar, provision. "I think


U


there is a need to change the way we
do business. I think the exemption is
problematic. I think the recommen-
dation to eliminate the exemption
was the correct recommendation."
In the end, Joyner suggested a
joint workshop would best resolve
the apparent misunderstanding be-
tween the two boards and bring to a
resolution the five-lot exemption
and road standards -- the two stick-
ing points in adoption of the code.
That joint workshop is tentatively
scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
March 29 in the courthouse.


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2005 TEACHER INTERVIEW DAY

JUNE 2, 2005


LEON COUNTY SCHOOLS TEACHER INTERVIEW DAY
will hold interviews for those certified and certifiable in
all subject areas in Leon County on
Thursday, June 2, 2005
at the Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center in Tallahassee, Florida.
Applicants may apply on-line to attend Leon County Schools Teacher Interview
Day beginning February 1, 2005 thru May 1, 2005

Qualified Teacher applicants must: have a current/updated electronic application on
file with Leon County Schools. Only those applicants with appropriate
certification or certifiable and pre-registered will be allowed to participate.
Beginning February 1, 2005, to apply on line, go to: pats.leon.kl2.fl.us

For additional information, call:
Leon County Schools
...,, Employee Relations &E'qiii tyRecruitment
850-487-7105
1-800-245-9449

For questions pertaining to the online application process, call:
Personnel Services
850-487-7203 or
850-487-7197
William J. Montford; Ill, Superintendent
Dr. Malinda W. Jackson, Executive Director, Employee Relations & Equity/Recruitment
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Tallahassee, Florida 32304
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Twso editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
THE TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK,
Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH I. EUBANKS,
PRISCILLA A. EBANKS, and
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION, Defendants. Case No.
04-343-CA.
NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Joseph I.
Eubanks 516 Lloyd Creek Road Route 3,
Box 142 Monticello, Florida 32344,
Priscilla A. Eubanks 516 Lloyd Creek
Road Route 3, Box 142 Monticello, Florida
32344. Any Unknown Parties/Unknown
Tendants in Possession, having or claiming
to have an interest in the subject property.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Jefferson County, 516 Lloyd
Creek Road, Route 3, Box 142, Parcel ID
Numbers 02-1S-3E-0000-0010-0000,
02-1S-3E-0000-0030-0000 and
36-1N-3E-0000-0180-0000, less and except
the following: Commence at a concrete
monument marking the NE corner of the
NW '/4 of the Sec. 1 Twnshp. 1 S, Range 3
E, Jefferson County, Florida, and run S 00
degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds W 1319 79
feet to a concrete monument marking the
NE corner of the SW /4 of the NW of
said Section 1, thence continue S 00
degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds W 22.50
feet to an iron rod in the center of a 30
foot easement, thence run along the center
of said easement as follows: S 89-degrees
19 minutes 14 seconds W 292 81 feet to an
iron rod, said point being on a curve
concave to the E, thence run in a
southwesterly direction along said
centerline and curve having a radius of
71.10 feet, through a central angle of 86
degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds, for an arc
length of 112 18 feet to an iron rod, thence
run S 02 degrees 35 minutes 26 seconds W
337 60 feet to an iron rod for a POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence from said POINT
OF BEGINNING continue S 02 degrees 35
minutes 26 seconds W 166 00 feet to an
iron rod, thence leaving said centerline
run N 87 degrees 24 minutes 34 seconds W
i67 38 feet to an iron rod, then N 02
degrees 35 minutes 26 seconds E 466 00
feet to an iron rod, then S 87 degrees 24
minutes 31 seconds E 467 38 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; SUBJECT TO
AND TOGETHER WITH A 30 foot
easement for ingress and egress, being
more particularly described as follows; A
30 foot strip of land lying within a line 15
feet left and right of the following
described centerline; Commence at a
concrete monument marking the NE
corner of the NW '4 of the NW 'A of
Section 1, Township 1 S, Range 3 E,
Jefferson County, Florida, and run S 00
degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds W 1319.79
feet to a concrete monument marking the
NE corner of the SW of the NW 1/4 of
said Section 1, thence continue S 00
degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds W 22.50
feet to an iron rod in the center of a 30
foot casement, thence run along the center
of said casement as follows S 89 degrees 19
minutes 47 seconds W 292,81 feet to an
iron rod said point being on a curve
concave to the E, thence run in a
Southwesterly direction along said
centerline and curve having a radius of
74.10 feet, through a central angle of 86
degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds, for an are
length of 112 18 feet to a iron rod, thence
run S 02 degrees 35 minutes 26 seconds W
803.60 feet to an iron rod for a POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence from said POINT
OF BEGINNING run N 02 degrees 35
minutes 26 seconds E 803.60.feet to an
iron rod, said point being on a curve
concave to the E, thence run in a
Northeasterly direction along said
centerline and curve having a radius of
74.10 feet, through a central angle of 86
degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds, for a arc
length of 112.18 feet to an iron rod, thence
N.89 degrees 19 minutes 47 seconds E
292.81 feet to an iron rod, thence S 89
degrees 07 minutes 17 seconds E 619.52
feet to an iron rod in the centerline of a
County Paved Road and the terminal
point of this easement; Extending and
shortening said easement as to beginning
at the Southerly boundary of the herein
described 5 acre parcel and to terminate
at the Westerly boundary of a County
Paved Road: has been filed against you.
You are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Daniel Te


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997-3568

Monticello News


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Total Circulation: 1.9 Million

SOS


LEGALS
Young, The Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is Smith Currie & Hancock LLP,
1004 Desoto Park Drive, Tallahassee,
Florida 32302, within 30 days after the
first publication of the notice, and to file
the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition. DATED this 11th of
March, 2005. AS CLERK OF SAID
COURT BY DEPUTY CLERK.
3/16,23 chg.
Notice of Public Hearing
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
decision to approve or not approve a site
plan development proposal from the
Eshden Partners for a proposed addition
and remodeling of the Capital City Truck
Travel Center at 1-10 and SR 59.
Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County Planning
Commission meeting on April 14, 2005 at
7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and
U.S. Highway 90 in Monticello, Florida
32344. The meeting may be continued as
needed. From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice
that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency, or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O. Box 1069, Monticello, Fl 32345 and
provide comments. The development
proposal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
3/16
,Notice of Public Hearing
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
recommendation regarding a proposed
major subdivision. The proposed
residential subdivision is to be located on
approximately 275 acres on Highway 59 at
Lukens Road. Interested parties may
present their concerns at the Jefferson
County Planning Commission meeting on
April 14, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello. Florida 32344. The meeting
ma. be continued as necessary. From the
Florida "-Go ernment in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of an, political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which-the appeal is to
be based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O, Box 1069, Monticello, Florida 32345
and provide comments. The development
proposal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
3/16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION: Probate Case No.:
04-78-PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
JAMES L. HINES, Deceased. NOTICE
TO CREDITORS: The administration of
the estate of JAMES L. HINES, deceased,
File Number 04-78-PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County, ; '
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County, Courthouse,
Room #10, Monticello, Florida 32344. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this



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LEGAL NOTICE

court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors
of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. The date of first
publication of this notice is March 16,
2005. Attorney for Personal
Representative: TARI ROSSITTO-VAN
WINKLE Attorney at Law Florida Bar
No.: 0613908, 1425 N. Monroe St.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32303, 850-224-3131.
Personal Representative: Susan J. Hines,
727 Robin Road, Monticello, Florida
32344.
3/16,23

NOTICE
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ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
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City of Monticello is accepting
applications for Police Patrol Officer.
Requires a minimum of high school
diploma and Florida Police Patrol
Standards. Must live in Jefferson County
or be willing to relocate. Have
demonstrated police skills, some advanced
police Certification, ie Radar or
Breathalyzer. Must complete a Dept. field
training program within the first month.
Background check required. Salary and
benefit information available upon
request. Submit to City of Monticello 245
S. Mulberry St. Monticello Florida 32344
Sb) March 18, 2005 EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.
3/11.16
Certified Nursing Assistants Pine Lake
Nursing Home in Greenville is recruiting
you for day and evening shifts. Your skills
and compassion are needed and
appreciated! We offer the best staff
education program in the Big Bend Area.
Apply in person at the Nursing Home or
call 948-4601 for more information. Ask
for the Director of Nursing.
3i11,16
Accounting Instructor needed at North
Florida Communit) College. Madison FI.
Master's degree in accounting with 18
graduate hours in additional discipline
preferred. Experience in use of technology)
in classroom highly desirable. Duties:
Teach 15 creditors each semester in
accounting and other qualified area.
Candidates chosen for interview will give
sample presentation utilizing instructional
technology. Duties commence 8/1/2005.
Position also requires having established
office hours, participating in department
and College activities. Teaching may be
night and/or dual enrollment courses on
NFCC campus and/or at satellite locations.
Applications to: Director HR, North
Florida Community College, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
Onl. complete application packets
considered: letter ofinterest. resume and
application; cop3 of transcripts (unofficial
okay). Application available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet must be
received by 03/25/2005 (Deadline
extended). EOE
3/16,23


SERVICES
Were a church that values tradition, but
we're not fundamentalists. Christ
.Episcopal Church, three blocks N of the
Court house. Sunday service at 10:00 A.M.
997-4166.
3/2,4 tan
Back hoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tan
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave Message.-
2/11 tan
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates Call
551-2000
3/9,11,16,18,23,25

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd

FOR RENT
RV/Mobile Home Lot for rent @
Monticello Meadows 19' South.
850-997-1630 Park Manager Liz.
1/7 tfn, chg.


Rustic 1 BR Cabin. with Screened in
porch. Completely furnished including
Amenities Located on 4 Acres at end of
dirt road only 6 miles from Monticello &
25 miles from Tallahassee. Electric &
" satellite TV included $750 month + Sec.
deposit, 6 month minimum lease. Call
342-1324 LV. Mess.
3A tfn
3 Bedroom 1 Bath with storage Shed.
$600.00 month Plus Deposit. Call 997-8295
or 352-514-7101
3/4,9,11,16,18 pd

FOR SALE
Jenn Aire Drop-in Range with / Extra's
(Down Draft) $399.
Amana, 25 Cu. Ft. Side by Side, Excellent
Condition, Ice/Water in Door. $399.
Call (850)997-4350 if not in leave name &
number.
3/9.11,18,25 pd
New Living Room Set. Suggested list
$1400., sell sofa $275., love seat $225.,
chair $175., Set $625. Hardwood frames
with lifetime warranty. 850-222-9879
1/12, tfn
Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K, 5th
S-Wheel, Fiberglass 3 slide outs. Priced
for quick sale. Book Price, 997-5441.
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11,16,18, pd
FOR SALE: Brown Yard Eggs $1 Dz.
FOR SALE: Baby Chicks, Ducks, Geese,
Prices vary with age. Location: 4473 Lake
Road. Wanted: Egg Cartons, will pay 5
cents per carton.
3/16,18,23,25,30,4/1 chg.

AUTOMOTIVE
1996 DODGE CUSTOM V-8 VAN (mint)
$5,500. 997-1560 or e-mail
GCASSBOR@NETZERO.NET
3/2,4,9,11, pd
1991 OLDSMOBILE ELITE GOOD
CONDITION. $2,500. Call 997-3080
3/16,18 pd.


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571




Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates Needed.



Fast Track Food Stores now

hiring in Madison and

Monticello areas.



Please contact store Manager at your

local Fast Track store for an application.


r .ir


The Leader in Home Listings!


KELLY & KELLY New- Hilltop Brick!
PROPERTI Mint Condition Roomy 2,672 Sq Foot House on 5
215 N. Jefferson Hilltop Acres. Close to JC Country Club, 4BR / 2.5


(850) 997-5516










i i i i i I I
1 1 1 11


BA, Fireplace, Workshop & Gated Entrance! $328,750
Love Tennis?
Two Story All Brick 3,556 Sq Ft Home, Circle Drive,
Tennis Court, Gazebo, Live Oaks, Wet Bar, Sunroom,
All Located on Plenty of In-Town Acerage! !$547,900
New on A Paved Private Road!
Stately 4BR/2.5 BA Tallahassee Home, 2 Acres, Close
to City Amenities. Space for Gardening or a Horse!
$288,900
See AI Of Our Lisings! Visit....www.cbkk.com


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Great Buvl Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8,500 per acre
Just Listed-Under Contract 6.67 wooded
acres on graded county road in eastern
Jefferson County $23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
New Listinq 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
SOLD Wonderful Home nice 4 bedroom 2
bath double wide with fireplace on 1.9
acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Sales are very qood we have a
shortage of listing for uyers looking


for Homes and Land


Realtor Tim Peary i
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Associate -

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate



Buyers looking for Homes and Land

Buyers Iookinq for Homes and Land


L I I


It ow








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 16, 2005


JES Club Performers

Entertain Legislators


PERFORMING for State Legislators and their spouses at
the Country Club in Tallahassee were Stubbs Musical Per-
formers, from front left: Patty Calendar, Brittany Tesdale,


fx
!/


Brionna Tesdale, Samira Martin, Ladarion Smiley, Al-
phonso Footman, Lenorris Footman, Lanesiya Massey,
Charlene Austin, and Trey Lewis., ,


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Members of the Stubb's Music
Performers, a program in the Jeffer-
son Elementary School Boys and
Girls Club, continue to be in de-
mand.
The group performed at the
Country Club in Tallahassee for a
delegation of State Legislators and
their spouses, last week. "They stole
the show," exclaimed Gerrold Aus-
tin, Club Director.
Performing at the event were:
Patty Calendar, Brittany Tesdale,
Brionna Tesdale, Samira Martin,
Ladarion Smiley, Alphonso Foot-
man, Lenorris Footman, Lanesiya


Massey, Charlene Austin, and Trey
Lewis.
Legislators were invited to the
event by the Executives of the Boys
and Girls Clubs in the north west
Florida region, to view activities of
area Boys and Girls Clubs.


calico Spring

Brts & Craft Show
OT 400 b o f Bl irf e & & m tf chais iiidMs
Ornamental Iron : Painted Glass Handcrafted Furniture Clothing
Jetcelrv Folk Arl Ceramics : PotteR
Seasonal Decorations Wood Crafts Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prins Painted Antiques Food Ciurt

:- March 19 & 20, 2005
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Spence Field Moultrie, Georgia
ISunblt ELpo site -1 miles Soluthea3s ot HM 319 on Hv\ ii3

$3 per person
(Children 6 and under free with an adults
FREE PARKING
For more information (229) 985-1968
imiuii<5^&ac&Q~ai~fe.llkards fikiii~' ioaigiUiI'RsdEoa


P 7
* 1,


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ILUKIHIAN3 I
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%" "'""mm,,-- Save "-,,,- Save
Dual A/ $7,000 Dual $7,500
Adjustable uRvar/C
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+ Tax Title and 839 Doe Peae + Tax Title and 1389 Doo Fee.


Option
Including
V.DVYD
Too many
to lIst
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012 000
All rebate applied + R P C Financing WAC
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ONLY 12 2004'S LEFT AT INCREDIBLE SAVINGS
2 Expeditions 2 Explorers 4 F150's 1 Freestar 1 Grand Marquis 1 Monterey


03 Ford F150 Super Crew
Lariat 4x4
FX4 8.4
s24,995.T.T
03 Ford Escape XLT
Leather VO Power Roof
Loaded Must See
*16,995.,,TT
02 Mercury Vrand Marquis LS
Extra Nloe
13,588TTL
00 Honda ORV
Must See
Extra Qlean
s9 p 9 S1 :j TTL


01 Mazda MVP ES
Leather Dual A/C V6
Looal Trade
$12,995.-TT
04 Mercury Sable
v6 Loaded
Must See
S11,5888TTL
99 Chevy Prizm
4 Door AfT Local Trade
$6,995.,,T
04 Oldsmobile Alero OL
4 Door A.T Loaded
Price Buster
S10,58O8TT,


04 Mustang
40th Anniversary
AfTr 16k Miles
s15, 9 5..
01 Toyota Camry
Extra Clean Must See
Loaded Only 27k Miles
$12,5 88.T,
03 Ford Taurus SE
Loaded Power Window
rLooks00 CD Player

03 Ford Explorer Sport KIT
Loaded
Must 895
s15,995.,,


01 Lincoln Town car 02 Ford Explorer Sportrac
Local Trade Loaded Must See
Ve Nice Ve Clean
$14, 995., $15,h9 5.!TT
04 Ford F250 Super Cab 00 OMO Sonoma
Lariat FX4 4x4 Extended Cab A/T
Beat Deal In South Georgia 44k Miles Extra Nice
$28,995.-T s8,995.TTL
01 Toyota Tacoma 03 F150 Super Crew Laralt
Regular Cab 5.4 Local Trade
31k Miles
Sg9,995.k s20,995 .-TT
04 Fordo TyTRurs
Loaded Low Mile.
811,995. _


JAI A A u7


MASVILLE SALES
Hive A sLttle, S
DrIe A Little. sa

800-255-1282
Highway 319- Thomasville, Georgia
www.thomasvlllesales.com


All rebate eId +.? P Fl alng WAC
"Rep. yat on n uest rebate.
Ra., 0M Logalty on oonquaat rebate.


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